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Autograph Letter Signed in Italian to Signor GIOVAGNOLI (William Michael, 1829-1919, Man of Letters and Art Critic)

ROSSETTI (Raffaello, 1838-1915, Italian Writer, Patriot and Politician) saying that he might "have believed that I had completely forgotten my commitment to obtain, if possible, the publication of an English translation of Spartacus. Nevertheless, this is not the fact. I read the book – and I browsed it with real pleasure and interest – I looked for a publisher . I approached three of London’s leading publishers – those who seemed to me the best suited for this purpose . The company Blackwood & Sons (January 21) has had bad experiences in the field of translation, with regards to profits, and does not want to undertake another. The company Chatto & Windus (January 27) does not want to venture into the translation of a book about a historical novel that has been previously done to a degree (to believe this company) in three other novels – the last Days of Pompeii by Lytton, and Gladiators by Whyte-Melville, and Antonina by Wilkie Collins. The Hurst & Blackett company (7 April) was rather reluctant, but without giving any precise reason. I do not find myself able to proceed further with this matter: I really wanted to succeed, but I didn’t and I must assure you of my good will and I remain at your service .", 3 sides 8vo., 56 Euston Square, 21st April His novel Spartacus, was published in installments in the Fanfulla in 1873-4. The novel deals with the revolt of slaves and gladiators in the first century B.C. Despite a certain sentimentalism, it glorifies the ancient revolutionary who rose against oppression. Giovagnoli wrote the novel at the café of Valle theater, where a group of intellectuals gathered, including Luigi Arnaldo Vassallo and Pietro Cossa, with whom the scholar formed the League of spelling. Translation 56 Euston Square London NW April, 21st 1876 Most precious Mr. Giovagnoli You may have believed that I had completely forgotten my commitment to obtain, if possible, the publication of an English translation of Spartacus. Nevertheless, this is not the fact. I read the book – and I browsed it with real pleasure and interest – I looked for a publisher, as long as he had time to get it. I approached three of London’s leading publishers – those who seemed to me the best suited for this purpose – but I remained with the matter unaccomplished. The company Blackwood & Sons (January 21) has had bad experiences in the field of translation, with regards to profits, and does not want to undertake another. The company Chatto & Windus (January 27) does not want to venture into the translation of a book about a historical novel that has been previously done to a degree (to believe this company) in three other novels – the last Days of Pompeii by Lytton, and Gladiators by Whyte-Melville, and Antonina by Wilkie Collins. The Hurst & Blackett company (7 April) was rather reluctant, but without giving any precise reason. I do not find myself able to proceed further with this matter: I really wanted to succeed, but I didn’t and I must assure you of my good will and I remain at your service. Believe me always devoted to you. W. M. Rossetti
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Fine Letter Signed ‘M[aréch]al Duc de Dalmatie’ as Minister of War, in French (with translation), (Nicolas Jean de Dieu, 1769-1851, Napoleon I’s Marshal, Duke of Dalmatia)

SOULT informing "Méry de la Canorgne . Captain Mayor-adjutant of the native Riflemen Battalion of Oran, that by Ordinance of the 27th of this month, the King appointed him Knight of the Royal Order of the Legion of Honor .", 1 side folio, Paris, 28th November Soult is best known for the campaigns in the Peninsula against Wellington. On the first abdication of Napoleon, 11th April 1814, he declared himself a Royalist, and was Minister of War from December 1814 to March 1815. He subsequently declared for Napoleon again, being chief-of-staff at Waterloo, and, after a brief exile, for each change of government till his death during the Second Republic. He was twice Minister of War for Louis Philippe, 1830-1834 and again from 1840 to 1844 and this was written during his second period. Pierre Laurent de Mery de la CANORGUE (1806-1865) was a French General and Commandant in Vienna under the second empire. Ministère de la Guerre Secrétariat général Contrôle en comptabilité générale Bureau du Secrétariat Ordre Royal de la Légion d’Honneur Paris le 28 novembre 1844 Le Président du Conseil, Ministre Secrétaire d’État de la Guerre informe Monsieur Méry de la Canorgne (Pierre Laurent Elzéar Gustave Jean Baptiste Léon) Capitaine Adjudant Major au Bataillon de Tirailleurs indigènes d’Oran que, par Ordonnance du 27 de ce mois, le Roi l’a nommé Chevalier de l’Ordre Royal de la Légion d’Honneur. Avis de cette nomination est donné au Grand Chancelier de l’Ordre, qui est chargé de faire procéder à la réception de Monsieur Méry de la Canorgne et de lui remettre sa décoration. Mr duc de Dalmatie Ministry of War General Secretary Control in general accounting Office of the Secretary Royal Order of the Legion of Honor Paris on November 28, 1844 The President of the Council, Minister Secretary of State for War informs Mister Méry de la Canorgne (Pierre Laurent Elzéar Gustave Jean Baptiste Léon) Captain Warrant Officer Major at the Battalion Indigenous of Tirailleurs of Oran that, by Ordinance of the 27th of this month, the King appointed him Knight of the Royal Order of the Legion of Honor. Notice of this appointment is given to the Grand Chancellor of the Order, who is responsible for proceeding the reception of Mister Méry de la Canorgne and present him his decoration. M. Duke of Dalmatia
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Autograph Letter Signed addressed to "Oh, my dear Lally" (Howard Overing, 1855-1920, Novelist who wrote about Homosexuality)

STURGIS thanking her "so much for giving me that enchanting book! It has moved me as nothing has for years. Don’t you know how seldom it is that anything speaks to the something that is very deep down in us. I have scored & scribbled it all over, a shocking thing to do, but with me nearly always a sign of deep interest. I think I have always been a Buddhist at heart ." asking her to tell him more about the author and continues "It has given me such a longing to leave this wicked bloodstained, drink-stained, gold worshipping aristocratic England, & go & be a monk in a yellow garment in some quiet Burmese monastery; there are just three insufferable objections, where nothing may be killed, there would be fleas . and I couldn’t live in a country of snakes & then the British are there too, busy bringing the benefits of civilisation to the poor benighted Heathen, as one or two tragic sentences in this wonderful book show .", he then talks about a missionary’s sermon about an Earthy paradise that he had heard some years before and he he had "thought of starting a subscription for a travelling scholarship that young men might go there to learn the philosophy of life, and I feel in reading this book ‘Oh! Why can’t we all go to school in Burmah!’ . I have had a letter from Frank from Athens – He has been to Burmah! & just mentions it in a list of other countries, Ceylon, Egypt etc!! He is by now in Corfu & hopes to be in Italy next week so we may meet there . don’t forget that you & Prince Henry are coming to lunch . I shall be so dreadfully disappointed if you throw me over; resist your natural impulse to do so with all your might . I will be very discreet & not ask you a word about Fielding Hall, though I shall burn to .", 8 sides 8vo., Queen’s Acre, Windsor headed paper, Easter Day Sturgis was born into an affluent New England American family: his father, Russell Sturgis (1805–1887), was a China trader and lawyer who later became head of Barings Bank. His mother was Russell’s third wife, Julia Overing née Boit. He was a friend of the novelists Henry James and Edith Wharton. After the death of his mother in 1888 he moved with his lover, William Haynes-Smith, into a country house named Queen’s Acre, near Windsor Great Park. Harold Fielding-Hall was with the Burma Commission.
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Finely penned Document signed, in Italian with translation, with autograph subscription, to his Majesty the King of the Two Sicilies (1820-1878, first King of Italy) & Camillo CAVOUR (1810-1861, Prime Minister of Piedmont, President of the Council of Ministers and the architect of Italian unity)

VITTORIO EMANUELE II FERDINAND II (1810-1859, King of the Two Sicilies from 1830 until his early death in 1859) informing him of "the new and terrible disaster I fulfil the sad office of notifying it to Your Majesty! My beloved Consort, Her Majesty Queen Maria Adelaide of Sardinia, Archduchess of Austria, rendered her kind soul to God on the evening of the 12th of this month after a brief but cruel illness occurred after the first days of her puerperium. May Your Majesty understand in what desolation I am left by the loss of a bride who, with her sweet manners and her angelic virtue formed my joy, the happiness of the family and the admiration of the whole nation .", countersigned at the foot by CAVOUR, 1 side folio, with original envelope, Turin, 30th January ADELAIDE of Austria (1822-1855) was the Queen of Sardinia by marriage to Victor Emmanuel II of Sardinia, future King of Italy. Adelaide and her husband had eight children during their thirteen year marriage, of whom 3 died in infancy. On 8th January 1855 she gave birth to a son who was styled the Count of Genevois. Days later Queen Maria Theresa died on 12th January. Adelaide went to the late queen’s funeral on 16th January and on returning to the palace caught a cold. She died four days later at the Royal Palace of Turin having had an acute attack of Gastroenteritis. Another story says that Adelaide died of her burns after stepping on a match that set fire to her clothes. She was buried at the Royal Basilica of Superga. A Sua Maestà Il Re del Regno delle Due Sicilie Signor Mio Fratello e Cugino Signor Mio Fratello e Cugino. Colpito da nuova funestissima sciagura adempisco il triste ufficio di notificarla a Vostra Maestà ! Le dilettissima mia Consorte, Sua Maestà la Regina Maria Adelaide di Sardegna, Arciduchessa d’Austria, rese la sua bell’anima a Dio nelle sera delli 12 di questo mese dopo una breve, ma crudele malattia sovraggiuntale dopo i primi giorni del suo puerperio. Ben comprende la Maestà Vostra in quale desolazione mi abbia lasciato la perdita d’una sposa che per le dolci maniere e le angeliche sue virtù formava la mia gioia, la felicita della famiglia e l’ammirazione della nazione intiera. Non dubito pertanto che Vostra Maestà nel piangere una così degna di Lei cugina, non prenda viva parte al mio sommo cordoglia. In questa certezza Le rinovo colle assicurazioni dè miei voti per la prosperità delle Maestà Vostra e della Reale di Lei Famiglia, le proteste dell’alta stima e del sincero attaccamento con cui mi pregio d’essere Torino Signor Mio Fratello e Cugino li 30 gennaio 1855 di Vostra Maestà buon fratello e cugino Vittorio Emmanuel C Cavour To His Majesty The King of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies Sir My Brother and Cousin Sir My Brother and Cousin. Impressed by the new and terrible disaster I fulfil the sad office of notifying it to Your Majesty! My beloved Consort, Her Majesty Queen Maria Adelaide of Sardinia, Archduchess of Austria, rendered her kind soul to God on the evening of the 12th of this month after a brief but cruel illness occurred after the first days of her puerperium. May Your Majesty understand in what desolation I am left by the loss of a bride who, with her sweet manners and her angelic virtue formed my joy, the happiness of the family and the admiration of the whole nation. I do not doubt therefore that Your Majesty, in weeping so worthy of His cousin, does take a lively part in my immense pain. In this certainty I reassure You with the assurance of my wishes for the prosperity of Your Majesty and of Her Royal Family, the expression of the high esteem and of the sincere attachment with which I have the honour of being Turin Sir My Brother and Cousin January 30, 1855 of Your Majesty good brother and cousin Vittorio Emmanuel C Cavour
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Autograph Letter Signed to Sir Algernon TUDOR-CRAIG (Sir George Stuart, 1835-1912, Field Marshal, Winner of the Victoria Cross, Commander in Chief in India and Defender of Ladysmith)

WHITE (1873-1943, Army Officer, Heraldist and Author of books on Art History) saying he believes that Craig has heard from "Tatham Hughes how the Commissioners of Chelsea Hospital stand with regard to the cases of Thos Sullivan & Thos Paul. Thos Sullivan was allowed to commute his entire pension of 1/- a day, in 1894 for the sum of £175-8-7 and consequently we can do nothing further for him. He remains a useful example of the necessity of being most particular in allowing pensioners to commute their pensions – this case has resulted in the stigma to the service of a Veteran with Crimean Turkish Long Service and Good Conduct Medals being in the Work house altho’ he has a good character. Thos Paul will almost certainly get 1/- a day campaign pension – as his ‘felony’ will be forgiven him, 18 years having elapsed since he committed it. He has lost 7½ a day for 18 years, or in other words he has, in addition to other punishment, suffered a fine of over £200 .", 2 sides 4to., Royal Hospital, Chelsea headed paper, 6th November White was stationed at Peshawar during the Indian Mutiny and then fought at the Battle of Charasiab in October 1879 and at the Battle of Kandahar in September 1880 during the Second Anglo-Afghan War. For his bravery during these two battles, he was awarded the Victoria Cross. He went on to command a brigade during the Third Anglo-Burmese War in 1886 and became commander of Quetta District in 1889 in which role he led operations in the Zhob Valley and in Balochistan. He was commander of the forces in Natal at the opening of the Second Boer War and fought at the Battle of Elandslaagte in October 1899. He commanded the garrison at the Siege of Ladysmith: although instructed by General Sir Redvers Buller to surrender the garrison he responded "I hold Ladysmith for the Queen" and held out for another four months before being relieved in February 1900. He was one of the most decorated men in the British Army. He was Governor of the Royal Hospital Chelsea from 17 June 1905 until his death there on 24 June 1912.