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HISTORY OF A HUNTING TRIP IN SIERRA MADRES NORTHERN MEXICO AUGUST 21

HISTORY OF A HUNTING TRIP IN SIERRA MADRES NORTHERN MEXICO AUGUST 21, TO OCTOBER 1, 1922

Carlton, L.A. [2],60pp. Original printed wrappers. Moderate soiling, light rubbing, spine head a bit chipped, spine ends a trifle stained. Minor dust-soiling to titlepage, otherwise clean internally. Very good. A presentation copy of this rare hunting trip diary, inscribed by the author on the front wrapper, "With my compliments L. A. Carlton." Carlton, a well-read and opinionated Houston lawyer, records his latest annual hunting trip with a group of fellow Texans in northern Chihuahua. Practically every day, Carlton records some information relating to hunting; he and his party stalked and killed deer, mountain lion, bear, quail, and wild turkey, among other game. The group went "two hundred and fifty miles southwest from El Paso [by the Southern Pacific Railroad] and then by pack-train sixty or seventy miles west into the mountains." They explore abandoned settlements, houses, and caves along their trip. Along with a daily account of the hunt, Carlton’s narrative includes his "comments and meditations.written in satirical style and exaggerated vein." His musings on the state of the world, Shakespeare and the English, the Bible, long-ago brutalities suffered at the hands of native peoples in Mexico, the Mormon colonies in Mexico, and his observations on the landscapes of Mexico are often well written and interesting. His views on politics, race, religion, and class are a mixed bag, while he seems to express relatively progressive views on women’s suffrage and organized labor for a Texas man in the 1920s. At the conclusion of the Preface, Carlton lists the other members of his party, which included a former Texas judge, two clerks of the Supreme Court of Texas, a jeweler, an African-American cook, and an African-American servant – all from either Houston or Austin. On the first day of the train ride, Aug. 21, 1922, a Pullman conductor "converted" Carlton’s African-American servant, Ruffin Price "into a pullman car porter by dressing him in a white jacket and thus gave us the advantage of his service in the drawing room." In El Paso awaiting travel into Mexico, Carlton attends and lays bets on a prize fight "between a negro and a white man." The former wins the match much to Carlton’s "gratification and.profit." On Friday, August 25, the group boards the Mexican Railway train south, first stopping in Pierson for lunch at "an adobe restaurant conducted by an ubiquitous Chink. Much jabbering. Constant smiles. Excellent food." By August 27, the hunting party has mounted pack mules for the journey into the wilderness, crossing land where there are rumored to live "a small band of wild Indians." The party meets a wide array of characters along their way, including Dave Lee ("a negro.has some property. Mexicans work for him"); a Mexican youth (".master of the hounds. He is nineteen or twenty years of age. Precious little sense. Pure Indian Grunts when he is spoken to. Perhaps has seen two hundred people in the whole of his life"); George Brown ("younger brother to Dave Brown who was chief of scouts for Pershing"); Captain Jack Leftbridge ("a typical Englishman. Complains about the English Income Tax"); Captain Cerillo Perez ("has a ranch five or six miles from here. He was well mounted and well caparisoned and attended by a mozo servant)"); and Veuturo ("He is a rather remarkable man. He must be sixty-five years of age but notwithstanding this goes in a trot continuously. He is on alert to give service. He takes his place as a servant and is efficient in all those outdoor qualities that makes such a one useful"). In mid-September, Carlton and his party have traveled beyond the familiarity of their guides, passing through an abandoned Apache camp on their way to Three Rivers. Over the course of the month, Carlton mentions more than once that he is reading H.G. Wells’ THE OUTLINE OF HISTORY, in which Wells himself considers questions of racial equality. On September 14, Carlton expounds upon his views of his African-American cook, Tom Kenney: "I have not given sufficient notice to this negro. His father, so he says was a German. He is more than six feet tall and weighs two hundred pounds. Erect and manly. Not a spare ounce of flesh on his frame. I have sat around camp fires and watched him cook with joy. It is not a small job to cook on a camp fire for a dozen or more hungry men, but yet, rain or shine, he has had food in plenty and of the best on time for every meal so far. He would be the pride of an efficiency expert. No lost motion. Evidently lives a very exemplary life. When at home he is a cook in a restaurant. Owns his home and speaks with pride of his wife and daughter." On September 24, regarding "Mexicans generally," Carlton writes: "From what I have seen of them they are a much maligned people. Savages are usually cruel and so these may be, but the picture of them with stiletto in hand ready to stab in the back gives a wholly distorted idea of their characteristics. While they are stolid Indians, most of those with whom I have come into contact have been docile and gentle and ready to serve. They have been slaves since Cortez came. No schools, no training, nothing that makes life worth living. Certainly they deserve a better environment and a better government than any they have ever had." The hunting party returned to Pierson on the San Miguel River on September 27, and made their way home by train, passing back through Juarez, El Paso, and San Antonio on the way back to Houston. An enthralling hunting diary, with important content relating to racial and ethnic relations in Texas and Mexico in the 1920s. Not in Phillips. OCLC records just six copes in institutions – five in Texas (Austin Public Library and two copies each at SMU and the Univ. of Texas) and one at the Univ. of Arizona. Rare and little-known. OCLC 5779744.
THE LIFE OF JOHN LEDYARD

THE LIFE OF JOHN LEDYARD, THE AMERICAN TRAVELLER; COMPRISING SELECTIONS FROM HIS JOURNAL AND CORRESPONDENCE

Sparks, Jared xii,325pp. Half title. Original publisher’s half brown cloth and paper covered boards, printed paper label. Label rubbed and chipped, boards lightly rubbed and edgeworn, binding refreshed in 1890 per a pencil note on the rear pastedown. Later ink inscription on front pastedown and titlepage, occasional mostly marginal foxing. Very good. A large, untrimmed copy. In a cloth clamshell box, gilt leather label. Daniel Webster’s copy, with his bookplate affixed to the front pastedown. John Ledyard was one of the first great American explorers. He accompanied Cook’s third expedition as a sailor, and so visited the Pacific, the Northwest Coast, Alaska, and Hawaii, where he was one of the oarsmen in the boat which took Cook ashore for the parley at which he was murdered. After the American Revolution, at the behest of Thomas Jefferson (then U.S. minister in Paris), Ledyard attempted to cross over to America by traversing Russia, only to be arrested and sent back in farther Siberia. He disappeared while exploring up the Nile in 1789. An important source for Cook’s voyage and other great explorations, seldom seen in the original publisher’s binding, and bearing an outstanding American provenance. HOWES S818. SABIN 88991. LADA-MOCARSKI 92. WICKERSHAM 6566. TOURVILLE 4252. FORBES 708.
THE CINCINNATI DIRECTORY

THE CINCINNATI DIRECTORY, CONTAINING THE NAMES, PROFESSION AND OCCUPATION OF THE INHABITANTS OF THE TOWN, ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED; WITH THE NUMBER OF THE BUILDING OCCUPIED BY EACH. ALSO, AN ACCOUNT OF ITS OFFICERS, POPULATION, INSTITUTIONS AND SOCIETIES, PUBLIC BUILDINGS, MANUFACTURES, &c.

Farnsworth, Oliver] 155,[1]pp. plus folding engraved map. Contemporary tree calf, gilt leather spine label, spine ruled in gilt. Moderate wear to extremities. Contemporary ownership inscription on front free endpaper. Six-inch diagonal tear to map repaired on verso, with no loss. Map a bit creased. Moderate foxing. About very good. The rare first Cincinnati directory. The text includes a statistical view of Cincinnati as of 1819, a discussion of the city’s foundries and commerce (including a section on trade with Havana), as well as a list of local officeholders and a directory of residents. There is also a lengthy section on the region’s steamboats and canals, including the names and descriptions of dozens of vessels. The handsome engraved map shows the rapid progress and expansion of the city, illustrating the populated city blocks. The large and detailed folding map of the city is almost invariably lacking, but is present in this copy. The contemporary ownership signature in this copy reads "John Meyer’s book bought at Cincinnati Ohio 19th July 1821." The Streeter copy sold to parties unknown for $175 in 1968. HOWES F51, "b." SABIN 13085. GRAFF 1296. AII (OHIO) 466. JONES 806. THOMSON 196. WILKIE 608. SPEAR, p.99. STREETER SALE 1357. SHAW & SHOEMAKER 47616.
TRANSCRIPT

TRANSCRIPT, TAKEN VERBATIM, FROM THE AUTHENTICATED RECORD OF THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA, SITTING IN THE YEAR 1821, IN THE CITY OF NEW-ORLEANS, IN THE CASE OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA, VERSUS THE ORLEANS NAVIGATION COMPANY

Louisiana] 24pp. Dbd., with first couple leaves detached. Some foxing, unevenly trimmed and close to top edge. Good. An exceedingly rare pamphlet from early Louisiana statehood. The canal in the Territory of Orleans connecting Bayou St. John with the Old Basin was called the Carondelet Canal. It was dug by order of Baron de Carondelet while Louisiana was under Spanish control. Sand bars and low water levels had rendered the mouth of the Bayou frequently impassable. Carondelet hoped a canal would solve the problem. After the United States purchased Louisiana, control of the Carondelet Canal passed to the Orleans Navigation Company. The Territorial Legislature chartered it in 1805 to improve the Bayou St. John for navigation, and authorized it to collect tolls. The issue in the present case was whether or not the Company had breached its duty to render the canal navigable. This pamphlet prints testimony of witnesses, summarizes direct and cross examinations, prints a deposition transcript, discloses funds received by the Navigation Company (including toll receipts) and company expenses, and includes printed testimony for the state of Louisiana by "Alexis Rochon, free man of colour." An early and important New Orleans court case, with only two known copies, at Louisiana State University and the Library Company of Philadelphia. Not in Cohen or Sabin. AMERICAN IMPRINTS 26232. OCLC 13505352.
DIARY OF THE WYOMING BEAR HUNT

DIARY OF THE WYOMING BEAR HUNT

McAleenan, Joseph] 59pp. plus sixteen photographic plates. Titlepage with title in a box in the upper left and vignette of a bear chasing a man at the lower right; on verso of titlepage: "Press of P.J. Collison & Co. Brooklyn- New York." Half cloth and stiff brown printed wrappers. Front wrapper chipped at outer corners, bookplate on verso of front wrapper. Ink presentation inscription on titlepage somewhat faded. Some offsetting from the plates, one plate loosening. Very good. In a cloth chemise and half morocco and cloth slipcase, spine gilt. A presentation copy, inscribed on the titlepage from McAleenan to "My Dear Archbishop," modestly disclaiming any literary merit. A rare and engaging day-by-day journal of a bear hunt in Wyoming, with interesting photographs. The bear hunt, which took plate in April and May, was on the Majo Ranch of Jones Bros. & Magill, and the hoped-for prey were grizzlies, brown, and black bears. McAleenan, a New York sportsman, writes: "We were very fortunate in securing the only permit to hunt in the Shoshone Game Preserve on Table Mountain. As this section has not been shot over in many years our prospects for the bear hunt were very good." He describes their train trip to Wyoming, the springtime snow storms that hit the region, their hunting experiences, and life in camp. The photographic plates show the members of the expedition and the landscapes and vistas of Wyoming, and a few show the hides of bears that were killed. Not in Phillips’ SPORTING BOOKS. OCLC locates copies only at Yale and Brigham Young University. We are also aware of the Streeter- Litchfield copy, a copy presented to Harlow Brooks, and the William Beach-Samuel Webb copy. HOWES W728. STREETER 4130. OCLC 54200246.
HISTORY OF TEXAS FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT IN 1685 TO ITS ANNEXATION TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1846

HISTORY OF TEXAS FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT IN 1685 TO ITS ANNEXATION TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1846

Yoakum, Henderson King Two volumes. 482,[4]; 576pp. plus four portrait plates, an engraved view of the Mission of San Jose, a folding facsimile letter from Santa Anna, three single-page maps, and two folding maps. Modern half calf and marbled boards, spines gilt, gilt leather labels. Uneven toning, mostly in the first volume, repairs to verso of Spanish Texas map, folding facsimile noticeably toned. Still, a very good copy. This is the first scholarly work on Texas after annexation, and one of the rare surviving 1855 editions, most having perished in a warehouse fire. The author, a lawyer from Tennessee, went to Texas in 1845, befriended Sam Houston, and served in the Mexican-American War. "In spite of its detractors, Yoakum’s history remains a necessary source. Modern historians rally to its support, with reservations. Gambrell said Yoakum managed to achieve ‘a degree of objectivity unusual for the amateur historian, and literary style not often equalled by the professional’" – Jenkins. "Mr. Yoakum seems to have collected with great care all the existing material, with much that has never yet appeared in print. All contemporary accounts, personal narratives, private correspondence, individual reminiscences, newspaper statements, and official documents are called into requisition. The work.is still of very great interest and value, and is deserving of general study. The author was evidently an enthusiastic admirer of Gen. Houston" – Raines. The work contains numerous unpublished letters by Sam Houston, and about 70% of the footnotes in the main text refer to original manuscripts, letters, or other primary sources. The four engraved portrait plates picture Stephen F. Austin, Sam Houston, Ellis Bean, and Thomas Rusk. The three single-page maps are titled, respectively, "San Antonio & Its Environs," "Ground Plan of the Alamo in 1835-6," and "San Jacinto Battle-Ground." The first folding map is a depiction of Texas during Spanish rule. The second folding map is titled simply "Texas.1855" and was specially-prepared for this book by J.H. Colton. HOWES Y10, "aa." RADER 3773. RAINES, p.223. BASIC TEXAS BOOKS 224.
THE NARRATIVE OF THE HONOURABLE JOHN BYRON (COMMODORE IN A LATE EXPEDITION ROUND THE WORLD) CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF THE GREAT DISTRESSES SUFFERED BY HIMSELF AND HIS COMPANIONS ON THE COAST OF PATAGONIA

THE NARRATIVE OF THE HONOURABLE JOHN BYRON (COMMODORE IN A LATE EXPEDITION ROUND THE WORLD) CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF THE GREAT DISTRESSES SUFFERED BY HIMSELF AND HIS COMPANIONS ON THE COAST OF PATAGONIA, FROM THE YEAR 1740, TILL THEIR ARRIVAL IN ENGLAND, 1746. WITH A DESCRIPTION OF ST. JAGO DE CHILI, AND THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF THE INHABITANTS. ALSO A RELATION OF THE LOSS OF THE WAGER MAN OF WAR, ONE OF ADMIRAL ANSON’S SQUADRON

Byron, John] [4],viii,257pp. plus frontispiece engraving. Half title. Contemporary vellum, gilt leather label. Minor soiling and edge wear, spine label slighly chipped. Armorial bookplate and old ownership signature on front pastedown, front free endpaper removed, occasional light marginal foxing, modern bookplate on rear pastedown. Very good. Byron’s account of the shipwreck of the Wager, on which he served as midshipman, off the coast of Chile, including descriptions of the suffering of the survivors and their captivity by the Indians before being turned over to Spanish authorities. The wreck of the Wager led to major changes in British nautical law relating to shipwreck. Byron (alias "Foul-Weather Jack") went on to command a voyage around the world from 1764 to 1766 in the Dolphin, was later governor of Newfoundland, and in 1775 became an admiral. Byron’s grandson, Lord Byron, the poet, based his description of the shipwreck in Canto II of "Don Juan" on his grandfather’s narrative. ".One of the most thrilling accounts in the language" – Sabin. HILL 232. SABIN 9730. PALAU 38223.
NARRATIVE OF A WHALING VOYAGE ROUND THE GLOBE

NARRATIVE OF A WHALING VOYAGE ROUND THE GLOBE, FROM THE YEAR 1833 TO 1836. COMPRISING SKETCHES OF POLYNESIA, CALIFORNIA, THE INDIAN ARCHIPELAGO, ETC. WITH AN ACCOUNT OF SOUTHERN WHALES, THE SPERM WHALE FISHERY, AND THE NATURAL HISTORY OF THE CLIMATES VISITED

Bennett, Frederick Debell Two volumes. xv,[1],402,[2]pp. plus folding map; vii,[1],395,[1]pp., including in-text engravings. Frontispiece in each volume. Half title in second volume. Original green blindstamped cloth, spines gilt, first volume rebacked, with original backstrip laid down. General shelf wear, spines somewhat sunned, minor soiling, spine head of second volume renewed, cloth along rear joint partially split and frayed. Modern bookplate to each front pastedown. Scattered foxing, short repaired tear to flyleaf of second volume, small portion of bottom blank margin of last text leaf inexplicably clipped, not affecting text. An about very good set. "According to Herman Melville, this is one of the only two works on the whale fishery of any value" – Sabin. Bennett, a scientist assigned to observe the habits of whales, visited Pitcairn Island in 1834, and herein gives an interesting account of the islanders and the mutiny of the Bounty. He went on to Madeira, Tahiti, the Marquesas, and Hawaii. Also included is a brief description of the inhabitants at Cape St. Lucas, on the southern tip of Baja California. "The narrative deals mainly with the ecological, historical, and sociological aspects of the Polynesian inhabitants, but the appendix includes a list and illustrations of plants and wildlife encountered in the course of the voyage" – Hill. An important Pacific whaling account. SABIN 4726. HOWES B357, "aa." HILL 113. BARRETT 256. FORSTER 7. COWAN, p.47. SPENCE 122.
A JOURNAL OF TRANSACTIONS AND EVENTS DURING A RESIDENCE OF NEARLY SIXTEEN YEARS ON THE COAST OF LABRADOR; CONTAINING MANY INTERESTING PARTICULARS

A JOURNAL OF TRANSACTIONS AND EVENTS DURING A RESIDENCE OF NEARLY SIXTEEN YEARS ON THE COAST OF LABRADOR; CONTAINING MANY INTERESTING PARTICULARS, BOTH OF THE COUNTRY AND ITS INHABITANTS, NOT HITHERTO KNOWN

Cartwright, George Three volumes. xvi,[2],[6, subscribers list],287[i.e. 295]; x,505; x,248,15pp., plus engraved portrait frontispiece of the author and two large folding maps (printed on three sheets). Large quarto. Contemporary three-quarter calf and marbled boards, spines gilt. Some rubbing to boards, extremities worn, joints partially split, hinges strengthened. Contemporary and modern bookplate to front endpapers of each volume, moderate foxing, especially to preliminaries and frontispiece but otherwise mostly marginal. Old tape reinforcement to verso of first folding map, tiny tape reinforcement and short closed tear near mounting stub of third map. Overall very good. A handsome large-paper copy of Cartwright’s well-regarded account of Labrador. George Cartwright first visited the Americas in the spring of 1766, when his brother John was first lieutenant of the Guernsey, flagship of Commodore Hugh Palliser. Cartwright sailed with the governor-designate to Newfoundland where he spent a season cruising along the northeast coast. He returned in the spring of 1768 and took part in an expedition to the interior of Newfoundland to establish friendly relations with the Beothuks at Red Indian Lake. Cartwright’s army career was foundering, so he determined to set up as a trader and entrepreneur in Labrador, and in 1770 he went on half pay. Raids by the Americans, competition between the English and French fishermen, and between the different English merchant houses, along with the hostility between the natives and Europeans, all made for an unstable business atmosphere during Cartwright’s time in Labrador and Newfoundland. None of this was helped by the political problems caused by the rival authorities of Quebec and Newfoundland. The scene of his operations from 1770 to 1786 was the stretch of coastline between Cape Charles, where he occupied Nicholas Darby’s old site, and Hamilton Inlet. From the stations he established, he engaged with his servants and sharemen in the fisheries for cod, salmon, and seals, and the trade in furs. The present work gives a fascinating insight into the business life of the region. But this work offers much else besides: a detailed record of the seasons with fine meteorological and natural history observations as well as extensive notes on the numerous hunting expeditions that Cartwright undertook. "The journal is, above all, testimony to a persistent, curious, and resourceful mind. In his relations with the native peoples of Labrador, especially the Inuit, Cartwright displayed an honesty which led to mutual trust. In 1772 he took a family of five Inuit to England, where they created considerable interest, meeting with the King, members of the Royal Society including Joseph Banks, and James Boswell, who reported to a skeptical Samuel Johnson his ability to communicate with them by sign language.What has only recently been properly recognized, however, is the interest of Cartwright not only in the Inuit language and its study, but also in making himself a glossarist of 18th-century Newfoundland English; and he was a close student of and perhaps contributor to the work of such scientific contemporaries as Banks, Thomas Pennant, and Daniel Carl Solander. Of his sole essay as a poet, LABRADOR: A POETICAL EPISTLE (composed in 1784 [and bound at the back of the final volume of the present work]), Cartwright himself warned the reader: ‘Tho I have often slept whole nights on mountains as high as that of famed Parnassus, yet, never having taken a nap on its sacred summit, it cannot be expected, that I should have awoke a Poet.’ Yet less interesting verses have attracted the industrious attention of Canadian literary historians, and among writings from the New World a more singular 18th-century document than the journal itself is hard to find" – DICTIONARY OF CANADIAN BIOGRAPHY. Robert Southey, who met Cartwright in 1791 and read this book in 1793, subsequently wrote that the author "had strength and perseverance charactered in every muscle.The annals of his campaigns among the foxes and beavers interested me far more than ever did the exploits of Marlbro [sic] or Frederic; besides, I saw plain truth and the heart in Cartwright’s book and in what history could I look for this?" There is some bibliographical confusion over the collation of the maps, which are after surveys of the coasts of Newfoundland and Labrador by Lane and are engraved by Faden: the work is complete with two maps, with one of the maps printed on two sheets and bound with the upper sheet in the second volume and the lower sheet in the third volume (as in the present set). "This Journal is written with care and fidelity; the style of the author is plain and manly; he delivers his sentiments with freedom, and with confidence, asserts only those circumstances which, from his own observations he knowns to be facts. The author was a brother of the celebrated Major John Cartwright. Highly commended by Coleridge. There are copies on large paper" – Sabin. A nice example of one of those large paper copies. BRUNET I:1606. GAGNON I:703. LANDE 106. MATTHEWS 226. MORGAN, p.64. JCB II:3516. SABIN 11150 (incorrect collation). TPL 586. VLACH 138. DAB VII, pp.412-13. FIELD 245.
VIEW OF THE CONFLAGRATION OF MARYSVILLE

VIEW OF THE CONFLAGRATION OF MARYSVILLE, ON THE NIGHT OF AUGUST 30th 1851. THREE ENTIRE SQUARES CONSUMED – LOSS ESTIMATED $5000,000 [sic] [caption title]

California Pictorial Letter Sheet] Pictorial letter sheet, 8 1/2 x 10 3/4 inches, on gray wove paper, with blank conjugate leaf attached. Slight bit of edgewear. Near fine. A striking view of the terrible fire that devastated Marysville, California in late summer, 1851. Fires ransacked many California cities in the 1850s. Marysville was only founded in 1850, but grew quickly as a town on the way to the northern gold fields from San Francisco and Sacramento. The fire that struck on Aug. 30, 1851 destroyed most of the wooden structures in the town. The image shows Marysville engulfed in flames that shoot up at menacing angles, and dark plumes of smoke swirl through the sky. The foreground shows dozens of people watching helplessly, and depicts the formation of a bucket brigade. According to Baird, this letter sheet was produced before April 24, 1852 and is a reworking of the view of Marysville from two sheets published by Marysville bookseller R.A. Eddy in 1851 (see Baird 280 and 280a). The lithograph was produced by the San Francisco firm of Justh, Quirot & Company, who also produced other letter sheets and maps for Eddy. This example of the Marysville fire letter sheet appears to be an early issue, with a mistake that was later corrected, and is unnoted by Baird, Peters, and the Clifford catalogue. In this copy the loss stated in the title is estimated at "$5000,000," as opposed to "$500,000." Baird located only four copies of this scarce and compelling image. BAIRD, CALIFORNIA’S PICTORIAL LETTER SHEETS 289. CLIFFORD LETTER SHEET COLLECTION 297. PETERS, CALIFORNIA ON STONE, p.137.
THE FIRST TRIAL & EXECUTION IN S. FRANCISCO ON THE NIGHT OF 10th OF JUNE AT 2 O'CLOCK.[caption title]

THE FIRST TRIAL & EXECUTION IN S. FRANCISCO ON THE NIGHT OF 10th OF JUNE AT 2 O’CLOCK.[caption title]

California Pictorial Letter Sheet] Pictorial letter sheet, 8 1/4 x 10 3/4 inches, on blue wove paper. With blank conjugate leaf still attached. A bit of light toning, mostly around the edges of the sheet. Near fine. A striking and rare California pictorial letter sheet, depicting the first act of violence of the Vigilance Committee – the execution of the "Sydney Duck," John Jenkins. The so-called Sydney Ducks were a gang of Australian convicts who committed a number of arsons and robberies in San Francisco. Their activities, and the seeming inability of the legal authorities to stop them, were among the factors leading to the establishment of the first Vigilance Committee on June 9, 1851. The remainder of the printed caption tells the story: "John Jenkins, a Sidney [sic] man entered the store of Mr. V on long Wharf in the evening of 10th of June & carried off a sale. After he was captured he was brought to the corner of Sansome & Bush Sts. where he was tried by a jury of the highest respectability, and condemned to be hung. The execution took place on the Plaza on the same night at 2 o’clock. Immediately after sentence of death was passed upon him, he was asked if he had anything to say. He replied: No, I have nothing to say, only I should wish to have a cigar & brandy & water, which was given him." This moody lithographic illustration is done in an almost impressionistic style, with dark clouds obscuring the moonlit night, crowds of shadowy, cheering on-lookers, and Jenkins’ body hanging from a rafter that forms part of a large cross at one end of the Custom House. "No series of events attracted greater attention than the workings of the 1851 and 1856 vigilance committees" – Kurutz (in the introduction to the Clifford Collection). This letter sheet was produced by Justh, Quirot & Co., one of the first and most important lithographic firms in San Francisco. It was printed on blue wove, gray wove, and white wove paper. A vivid depiction of violence and justice on the Barbary Coast. BAIRD, CALIFORNIA’S PICTORIAL LETTER SHEETS 79. CLIFFORD LETTER SHEET COLLECTION 73. PETERS, CALIFORNIA ON STONE, pp.133, plate 66.
NOVUS ORBIS SEU DESCRIPTIONIS INDIAE OCCIDENTALIS LIBRI XVIII.

NOVUS ORBIS SEU DESCRIPTIONIS INDIAE OCCIDENTALIS LIBRI XVIII.

Laet, Joannes de [32],690,[i.e. 590],[18]pp. plus fourteen double-page maps by Hessel Gerritsz. Sixty-eight woodcuts in text, illustrating plants, animals, and inhabitants of the New World. Half title. Engraved title with elaborate emblematic and architectonic border, with date altered in manuscript to "1688." Folio. Contemporary speckled calf, spine gilt, raised bands, textblock edges stained red. Spine ends repaired, moderate edge wear, joints a bit worn. Some foxing and toning, occasional tanning, small unobtrusive marginal repair to most maps. Overall very good. The first Latin edition of "arguably the finest description of the Americas published in the seventeenth century" – Burden. The maps include the first to use the names Manhattan, New Amsterdam (for New York), and Massachusetts, and one of the foundational maps of Canada. This work is one of the most important 17th-century New World histories. It is a cornucopia of early knowledge of the Americas and was compiled by Joannes de Laet, a director of the newly formed Dutch West India Company, with access to all the latest geographic knowledge. Pierre François Xavier de Charlevoix, writing in the 18th century, noted that the work as a whole "is full of the most excellent and curious details of the natural history, and the character, manners, and customs of the American aborigines, derived from the reports of the European mission establishments in America." The text includes various specimens of indigenous language vocabularies, including Huron, Nahuatl, Quechua, Tupi, and Arawak. "One of the most famous contemporary descriptions of the natural history of the New World. The work was highly praised a century later by Charlevoix, attesting to its accuracy. Winsor referred to Laet’s book as the standard seventeenth-century work on New Netherland" – Streeter. The present first edition in Latin was preceded by two editions in Dutch (the first of which was published in 1625). De Laet continued to add to and improve the work throughout his lifetime: the present edition contains fourteen maps as opposed to the ten in the 1625 edition, and the text has been considerably expanded. The maps are by Hessel Gerritsz and are some of the very best to appear up to that time. Gerritsz had trained under Willem Blaeu, but had been chosen in preference to his old master when the appointment of cartographer to the Dutch West India Company was made. The charming in-text illustrations are chiefly of biological or botanical specimens and are generally surprisingly accurate for their time, and each of the eighteen constituent books is turned over to the consideration of a different region of the New World. The quality of the maps can be gauged from the fact that they served as a prototype for the mapping of America, with a number of them being reused in various later 17th-century atlases. The maps are titled as follows: 1) "Americae sive Indiae occidentalis tabula generalis." Burden 229: "The best west coast delineation to date." 2) "Maiores minoresque insulae. Hispaniola, Cuba, Lucaiae et Caribes" 3) "Nova Francia et regiones adiacentes." Burden 230: "One of the foundation maps of Canada." 4) "Nova Anglia, Novum Belgium et Virginia." Burden 231: "The first [map] to use the names Manhattan and N. Amsterdam. It is also the earliest to use.Massachusets [sic]." CUMMING 35. SCHWARTZ & EHRENBERG, p.105. 5) "Florida. et regiones vicinae." Burden 232: "Its influence was quite considerable." CUMMING 34. 6) "Nova Hispania, Nova Gallicia, Guatamala." Burden 215: "The delineation of the coastlines here was the most accurate to date." 7) "Tierra Firma item Nuevo Reyno de Granada atque Popayan" 8) "Peru" 9) "Chili" 10) "Provinciae sitae ad fretum Magellanis itemque fretum Le Maire" 11) "Paraguay, o prov. de rio de la Plata: cum adiacentibus Provinciis, quas vocant Tucuman, et Sta. Cruz de la Sierra" 12) "Provinciua de Brasil cum adiacentibus provinciis" 13) "Guaiania sive provinciae intra rio de las Amazonas atque rio de Yviapari sive Orinoque" 14) "Venezuela, atque occidentalis pars Novae Andalusiae" The Streeter copy sold to Nico Israel for $550 in 1966. It was later bought by an American collector, from whom the Reese Company acquired it in 1990. It is now at the Virginia Historical Society. BORBA DE MORAES, p.451. SABIN 38557. EUROPEAN AMERICANA 633/65. STREETER SALE 37. STREIT II:1619. JCB (3)II:246. TIELE 628. BELL L33. VAIL 84. RODRIGUES 1352. ASHER 3. WILLEMS 382. ALDEN II:337. BRUNET III:741. BEINECKE, LESSER ANTILLES COLLECTION 31.
NEW ENGLAND'S MEMORIAL

NEW ENGLAND’S MEMORIAL, OR A BRIEF RELATION OF THE MOST MEMORABLE AND REMARKABLE PASSAGES OF THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD MANIFESTED TO THE PLANTERS OF NEW ENGLAND IN AMERICA.

Morton, Nathaniel [10],248,[1]pp. Full polished calf, ruled in gilt, spine richly gilt, morocco spine labels, raised bands, gilt inner dentelles, a.e.g., by Pratt for Henry Stevens, 1859. Titlepage in expert pen facsimile. Hinges a bit tender, moden bookplate on front pastedown, margins of leaves A2, A3, and A4, expertly repaired with no loss to text. Other than the facsimile, a near fine copy. In a cloth slipcase. The second edition of one of the most important New England books, practically as rare as the first of 1669. Morton was the nephew of William Bradford, governor of the Plymouth Colony, and much of this book, valuable for its history of the colony, was drawn from Bradford’s papers which had passed into his possession. Generally considered one of the foundation works of New England history, and the first secular book published in New England, it is probably also the first secular book to be reprinted, a tribute to its enduring interest. "This second edition contains a supplement by Josiah Cotton, register of deeds for the county of Plymouth" – Sabin. There are two issues of this reprint, revealing of Boston booktrade practice of the time, since one bills the successful bookseller, Henchman, as publisher, the other his less successful competitor, Nicholas Boone. The first edition of Morton has become virtually unobtainable, and even the Siebert collection lacked a copy. This edition is in many ways equally important. HOWES M851 "b." VAIL 336. SABIN 51013. EVANS 2267.
THE PHILADELPHIA DIRECTORY FOR 1798: CONTAINING THE NAMES

THE PHILADELPHIA DIRECTORY FOR 1798: CONTAINING THE NAMES, OCCUPATIONS, AND PLACES OF ABODE OF THE CITIZENS.ALSO A REGISTER OF THE.MAGISTRATES.WITH AN ACCURATE TABLE OF THE DUTIES ON GOODS, WARES, AND MERCHANDIZE; TOGETHER WITH A GENERAL ABSTRACT FROM THE REVENUE LAWS.

Stafford, Cornelius William 166,[2],77,[2]pp. Modern half calf and marbled boards, spine gilt, leather label. Modern bookplate on front pastedown. Some foxing and toning, contemporary ownership signature on contents leaf, titlepage and a few terminal leaves with minor marginal repairs, small repair and open tear to leaf K1, costing a few words on a few lines. Overall very good. A contemporary Philadelphia citizen’s copy of this scarce early directory for the City of Brotherly Love. This is Stafford’s second directory of Philadelphia, following his first of 1797, and includes an alphabetical listing of citizens with their occupations and addresses. On the first page of the listing of names is John Adams, "President of the United States of America, 190, High street." The contemporary owner of this copy, Thomas Proctor, is listed within as a "Gentleman" living at 163 Arch Street. After the listing, the work includes a printing of the Constitution (without the Bill of Rights), followed by the usual additions relating to politics and finance. The work ends with a two-page account of the July 1797 Yellow Fever outbreak in the city. A scarce work, with only nineteen copies listed in ESTC, six of which are at the Library Company of Philadelphia. SPEAR, p.275. EVANS 34593. ESTC W27617.
PAIR OF VERNACULAR PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS CAPTURING THE LIFE OF A JAPANESE AMERICAN FAMILY IN JAPAN AND THE UNITED STATES IN THE EARLY- 20th CENTURY]

PAIR OF VERNACULAR PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS CAPTURING THE LIFE OF A JAPANESE AMERICAN FAMILY IN JAPAN AND THE UNITED STATES IN THE EARLY- 20th CENTURY]

Japanese American Photographica] 405 mounted silver gelatin photographs, various sizes. Two oblong folio photograph albums. Original pebbled leather, brad- bound. Minor wear to extremities and rubbing to both albums. Slight mirroring or fading to a handful of images. Overall very good. An engrossing collection of photographs documenting the lives of an extended Japanese American family both in their homeland and their adopted homeland. The first album contains 146 photographs, about half of which appear to emanate from Japan, with traditional Japanese architecture in the backgrounds, and with most subjects in Japanese dress. Midway through the album, after a couple of shots featuring a large group of Japanese people onboard a ship, the scenery and dress of the subjects change. From this point, most of the photographs feature subjects and settings much more American in nature, with a few photographs taken in seemingly western American locations. An image toward the rear of the album depicts the Hokoku Co. storefront, founded in 1907 and touted on its facade as a purveyor of "Japanese American General Merchandise." A couple of later snapshots of the interior of a store perhaps feature the interior of the Hokoku Co. Following this image is one showing a Japanese-American man at the reins of a horse-and-carriage in a mountainous locale. This album concludes with two serene shots of a Japanese woman reading (and one showing her home library) and various family group photos. The second album, containing 259 photographs, continues with some of the same subjects, largely in what is likely the Los Angeles area. One of the photographs is stamped "Rudolpho Studio Burbank Calif" and many of the houses reflect the bungalow style prevelant in southern California. Again, the majority of the photographs feature families posed together, a great many with young children, with almost all of the photographs taken outdoors. The subjects occasionally wear traditional Japanese clothing. A handful of the images are dated in the margins in either 1923 or 1924, and numerous photographs show Japanese Americans driving or posed around early automobiles. A portrait of an infant bears the blindstamp of the Motoyoshi photography studio of San Francisco. There are also six elementary school class pictures dated between 1929 and 1931, showing groups of children from a diverse range of ethnic backgrounds. A splendid group of over 400 photographs memorializing the lives of Japanese Americans in Japan and the American West during the Roaring Twenties and the early years of the Great Depression.
SEVEN ORIGINAL

SEVEN ORIGINAL, ANNOTATED TYPESCRIPTS OF WORKS BY NOVELIST AND HISTORIAN DEE BROWN]

Brown, Dee Seven volumes. Quarto. Modern red and blue morocco, gilt tooled and lettered. Binder’s tickets on front endpapers. Copious annotations throughout. Occasional tape repairs and paper loss not affecting text. Fine. Seven bound typescripts, comprising draft copies of fiction and non-fiction works by the acclaimed writer and historian, Dee Brown. These are Brown’s own personal copies of the typescripts, heavily annotated by his editors and with occasional notes by Brown himself in preparation for publication. Each volume contains editorial notes as well as notes on typography, design elements, and more. In all, the volumes in this collection provide an outstanding perspective into the authorial and editorial process not only of BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE, but for several other significant works by Brown. Western historian Dorris Alexander "Dee" Brown (1908-2002) is best known for his trailblazing perennial bestseller, BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE, but wrote many other novels and histories about the American West, often about the Native American experience. This collection consists of late drafts of four works of non-fiction and three of fiction, bound by the author for his personal library. The titles included here are as follows (in chronological order of publication): 1) GRIERSON’S RAID (1954). Dee Brown’s third novel tells the story of Col. Benjamin Grierson’s raid in support of the Union siege of Vicksburg during the Civil War. Heavily marked with editorial notes and corrections, and notes in Dee Brown’s hand as well. 2) THE GENTLE TAMERS (1958). A history of women in the West, from major figures to lesser-known female pioneers. 3) ACTION AT BEECHER ISLAND (1967). Brown’s novelistic retelling of the nine-day siege between Plains Indians and the U.S. Army in eastern Colorado, on the Arikaree River near the border with Nebraska and Kansas, in September, 1868. The army was engaged in protecting settlers and the Kansas Pacific Railroad from raids by Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes. The victorious Americans were commanded by General Alexander Forsyth, while the Cheyenne were led by the legendary warrior, Roman Nose, who died in the battle. 4) BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE (1970). A pencil note on the endpaper in Dee Brown’s hand reads "copy editor’s copy that went to printer, in 1969." This copy is heavily marked up, with editorial notes on nearly every page, as well as notes on illustrations, design elements, typography, etc. 5) HEAR THAT LONESOME WHISTLE BLOW: RAILROADS IN THE WEST (1977). Brown’s epic history of the building of railroads in the West. Heavily marked with editorial and production notes. 6) CREEK MARY’S BLOOD (1980). Brown’s first novel after ACTION AT BEECHER ISLAND. Using the main character of "Creek Mary," a Muskogee woman born in Georgia before the American Revolution, Brown tells a story of the forced migration of Native Americans westward, and the interweaving of cultures through intermarriage with other tribes and with Caucasians in a story that spans more than a century. 7) KILLDEER MOUNTAIN (1983). In this novel Brown utilizes a narrative device similar to the Orson Welles film, MR. ARKADIN, in which a journalist researches the story of a mysterious Major Charles Rawley, revealing a multifaceted personality capable of good and evil. On paper stock of multiple colors, and with copious notes from editors, production designers, and Dee Brown himself. Each typescript is annotated for content, style, and formatting in various hands, including Brown’s, and the draft of GRIERSON’S RAID includes an annotated gelatin silver print bound in depicting a "Map Showing Course of Grierson’s Raid." The binding work was done by a local binder of Little Rock, Arkansas, where Brown made his home for the last three decades of his life and where he wrote many of his later books. A fascinating and singular collection of works that document the authorial and editorial process for a significant portion of the oeuvre of a now classic Western author.
TYPESCRIPT FOR AN EARLY VERSION OF Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee]

TYPESCRIPT FOR AN EARLY VERSION OF Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee]

Brown, Dee [8],592,19pp. (with some repeated or augmented pagination), on white or yellow typing paper. A few pencil corrections to the Table of Contents. Modern green cloth, front board and spine lettered in gilt. Binder’s ticket on front pastedown. Author’s inscription on titlepage. Fine. A unique and outstanding record of the publication of a modern classic on the American West, this is Dee Brown’s own typescript copy of the earliest submission of his towering work, BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE. Historian Dee Brown’s groundbreaking revisionist history of the encroachment of settlers on Native Americans and their lands in the latter half of the nineteenth century was published in 1970, and had an initial print run of less than 10,000 copies. It has remained in print ever since, selling more than five million copies and translated into more than a dozen languages. This carbon typescript is the first submission of the book to Brown’s editors, which Brown later had bound for his home library, and is signed by him on the titlepage and inscribed, "Carbon copy of first submission (which no longer exists) Dee Brown April 15, 2000." The binding work was done by a local binder of Little Rock, Arkansas, where Brown made his home for the last three decades of his life and where he wrote many of his later books. The typescript, however, bears his earlier address in Urbana, Illinois, where he worked as an agriculture librarian at the University of Illinois from 1948 to 1972, and where he wrote his landmark work.
PANORAMIC PHOTOGRAPH OF COMPANY I

PANORAMIC PHOTOGRAPH OF COMPANY I, A RIFLE UNIT IN THE 808 PIONEER INFANTRY]

World War I]: [African Americana]: Pierce, Frederick, Corp. Panoramic photograph 8 x 46 1/4 inches. A handful of creases and tears, far right 8 x 6-inch section separated vertically and re- attached with tape on verso, minor surface dust-soiling. Good. Rolled. A striking and well-composed panoramic photograph depicting the African-American soldiers of the 808th Pioneer Infantry in training at Camp Meade during World War I. The photograph shows the soldiers in closer- than-usual detail, likely because there were less than a hundred men in the unit. The present image shows about eighty-five African- American soldiers posed with their rifles, with one white officer standing at extreme left. The verso of the photograph is signed "Corporal Frederick Pierce Co. ‘I’ 808 Pion Inf." Pierce was likely the owner of the photograph, as well as one of its subjects. Below his signature is a seemingly unrelated name and address in a different hand. The 808th Pioneer Infantry was organized in July 1818 at Camp Meade, Md. The 808th was the first of the pioneer infantry regiments to arrive in France during the Great War, landing their first troops at Brest on Sept. 7, 1918. The unit served as salvage workers, and constructed roads, railroads, bridges, and hospitals under the Army Engineers. The 808th returned to the United States in June 1919 and was demobilized at Camp Lee, Va. "Unlike other SOS troops, black pioneer infantrymen could at least claim to have been under fire.Alfred Allen arrived in France in January 1918 as part of the 808th Pioneer Infantry. He spent nearly four months on the front lines near Metz, hauling ammunition and cutting barb-wire entanglements, among other perilous duties, and returned home shell- shocked as a result. German shelling and gas attacks killed and injured several African American Pioneer Infantry soldiers, the result of inadequate preparation and a lack of defensice support. J.A. Toliver of the 808th Pioneer Infantry informed W.E.B. Du Bois after the war that his unit survived a gas attack and did not receive instructions on how to use their masks until they were within enemy range. Jerry Marton, also a veteran of the 808th Pioneer Infantry, stated honestly that he was ‘scared all the time I was there.’ Although not actual combat, it was nevertheless close enough to provide an affirmation for many African American pioneer infantrymen that they did indeed deserve the title of soldier" – Williams. A rare and captivating image of a well-known African-American World War I unit, signed by one of the soldiers. Chad L. Williams. TORCHBEARERS OF DEMOCRACY: AFRICAN AMERICAN SOLDIERS IN THE WORLD WAR I ERA. (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2010), p.114.
4th Co. 808 PIONEER INFANTRY

4th Co. 808 PIONEER INFANTRY

World War I]: [African Americana] Panoramic photograph, 8 x 35 1/2 inches. Minor edge wear, a few edge chips and tears, some soft creases, one heavy crease near center, dust-soiling to surface. Overall very good. Rolled. Captivating image of an African-American company in training at Camp Meade during World War I. The image shows about 175 African-American soldiers sitting and standing for the camera, with one white officer standing at extreme left. The 808th Pioneer Infantry was organized in July 1818 at Camp Meade, Md. The 808th was the first of the pioneer infantry regiments to arrive in France during the Great War, landing their first troops at Brest on Sept. 7, 1918. The unit served as salvage workers, and constructed roads, railroads, bridges, and hospitals under the Army Engineers. The 808th returned to the United States in June 1919 and was demobilized at Camp Lee, Va. "Unlike other SOS troops, black pioneer infantrymen could at least claim to have been under fire.Alfred Allen arrived in France in January 1918 as part of the 808th Pioneer Infantry. He spent nearly four months on the front lines near Metz, hauling ammunition and cutting barb-wire entanglements, among other perilous duties, and returned home shell- shocked as a result. German shelling and gas attacks killed and injured several African American Pioneer Infantry soldiers, the result of inadequate preparation and a lack of defensice support. J.A. Toliver of the 808th Pioneer Infantry informed W.E.B. Du Bois after the war that his unit survived a gas attack and did not receive instructions on how to use their masks until they were within enemy range. Jerry Marton, also a veteran of the 808th Pioneer Infantry, stated honestly that he was ‘scared all the time I was there.’ Although not actual combat, it was nevertheless close enough to provide an affirmation for many African American pioneer infantrymen that they did indeed deserve the title of soldier" – Williams. Chad L. Williams. TORCHBEARERS OF DEMOCRACY: AFRICAN AMERICAN SOLDIERS IN THE WORLD WAR I ERA. (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2010), p.114.
NORTH PACIFIC COAST PORTS [cover title]

NORTH PACIFIC COAST PORTS [cover title]

Samuels, Frederick] [8],77,[16]pp. including ads, plus three folding maps. Original dark blue publisher’s cloth, gilt. Spine ends and corners lightly worn, hinges a trifle loose. Very clean internally. Very good overall. The third edition, enlarged and improved over editions under a different title published in 1886 and 1889. This scarce guide to West Coast ports was produced by J.D. Spreckels & Bros., a major firm of commercial merchants and shippers on the Pacific Coast. The text gives much useful information on the ports of Honolulu, Nanaimo and Vancouver Island, Portland, Puget Sound and Tacoma, as well as San Francisco, San Diego, San Pedro, Redondo, and Los Angeles in California. Included are customs house rules, rates for towing, dockage, pilotage, and stevedores, as well as the qualities of the ports and cities, and other services provided. The three folding maps show the harbors of San Francisco and San Diego (both copyrighted 1889), as well as the Washington coast. Most of the photographs show tow boats operated by the Spreckels company, though two show views of San Diego. The advertisements are for a variety of nautical and industrial businesses. John D. Spreckels was prominent in San Diego affairs, helping to develop Coronado Island as well as the city’s railroad and ports. The Spreckels family were also well-known philanthropists, but are perhaps best known in California as manufacturers of sugar from beets, and whose factories had the unfortunate side effect of imparting unpleasant odors upon many a small town. The Spreckels Company issued a work of a similar title in 1886, covering only San Francisco, with twenty pages of text and a map. They enlarged that to fifty-four pages in 1889, and included other West Coast ports. This 1894 edition is more comprehensive than either of those two earlier efforts. SMITH, PACIFIC NORTHWEST AMERICANA, 8971.
TREMENDOUS EXCITEMENT! SAMUEL WHITTAKER AND ROBERT McKENZIE RESCUED FROM THE AUTHORITIES

TREMENDOUS EXCITEMENT! SAMUEL WHITTAKER AND ROBERT McKENZIE RESCUED FROM THE AUTHORITIES, AND HUNG BY THE VIGILANCE COMMITTEE, ON SUNDAY AUGUST 24th AT 3 O’CLOCK P.M. IN THE PRESENCE OF FIFTEEN THOUSAND PEOPLE [caption title]

California Pictorial Letter Sheet] Pictorial letter sheet, 8 1/4 x 10 3/4 inches, on blue wove paper. With blank conjugate leaf still attached. Fine. A scarce California pictorial letter sheet depicting an act of violence by the first Vigilance Committee: the execution of two "Sydney Ducks," Samuel Whittaker and Robert McKenzie. The so-called Sydney Ducks were a gang of Australian convicts who committed a number of arsons and robberies in San Francisco. Their activities, and the seeming inability of the legal authorities to stop them, were one of the factors leading to the establishment of the first Vigilance Committee in 1851. Whittaker and McKenzie were arrested in Sacramento by Committee members on Aug. 20, tried, and sentenced to hang in San Francisco, where they were soon transported. On the 23rd the San Francisco sheriff and mayor rescued the condemned men from the Committee’s headquarters and put them in jail. On Aug. 24 the Vigilance Committee broke into the jail and recaptured the prisoners, taking them to the Committee headquarters, where they were hanged. McKenzie and Whittaker are shown in this lithograph hanging from the second floor of a commercial building, which also housed the headquarters of the Vigilance Committee. A large crowd is gathered in the street to take in the grisly event, which drew masses of spectators. Telegraph Hill, where many of the Sydney Ducks lived, is seen in the far right background. "No series of events attracted greater attention than the workings of the 1851 and 1856 vigilance committees" – Kurutz (in the introduction to the Clifford Collection). This copy differs from the one described by Baird in that the word "hung" (rather than "hanged") appears in the title. Peters locates a copy with "hung" in the title at the California Historical Society (which contains a manuscript letter dated Aug. 30, 1851). This letter sheet was produced by Justh, Quirot & Co., one of the first and most important lithographic firms in San Francisco. Rare, and an important visual component of the rough early history of San Francisco. BAIRD, CALIFORNIA’S PICTORIAL LETTER SHEETS 274 (other issue). CLIFFORD LETTER SHEET COLLECTION 283 (this issue). PETERS, CALIFORNIA ON STONE, pp.134-36.
VIEW OF THE GREAT CONFLAGRATION AT DOWNIEVILLE

VIEW OF THE GREAT CONFLAGRATION AT DOWNIEVILLE, THE NIGHT OF FEBRUARY 20th 1852. WHOLE ENTIRE TOWN DESTROYED. – LOSS ESTIMATED $500,000 [caption title]

California Pictorial Letter Sheet] Pictorial letter sheet, 8 1/2 x 10 3/4 inches, on blue wove paper, with blank conjugate leaf attached. Fine. A rare and dramatic view of the terrible fire that destroyed virtually all of the California Gold Rush mining town of Downieville. Situated at the forks of the North Yuba River, Downieville was founded in 1849 and its population grew to 5,000 by the next year. The mining camps of the Sierra Nevada foothills grew quickly, and usually consisted of wooden structures or tents, making them quite susceptible to fire. Indeed, fire struck Downieville on Feb. 20, 1852, nearly levelling the town. This letter sheet shows the cataclysm in progress, as a volcano of fire and smoke erupts from the center of the image, engulfing the main part of the town. Scores of townspeople are shown running on the periphery, the center of the town ringed by fences, wooden buildings, and tents. A bridge leading into the town is shown at lower right. This view was lithographed by Quirot & Co., and was published by Samuel Langton, who was a prominent independent expressman in Downieville. The earliest view of Downieville noted by Reps is another letter sheet, lithographed by Justh, Quirot and also published by Samuel Langston, in 1851, just the year before the present view was produced. In fact that earlier view of Downieville served as the template for the present letter sheet. This letter sheet is not in Baird or in Peters, CALIFORNIA ON STONE, and we can locate no copies in OCLC or in auction records. The only copy I can find having appeared in the market is the Clifford copy, lacking the blank conjugate, which sold for $700 in 1994. It was listed in the "unrecorded letter sheets" portion of the Clifford catalogue. CLIFFORD LETTER SHEET COLLECTION 357.
THE INDEPENDENT GOLD HUNTER ON HIS WAY TO CALIFORNIA

THE INDEPENDENT GOLD HUNTER ON HIS WAY TO CALIFORNIA

California Gold Rush] Handcolored lithograph, 13 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches (sight). Very clean. Handsomely framed and matted. An iconic image of the California Gold Rush, showing a well-dressed and well-equipped argonaut, just setting off on the overland journey to the gold fields of California. The "independent gold hunter" is shown walking across the prairie, some 350 miles west of St. Louis and 1700 miles from California. His clothes are clean, and his hair and beard are neatly trimmed. He wears a frock coat, knee-high black leather boots, and a large kettle for a hat. In a lower coat pocket are several knives and a pistol, and in an upper pocket is a flask. He smokes a cigarette, carries a small suitcase in his left hand, and his right hand holds a long stick on top of his right shoulder. From the stick hang sausages, small fish, and a tea kettle. Also seen dangling from him are the tools of his future trade: a gold mining pan, a shovel, and scales. This copy is attractively colored in muted tones of blue, green, grey, and tan. This lithograph was issued by two different publishers: Kelloggs & Comstock of Hartford (with Ensign & Thayer of Buffalo listed as co- publisher), and by the famed firm of Currier & Ives of New York. The Currier & Ives issue is likely the first; either issue is quite scarce. Peters singles this print out from the vast production of the Kelloggs firm (they were second only to Currier and Ives in productivity), saying that their western prints are "a small but important and rare group," and calling this lithograph "extremely interesting." Not in Vail’s GOLD FEVER, though he does list several Gold Rush prints, nor was a copy featured in the 1999 Huntington Library exhibit, "Land of Golden Dreams." A copy of the present issue sold at auction earlier in 2018, and before that Rare Book Hub lists no copies at auction since the sale of prints from the stock of Edward Eberstadt & Sons in 1967. OCLC locates only a single copy of this Kelloggs & Comstock issue, at the American Antiquarian Society. There are also copies at the California State Library, the Beinecke Library, the Oakland Museum of California, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the St. Louis Mercantile Library. PETERS, AMERICA ON STONE, p.246. PETERS, CALIFORNIA ON STONE, p.140 & plate 69. FINLAY, PICTURING VICTORIAN AMERICA, 434. OCLC 191117340.
THE LOST CHILD; OR

THE LOST CHILD; OR, THE CHILD CLAIMED BY TWO MOTHERS: A NARRATIVE OF THE LOSS AND DISCOVERY OF CASPER A. PARTRIDGE AMONG THE MENOMONEE INDIANS, WITH A CONCISE ABSTRACT OF COURT TESTIMONY, AND REVIEW OF COMMISSIONER BUTTRICK’S DECISION

Plimpton, F.B. 79pp. Early-20th-century blue crushed morocco, gilt floral designs on boards, spine gilt. Minor wear to extremities. Modern bookplate on front pastedown, minor occasional foxing. Very good. Original front wrapper bound in. A rare and fascinating Indian captivity, relating the experiences of Casper Partridge, snatched from his parents in 1849 at age three by Menominee Indians in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. The text describes the circumstances of his abduction, the ensuing search, and his seeming discovery three years later. In an interesting and unusual turn, the Indian mother, Nah-kom, contested the claim, asserting that the child was hers by birth. More than half the text gives the details of the trial in which the Partridge family sued Nah-kom for custody, recording the testimony of the white and Indian witnesses. Court Commissioner Edwin L. Buttrick decided in favor of Nah-kom, and the child, thence called O-ah-ka-hah, remained with his Menominee mother. The final portion of the text offers criticism of the decision. The Braislin sale catalogue of 1927 calls this "an excessively rare captivity, of which only one other appears to have occurred at auction." Not in the Siebert or Streeter sales, nor in Field, Hubbard, Paullin, Thomson, Brinley, Graff, or Sabin. OCLC locates only ten copies. HOWES P423, "b." AYER SUPPLEMENT 101. EBERSTADT 122:292. BRAISLIN SALE 1482. OCLC 27861745.
TWENTY-TWO ORIGINAL WATERCOLORS DONE FROM LIFE DURING A CRUISE ABOARD THE LANCASHIRE WITCH]. [with:] WAR

TWENTY-TWO ORIGINAL WATERCOLORS DONE FROM LIFE DURING A CRUISE ABOARD THE LANCASHIRE WITCH]. [with:] WAR, WAVES, AND WANDERINGS. A CRUISE IN THE "LANCASHIRE WITCH."

Francis, Francis] Eighteen stiff cards, four with two mounted watercolors, fourteen with one watercolor each, for a total of twenty-two illustrations. Average image size approximately 9 x 5 1/2 inches. Large folio portfolio. Three-quarter red morocco, green tie straps. Bookplate of the Easton Neston Library on front pastedown. Moderate edge wear to all cards, some minor chipping. Two of the watercolors detached from the mounts (but present). All watercolors bright and near fine, with autograph descriptions of scenes written in margins. Overall an excellent set of these charming original amateur watercolors. In a cloth case, leather label. Book: Original cloth, very good, in matching case. A collection of handsome original watercolors executed from life during a gentlemen’s adventure around the world in the yacht, Lancashire Witch. The artwork illustrates places in and around Madagascar, the Seychelle Islands, Burma, Japan, Alaska, the Pribilof Islands, and elsewhere, and are a unique and unpublished record of this voyage. Francis Francis published a memoir of his round-the-world voyage in a book entitled WAR, WAVES, AND WANDERINGS. A CRUISE IN THE LANCASHIRE WITCH (London, 1881, two volumes bound in one: [8],300;[4],308pp., a copy is included here). Francis’s published account of the voyage is unillustrated, however, and so these watercolors are a unique visual record of a lively round-the-world voyage. All of the watercolors are done in Francis Francis’ quite impressive amateur hand. Their greatest strength lies in their blending of color between sky and landscape, and in the firsthand details of places and persons that Francis observed. Departing from Natal, the adventurers visited several points in Madagascar, Johanna, Zanzibar, Formosa, the Seychelles, Singapore, Siam, Japan, San Francisco, and Alaska. The watercolors as listed below are in chronological order, with Francis’ titles listed first, and with appropriate references to Francis’ text provided in quotations. The tone of the text is playful, and the illustrations are often touched with humor and sport. 1) "A cold douche on board the yacht." "Near the lee scuppers C. is being played upon with the hose instead of having a shower bath below." p.93. 2) "Mode of travelling in Madagascar." "S. was the first seated, and rousing the sleepy inhabitants of Majunga with a ‘Hark for’ard, gone away, gone away, gone away, tally-ally-ally-ally ho!’ he and his bearers went off at a rapid trot. We soon followed." p.108. 3) "Duck shooting, Madagascar." "Through the slim trunks we could see the glint of water, and as the view became more extensive, flocks of ducks and teal could be distinguished on the surface and round the shores of the pond. Up they rose in clouds. The main body departed, but for a few minutes single birds continued to circle aimlessly round. We bagged four and a half brace, besides three plover which fell to a single shot." p.110. 4) "Tip asleep." "Tip was asleep. Tip always is asleep if left to himself for five minutes." p.113. 5) "Johanna, one of the Comoro Islands." "Soon after sunrise we caught our first glimpse of Johanna. Already we were well within view, and amply justified were the expectations we had formed with regard to its attractions. Still and picture-like the painted island lay on the sunlit waters, as though under a spell." p.122. 6) "Hippo shooting on the Wami." "Submerged in water were ten or twelve hippoes in every reach, there just visible above the surface as they gazed curiously at us.With a little care in stalking I wounded a couple of hippoes. The first, after a great deal of splashing and considerable loss of blood, disappeared in deep water; the second, with decent resignation speedily turned up his toes and floated down stream, feebly pawing the surface of the water. I followed him until at length he also sank." p.161. 7) "Seychelle Islands." "A run of six days close-hauled – headwinds varied by calms prevailing throughout the voyage – brought us to the Seychelles, and about noon on a brilliant sunny morning Douglas, with his accustomed skill and care, piloted us through the somewhat intricate entrance to the little reef-bound harbour of Port Victoria." p.199. 8) "Marketplace. Patchbowree. Siam." "The bazaar is simply a long narrow foot road, with open stalls on either side. It was perhaps the – and yet no, bearing in mind the bazaar at Zanzibar, I cannot call this the dirtiest place I ever visited.[It] was crowded with a stream of Klings, Parsees, Malays, tattooed Burmese, handsome Laos, savage Tongzus, Chinamen, and Siamese all more or less naked." pp.260- 62. 9) "On the Meinam, Siam." "Early morning on the Meinam is very charming. The delicate rosy tints of the rising sun, reflected on the broad ‘mother of waters;’ the soft clear skies, pierced by the slender minarets and spires of many temples; the fresh coolness of the morning breeze whispering down the river ripples, as yet unbroken by the rush of traffic; the very stillness, even, are doubly pleasing after the hot restless night and ceaseless hum of insect life." pp.276-77. 10) "On the Mekong, Siam." "Bananas, tall clumps of graceful bamboos with feathery foliage not unlike the willow, stalwart mangoes, stately palms, tree ferns, and the great embossed trunks of many a ‘green-robed senator’ whose name I knew not, fringed with rich scenery the banks of a river far broader than the Thames." Vol. II, p.3. 11) "Tip asleep on river bank, a lizard ran up his leg, tied his handkerchief round it to prevent it ascending, tied it in instead of out." "During a pause in the conversation, S. who was reclining at ease according to his custom, on the bamboo matting of the floor, suddenly sprang up with a yell and howl. ‘Oh! oh! oh! Hi! cut the trousers off me! Cut ’em off, I tell ye! He’s up my leg! Oh! the beast!.At length, removing the handkerchief, S– began gingerly shaking the leg of his trousers, with a face no pencil could ever depict." Vol. II, pp.9-10. 12) "Camp ki
LIVINGSTON'S GUIDE BOOK TO ST. JOHN AND THE SAINT JOHN RIVER WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE FISHING GROUNDS OF NEW BRUNSWICK

LIVINGSTON’S GUIDE BOOK TO ST. JOHN AND THE SAINT JOHN RIVER WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE FISHING GROUNDS OF NEW BRUNSWICK

Livingston, Gordon [ii],138,[vi, ads and indexes] pp. plus folding map. First 26 pages of text and ads printed on multi-colored stock. 12mo. Original printed salmon wrappers. Wrappers lightly soiled and edgeworn, a few small chips. Overall in near fine condition. A very early guidebook to the salmon and trout fishing grounds of New Brunswick, not located in any of the standard fishing bibliographies. Produced just as sport fishing was becoming popular in the region, this guide provides some of earliest information for anglers visiting the area. A dozen pages are devoted to the fishing grounds, describing the salmon and trout to be found there, the rivers and lakes that would yield the best catches (the longest entry is devoted to the fertile Miramichi River, and there is also a paragraph on the Restigouche), and the gear that should be carried. The rest of the text is taken up by a historical description and guide to St. John and other cities in New Brunswick, along with information on local sights and services, banks, churches, hospitals, transportation, and Masonic and temperance organizations. The first twenty-six pages consist of advertisements for businesses in New Brunswick, and other ads are found later in the text. The map is a plan of the city of St. John, with a key showing the locations of important buildings. Livingston produced a similar guidebook to the region in 1869, but the present edition was the first to include fishing information. The NUC locates only three copies, at the Library of Congress, American Antiquarian Society, and Acadia University in Nova Scotia. OCLC adds only a single copy, at the Library and Archives of Canada. Not in Lande. A remarkable survival from the period before the establishment of the fishing camps along the Restigouche. OCLC 1007619745.
THE WORLD'S INDUSTRIAL AND COTTON CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION

THE WORLD’S INDUSTRIAL AND COTTON CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION, NEW ORLEANS, LA.PLAN No. 2 MAP OF THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS SHOWING LOCATION OF EXPOSITION GROUNDS AND ALL APPROACHES THERETO BY LAND & WATER

New Orleans]: [Southern Litho. Co. (printer)] Folding lithographic map, with thirteen insets or vignettes. Sheet size: 27 1/2 x 36 3/4 inches. Printed "Stranger’s Guide" affixed to front pastedown. Original publisher’s blindstamped cloth. Small fold separations, expertly repaired. Very good. A rare and positively-ephemeral item from the New Orleans exposition of 1884, the second world’s fair to be held in America. The Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, held on the centennial of the first known export of cotton from the United States to Great Britain, offered New Orleans a chance to demonstrate to the world how its businesses and infrastructure had been revitalized by Reconstruction. The fair, however, suffered from debt and fraud and was not financially successful. Although the buildings constructed for the fair, held on present-day Audubon Park, were among the largest in the United States to that date, all were dismantled. The map is very detailed, showing New Orleans bounded by Lake Pontchartrain at the top and the Mississippi River at the bottom. The map shows the various levees in the city, as well as cemeteries, parks, and several railroads, including the new Shell Beach Railroad. The thirteen insets or vignette illustrations on the map include: "View of New Orleans in 1719"; "Plan of New Orleans in 1770"; "Rail- Road Map of Louisiana and Texas"; a bird’s-eye view of an approach to New Orleans by water; "Ground Plan of the Exposition"; "Perspective View of the Buildings and Grounds from the northeast"; and views of seven individual Pavilions and Halls containing the Exposition. The "Stranger’s Guide" on the front pastedown lists public buildings and points of interest, hotels, depots and ticket offices, and railroad ticket brokers. See CHARTING LOUISIANA 188 for a broadside advertisement for the exposition that includes a bird’s-eye view of New Orleans; this map is not listed in the carto-bibliographic work. A fine, detailed, and visually appealing New Orleans map. RUMSEY 5324.
TO THE MEMORIES OF THOMAS GILPIN AND JOHN HUNT WHO DIED EXILE'S IN VIRGINIA 1778
WONDER

WONDER, MYSTERY, AND DELIGHT. DE LA MANO’S CHAMPION EXHIBITION. THE GREAT FRENCH MAGICIAN! THE AUTOCRAT OF THE WORLD OF MAGIC! IN HIS NOVEL AND LAUGHABLE ENTERTAINMENT

Magic] Broadside, 24 x 4 3/4 inches. Two small areas of discoloration near bottom edge, else fine. Mounted and framed. A slim illustrated broadside printed on tan paper announcing and describing a performance by the Austrian magician and showman, De La Mano, here billed as French. His real name was Zell Dreitzehn, and he performed for several years in the United States before he himself disappeared in upstate New York in 1882. The broadside offers a "Night of Mystery" and "Two Hours of Fun" for attendees who should expect to be treated to illusions such as "The Bird Cage of Leah," "The Mesemerized Cards," "The Aerial Suspension," "The Witches Knot," "The Chinese Paradox," "The Great ‘Hindoo Box’ Mystery," and "a Thousand and One other tricks." Three small illustrations depict scenes from De La Mano’s act, including the transformation stand, the Inexhaustible Bottle, and the Miser’s Dream. The Inexhaustible Dream illustration is credited to "Mitchell, Buffalo." The broadside claims that "This is no exhibition of doubtful merit, but a permanently established and legitimate entertainment, exhibited with pride and pleasure. Prof. De La Mano has traveled extensively in the Southern and Eastern States, and has gained a reputation as a Magician, excelled by none." A rare theatrical advertisement from a bygone age, with only two copies listed in OCLC, at the American Antiquarian Society and the Clements Library. OCLC 191290992 and 83859708.
CONTEMPORARY COPY BOOK OF LAND INDENTURES ALONG THE WELCH TRACT GRANTED TO WILLIAM PENN

CONTEMPORARY COPY BOOK OF LAND INDENTURES ALONG THE WELCH TRACT GRANTED TO WILLIAM PENN, 1681 – 1684]

Pennsylvania]: [Penn, William] 367pp. Folio. Remnants of cloth spine, still holding well by cords. Boards no longer present, but marbled endpapers (chipped) remain. A handful of leaves with minor chips or repairs at the fore-edge or corner, costing little text. Good. In a modern quarter morocco box, spine gilt. A significant early copy book recording the sale of land in an area of Pennsylvania known in the 17th and 18th centuries as the "Welch Tract." This tract covered approximately the area now comprised of the towns of Radnor, Haverford, Merion, Ardmore, and Broomall. The volume contains hundreds of indentures granted by various agents of William Penn to numerous families and individuals both in Wales and in the Province of Pennsylvania. On March 4, 1681, Charles II of England granted William Penn a proprietary charter over land extending west from the Delaware River and bounded by New York to the north and Maryland to the south. Penn was granted sweeping power over the territory including the rights to create and fill offices, make laws as he saw fit (provided they were not contradictory to any established laws of England), and to establish counties, towns and seaports. Once the charter was signed, Penn hastened to find settlers for the new colony. He offered one hundred 5,000-acre tracts at the price of one hundred pounds each, as well as several smaller tracts. Seven of the 5,000-acre tracts were sold almost immediately to Penn’s Quaker acquaintances in Wales. Seven individuals purchased 30,000 acres of land to the northwest of Philadelphia and proceeded in aiding the Welch Friends in their emigration to America. These individuals formed land companies for the division and sale of the 30,000 acres in the tract. Those companies were granted blocks of land, which each company subdivided and sold to others, and the heads of each company retained some land for himself, as well. The usual size of the company’s grants were 5,000 acres, although some tracts were smaller. The original instruments of each Patent are in existence today, such as those at Haverford College and in the Friends Historical Library at Swarthmore College. The individuals whose names were connected with these early companies are as follows: 1) John Thomas, of Llaithgyn, Merionethshire. 2) Dr. Edward Jones of Bala, Merionethshire. 3) Charles Lloyd, of Merionethshire. 4) Margaret Davies, widow of William Lewis, of Dolobran. 5) John Evans, of Treverigg, Glamorganshire. 6) John of Ruabom, Denbighshire. 7) Dr. Thomas Wynn of Caerwys, Flintshire. 8) Lewis David, of Llandewy, Pembrokeshire. 9) Richard Thomas, of Whitford Garne, Flintshire. 10) Richard Davies, of Welshpoole. These individuals became, in effect, Pennsylvania’s first real estate agents, although it is doubtful that many of them ever visited the land in question. This book records the sale of lands from Richard Davies, Richard Thomas, John Thomas, Edward Jones, and Lewis David. Each indenture records the date of the transaction, the individuals involved, a vague description of the boundaries of the land grant, and the amount paid for the land. The indentures are written in several hands, most likely by the individuals selling the land. Hundreds of individual buyers are named, thus documenting the earliest land transactions between Europeans in this region of Pennsylvania. The earliest indentures were sold in 1681, and the latest sale recorded in the book occurred in 1684. It is uncertain when the indentures were copied into the copy book, but it was most likely very soon after the transaction took place. An important copy book documenting land sales and settlement in late 17th-century Pennsylvania. John B.B. Trussell, Jr., WILLIAM PENN: ARCHITECT OF A NATION (Harrisburg, 1980) pp.29-39 (passim). DAB XIV, pp.433-37 (Penn). ANB 17, pp.291-94 (Penn).
MANUSCRIPT DOCUMENT SIGNED BY EIGHT MOHAWK LEADERS CEDING LAND NEAR FORT HUNTER

MANUSCRIPT DOCUMENT SIGNED BY EIGHT MOHAWK LEADERS CEDING LAND NEAR FORT HUNTER, NEW YORK]

Mohawk Indians] [3]pp. Folio. Old fold lines. Central folds reinforced with later lined paper, some manuscript pencil notes. Minor soiling and wear. About very good. In a half morocco box. An early deed for land granted to the commander of Fort Hunter, which had been built at the request of the Mohawk ambassadors to Queen Anne. The transaction took place four years after the construction of Fort Hunter, which was situated on the banks of the Mohawk River at the mouth of the Schoharie Creek. Herein, eight Mohawk tribesmen gave a tract of land "unto Rebekea," the daughter of Captain John Scott (d. 1725), the first commander of Fort Hunter. The Mohawks granted the land only "in Consideration of the Great love, favour & affection which we have and do bear toward our great friend and Loving Acquaintance Capt John Scott." The land in question was located "opposite Over Against the Land we have given to the Wife of Capt John Colins and her son." Queen Anne had ordered the construction of Fort Hunter at the request of Hendrick Tejonihokarawa, one of the four "Mohawk Kings" who travelled to London in 1710, to counter French Catholic influence over the Iroquois Confederacy. The fort included a small Anglican chapel within, serving as a religious mission to the Mohawks. In return for the protection of the fort and the benefit of the Anglican mission, Queen Anne asked Tejonihokarawa to help settle Palatine German refugees fleeing religious conflict in Europe. The settlers provided an important buffer between the Iroquois, as well as the French and the English. The document is signed by eight Mohawk leaders with their pictograph signatures, (identified as "Craine," "Sancler ye Indian," "Asras," "Tequoinhunt," "Joharis ye Indian," "Cornelius Ind.," and "Kawinadichtow"), dated "In the Mohaughs Cuntry," May 14, 1716. Rare and of the greatest interest.
AUTOGRAPH LETTER

AUTOGRAPH LETTER, SIGNED, SENT TO AMERICAN MINISTER TO ENGLAND RUFUS KING BY THE THREE AMERICAN COMMISSIONERS WHO NEGOTIATED THE CONVENTION OF MORTEFONTAINE WITH FRANCE, NOTIFYING HIM THAT THE CONVENTION HAS JUST BEEN SIGNED]

Convention of Mortefontaine]: Ellsworth, Oliver; William R. Davie; and William Vans Murray [1]p. on an 8 3/4 x 8 1/2-inch sheet of paper, docketed on verso. Old folds. Faint bleed-through from the docketing. Very good. In a folding cloth box, gilt leather label. A strikingly immediate and significant letter, sent by the American commissioners in Paris to the American minister in England, notifying him of the signing of the Convention of Mortefontaine, a crucially important early American treaty with France. The treaty repaired relations between the two nations that had been disintegrating for a decade, ended a naval conflict, and paved the way for the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. The present letter transmits the news of the treaty to Rufus King, the American minister to England and is signed by the three American commissioners who negotiated the agreement, Supreme Court Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth, North Carolina Governor William R. Davie, and diplomat William Vans Murray. The Convention of Mortefontaine, signed on September 30, 1800 and ratified and proclaimed the following year, was an important event in the course of relations between the United States and France. France and the U.S. first signed a pair of treaties on February 6, 1778 – one of alliance and the other of amity and commerce. They were the first treaties ever signed by the United States with a foreign power, and marked the recognition of the former British colonies as a legitimate nation. French military assistance during the Revolution, a result of the treaty of alliance, was a crucial factor in the achievement of American independence. In 1782 and 1783 further agreements were signed between the two nations regarding loans and credits, and in 1788 a convention was signed establishing the functions and privileges of consuls and vice-consuls. The 1790s brought a cooling of relations between France and the United States, largely due to the war being fought between France and Great Britain, and the American policy of neutrality in the conflict. Relations were further soured by the controversial actions of Edmund Genet, the French Minister to the United States, who commissioned American ships as privateers, established French prize courts in American ports, and sought to raise troops to attack British and Spanish holdings in North America. The Washington administration requested Genet’s recall and the French government acceded, but the Jacobin faction in charge demanded the recall of the American minister to France, Gouverneur Morris, who was suspected of having royalist sympathies. Relations between the two nations continued to worsen over the following years. In 1796 the French government, angry over the American treaty with England of 1794 (Jay’s Treaty) announced that they would treat American ships as they would British vessels, thus formally endorsing French privateering raids against American vessels. Shortly thereafter President Washington replaced James Monroe (who was considered pro-France) as minister to France with Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, who the French government refused to acknowledge. All of these events came to a head in the so-called "Quasi-War" between the United States and France, and the diplomatic scandal known as the "XYZ Affair." The Quasi-War was an undeclared naval war between the two nations, fought between 1798 and 1800 mostly off the southern coast of the United States and in the Caribbean. The Federalists in Congress pushed President Adams to declare open war with France, and in July, 1798, the Congress abrogated the 1778 Treaty of Amity with France. Adams also sought peace, however, sending three American commissioners to France in 1797 to re- establish good relations. The "XYZ Affair" destroyed these hopes, however, when it was revealed that agents of French Foreign Minister Talleyrand demanded bribes from the Americans to even permit talks to begin. This resulted in an uproar in the United States. Conciliatory moves by Talleyrand encouraged President Adams to appoint another peace delegation to France in 1799, comprised of Supreme Court Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth, North Carolina Governor William Richardson Davie, and William Vans Murray, the American minister to the Netherlands. Ellsworth resigned as Chief Justice of the Court in order to take the assignment. Murray, stationed at the Hague, had already been meeting with the French envoy, Pichon, to repair relations. The American representatives presented their credentials to the new French First Consul, Napoleon, in March, 1800, and negotiations commenced. They culminated in the Convention of Mortefontaine, signed on September 30, 1800 in Paris. The agreement re-established peace between the United States and France, abrogated the 1778 treaty of alliance (the United States’ first "entangling" alliance), restored captured naval vessels to each side, arranged for payments of debts, and re-affirmed the trade rights of neutral ships. The text of this brief letter from the American commissioners to Rufus King, sent the day after the signing of the convention, reads as follows: "Paris, Oct. 1, 1800. Sir, We have the honor to inform you that a convention [written above the words "provisional treaty," which have been crossed out] was yesterday signed between France & the United States which if ratified re-establishes the relations of amity between the two nations. We are, sir, respectfully your most obedient Oliver Ellsworth, W.R. Davie, W. V. Murray." The letter is docketed on the verso (likely in Rufus King’s hand) as having been received on 3 November, 1800. The Treaty of Mortefontaine was the capstone of William Vans Murray’s diplomatic career and the final act of public service in the life of Oliver Ellsworth. John Adams considered it one of the most important accomplishments in his long career. This letter was sent to Rufus King, the American minister to England and a leading Federalist politician. Informing King of the agreement was very important, as King would have to gauge the feelings of the British government on the ag
TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND AMERICA. MASSACHUSETTS SPY

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND AMERICA. MASSACHUSETTS SPY, EXTRA

Convention of Mortefontaine] [2]pp. Text in four columns. Broadsheet, approximately 10 1/2 x 17 1/4 inches. Moderately tanned, some light staining. Very good. In a green cloth chemise and half morocco and cloth slipcase, spine gilt. An historically-important and rare extra edition of Isaiah Thomas’s MASSACHUSETTS SPY, reporting the fledgling United States’ 1800 treaty with France that averted all-out war between the two nations. Relieving the tensions that had built through the period of the Genet Affair, the XYZ Affair, and the Quasi-War, the Convention of Mortefontaine re-established peace between the United States and France, abrogated the 1778 treaty of alliance (the United States’ first "entangling" alliance), restored captured naval vessels to each side, arranged for payments of debts, and re-affirmed the trade rights of neutral ships. As importantly, it restored friendly relations between the two nations, a condition that reaped great benefits less than three years later when the United States acquired the Louisiana Purchase from France. The Convention of Mortefontaine was negotiated between Supreme Court Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth, North Carolina Governor William R. Davie, and diplomat William Vans Murray of the United States and Joseph Buonaparte, Charles P. C. Fleurieu, and Pierre L. Roederer of the French Republic, and agreed to in late September 1800. The full text of the treaty appears in this newspaper broadsheet extra, dated December 24, 1800. It enumerates all twenty-seven articles of the treaty, and is signed in type by all six negotiators as well as the French Foreign Minister, Charles Maurice de Talleyrand. This "Extra" issue of the SPY also prints the November 11 speech of King George III before the House of Lords, in which he comments on the treaty between the United States and France, and its potential effects on relations between England and her former colonies. The Convention of Mortefontaine, also known as the Convention of 1800 or the Treaty of Mortefontaine, signed on Sept. 30, 1800 and ratified and proclaimed the following year, was an important event in the course of relations between the United States and France. The two nations first signed a pair of treaties on Feb. 6, 1778 – one of alliance and the other of amity and commerce. They were the first treaties ever signed by the United States with a foreign power, and marked the recognition of the former British colonies as a legitimate nation. French military assistance during the Revolution, a result of the treaty of alliance, was a crucial factor in the achievement of American independence. In 1782 and 1783 further agreements were signed between the two nations regarding loans and credits, and in 1788 a convention was signed establishing the functions and privileges of consuls and vice-consuls. The 1790s brought a cooling of relations between France and the United States, largely due to the war being fought between France and Great Britain, and the American policy of neutrality in the conflict. Relations were further soured by the controversial actions of Edmund Genet, the French Minister to the United States, who commissioned American ships as privateers, established French prize courts in American ports, and sought to raise troops to attack British and Spanish holdings in North America. The Washington administration requested Genet’s recall and the French government acceded, but the Jacobin faction in charge demanded the recall of the American minister to France, Gouverneur Morris, who was suspected of having royalist sympathies. Relations between the two nations continued to worsen over the following years. In 1796 the French government, angry over the American treaty with England of 1794 (Jay’s Treaty) announced that they would treat American ships as they would British vessels, thus formally endorsing French privateering raids against American vessels. Shortly thereafter President Washington replaced James Monroe (who was considered pro-France) as minister to France with Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, whom the French government refused to acknowledge. All of these events came to a head in the so-called "Quasi-War" between the United States and France, and the diplomatic scandal known as the "XYZ Affair." The Quasi-War was an undeclared naval war between the two nations, fought between 1798 and 1800 mostly off the southern coast of the United States and in the Caribbean. The Federalists in Congress pushed President Adams to declare open war with France, and in July 1798, the Congress abrogated the 1778 Treaty of Amity with France. Adams also sought peace, however, sending three American commissioners to France in 1797 to re-establish good relations. The mission was a failure. Thomas Jefferson and the pro- French Democratic-Republicans called for the publication of the dispatches from the commissioners in an effort to undermine Adams, who they assumed was hiding the truth behind the mission. The dispatches, when released, revealed an attempt by the French to extort a large loan for the French government (upwards of $12 million), and it was revealed that agents of French Foreign Minister Talleyrand demanded bribes from the Americans to even permit talks to begin. In the dispatches, each of the French agents had been given letter designations: "X" for Baron Jean-Conrad Hottinguer, "Y" for Pierre Bellamy, and "Z" for Lucien Hauteval; hence the "XYZ Affair." This diplomatic catastrophe resulted in a political uproar in the United States. Conciliatory moves by Talleyrand encouraged President Adams to appoint another peace delegation to France in 1799, comprised of Supreme Court Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth, North Carolina Governor William Richardson Davie, and William Vans Murray, the American minister to the Netherlands. Ellsworth resigned as Chief Justice of the Court in order to take the assignment. Murray, stationed at the Hague, had already been meeting with the French envoy, Pichon, to repair relations. The American representat
THE QUADRUPEDS OF NORTH AMERICA

THE QUADRUPEDS OF NORTH AMERICA

Audubon, John James, and John Bachman Three large octavo volumes. 155 handcolored lithographed plates by W.E. Hitchcock and R. Trembly after J.J. and John Wodehouse Audubon. Contemporary three-quarter black morocco and cloth, spines gilt. Third volume expertly rebacked, with original backstrip laid down. Minor wear to extremities, front hinge of second volume tender. Internally clean. Very good plus, with tissue guards facing the plates, preserving the fine hand-coloring and preventing the offsetting typically seen with this set. An attractive set of the first octavo edition of Audubon’s final great natural history work, with plates and descriptions of the quadrupeds of the United States including Texas, California, and Oregon, as well as part of Mexico, the British and Russian possessions and Arctic regions. Audubon’s collaborator on THE QUADRUPEDS was the naturalist and Lutheran clergyman, John Bachman, who had studied quadrupeds since he was a young man and was a recognized authority on the subject in the United States. The two began their association when Audubon stayed with Bachman and his family in Charleston for a month in 1831. This friendship was later cemented by the marriage of Victor and John W. Audubon to Bachman’s daughters, Maria and Eliza. Audubon knew Bachman’s contribution to THE QUADRUPEDS would be crucial, and endeavored to convince his friend to lay aside his fears about the project. Audubon was eager to begin what he felt could be his last outstanding achievement in natural history, but Bachman was more cautious and worried that they were entering a field where "we have much to learn." Audubon persisted in his efforts to get him to take part, and Bachman, "anxious to do something for the benefit of Victor and John [Audubon]," eventually relented, with the final condition that all of the expenses and all of the profits should go to the Audubons. By 1835, Bachman had become indispensable to the QUADRUPEDS project, writing most of the text and editing the entire work. With the success of the octavo edition of THE BIRDS OF AMERICA in mind, a similar edition of THE QUADRUPEDS. was envisaged from an early stage. The folio edition was published in thirty numbers between 1845 and 1854, and publication of the first octavo edition began in 1849 and was also completed in 1854. Unfortunately, Audubon did not live to see the completion of either project, and after his death in January 1851 the work was seen through to completion by his son, John Woodhouse Audubon. The two editions form a fitting memorial to the greatest natural history artist of his day. WOOD, p.208. REESE, STAMPED WITH A NATIONAL CHARACTER 38. BENNETT, p.5. NISSEN (ZBI) 163.
NARRATIVE OF A VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD

NARRATIVE OF A VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD, IN THE URANIE AND PHYSICIENNE CORVETTES, COMMANDED BY CAPTAIN FREYCINET, DURING THE YEARS 1817, 1818, 1819, AND 1820; ON A SCIENTIFIC EXPEDITION UNDERTAKEN BY ORDER OF THE FRENCH GOVERNMENT. IN A SERIES OF LETTERS TO A FRIEND

Arago, Jacques Etienne Victor iv,[2],xxvii,[5],285,[2],297,[3]pp. plus folding map and twenty-five lithographic plates. Quarto. Contemporary calf, ruled in gilt and blind, spine elaborately gilt, a.e.g. Expertly rebacked with original backstrip laid down. Minor shelfwear, modern bookplate on front pastedown. Light foxing on map and plates, with some offsetting to facing pages, but text otherwise clean. Very good. Lacking half-title in first part. First edition in English of this important narrative of an expedition supported by the French government, written by the expedition’s artist. The purpose of the expedition, which was commanded by Freycinet, was to make chronometric and magnetic observations in various latitudes. The voyage included a one-month visit to the Sandwich Islands, with time spent in Hawaii, Maui, and Oahu, as well as visits to Rio de Janeiro, Cape of Good Hope, Montevideo, Mauritius, New South Wales, and the Caroline Islands. The many handsome lithographic plates add greatly to the ethnographic aspect of the work. Six of the plates feature Hawaiian subjects. "The URANIE, with a crew of 125 men, entered the Pacific from the West to make scientific observations on geography, magnetism, and meteorology. Arago was the artist of the expedition which visited most notably Australia, the Hawaiian Islands, Tonga, and Tierra del Fuego. The original ship, wrecked off the Falkland Islands, was replaced by the PHYSICIENNE which visited Rio de Janeiro.These entertaining letters, written in a lively and witty literary style, provide vivid descriptions of the topography and the inhabitants of the Pacific Islands" – Hill. A scarce and informative account of a far-ranging Pacific voyage. HILL (1st ed), p.295. HILL (2nd ed) 29. SABIN 1865. FERGUSON 885. FORBES HAWAII 562. JUDD 4.
COLLECTION OF 128 VERNACULAR PHOTOGRAPHS

COLLECTION OF 128 VERNACULAR PHOTOGRAPHS, SOME ANNOTATED, AND ASSORTED EPHEMERA DOCUMENTING AMERICAN NAVY LIEUTENANT F.H. BAIR’S EXPERIENCES IN OCCUPIED JAPAN]

World War II Photographica]: [Occupied Japan]: Bair, F.H., Lieut. 128 photographs, most either 3 x 4 1/2 inches or 1 1/2 x 2 inches, with six ephemeral paper items. Photos slightly curled, with some minor wear, a handful of photographs with slight loss to margins or image area. Overall very good. An outstanding collection of photographs and ephemera kept by Lietuenant F.H. Bair of the United States Navy while stationed at Camp Wood in Kumamoto, Japan during the American occupation immediately after the conclusion of World War II. The material was likely sent home by Lt. Bair to his family in Pollocksville, N.C. Several of the photographs bear his ink annotations, which illuminate the photographs for his family back home. Particularly noteworthy among the larger photographs are those concerned with the war damage to the city. In a couple of the photos, Bair juxtaposes some of the wrecked area around Kumamoto with the undamaged section ("Large area burned out, with a few scattered new buildings"). A couple of images depcit the "Bombed out area – Kumamoto" and "Bombed out buildings in middle distance." Bair also visited aircraft wreckage at the airport, which he cheekily captions the remains of "the Japanese Air Force." Along with some images of Bair himself, and three showing him with his friend "Bull Kresge," the photographs capture a wide range of subjects, including Japanese women washing clothes in the river; "Jap boys playing at a little shrine;" views of Japanese farms; the "Aso Kanko Hotel, near the volcano;" Kumamoto castle and its grounds; the Kumamoto "black market center;" a view of the springs below the camp showing Japanese children on stilts; a "Girl in Japanese costume, very pretty but I didn’t ger her telephone number!"; the Kumamoto water supply park; a view of the volcano across from Kagoshima; several aerial views of Camp Wood or Kumamoto; a view of five young men captioned on the verso "Jap farmers;" a lumber yard beside a bamboo grove; a "Jap barn;" a shot of ten small children in the village captioned, "Nip kids;" a shot of Inoue Taisan ("a Nip buddy of mine"); and a "Jap roadway," among others. The thumbnail photographs include many of the same types of subjects as the larger photographs, showing war damage, city views, street and market scenes, portraits of Japanese citizens, and more, though none of the smaller photographs are annotated. The ephemeral items are very interesting in their own right. Among these are a partially-printed travel ticket for Bair from Omura to Nagasaki dated Nov. 11, 1945; a partially-printed railway ticket filled out for Bair as he traveled from Kumamoto to Saebo dated May 8, 1946; and Bair’s membership card in the Order of the Golden Dragon, given to him for "having crossed the 180th meridian on the U.S.S. Grimes during World War II and having been initiated, then and there, "into the oriental mysteries of honorable ancestors of the Golden Dragon." Most interesting among the ephemeral items is a small counter receipt for a money order Bair sent to his wife on Nov. 1, 1945. On the verso of the receipt, Bair has listed numerous numbers and words with their Japanese translations, giving him handy reference for communicating with the Japanese people once he arrived at Camp Wood. A wonderful collection of vernacular photography and ephemera, documenting one American Navy officer’s experiences for a handful of months in Occupied Japan in late 1945 and early 1946.
THE UNITED STATES GAZETTEER: CONTAINING AN AUTHENTIC DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL STATES. THEIR SITUATION

THE UNITED STATES GAZETTEER: CONTAINING AN AUTHENTIC DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL STATES. THEIR SITUATION, EXTENT, BOUNDARIES, SOIL, PRODUCE, CLIMATE, POPULATION, TRADE AND MANUFACTURES. TOGETHER WITH THE EXTENT, BOUNDARIES AND POPULATION OF THEIR RESPECTIVE COUNTIES. ALSO, AN EXACT ACCOUNT OF THE CITIES, TOWNS, HARBOURS, RIVERS, BAYS, LAKES, MOUNTAINS, &c

Hamlin, Hannibal]: Scott, Joseph Engraved title, errata leaf, [iii]-iv, blank leaf, [v]-vi, [292]pp., plus nineteen engraved folding maps, including the large folding frontispiece map. 12mo. Late 19th century polished calf, boards and spine ruled in gilt, raised bands. Expertly rebacked with original backstrip laid down. Small chip to lower outer corner of the titlepage. Minor occasional marginal foxing, slight wear to a couple maps. Overall very good. Hannibal Hamlin’s copy of the first gazetteer of the United States, with an important series of engraved American maps. These, along with the maps in Carey’s AMERICAN ATLAS issued the same year, represent a major step forward in American cartography. Scott’s maps cover the United States in general, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, New Jersey, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, the Northwest Territory, and the Southwest Territory. This copy comes from the library of Hannibal Hamlin, with an identifying inkstamp on the titlepage and the verso of the frontispiece map. Hamlin, the 15th Vice President of the United States, was a staunch abolitionist, and one of the architects of the Emancipation Proclamation. A Maine lawyer and politican, he served in Congress from 1842 to 1861 before his stint as Lincoln’s first Vice President. Hamlin then served several more terms in the Senate from 1869-1881, and after a notable 50-year career in public service, he died in Bangor in 1891. His papers and library remained intact in his large mansion there until the 1960s. At the time the material was dispersed, items were stamped with the blue library stamp found on the verso of the folding map and on the titlepage here. The backstrip also bears Hamlin’s name, stamped in gilt. An important early work of American cartography and among the earliest mappings of each state, from the library of a notable American Vice President and bibliophile. HOWES S237, "aa." SABIN 78331. EVANS 29476. CLARK III:123. WHEAT & BRUN 125. REESE, FEDERAL HUNDRED 54.