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A Wheel Within a Wheel: How I Learned to Ride the Bicycle

A Wheel Within a Wheel: How I Learned to Ride the Bicycle

Willard, Frances Original green publisher’s cloth binding with silver and gilt to spine and front board. Housed in the only known example of the glassine jacket, in exceptional condition with only the smallest nicks and closed tears to the bottom edges, and small loss at the crown of spine. Glassine adhering in a small area on spine of book. Internally clean, complete, and tight. Small publisher’s advertisement laid in. Released in the same year through the Woman’s Temperance Publication Association, scholars note no priority between the two, which appear to have been bound from the same sheets with only the title page distinguishing them. Revell Company had a reputation for partnering with women’s clubs and activist groups to ensure wider distribution of political works. This autobiographical work by leading American women’s activist Frances Willard has appeared only twice at auction, with the most recent over 30 years ago in 1987. "Frances Willard, leader of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), was a complex and energetic figure in American feminism and social reform.Although Willard proclaimed the virtues of traditional domesticity for women, she was not bound by those conventional ideas in her own life" (GMU). After an unhappy engagement early in her life, Willard refused to marry any man, instead living long term with her partner Anna Gordon and working for women’s rights. Her brief autobiographical narrative A Wheel Within a Wheel focuses on Willard’s discovery of the bicycle in her late fifties, and the sense of freedom she gained from it. Since its invention, the bicycle had been a controversial mode of transportation for women, both because it required riding astride and because it provided a new, unchaperoned form of mobility. Among suffragists the bicycle and later the car became symbols of liberation. Here, Willard describes her experience and how "she viewed the ‘conquest’ of the bicyle as similar to the mastery that woman needed to achieve over the ‘wider world’" (History Matters). The liberation of the bicycle, for Willard, is incredibly personal as well as symbolic. "Living in the country, far from the artificial restraints and conventions by which most girls are hedged from the activities that would develop a good physique.I ran wild until my sixteenth birthday, when the hampering long skirts were brought, with their accompanying corset and high heels.[it] was the first heartbreak of a young human colt taken from its pleasant pasture," she writes. And she explains that her recapturing of freedom through bicycling was "an act of grace if not of actual religion," which "help women to a wider world." Containing practical information as well, on a proper bicycling costume, methods of learning, and health benefits of riding, A Wheel Within a Wheel packs an intense amount of information and joie de vivre into a small tome. Fine in Near Fine dust jacket.
The National Cookery Book: Compiled from Original Receipts for the Women's Centennial Committees of the International Exhibit of 1876

The National Cookery Book: Compiled from Original Receipts for the Women’s Centennial Committees of the International Exhibit of 1876

Women's Centennial Committees Original green publisher’s cloth binding embossed in bright gilt and black to spine and front board featuring the motto "E Pluribus Unum" [From Many, One]. Some rubbing to extremities and spotting to rear board; corners bumped. Hinges tender but holding well. Brown coated endpapers. Contemporary ownership signature in pencil on front flyleaf: "R. S. Luce from Eliza, Bought at Centennial." Internally complete and pleasing, with occasional finger soiling not affecting text, and largely concentrated on pages 190-191 and 211-212. With a modest presence at institutions and no other copies on the market, the present work documenting the intersection of women’s domestic labor and activism has become quite scarce, especially in this condition. The Centennial International Exhibition of 1876 — the very first official World’s Fair hosted by the U.S. — took place in Philadelphia from May 10-November 10 of that year. Overlapping the the Centennial of the Declaration of Independence, the event took on additional significance to the women’s right’s movement, thanks to Susan B. Anthony and the NWSA’s disruption of Centennial events at Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Rights of Women was read and distributed on July 4. While Anthony orchestrated this important historical moment, her collaborator Elizabeth Cady Stanton formed the Women’s Centennial Executive Committee to ensure that women had a presence at the World’s Fair events. Beginning three years prior, in 1873, the committee was "formally recognized by the United States government, the women’s work was circumscribed by male officials. Women were restricted to fundraising, gathering petition signatures, creating a Women’s Pavilion at the Centennial Exhibition, and choosing the music" (Falvey). The committee’s work was highly strategic as a result. Designing the Women’s Pavilion as a celebration of women’s public work in fields like fine arts, industrial crafts, wood carving, science, medicine, and technology, fundraising projects that seemed safely ensconced in domestic spaces became touched with political resistance. Even the act of cooking became a means for public authority. "Female organizers attempted to translate the individual values and attributes of womanhood into social action, thereby increasing women’s influence in the public realm. By expanding rather than rejecting woman’s sphere, Centennial women employed a popular means for justifying female autonomy outside the home" (Cordato). Producing a cookery was a highly effective strategy. A useful volume like this was easy for a woman to justify purchasing and bringing into her home, filled as it was with receipts for delectables like Charlotte Russe and hardy dishes like stew. But purchasing and using it also became a financial contribution to resistance, and a visible sign of it. The Women’s Committee understood and acknowledged this. "It was thought proper in a department exclusively devoted to ‘women’s work’ that cookery– an art consigned so largely to her — should not be forgotten," reads the Preface. The present volume of this scarce work was a gift, purchased by one woman at the exhibition and given to another, per the ownership inscription. Per the finger soiling around favorite recipes, it was also clearly employed in the kitchen. An excellent example of activism at a critical historical moment. Not in Krichmar. Kramer 3853.
Mental Perceptions Illustrated by the Theory of Sensations

Mental Perceptions Illustrated by the Theory of Sensations

Ferris, Sarah Contemporary paper spine over boards, with amateur rebacking and blank paper spine label. Measures 184 x 102mm and collates xxiv, 168: complete but for initial blank. Text block uncut, largely clean and tight. An exceptionally scarce survivor of this self-published epistemological treatise by a woman, which last appeared at auction almost a century ago in 1922. OCLC reports 8 copies known worldwide, with 3 of those at institutions in the U.S. "As it becomes clear that there have been women philosophers throughout the history of western civilization, and in other cultures as well, historians of philosophy begin to look for those women who never made it into the histories of the field, or whose philosophical work never got published, or if published was ignored, but who are there to be discovered and studied. We can no longer assume that lack of approbation or attention from the philosophical establishment is automatically a sign of lack of philosophical merit" (McAlister). As specialists, scholars, curators, and collectors begin unearthing the work of previously unrecognized women, we gain new knowledge about how philosophical ideas traveled and evolved over time and what role women were playing among contemporaries in these fields. Sarah Ferris, the author of the present work, falls within this category. The author of only one published book, which is mentioned within both Watkins’ and Allibone’s dictionaries, her name does not appear elsewhere in histories or bibliographies. And yet her text on epistemology is complex and well informed, drawing on Plato and the Epicureans for discussions of art and aesthetics and applying Locke, Leibniz, and Spinoza to questions of theology and rationalism. More in line with theists like Kant or Bishop Berkeley, who did not experience cognitive dissonance in the enfolding of theology with philosophy, Ferris positions herself against atheistic rational arguments. Instead, she uses her empirical frameworks to posit in a more Humean framework that sense ties the spiritual and the rational. God has "given to us precisely that degree of sensibility which, considering everything, is best suited to our wants and necessities." A reading of Ferris’ arguments raises important questions that scholars are increasingly addressing as they broaden their understanding of the field by including women’s work. While an essentialist view of thinking can be dangerous, we must recognize that more diverse representation expands our ability to see how education and experience shape a philosopher’s work. "While both males and females have inquired into the basic principles of science, mathematics, and human behaviors, when women philosophers have done this they frequently draw on their perspective as women.Indeed, this makes the philosophical topics and theories of women philosophers equally diverse and interesting as those which characterize ‘traditional’ male philosophers" (Waithe). An examination of Ferris’ arguments as they concern religion, for example, opens the door to considering how women’s training at the time within a religious framework, or within the expectation that they become wives and mothers, shaped her views on rationalism and sense. A consideration of its physical binding opens the door to comparisons among known copies and explorations about a woman’s self-publishing and the distribution of her scholarly work (notably, the Edinburgh Review records the book for sale in its Education list of the same year). An rarity that deserves further study and attention.
Album from a Friend" -- 19th century commonplace book documenting women's literary interests

Album from a Friend" — 19th century commonplace book documenting women’s literary interests

Commonplace Book] Mrs. S. Beehee Manuscript notebook comprised of 99 pages in a variety of hands in ink and pencil, including a hand-drawn title page. Bound in brown leather embossed with gilt, with green endpapers, measuring 8 x 5 inches. The compilation of poems is largely copied by women, making this manuscript an important recording of what literary works attracted women readers during the period, and how those verses assisted women in expressing themselves within their coteries. The nearly 100 pages of poetry recorded in Mrs. Beehee’s book provide a rich opportunity for learning about what, how, and when 19th century women were reading as well as how they engaged with those works. While several men do contribute to the notebook, the majority of the well-copied works are penned and signed by women; and these women’s tastes run the gamut from scripture to romance to the erotic. Among the numerous complex italic and secretary style hands — a testament to the women’s level of education in this time and place — there are works by canonical writers like Byron and Thomas Moore. Several of the poems come from serials and magazines of the time. Mrs. Smith’s opening poem, for example, hails from the 1819 Ladies’ Literary Cabinet; not content to simply replicate its sentiments, she swaps the name of the original poet’s "Anna" for her own friend’s: "Just as the moon advances in her orb.So may My Beehee." The piece Woman, with its lovely embellished title, originated in the Ladies’ Repository of 1846. A sonnet copied by Hermione Pillet was originally Samuel Rodgers’ Imitation of an Italian Sonnet from 1849. And a poem by someone identified only as JEB first appeared in the North American Review of 1826 with a note that even this was transmitted from further away, as a contribution to "The European Magazine." Hermione Pillet, not to be outdone on exoticism, shows her skill again by copying out verses in French. Not all of the works in the book come from other sources, however. Mrs. De Peyster’s The Air appears to be original, and across its two pages it lifts memorable images and makes reference to works by Milton, Moore, Hazlitt, and even Sarah Josepha Buell Hale. A running reference that ties a number of the contributions together are titles or lines regarding Sophronia — a Greek name that means "prudent or discreet." Whether the classical reference is one preferred by Mrs. Beehee herself, or one which ties the women together as a coterie, it is unclear. What does stand out is that this book was shared among an educated, curious, and humorous community of women across at least two decades. Not passive readers, they engaged with the literature they were reading, used it to convey rememberance, good humor, family connections, and shared joys. An exceptional and research rich piece with appeal to scholars in fields including but not limited to trans-Atlantic and North American literary transmission, the history of reading and writing, paleography, women’s education, women’s communities and gift exchange, and poetry.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Carroll, Lewis The book that forever changed the face of children’s literature. In the original publisher’s red, gilt-stamped cloth, gilt edges, light blue end papers, Burn & Co. binder’s ticket on lower pastedown. A Very Good copy, recased, preserving the original spine. Minor spotting and soiling to the cloth. Contemporary owner’s signature on the front end paper. Early issue with the inverted "S" on the last line of the contents page. Housed in a custom clamshell case. "Have I gone mad?" "I’m afraid so, but let me tell you something. the best people usually are." Cleverly crafted by Oxford don, Charles Dodgson, under the pen name Lewis Carroll, "Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland" remains one of the most influential pieces of children’s literature ever written. The book has been published in more than 112 languages and defined the popular "nonsense" genre of writing in the nineteenth century. While teaching mathematics and living at Christ Church College, Dodgson developed a close friendship with the daughters of the college dean, and told them tales of wonderland. Alice, ten years of age at the time, begged Dodgson to write them down and soon after the story took shape. While the original manuscript given to Alice, which was hand written and illustrated by Dodgson, remains with the British Library, Dodgson published the story in 1865 with accompanying illustrations by John Tenniel. The first 2,000 copies were not distributed because Tenniel was dissatisfied with the print quality. Macmillan quickly reprinted the book using this 1866 title page, with copies available as early as November 1865, making this the first "published" edition available for purchase at bookstores. The 2,000 unbound sheets that were rejected by Tenniel were sent to the U.S. publisher, Appleton & Co., who bought the rights and used them as the first U.S. edition approximately six months later in 1866. Very Good.
Woman's poetic copybook containing original and copied verse

Woman’s poetic copybook containing original and copied verse

Commonplace Book] Kezia Holmes Comprised of 79 handwritten pages and 16 original illustrations in color. Loosely bound in woven paper in self wraps, measuring approximately 8 x 12 inches. In addition to a significant number of copied and original poems, the commonplace book also contains penmanship practice and lessons on shorthand. According to Plymouth County records, the book’s owner Kezia Holmes gave birth to her daughter Susan in 1822; given the book’s preoccupation with poetry about children and motherhood, it seems likely that it was compiled near this time. Additionally, the American Antiquarian Society has only one record of paper with the present E. Burbank watermark, dating it at 1821. Kezia Holmes took a level of pride in her copybook, as she placed her name throughout its pages. And her book, with its blend of penmanship practice, shorthand, and colored drawings suggests that she had an active and curious mind. The collection of verse she gathers ranges in topic and appears in no particular order; an organizing principle throughout, however, is that she uses poetry as an opportunity to practice a range of cursive sizes and styles, as well as occasionally transcribing the poems into shorthand on facing pages. At times having titles like Sunrise, Compassion, or The Rose the works seem to be copied from other sources. Some poems are religious in nature, focusing on piety, forgiveness, and virtue. Other works have much more specific titles that seem to relate to Kezia’s personal experiences: Love and Duty to Parents, An Apostrophe to my Deceased Brother, For a Young Lady About to be Married, and To a Young Child on Getting Well, for example, all share a more simple, straightforward rhyme scheme and are likely originally written based on events in her own life, giving readers an opportunity to learn about the arc of friendships, marriage, and births shaping her world. With research possibilities including but not limited to penmanship and paleography, shorthand and cryptography, historical approaches to femininity, women’s education and reading, and the exchange and transmission of ideas through poetry.
A King's Story: The Memoirs of the Duke of Windsor [with] The Heart Has its Reasons: The Memoirs of the Duchess of Windsor
Wonderland Avenue. A True Rock 'n' Roll Saga (Presentation Copy)

Wonderland Avenue. A True Rock ‘n’ Roll Saga (Presentation Copy)

Sugerman, Danny Extraordinary presentation copy signed and inscribed by the ex Doors manager and Jim Morrison confidant Danny Sugerman to film director Oliver Stone, who went on to make his own annotations and markings as preparation for his 1991 film The Doors. Original white publisher’s binding with gilt to spine. Some minor soiling and toning to boards near spine. In the original bright yellow, pink, and orange dust jacket with only the most trivial wear to the crown of spine and corners, and some rubbing to the rear panel. In all, an exceptional association linking this copy both to the Doors and the director who immortalized their story on film. "Here, Sugerman reconstructs his glamorous and desperate life–shadowed, inspired, and nearly doomed by his friendship with rockstar Jim Morrison, leader of the Doors.Morrison was a magical mentor to Danny, a poet-philosopher in the dark lineage of Byron and Rimbaud. Morrison gave Danny the dangerous idea that, in order to grow, brave men tempt death.A cocky, fluent, scary tale of the reckless life, at once an insider’s tale of the rock scene, and a story of recovery" (contemporary review, Morrow). Wonderland Avenue became not just a tell-all memoir in its own right, but the basis for an unforgettable film. And the present copy, inscribed by Sugerman to Oliver Stone, was specifically used in Stone’s research for the movie starring Val Kilmer. Throughout the pages, Stone leaves underlinings, blockings, and heavy annotations that reveal the process the book underwent in adaptation. An exceptional piece of pop culture. Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket.
The Old Man and the Sea

The Old Man and the Sea

Hemingway, Ernest Book Fine with a previous owner’s signature and address on the front endpaper, otherwise unread and in excellent condition. In a Near Fine dust jacket with some slight wear to extremities and an additional bookseller’s price of $2.35 stamped above the original $3.00. Jacket retains its fresh, bright colors, making this a pleasing copy. The final work of fiction published in the author’s lifetime, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and cited by the Nobel Prize Committee, "The Old Man and the Sea" cemented Hemingway’s legacy as one of the greatest American writers of the twentieth century and would turn him into a household name. The story follows the tribulations of an aging and suddenly unlucky fisherman, Santiago, as he tries to catch a gigantic marlin in the Straits of Florida. Hemingway wanted to show the simple dignity and biblical nature of Santiago’s trials – and succeeded mightily. The book was originally published in full in an issue of Life Magazine, which subsequently sold 5 million copies in less than a week. "No outbursts of spite or false theatricalism impede the smooth rush of its narrative. Within the sharp restrictions imposed by the very nature of his story Mr. Hemingway has written with sure skill. Here is the master technician once more at the top of his form, doing superbly what he can do better than anyone else." (Contemporary New York Times Review). Fine in Near Fine dust jacket.
The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

Fitzgerald, F. Scott First issue, with the four main issue points present: 1) pg. 60, line 16 "chatter" 2) pg. 119, line 22 "northern" 3) pg. 205, lines 9-10 "sick in tired" 4) pg. 211, lines 7-8 "Union Street station." Original publisher’s cloth binding with gilt to spine and blind embossing to front board. Near Fine with minor foxing mostly at the early pages, top edge a bit dusty. In all, a pleasing and complete copy of this exceptional novel, which introduced the Lost Generation to the world. Fitzgerald’s masterpiece and one of the great novels of the 20th century. Fitzgerald intended the novel to be a "consciously artistic achievement" and "something extraordinary and beautiful and simple, and intricately patterned." The book took Fitzgerald two years to write, and he worked on it under a variety of different titles, including Dinner at Trimalchio’s and Under the Red, White and Blue. Unfortunately, when it was first released "The Great Gatsby" was neither a commercial nor a critical success. In fact, even though Fitzgerald received a great deal of praise from many literary lights of the period – including TS Eliot and Willa Cather — the book did not achieve its current level of popularity and renown until after Fitzgerald’s death, when it was distributed as a cheap paperback to GIs during World War II. The book has maintained its critical and commercial acclaim ever since, and has sold over 25 million copies. In 1960, the Times would call it "a classic of twentieth century American fiction." It has been adapted into numerous film versions, including a 1974 production starring Robert Redford and Mia Farrow, and with a script by Francis Ford Coppola. "A curious book, a mystical, glamourous story of today." (Contemporary New York Times Review). Near Fine.
Programming for the EDSAC 2

Programming for the EDSAC 2

Wilkes, Maurice Original gray printed wrappers, slightly faded at spine. Signed by Wilkes on the first leaf. 64pp. A Fine copy of this important work, which has never appeared at auction; OCLC reports no institutionally held copies worldwide. Provenance: the library of Victor Hale. Following the success of his invention EDSAC, world’s first practical stored program electronic computer, Wilkes began planning for its successor in 1951; and the new machine, EDSAC 2 became operational almost a decade later, in early 1958. EDSAC 2 contained a ferrite-core memory, and was the first large computer to be built with a control unit based on microprogramming. David Wheeler designed EDSAC 2’s instruction set and microprogram, which controlled all of the machine’s operations. "A feature of EDSAC 2 was the provision, in addition to the high-speed core memory, of a read-only memory of similar size and speed. This was made of the same type of ferrite core and had permanently wired into it routines for commonly required operations" (Wilkes). EDSAC 2’s memory capacity was originally 1024 words; this was later increased to 16,000. The first part of this programming guide for EDSAC 2 contains a general introduction to the more important features of the machine’s order code and programming facilities. The second part "contains full details of the order code, the facilities provided by the program input routing, and the error diagnosis facilities." An important work tracking Wilkes’ career progress and the rapid early advancement of computing technology. Origins of Cyberspace 1041. Fine.
Beowulf: Autotype of the unique Cotton Ms. Vitellius Axv in the British Museum; with a transliteration and notes by Julius Zupitza

Beowulf: Autotype of the unique Cotton Ms. Vitellius Axv in the British Museum; with a transliteration and notes by Julius Zupitza

Julius Zupitza, ed.] Early cloth binding with gilt to spine, measuring 165 x 242mm. All edges sprinkled red. Sunning to spine and front board. Shelfwear and rubbing to extremities with some fraying to the cloth at the crown of the spine. Splitting along outer joints. Library shelfmark to spine. Front and rear hinges cracked but holding. Bookplates of St. Mary’s College on front pastedown and front endpaper respectively. Collates viii, 145, [1]: complete, including 70 plates. Internally a Near Fine copy, with a clean, tight, square textblock. This edition was the first to include plates of the entire surviving manuscript, with a facing-page transliteration of the Old English from the MS. This edition allow broader access to the original text than ever before, and it’s the first time a transliteration was published in England (Thorkelin’s being done in Copenhagen). With copious notes by Zupitza throughout. Well represented institutionally, this edition has remained scarce on the market, with its last appearance at auction occurring in 1906. The transmission of Beowulf, much like the tale it tells, is the stuff of legend. Beginning in an oral culture, "a poem resembling Beowulf once existed, in the symbolic system of words spoken and sounds heard. The performance of such a work before an audience of listeners would have been a privileged event serving to knit the members of a community together. Through the poet’s words, the participants in this event would have been made aware of their ties to one another, as well as to prior generations.At an unknown time and place and for unknown immediate purposes, someone familiar with the technology of script wrote out a text of Beowulf by hand. Once the text was converted into book form, the codex in which is was preserved would have represented a commodity of value, suitable for the gift exchanges that were a normal part of power relationships among the aristocracy.One copy of Beowulf in the handwriting of two scribes working about the year 1000 A.D. comes down to us as folios 129-198 of British Library MS Cotton Vitellius A.XV." (Niles). An important moment in scholarship and in literature, Beowulf’s battle with Grendel has become a core component of our culture.
The ENIAC--high speed calculating machine

The ENIAC–high speed calculating machine

Wilkes, Maurice Original printed self-wrappers signed by Wilkes on the front. 6 pages, complete with text illustrations. A Fine copy of this rare and important work, which has never appeared at auction; OCLC reports no institutionally held copies worldwide. Provenance: the library of Maurice Wilkes. Computer pioneer Maurice Wilkes’s first paper on electronic computing, which was published in the aftermath of WWII, within the first year of his rise to leadership in the Cambridge Mathematical Laboratory. It was in this year that L. J. Comrie supplied Wilkes with a copy of John von Neumann’s report "summarizing the deliberations of the computer group at the Moore School of Electrical Engineering, University of Pennsylvania. The Moore School had just completed the ENIAC, the world’s first electronic computer for defense calculations.He at once recognized it as ‘the real thing’ and decided that the laboratory had to have one" (A. M. Turing Awards). Following attendance at a convention on ENIAC and the Moore’s followup EDVAC in 1947, Wilkes returned to the U.K. to begin work on a project of his own: EDSAC, which was completed in 1949 and became the world’s first practical stored program electronic computer. The present paper, Wilkes’ first on the subject, contains a brief and early description of the design and operation of ENIAC, and is "primarily concerned with the ENIAC as an interesting application of modern electronic technique." A critical work in the history of computing, and a foundational text that launched Wilkes into the field. Origins of Cyberspace 1015. Fine.
An American Tragedy (Presentation copy)

An American Tragedy (Presentation copy)

Dreiser, Theodore Two volumes in original publishers’ boards. One of 795 deluxe copies, this one marked for Presentation, signed on the limitation page and additionally inscribed on the title: "For Mary Gold, who slaved on this. Theodore Dreiser." An excellent copy in all, with an important association. "Dreiser is widely regarded as the strongest of the novelists who have written about America as a business civilization. No one else confronted so directly the sheer intractibility of American social life and institutions, or dramatized with such solicitousness and compassion the difficulty of breaking free from social law. Dreiser had a genius for factuality: he recreated the inner workings of a factory, a stock exchange, a luxury hotel; he was definitive" (The New Yorker). Among the greatest of his works stands An American Tragedy, with its emphasis on sexual obsession and unquenchable desire. Indeed, the despair that characterizes the novel seems to stem from Dreiser’s own troubled Catholicism and fascination with true crime. "The germ of the novel was a newspaper story of 1906: A young man was convicted of drowning a pregnant girl in Upstate New York.Dreiser clipped accounts of the case and brooded over it for years" and in the end he hoped to create "a crime sensation of the first magnitude, with all those intriguingly colorful yet morally atrocious elements — love, romance, wealth, poverty, death" (The New Yorker). Very Good +.
Influence: A Moral Tale for Young People (in 2 vols)

Influence: A Moral Tale for Young People (in 2 vols)

Anley, Charlotte] A Lady Contemporary half calf over marbled boards, with morocco labels and gilt to spines. Some rubbing and edgewear to boards; small cracks to front hinge of volume I and rear hinge of volume II but both holding firmly. Marbled endpapers. Contemporary ownership inscription on verso of front endpaper in volume I: "Jeanette Hamilton received this book of Mr. Wheems, the English Ambassador at Copenhagen." Additional ownership signature of Esther Henckel on front endpaper of volume II. Collating xi, [1, blank], 255, [1, blank]; [4], 248: lacking the half title in volume I, else complete. Some light scatered foxing to preliminaries of both volumes, but overall a clean, neat, tight set. The only copy currently on the market, Charlotte Anley’s scarce didactic novel is held by only 12 institutions accordng to OCLC. A Quaker, and a protege of English prison reformer Elizabeth Frye, Charlotte Anley sought to use her writing to encourage kindness and humility among her readers. While a contemporary review characterized Influence as "a covert vehicle for the conveyance of certain theological opinions and rules of life," Anley was indeed quite transparent about her goal of using an imaginative tale to teach Christian lessons (New Monthly Magazine & Literary Journal). "If then a moral tale can be made a vehicle of religious influence, as well as amusement, are to exclude the benefits which it may produce?" she asks of her critics in the Preface. Selecting a genre noted at the time for frivolity and sensation, Anley’s novel she hopes will exist as part of a different class of novels that encourage upright behaviour rather than romance or scandal. After all, she reasons, young people (and young women especially) are going to find ways of reading novels, so why not supply them with something wholesome: "Many parents exclaim against novel reading, and would very properly exclude all romances from the libraries of their children; yet there is scarcely a young woman who at eighteen is not conversant with every novel of the last two or three years’ standing." A travel and coming of age tale focused on the young female protagonist Ellen, Influence was released before Anley herself entered a new phase in life, when she would be "commissioned by Elizabeth Fry to investigate the condition of women prisoners in Australia.[using] her connections to gain access to female prisoners in Sydney and the notorious Female Factory in Parramatta" (Richardson). Her 1841 report "was influential in raising awareness of the treatment of female convicts and influencing policy. In particular Anley supported proposals for the building of new female penitentiaries to act as institutions to reform rather than to punish" (Richardson). Signs of these ideas already exist as early as Influence, as much of Anely’s novel does not condemn novels or novel readers, but rather proposes taking the form and using it for more educational means. Gifted to Jeanette Margrete Steenbock Hamilton by the Ambassador to Denmark Sir Henry Watkin Williams Wynn, a Grenville, who after a tumultuous youth ‘"served with great tact and dignity in Copenhagen" (History of Parliament).
Legal and Political Status of Women in the United States

Legal and Political Status of Women in the United States

Wilson, Jennie L. With pristine publisher’s prospectus containing praise from suffrage leaders and legal experts. Original publisher’s cloth binding with title to spine and cover. A Near Fine copy of this extraordinarily rare work on women’s legal position during wartime and in advance of suffrage. Scarce in institutions and absent from modern auction records, this is the only copy of Wilson’s work on the market. A member of the Iowa bar association, Wilson became an attorney before she ever gained the right to vote. As a resident of a key state in the battle for enfranchisement, she became a collaborator with leaders such as Carrie Chapman Catt to draw attention to the legal limitations placed on women, and to educate women about their existing rights. In this work, Wilson outlines the history of Common Law, Marriage & Divorce Law, and Property Laws as they relate to American women; and she provides critiques for the limitations they place on the women’s rights and wellbeing on federal and state levels. A suffragist aware of how 19th Amendment ratification would need to work — traveling across the state level before expanding nationally — Wilson also presents readers with a Digest of State Laws that breaks down in detail how the various states deal with issues of women’s health, marriage, custody, business, and property rights. The result is more than a history. It is a functional reference guide for women across the U.S. to refer to when making important life decisions. As an attorney herself, Wilson was only able to hold her career and political position because of the state in which she resided. Iowa was one of the earliest states to admit women to practice law and to serve on state boards and commissions, passing such legislation ahead of other states in the mid 1800s. A scarce and important reference guide designed to assist women in operating under current law, and to inspire them to push for improvements to the law. Krichmar 1225. Near Fine.
The Practice of Contraception: An International Symposium and Survey

The Practice of Contraception: An International Symposium and Survey

Sanger, Margaret and Hannah Mayer Stone Original green publisher’s cloth binding with gilt to spine. With the exception of faint offsetting from jacket to the preliminaries, a pristine, square copy. Unclipped dust jacket has minor paper loss to corners, some small chips and wrinkles to spine edges and rear panel, and a 2.75" closed snag to the rear panel. The only copy currently on the market in the scarce jacket, The Practice of Contraception does not appear in the modern auction record. A rare and important collaboration on contraception, released in the time of constraining U.S. Comstock Laws. Sanger and Stone’s collaboration began a decade prior, when both women met at the first American Birth Control Conference of 1921. Women’s reproductive health and rights were of critical importance to both women, and in 1925, Stone formally joined Sanger as a head physician for the Birth Control Clinical Research Bureau. In the face of U.S. Comstock Laws, which banned the distribution of contraceptives or reproductive health information, the two women worked to promote women’s knowledge of birth control and keep detailed records on contraceptive use and success rates among clinic patients. The International Symposium of 1931 was an extension of this work. Organized and hosted in Zurich by Sanger, the conference gathered scientists, clinicians, and doctors to share information on medical advances in the field rather than focusing on political questions surrounding contraception. Among key findings were more accurate rhythm calendars based on women’s monthly cycles, the development of intrauterine devices, improvements in diaphragm designs, and new tests being performed on chemical methods of birth control. In their published Survey, Sanger and Stone brought this information together to provide American readers with an accurate overview of the Symposium’s findings and to encourage continued work in the field. Fine in Near Fine dust jacket.
Ben-Hur A Tale of the Christ

Ben-Hur A Tale of the Christ

Wallace, Lew Original pictorial publisher’s cloth binding. A Very Good copy that has been rebacked retaining the original spine, with some cloth repair to crown and foot of spine. Cloth faded and rubbed at extremities; some spotting to boards. Bookplate of Lucy Smith Battson on front endpaper. Title and dedication pages a bit loose at the base but holding; text block tight and square, with only minimal toning. Housed in a custom clamshell with chemise. In all, a pleasing copy of this important work of theological fiction, which was memorialized in film by Charleton Heston. "Betrayed by his best friend and enslaved by the Romans, Judah Ben-Hur seeks revenge but instead finds redemption through his encounters with Jesus. Generations have thrilled to the sacred destiny of the mighty charioteer Ben-Hur, whose enduring tale began as a best-selling 1880 novel that later inspired equally popular stage and film interpretations. Combining the appeal of a historical adventure with a heartfelt message of love and compassion, the story blends the visceral excitement of a quest for vengeance with the spiritual thrill of forgiveness" (Dover). Extensively researched by the author, who sought as much as possible to be accurate in his depictions of galleys, Roman slavery, and leper colonies, it has been admired as much by literary scholars and historians as it has been by readers. "Victorians who swore off novels because of their immoral influence eagerly picked up Ben-Hur–were even encouraged to by their pastors.the book made Lew Wallace a celebrity" (NEH). A former literature professor, President Garfield himself hailed Ben-Hur as a "beautiful and reverent book." Since its release, the novel has never been out of print, and it outsold every book with the exception of the Bible until the 1936 release of Gone with the Wind. It has been printed in over twenty languages, including Indonesian and Braille. For this contribution, Wallace is the only novelist honored at the National Statuary Hall of the U.S. Capitol. Very Good.
Native Son

Native Son

Wright, Richard First issue binding in dark blue cloth, with a date of 1940 on the title page, "First Edition" stated on the copyright page and a publisher’s code of "A-P" just below the edition statement. Jacket is first issue, with a price on the front flap of $2.50, a long essay taking up both flaps and most of the rear panel, ending with a quote from Edward A. Weeks of The Atlantic Monthly and a biography of Wright. Some offsetting to the endpapers, else Fine in a Very Good+ dust jacket with the slightest fading to the spine and minor amounts of shelfwear to extremities. A difficult and important novel, Native Son draws on literary antecedents like Crime & Punishment to explore race and racism in America. Depicting the murder of a white woman by a black man, Wright’s novel exposed important questions about enduring and systemic oppression of African Americans "’The day Native Son appeared, American culture was changed forever,’ Irving Howe once wrote, and the remark has been quoted many times. What Howe meant was that after Native Son it was no longer possible to pretend.that the history of racial oppression was a legacy from which we could emerge without suffering an enduring penalty. White American had attempted to dehumanize black Americans, and every one carried the scars; it would take more than calling American ‘Land of the Free’ and really meaning it to make the country whole.Native Son also stands at the beginning of a period in which novels by black Americans have treated the subject of race with a lack of gentility almost unimaginable before 1940" (New York Times). Unlike Civil War and Reconstruction era works that sought to ingrain the Noble Negro in the cultural imaginary, Wright and his peers forced their fellow citizens to confront the history and continuation of racism in all its ugliness. Adapted to film in 1986, there are recent reports that another film will be appearing in 2019 or 2020. Fine in Very Good + dust jacket.
Democracy in America. Part the First

Democracy in America. Part the First

De Toqueville, Alexis Two octavo volumes (pages: 207 x 130 mm) collating xliv, 333; viii, 462: complete, including the folding map to the front of volume 1. Contemporary 3/4 calf over marbled boards, marbled end papers, and page edges, lacking spine labels, gilt spine compartments. Minor wear at the extremities of the binding. Bookplate of Sam A. Lewisohn on the front paste-downs, otherwise a fine copy internally, in a handsome contemporary binding. The second edition in English of Part I, which was originally released in French and English a year earlier in 1835. Complete as issued, Part II of Democracy in America would not appear in first edition in the Paris or London imprints until 4 years later, in 1840. De Tocqueville, a French aristocrat, visited America between 1831 and 1832, ostensibly to study the penal system, although his interest was considerably broader. It seems logical that France would look to America as a beacon of hope for a successful democracy. After France embraced the goals of equality and democracy in 1789 at the start of the French Revolution, it found itself first in a dictatorship under Napoleon and then in one constitutional monarchy after another during the years following. De Tocqueville’s astute observation of several aspects of American society and culture provides an invaluable lens of foreign perspective on our young nation’s political growth. Democracy in America was an immediate and sustained success. Almost from the beginning it enjoyed the reputation of being the most acute and perceptive discussion of the political and social life of the United States ever published. Whether perceived as a textbook of American political institutions, an investigation of society and culture, a probing of the psyche of the United States, or a study of the actions of modern democratic society, the book has maintained its place high within the pantheon of political writing. HOWES T-278, 279. Sabin 96062, 96063. Clark III:111. Library of Congress: A Passion for Liberty, Alexis de Tocqueville on Democracy & Revolution (Washington, 1989).
Some Account of Phillis

Some Account of Phillis, a learned Negro Girl. in The Gentleman’s Magazine

Phillis Wheatley] The first appearance of a defense of the work of Phillis Wheatley, on page 226. Disbound with spine reinforced. Collates [2], [207]-256: lacking the folding plate of the canal plan, else complete. Kidnapped from Gambia and brought to slavery in the American colonies, Phillis Wheatley rose to prominance as a poet. Purchased by the Wheatley family at the age of 7, she quickly stood out for her apt and creative mind; "soon she was immersed in the Bible, astronomy, geography, history, British literature, and the Greek and Latin classics," being educated in a similar manner to the family’s two children (Poetry Foundation). This classical humanistic education prepared Wheatley for authorship, and she began writing a collection of poetry and sought subscribers for their publication. "When the colonists were apparently unwilling to support literature by an African, she and the Wheatleys turned in frustration to London for a publisher" and were able to secure funding from "a wealthy supporter of evangelical and abolitionist causes" (Poetry Foundation). On her arrival in London, Wheatley was hailed by dignataries, scholars, and activists who anxiously awaited the release of Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1773), which would become the first volume of poetry published by an African American in modern times. A master of iambic pentameter, Wheatley’s work was rich in Biblical and classical references. For this reason, some more narrow minded critics initially called her authorship into question. The present work, which appeared that same year in London’s The Gentleman’s Magazine, provides a rigid defense of Wheatley’s authentic talent. In addition to providing some biographical information on her purchase by the Wheatleys, the piece documents John Wheatley’s attestation that "as to her writing, her own curiosity led her to it; and this she learned in so short a time." The author encourages readers to purchase the volume for themselves and judge its contents. He also provides an activist incentive: "She now is under the disadvantage of serving as a slave in a family in Boston. It is hoped (though it is not so expressed), that the profits of this publication will, in the first place, be applied toward purchasing her freedom." Wheatley’s fame only continued to grow, but she did not gain her freedom through purchase. Rather, she was manumitted after the death of her mistress a year later; and she faced an uncertain future as a freewoman in colonial America, turning to several of her English friends for advice and assistance on supporting herself and her work. Near Fine.
Considerations on Religion and Public Education.Together with An Address to the Ladies

Considerations on Religion and Public Education.Together with An Address to the Ladies

More, Hannah Printed one year after the first English edition. Disbound and loose, but altogether holding well. Small paper loss to upper corner of front wrap, not affecting text. Minor scattered foxing, but in all a clean and complete copy of this rare work. Both the 1793 and 1794 editions of this work have become exceptionally scarce. While the 1793 is reported at no institutions and has not appeared at auction, the present first American edition is held by 15 institutions according to OCLC and last appeared at auction in 1989. Across her involvement in abolition, women’s education, and integration movements, Hannah More adeptly learned to use chapbooks and cheaply distributed publications like the present work to disseminate ideas. "As an independent woman writer, much of her work was directed to the female sex, but her desire to see women play a more constructive role in society came into conflict with her own fear of certain revolutionary ideas. Consciously aware of the techniques of propaganda that she saw being used in radical literature.[she sought] to alert British women to the serious social and political dangers inherent in those forms of radical propaganda" (Hole). Such tension shaped her Considerations on Religion and Public Education, which was directed in its first appearance "to the Ladies &c of Great Britain and Ireland" and in its first American appearance expanded that audience to a transatlantic community. "More’s opposition to the threat she believed the ideas of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution posed led her to popular propaganda that was directed first to the poor, then to women of the rising middle class. Her urgent campaign against the way women were represented in literature during this time led her both to her most sucessful and vigorous polemic" (Hole). Of the present work, Professor Claudia Johnson notes "On Religion and Public Education is straight propaganda: it is not contrived in a bluffy vernacular dialogue form for working class audiences but speaks directly to an elite readership with an unmediated critique" of ideas about the separation of religion from education and the rise of secularism. Arguing against Dupont’s remarks at the National Convention of France, More encourages her female readers to hold fast to ideas and practices related to religious morality, including sacrifice and humility. And she exhorts her readers to remember the English beliefs about God’s relationship to sovereigns, discouraging the impiety of overthrowing such leadership. Near Fine.
An Address Upon the Co-Education of the Sexes

An Address Upon the Co-Education of the Sexes

Magill, Edward Original printed wraps, with stitching holding well. Small stamp of Andover Newton to top corner of front wrapper. Mild offsetting and toning to exterior, with top rear corner bent. 14 pages. Internally complete, clean and unmarked. The present argument for coeducation in the U.S. has become quite scarce, with no appearances in the modern auction record and no other copies on the market. Composed and presented by the President of Swarthmore College a decade after its foundation, the Address asserts the need for national access to coeducation, outlines its benefits both to women and the population at large, and strikes down counterarguments through the use of statistics from coeducational universities including Swarthmore and Oberlin College. While Magill posits that the burden of proof should fall on the detractors of women’s education, he nonetheless uses Swarthmore and Oberlin’s successes as evidence that women should not be taught frivilous fashionable accomplishments but instead should be given opportunities for "the serious work of pursuing a liberal course of study" by which they may "pursue the same courses of study and receive the same degrees" as their male peers. At these schools, women were given the opportunity to attend the same rigorous courses in classical languages, literature, mathematics, science, and economics as any man; at Magill asserts that the presence of both sexes in the classroom invariably adds to the quality of ideas and diversity of solutions presented to problems. Both sexes benefit and are refined by contact with each other. Though he acknowledges that girls’ education prior to the university needs to be improved to allow women to enter college on equal footing to their better-trained male classmates, Magill shows that this is a fixable condition unrelated to women’s natural abilities. Counterarguments that higher education strains women’s health, reduces their employment or marriage possibilities, or disrupts men’s concentration in class are summarily knocked down using statistics on men’s versus women’s rates of ill health and death at universities, which align, testimonials from professors and male students, and rates of marriage. "I have thus endeavored to show that morally and socially coeducation is productive of the best results ; and that scholarship will not suffer but rather be promoted by it.Nothing short of co-equal educational advantages and the same degrees conferred upon both sexes for equal attainments will meet the demands of the time." Near Fine.
The Writings of Thomas Jefferson: Being his Autobiography

The Writings of Thomas Jefferson: Being his Autobiography, Correspondence, Reports, Messages, Addresses, and Other Writings Official and Private.(in 9 volumes)

Jefferson, Thomas In nine volumes. Original publisher’s cloth bindings embossed in blind with gilt to spines. Spines on volumes 1-2 have been repaired; remaining volumes with some wear to spine extremities and corners, but overall presenting nicely. Volumes contain the blindstamp of previous owner, Thomas C. Acton, a supporter of Lincoln and outspoken abolitionist who also served as Police Commissioner of Manhattan during the Draft Riots. Internally a clean, tight, and pleasing set that contains the four folding plates of the Declaration of Independence in volume 1. The first collected works of Jefferson, the editor H. A. Washington drew specifically on the holdings of the Library of Congress to present the American people with a well-rounded and historically accurate view of this Founding Father’s contributions to the nation’s formation. "Jefferson was exceptionally controversial in his own time, and many of his ideas remain the subject of national debate. In his arguments for a system of general education, for local rather than central authority, for caution in international affairs, for religious and intellectual freedom, and for economic and social justice, Jefferson defined the issues that still direct our national political life centuries after the nation’s formation" (Library of America). Drawn from public and private documents housed at the Library of Congress, which Jefferson’s donation helped establish, the present set provides an in-depth look into this revolutionary thinker’s ideas and work. Near Fine.
The New Woman: Ideals Regarding Women Have Changed

The New Woman: Ideals Regarding Women Have Changed

Women's History] Original printed wrappers featuring a woman on a bike on front and a woman ice skating on rear. Stapled as issued. 32 pages, measuring 3.5 x 6 inches. Gently toned throughout, with some light soiling to wraps. In all a clean and pleasing copy of this short advertising pamphlet, designed to promote Dr. Pierce’s line of health products while also touting new social and political moves towards women’s liberation. With only two libraries holding copies according to OCLC and no others on the market, this pamphlet has become a rare example of how companies sought to curry favor with a newly emerging, opinionated, and powerful market: women. Ostensibly an advertising promotion for Dr. Pierce’s Pleasant Pellets, among other Dr. Pierce products, The New Woman contains a surprising amount of information about how advertisers and businesses viewed the rising generation of women. The front wrap features a woman on a bicycle — a recognizable symbol of women’s independence and increased mobility — and it prepares readers for several key questions that appear within the first pages. "Stories of Borrowed Sex," printed on the verso of the front wrap, documents "several women who served with the greatest distinction" after cross-dressing to become soldiers. This leads into the title and its follow up question: "The New Woman. Ideals Regarding Women Have Changed: Which Makes the Best Wife, the Bicycle Girl or the ‘Delicate Clinging Vine’?" Here, the pamphlet pushes back against Victorian expectations of submissive femininity, touting instead the benefits of a woman "distinctly able to take care of herself." "The New Woman marries if she pleases–and if the right man presents himself. She is able to take care of herself. She doesn’t have to lean on anybody. She doesn’t have to depend on anybody for her living — she can make that by herself." The praise heaped upon this emerging generation emphasizes their spending power, as well as their need to maintain active lifestyles and good health that help them avoid the "Female Complaints" so common among their Victorian matriarchs. Dr. Pierce’s products are promoted as a means for doing this, and the booklet provides several pages of women’s testimonials, with facsimile signatures, explaining how the products have assisted with nutrition, recovery from childbirth, and the easing of menstral discomforts. A fascinating shift in advertising, in which praise of financially independent women and testimonials from women themselves were valued as a method for tapping into a previously undervalued market. Near Fine.
Southern Women in the Recent Educational Movement in the South

Southern Women in the Recent Educational Movement in the South

Mayo, Rev. A. D. Listed on the front wrap as Bureau of Education Circular of Information NO. 1, 1892. Original printed wrappers with some minor chipping and paper loss, and with significant loss to crown and foot of spine. Front wrap loose at base but holding. Contemporary handwritten label on spine "Southern Women in Education." Two early ownership stamps to front wrapper and title page read "Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland OH" and "Compliments of Vincent A. Taylor, MC." Internally tight and pleasing, with the usual toning found in imprints of this era. While OCLC shows wide digital access to the text, only 3 institutions report the first edition in hardcopy. Rich with charts and statistics, Mayo’s account of Southern education focuses in detail on women’s role as educators and students in the decades following the Civil War. The report opens with information on "Schools for the Education of Southern White Girls," addressing the previous dearth of school access to girls of the region and articulating the curriculum that has developed following emancipation and in the struggle toward suffrage. Schools were to promote the idea that the new "national constitutional amendment [is] an ideal to be gradually realized" (a tacit justification here for the separation of white girls from their African American peers). For this category of student, the schools were also encouraged to focus on industrial skills and the creation of a new and advanced class of working Southerners, as well as the encouragement of women to take on new domestic responsibilites to support their families because "financial wreck of civil war [was] equivalent to reduction of supeior class to poverty." Notably, girls and women of the region were to be praised for their contributions — the "heroic efforts of Southern women in rebuilding home life" while men of their generation struck out, often going North, to try to rebuild their fortunes. As the report continues, it also addresses the education of freed peoples as "the most memorable [movement] in modern history–a service of Southern people in giving freedmen the common schools" while acknowledging that the "path of school education is still a ‘steep and rugged way’ for majority of Southern youth–A full third of Southern children of legal school age are still outside school opportunities." The deeper one reads into the report, the more complex a view one gains of the South’s struggles to redefine itself compared to the North in its views on gender, race, class, dialect, educational access, and job accessibility. Many of the systemic issues from before the war remain, as do hints of what would become a Jim Crow South, resistant as well to the idea of women’s suffrage except insofar as it supported a more white-dominant electorate. At the same time, signs of progress also abound, and much of the praise and responsibility for it falls upon women and the rising generation of African Americans building lives in a freer nation. Very Good +.
Dear Friend [An open letter by the members and friends of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society]

Dear Friend [An open letter by the members and friends of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society]

Chapman, Maria W. and Eliza L. Follen One page printed letter signed in type, on the front of a folio sheet folded with the remaining pages blank. Addressed in ink on page 4 to the Reverend John Lewis Russell of Hingham. With the exception of a closed tear expertly repaired, this piece is in Fine condition. A rare piece of women’s anti-slavery activism, with only 9 institutions reporting copies on OCLC. Founded by William Lloyd Garrison a decade earlier, the American Anti-Slavery Society was committed to abolition and ardently promoted women’s importance as leaders in the cause. Among those leaders were Maria Chapman, Garrison’s chief lieutenant, and Eliza Cabot Follen, an educator and author. In the present work, Chapman and Follen write on behalf of the Massachusett’s branch and its managers, who are fundraising for the impending festivities surrounding Independence Day. Seeking donations totaling to $500, Chapman and Follen call for provisions to refresh attendees (including "milk, cream, sugar, lemons, ice, eggs, flowers, cakes") as well as travel funds for "the best speakers to be secured from among the ranks of devoted friends, and no exertion spared to make the day, so long desecrated by empty eulogies on liberties already sacrificed, worthy of the Anti-Slavery cause." Both women acknowledge the need for financial support, kitchen provisions, and volunteer labor, as "the occasion will be one of moral and religious improvement and high social enjoyment.while at the same time a grand financial operation." Ads were to be run, for example, in the Liberator, the Standard, and the Herald of Freedom to keep the hypocrisy of Independence Day in the public eye in the lead up to the holiday. An important call to action by two women abolition leaders, with clear signs of the wide possibilities abolitionists had for contributing to the cause. Not in Krichmar. Fine.
The History of Tawny Rachel

The History of Tawny Rachel, the Fortune Teller, Black Giles’ Wife

More, Hannah] Bound in self-wraps with the header Cheap Repository Number 17 to title page. First and final pages detached but present, else the chapbook pages are holding. Internally clean and complete. After the Cheap Repository released parts 1-2 of Black Giles the Poacher and a sequel Tawny Rachel in the London imprint in 1796, they distributed American editions from Philadelphia in 1800 (Cheap Repository Numbers 15, 16, and 17). About as rare as its English predecessor, the American first edition of Tawny Rachel is held by 5 institutions according to ESTC, and it last appeared at auction in 1959. "Cheap Repository Tracts were a popular series of chapbooks written by evangelist Hannah More. Cheaply produced and therefore affordable to many, these moral tales were intended to discourage political dissent and unscrupulous lifestyles. Politically conservative, the stories were made more appealing by the addition of woodcut illustrations" (British Library). While the two tracts preceding Tawny Rachel focused on Black Giles’ laziness and trafficking in poached goods (both listed in the List of Repository Tracts Already Published on p. 36), the present followup turns attention to Giles’ wife, who uses her fortune-telling to cheat neighbors and lead good women astray. "I have thought it my duty to print this little history as a kind warning to all you young men and maidens not to have anything to say to Cheats, Imposters, Cunning Women, Fortune Tellers, Conjurers, or Interpreters of Dreams.I assure you that God never reveals to weak and wicked women those secret designs of his providence." So More concludes the History of Tawny Rachel, a character who uses her racial difference to convince townspeople that she has an ancient and mysitcal ability to predict their futures and, in turn, cheats them out of their money and goods. A seeming response to the rising popularity of almanacs and dream books attributed to female authority figures such as Mother Bridget, Mother Bunch, and Mother Shipton, who were "doubtless intended to attract.a largely female readership," More is uncompromising in her depiction and final assessment of Rachel (Perkins). Unlike most figures in the Cheap Repository Tracts, who learn their lessons and find redemption, "the author paints a damning picture of all members of this family" (British Library). Around the same time that her husband dies of injuries from an armed robbery in Number 16, Rachel is sentenced to prison for her crimes at the end of Number 17. A fascinating opportunity for studying the intersections and related tensions among classism, racism, religious ideology, and activism on behalf of women and slaves in More’s work. ESTC W31097.
Letter Addressed to the President of the United States on Slavery

Letter Addressed to the President of the United States on Slavery, Considered in Relation to the Constitutional Principles of Government.

An American Citizen [Chickering, Jesse] 91 pages. Disbound but with contents holding tight. All edges speckled. Internally a tight, unmarked, and fresh copy with none of the toning found in imprints of this period. Chickering’s important argument on the illegality of slavery in the U.S. last appeared at auction in 1976, and has become scarce both institutionally and in the trade. A political economist with a degree from Harvard, Chickering committed his published works to the study of immigration, slavery, and race in the young nation. His Letter Addressed to the President is an outlined legal argument about the illegality of slavery in the U.S., based both upon its adoption and reliance on British Common Law precedents as well as on the U.S.’s own Constitution. He further argues that in a nation where sovereignty is derived from the people, that the expansion of that people to include everyone leads to improvements for all citizens. "Those who have been clothed with power are charged to defend and maintain the rights of each and every one, under a system of regulated Liberty — uninfluenced by ephemeral majorities, or by the claims or pretended claims of partisans — not favoring the rich or the poor, those in office or those out of office, the North or the South.knowing nothing in civil matters except ‘our country, our whole country.’ Let it not be supposed that we wish harm to the interest of slave holders; we would promote them, by securing the rights of the whole people." While the larger body of the open letter contains great legal and historical detail in support of his argument, Chickering concludes with a concise and powerful outline of his larger position that the U.S. government’s allowance of slavery in the South, and that a human’s right to humanity differing across state lines, is "contrary to the charge of our National Sovereignty of Freedom, renders the United States a slave agency, and, as such, is against the Law and against the Constitution of the United States." Sabin 40262. Afro-Americana 5795. Fine.
Strictures on Female Education

Strictures on Female Education

Bennett, John] A Clergyman of the Church of England Contemporary full brown sheep with faint gilt to spine. Gentle rubbing to spine and boards, and bumps to corners. Measures 95 x 165mm (pages). Collates [iv], 133, [1, blank]: complete. Contemporary ownership signature to front endpaper reads "Caty M. Havens Bot at Northampton June 17th 1795." Light scattered foxing throughout, but otherwise a tight, neat, unmarked copy. First printed in London in 1787, Strictures on Female Education made its initial appearance in the U.S. under the Bushnell imprint with the byline "By a Clergyman"; an edition released in Philadelphia the next year name the author as Reverend John Bennett. ESTC records 16 known copies at institutions. Presently the only copy on the market, and with its last appearance at auction over a decade ago, this important work on women’s intellectual equality has become quite scarce. "When we consider the natural equality of women with the other sex, their influence upon society, and their original destination to be the companion of man.it may justly appear a matter of amazement that their education has so much and so generally been neglected." From the outset of his collection of four essays on women’s education, Bennett assumes women’s intellectual capability and situates them as the equals of men. And he takes society to task for preventing women from the same type of training and mental growth that is provided to their male counterparts; and he highlights that even while the system bars women from rigorous education, it criticizes them for lacking that training. "We expect a rich, spontaneous harvest from an untilled soil; and whilst we make their failings inevitable by our remissness, we fail not to load them with the heaviest censure, ridicule, and contempt." In the essays that follow, Bennett examines the history and failings of systems of women’s education at home and abroad; he makes observations on how the improvement of women’s education can and will uplift public knowledge and taste; he conducts a comparison of male and female talent to show that, when provided with equal training, equal possibilities exist; and he concludes with an examination and critique of contemporary boarding schools, highlighting their shortcomings and urging rigorous exploration within spaces that encourage curiosity rather than fashionable accomplishment or rote learning. Bennett’s arguments were timely for American audiences, as the first female seminaries and institutes of higher education had yet to be founded (the first would come in 1821, when Emma Willard would establish the Troy Seminary with her sister Almira Phelps). His positions would influence curriculum development as well as provide support for the women’s arguments on behalf of girls’ education. ESTC W3578.
Astronomy I notebook of a young woman in school

Astronomy I notebook of a young woman in school

Girls' Education] [Women in Science] Margaret J. Alcott Exceptionally dense and detailed Astronomy I class notebook, comprised of 81 handwritten pages in pencil, 3 folding hand-drawn diagrams and star maps, 3 additional pasted in maps and photos, and numerous hand-drawn illustrations of constellations, astronomical tools, and the surface of the moon. Bound in a cloth and brown paper composition book with handwritten paper label on front. The notebook begins with a detailed 4 page table of contents before moving into observations and calculations related to the constellations, sun, and moon. Composed in pencil throughout, with occasional red ink corrections by the instructor. Enrolled in her science course from the winter of 1914 into the spring of 1915, student Margaret Alcott was studying at an exciting moment in the history of astronomy. Though the field continued to be heavily male dominated, women like Annie Jump Cannon, Henrietta Swan Leavitt, Phoebe Waterman, and Mary Proctor were making cutting edge discoveries and distributing their findings. These accomplishments shaped the lessons Alcott took, as she records the variable brightness of stars throughout the months (Leavitt, Period Lumosity), considers spectra (Cannon), and makes use of telescope and telescopic photos to look at surfaces (Waterman and Proctor). While Alcott records verbal observations on the appearance and movements of celestial bodies, she also uses geometry to calculate their movements and placement relative to each other and to the Earth. Large portions of the notebook are dedicated to these calculations. A dedicated student, Alcott’s work is rarely corrected; when red ink does appear, the instructor is usually questioning a turn of phrase of the use of a word in describing an object. While we’ve been unable to locate information on Alcott’s identity, the level of the work being done suggests that this was a high school or early college level course. A unique and important manuscript created at a time when women were increasingly gaining access to the field of astronomy, and were making a push to have their contributions recognized. With research possibilities including but not limited to comparative astronomy, the history of women in science, the history or science, and the history of education.
Political Debates between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas in the Celebrated Campaign of 1858

Political Debates between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas in the Celebrated Campaign of 1858

Lincoln, Abraham and Stephen A. Douglas Original publisher’s cloth binding with some rubbing to spine and extremities. First issue, with all points as called for by Monaghan (no line over the publisher’s slug on title verso, and the number 2 at the foot of page 17). Collates [viii], 268 pages: lacking front endpaper else complete. Some light scattered foxing as is common in American imprints of this era, but in all a tight, pleasing copy of this book documenting an important moment in American politics. Documenting Lincoln and Douglas’ rivalry for the 1858 U.S. Senate race, this title captures an important moment of flux for American politics. Just beginning his political career, the young Lincoln earned the Republican nomination right as the party was forming; and he already had proven himself "a leading figure because of his adroit and earnest dealing with the problem of slavery" (Oxford Companion). One of his great strenghts was his eloquence — something Lincoln put on full display in these debates against Douglas, including the utterance of one of his most memorable lines, that "A house divided against itself cannot stand." Though Lincoln lost the Senate in 1858, he had managed to develop a national reputation and in 1860, the year of this book’s release, would win the Presidency. Monaghan 69.
Familiar Letters on Subjects Interesting to the Minds and Hearts of Females

Familiar Letters on Subjects Interesting to the Minds and Hearts of Females

Fales, Sally] A Lady Contemporary buff cloth binding with paper label to spine. Some rubbing and shelfwear to extremities, largely concentrated on crown and foot of spine, where the lower quarter has perished. Some soiling and sunning to boards. Collates [3], 340, [4]: complete, including publisher’s ads to rear. Internally a pleasing copy overall, with some mild scattered foxing to the preliminaries as expected in an American imprint of this period, but the majority of the book pleasing and clean. Bookplate on front pastedown identifies the previous owner as the Library of State Normal School of Salem, MA and a gift of "A. Crosby." Scarce in trade and institutions, this is the only copy on the market. While OCLC locates multiple institutions with microfilm access to the text, it does not list any hardcopy holdings. With a disarming level of transparency, Fales begins her book by admitting that her present effort is put forth, in large part, for financial benefit. "Twelve years of unremitted toil in the profession of a teacher have inadequate to the demands of a large family. Not literary fame, therefore, but emolument is the present object of publication." With this introductory remark, Fales makes it clear that she is not easily pigeon-holed. A wife and mother, she is also educated and employed, though her labor is undervalued. In this volume, framed as an epistolary novel, she encourages female readers to engage in the dialogues occurring among a coterie of women with diverse interests. With a tantalizing amount of voyeurism, readers learn of Mrs. C’s views on the management of girls’ boarding schools, Mrs. T’s views on the requisite skills of "an accomplished woman," the women’s debates on Baconian philosophy, and the importance of knowing Hebrew scripture. Yet Fales also encourages readers to take the women’s interrelationships into account; they are each others’ cousins, teachers, and friends. Intellectual issues like these are blended into more emotional discussions that draw attention to those events that shaped women’s lives at the time — the death of parents, the birth of children, the pursuit of education, and the existential crisis of finding the path that gives one’s life meaning. An interesting example of the epistolary novel form being used to encourage thoughtfulness and reading.
Address to a Young Lady on Her Entrance into the World

Address to a Young Lady on Her Entrance into the World

Nicklin, Susan] Two volumes in contemporary calf with morocco label remaining on volume II. Corners rubbed and bumped, and some loss to feet of spines; front hinge on volume II cracked but holding well. Else externally a copy that presents nicely. Collating [2], 202; [2], 216 pages: complete. Ownership signature of M. T. L. Mansel to front pastedown of each volume. Volume I contains some offsetting to preliminaries and rear; front endpaper loose but holding. Internally, about Fine, with both volumes clean, tight, and complete. With only one copy appearing in the modern auction record (over a decade ago), and ESTC locating only 8 copies in the U.S., this early women’s education text has become quite scarce. Composed by a governess, Susan Nicklin, nearing her retirement, Address aims to prepare young women for the world as they come to the tail end of their formal educations. "Every season of life after the years of infancy have elapsed has duties peculiarly its own, all progressive in their dignity and consequently in their difficulty too. Those relative to each period seem as successive exercises; by which powers are gradually acquired, competent to the due discharge of the more arduous obligations imposed by the circumstances of maturing age," she advises her female readership. She explains that while infancy teaches joy, sensory experience, and affection almost effortlessly, later youth leads us to more seriously "observe, compare, and inquire." The young woman leaving home and schoolroom is on the cusp of a new period of life. "Very soon the world of ideas is enlarged to a magnitude that requires some governing power to arrange its to confirm the good, to erase the evil.this power of the human mind is the heaven-deputed privilege of reason." Educated young women are in possession of this reason, thanks to good families and good teachers. But Nicklin expresses that this is not enough to protect a woman as she departs into the wider world. Her intellect must combine with faith, and by developing her knowledge of religion and using it to bolster her more rational abilities, she will be better prepared to make solid judgements in life. Thus, Nicklin emphasizes reading and learning lessons from scripture, joining with the community on sabbath days, cultivating a calm and meditative mind inclined toward optimism, and reflecting seriously on how to fulfill social duties of wifehood and motherhood. Address to a Young Lady is religious in nature while at the same time acknowledging that a woman is a rational, intelligent creature who can only be satisfied, and can only fulfill her obligations to God, country, and family when both sides of her are allowed to develop. An important and rare text encouraging women’s lifelong learning. ESTC T129214.
Selection of lyric poems copied out by an educated woman

Selection of lyric poems copied out by an educated woman, including work by Bluestocking Anna Laetitia Barbauld

Commonplace Book] Mrs. Russell Comprised of 7 pages in ink in a single hand, containing six works of poetry. Dark blue printed wraps over lined paper, measuring 7x 6 inches. Ownership signature of Mrs. Russell to header of front wrap. Scattered foxing and some dampstaining not affecting text. Text block loose but holding. In all, an intriguing glimpse into a woman’s use of literature to express her own preoccupations with humans’ place between nature and the divine. The six poems contained in this slim volume appear to have been thoughtfully selected and carefully copied out. Indeed, among them exist several thematic threads that teach us about the elusive Mrs. Russell, who leaves no identifying information except her ownership signature. The first poem, The Silent Expression of Nature, first appeared in the religious collection Musae Biblicae (1819) before being reprinted in Pierpont’s National Reader of 1829, which was designed to provide teachers with reading exercises in class and copy exercises out of class. From its opening line, it places the narrator and reader at the center of the earth and heavens, emphasizing how nature moves before "my wondering eyes," "fills my heart," and "around me falls." Not copied in full, the opening selection of the poem emphasizes the senses in these lines, and encourages the individual to experience the cosmos. The second work, titled simply Hymn, is drawn from John Bowring’s 1823 Matins and Vespers, critiqued the same year by the Monthly Review which praised its "sentiments as pure and excellent, and the language is elegant and often poetical," though the editors note "we could have wished for the occasional display of a higher spirit" (Griffiths). The poem in question is pulled out as an example of a more simplistic, childlike poem of wonder. Indeed, it shows the narrator turning to the reliable comfort of sunrise and sunset to push away existential doubts. Notably, Blue Stocking Anna Laetitia Barbauld’s poem Tomorrow (1773) is included within the selection. While Baurbauld had herself written a poem in praise of Bowring, this particular piece undercuts the sentiments of his, warning the reader not to trust nature because while the sun rises and sets, no individual lives to see the process without end. Across the selections, one experiences a push and pull of humanity between nature and the divine. One also sees the carefully formed letters created by Mrs. Russell, and the care she has placed into copying out these specific pieces. With research possibilities including but not limited to paleography, gender studies, poetic publication and transmission, the role of Blue Stocking writers within the poetic community, and the use of literature to explore science and theology.
Practical Education

Practical Education

Edgeworth, Maria Two volumes bound in one. Contemporary green cloth binding with label to spine. Wear to corners and rubbing to boards; spine lightly sunned. Hinges cracked but holding. Bookplate of "JM" and bookseller’s ticket of Subun Book Store, Tokyo to front pastedown. Some worming to front and rear margins, with text unaffected. Light scattered foxing throughout and occasional marginal commentary in blue ink from a previous owner. Collates: x, [2], 775, [19]: lacking title page for Volume II, else complete, containing all three plates (of which two are folding). An overall pleasing copy of this cornerstone work on education. A contemporary and correspondent of such luminaries as Anna Laetitia Barbauld and Jane Marcet, Maria Edgeworth made her name as an advocate for women’s education. Beginning with Letters for Literary Ladies three years earlier, Edgeworth began to write about the need to train girls into a lifelong love of learning. But it was in Practical Education, a collaboration with her father, that her views on methods of education were most specifically laid out. Opening chapters focus on the education of children, with an emphasis on the use of toys and play, the employment of reward and punishment, and the role of household figures like servants. The center of the text shifts to more mature education, with information on instruction in chemistry, mechanics, geometry, classical grammar and language, and history. By the end, Edgeworth considers where girls and women fit within the educational system — particularly given that they are expected, as mothers or as governesses — to train rising generations. Key to Edgeworth’s tome is the idea that education is not rigid, and that systems of education must be tried and adjusted over time depending on the situation and the student. "To make any progress in the art of education, it must be patiently reduced to an experimental science; we are fully sensible of the extent and difficulty of this undertaking, and we have not the arrogance to imagine that we have made any considerable progress in a work, which the labors of many generations may perhaps be insufficient to complete; but we lay before the public the results of our experiments and in many instances the experiments themselves." The result is a researched framework of suggestions and possibilities for training young minds into responsible and intellectual adulthood. Feminist Companion 328. Great Women Writers 155. ESTC T137068. Very Good +.
Mathematics notebook of a 19th century woman

Mathematics notebook of a 19th century woman

Women in Mathematics] Mary Ann Wilder Comprised of 41 handwritten pages of mathematical definitions, tables, methods, and exersises. Ownership signature of "Mary Ann Wilder, Rindge 1823" to top corner of first page. All entries done in a single hand. Bound in a contemporary composition book with brown tape spine and marbled paper wraps. Genealogy and local municipality records for Rindge, New Hamphire document Wilder as a resident from her birth in 1806 until her marriage in 1829, making her 19 at the time of composing this book. The Missionary Herald lists her in as a donor, along with Miss Nancy Wilder, to the School Fund of the Missionary Chapel at Bombay in 1818, suggesting her interest both in her own education and that of others. An example of an American girl’s education in math that is exceptional and scarce, as most documents of this kind come from school boys of the same age. Wilder’s access to a rigorous education was the benefit of a life of privilege, as the daughter of a wealthy attorney. Mary Ann Wilder’s meticulously composed arithmetic book opens with a definition of Arithmetic as the "art of computing by number and has five principle rules for its operation, viz. Numeration, Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division." Following this, Wilder lays out the the names of numbers before neatly placing them in a table, descending from trillions down to units. Drawing on her initial definition of Arithmetic, Wilder arranges the notebook in that order, with headings for each section, and each rule of operation being given space for a Simple and a Supplemental or Compound format accompanied by explanations and exercises. By the middle of the book, Wilder shifts her focus to the practical use of these skills to daily tasks — weights and measures, the calculations of time, determination of land acreage, money and finances, the cutting and preparation of cloth. As she performs her fractions, conversions, and multiplications, Wilder maintains a formal secretary style cursive hand, always neat and orderly to ensure that the book will last for future reference in her household. Records show that she would go on to marry the Reverend Camp in 1829 and have a daughter of her own; but she died young, in 1830, at the age of 25. A unique and exceptional document, Wilder’s notebook has research possibilities including but not limited to the history of education in the U.S., the history of women’s education, the effects of race and class on girls’ education, mathematics, historical measurements, paleography, and women’s and gender studies.