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Le Marteau sans Mâitre.

MIRÃ". Char, Renà . Folio. (452 x 344 mm). pp. 180. Half-title with copyright verso, printed title, leaf with introduction by Char and Char’s verse illustrated with 23 original colour etchings with aquatint (8 double-page) by Joan Mirà , 2 leaves with ‘Table des Poà mes’, leaf with justification and final leaf with achevà d’imprimer. Loose as issued in publisher’s grey printed wrappers with calligraphic titles to front and original pupkin morroco-backed and -edged box with titles in black to spine by Bernard Duval. Louis Barnier’s presentation copy of Renà Char’s ‘Le Marteau sans Maître’; Barnier’s L’Imprimerie Union printed the first edition of Char’s collection. From the edition limited to 175 copies on grand và lin d’Arches pur fil signed by the artist and poet, with this one of 25 hors commerce copies; also included is a letter of presentation (see below) from Char. Three illustrated editions of ‘Le Marteau sans Maître’, which collected all of Char’s poems published after 1927 and before 1934, were published in the 20th century: the first edition was printed by L’Imprimerie Union and published by Josà Corti’s Editions Surrà alistes, the second, published by Librairie Josà Corti, of 1945 included an etching by Picasso and this, the third, illustrated by Joan Mirà , appeared in 1976. This copy with a letter from Char to Louis Barnier – it was L’Imprimerie Union, of which Barnier became director in 1957, who had printed the first edition of Char’s collection – in black ink to a leaf of wove paper recto only: ‘A mon Ami / Louis Barnier / en souvenir / du Marteau [underlined] premier nà / à l’Imprimerie Union. / avec amitià et / fidelità / Renà Char / 5 novembre 1976 / Et de la part de / Janine Quiquandon / à galement.’ [Cramer 216].
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100,000.

BYARS, James Lee. 4to. (269 x 209 mm). [206 unnumbered leaves]. Blank leaf, 204 leaves with offset lithograph reproduction of manuscript text by Byars recto only, blank leaf; the colophon and justification is printed to the rear inner wrapper. Original publisher’s pink paper wrappers with title to spine in black. An excellent copy of James Lee Byars first artist book and conceptual biography. From the edition limited to 250 unnumbered copies. Composed during James Lee Byars’ (1932 – 1997) first European solo exhibition at Antwerp’s Wide White Space (renamed ‘The Institute for the Advanced Study of James Lee Byars’ and painted pink for the occasion), ‘100,000’ or ‘100,000 minutes’ (see below for additional titles) is the supposed first half of the then 37 year-old Byars’ autobiography. According to his own theory, ‘according to statistics, with 36, you are halfway . that’s why I’m writing the first half of my biography now’. The book reproduces, on the recto of 204 sheets of pink paper, the thoughts, questions and statements that occurred to Byars during the exhibition and these are printed as reproductions of his own manuscript. Typically gnomic, Byars veers from the profound (‘How many ways are / there to look?’) via the banal (‘I write best with / ball pen.’) to the peculiar (‘What in imagination / allows a Chinaman / to say my Beard is 10,000 feet long?’). Although the most important statement in the book may be ‘Your reading my big / sample is one of / my works.’ Byars’ title, ‘100,000’ as printed on the spine, continues within the book: ‘100,000 minutes . OR The Big Sample of Byars . OR 1/2 an autobiography OR . The First Paper of Philosophy . ‘ &c. &c. &c. [Artists Who Make Books 35].
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RÃ trospective Jean Dubuffet. 16 DÃ cembre 1960 – 25 FÃ vrier 1961.

DUBUFFET, Jean. Oblong 8vo. (156 x 210 mm). Monochrome reproduction portrait photograph of Dubuffet on glossy paper as frontispiece, half-title, printed title with copyright verso, preliminary matter and the three sections ‘Documentation’, ‘Mà moire sur le Dà veloppement de Mes Travaux à Partir de 1952’ and ‘Catalogue’ illustrated with 90 leaves of plates on glossy paper including 11 in colour, the majority recto and verso, ‘Table’ and so on and final leaf with achevà d’imprimer; printed text on various different paper stocks in French throughout. Original publisher’s printed wrappers reproducing a monochrome work by Dubuffet in ‘phototypie’ over front and rear covers and spine, front cover with reproduction of Dubuffet’s signature in black. The scarce catalogue for Jean Dubuffet’s major 1960 retrospective exhibition at the Musà e des Arts Dà coratifs. This beautiful and extensive catalogue was designed by Jacques Roblin and edited by Pierre Mathey. Divided into three sections, ‘Documentation’, ‘Mà moire sur le Dà veloppement de Mes Travaux à Partir de 1952’ and ‘Catalogue’, it provides details and descriptions of Dubuffet’s life, early work, writings and theoretical works, prints, illustrated books, exhibitions, an annual bibliography and a large body of illustration of Dubuffet and his work. At the core of the catalogue and printed on green paper is the artist’s ‘Mà moire’; the catalogue of the work displayed follows, divided into ‘Peintures’, ‘Gouaches et Dessins’, ‘Lithographies’, and ‘Sculptures’ before the section ‘Planches en Noir’ reproducing 180 items in monochrome. The catalogue concludes with the ‘Table’, photographic credits and so on.
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Parkett. Kunstzeitschrift / Art Magazine. Nos. 1 – 100 / 101. (All Published).

PARKETT. 101 issues in 98. 4to. (255 x 211 mm). Printed text in German and English throughout, each issue illustrated profusely in colour and monochrome with works produced especially for the magazine, loose inserts, a CD and a variety of related ephemera. Original publisher’s colour printed wrappers with titles to front covers and spines, the spines illustrated throughout with composite illustrations by various artists. A very good complete set of Parkett, a cornucopia of contemporary art and the benchmark for the zeitgeist of the art market. From its conception and first issue in 1984, Parkett reflected the concerns, aims and achievements of artists, elucidating and promulgating their work, collaborating with them (each issue was produced with an artist, later with several artists), interviewing them, serving as a forum for the creation of new works (in the vorzusausgabe version many of the issues became works themselves or promoted editioned original works in limited numbers). In essence, Parkett served both the art world and market that encompassed those artists while acting as their own vehicle. The production values were of the highest level, the printing exceptional, the choice of paper stock (a variety was used) meticulous and the scope and content of the widest range; a list of the featured artists would encompass anyone and everyone of importance or interest in the wide field of modern and contemporary art. This excellent complete set includes all of the issues published over the course of more than thirty years but also a number of the additional, ephemeral offshoots. These are listed below. ‘A catalyst for invigorating change whilst always producing the ‘harvest of the quiet eye’.’ (Hans-Ulrich Obrist). ‘Dear reader, We are happy to present Parkett to you, the new art magazine in German and English. Parkett will be partial and bold in discussing notable, yet unnoted undercurrents, and quick to recognize new developments in the bud. We are aiming to produce a vehicle of direct confrontation with art, providing not only coverage ‘about’ artists, but original contributions ‘by’ them. We would like to thank Enzo Cucchi for his enthusiasm; what more could we wish for than a great artist helping to launch Parkett with original works and his spirited ‘Coraggio amici’! Now let yourself be carried away, and let Parkett treat you – four times a year, with intelligence and grace – to views and insights into art.’ (Bice Curiger writing in issue 1). ‘This volume completes the 33-year adventure of Parkett as a printed book. It is a weighty publication comprising Parkett’s traditional format in combination with a retrospective view, characterized by the polyphony of voices that our readers have come to anticipate . Statements by former editors, designers, and curators of Parkett exhibitions chart the exceptional reach of an impassioned network dedicated to in-depth inquiry into the art of our times.’ (Introduction to the final issue, No. 100 / 101). The additional material included with this complete set is the following: – ‘Un Musà e en Appartement / Artists’ Editions’, 1999. Boxed series of 102 postcards (title card + 101) depicting all of Parkett’s deluxe editioned works from No. 1 (1984) to No. 55 (1999) with the additional explanatory folding booklet. – ‘Parkett Collaborations Editions. Published on the Occasion of the Parkett Exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art New York, 2001’. Small cloth-backed book remaining in its original shrink wrap. – ‘Sonderangebot für Parkett-Editionen’, 2002. Boxed series of 21 postcards depicting all deluxe editioned works remaining available with the additional explanatory booklet. – the three supplements ‘(IM)MATERIAL?’ issued in Nos. 70, 71 & 72 (2004). – ‘Parkett – 20 Years of Artists’ Collaborations’, Zürich, 2004. The extensive document detailing how Parkett’s editions were produced using correspondence with the participating artists, the works themselves, interviews with various participants, lists of the editions produced, indices etc. Illustrated throughout in monochrome with several colour plates, plans etc. – ‘Parkett Artist Editions / Parkett Books’, 2010. Booklet listing all available editions from No. 60 (2000) to No. 87 (2010) as well as all available issues, those out of print, participating artists etc. – ‘Parkett Artist Editions / Parkett Books’, 2016. Booklet listing all available editions from No. 66 (2002) to No. 98 (2016) as well as all available issues, those out of print, participating artists etc. – ‘Parkett Artist Editions / Parkett Books’, 2017. Booklet listing all available editions from No. 49 (1997) to No. 100 / 101 (2017), many of the editions had sold out previously so there are considerable gaps, as well as all available issues, those out of print, participating artists etc. – ‘Parkett – A Comprehensive Library on Contemporary Artists – Book Index: A 33 Year Time Capsule’, 2017. The folded booklet listing each issue of Parkett and each editioned work, showing each cover, listing all contributing artists and listing all 60 issues remaining available.
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Grapefruit.

ONO, Yoko. Small square 8vo. Unpaginated. Original cream wrappers, printed title in black to front wrapper. First edition of Yoko Ono’s Conceptual compendium. This copy with a presentation in blue ink to initial blank in Japanese and English, to Nigel Samuel and his wife Sue: ‘Spring o spring Why don’t I fly in the sky tonight’ / ‘To Nigel & Sue, / Yoko / Spring 1967, / London’. Nigel Samuel was the brother of Nicky Samuel, known as Nicky Weymouth. Nicky, who knew Andy Warhol and many of the other great personalities of the 60s, worked for Yoko when she was married to Tony Cox. ‘Grapefruit’ contains a series of ‘event scores’ that were designed to replace the physical work of art. Often considered a Fluxus artwork, in fact Grapefruit was originally published by Ono’s own imprint, Wunternaum Press in Tokyo in an edition of 500. Event scores were developed by a number of artists attending John Cage’s Experimental Music Composition classes at the New School for Social Research in New York. Whilst Ono did not attend these informal lessons, her husband at the time, Ichiyanagi Toshi, (an experimental musician) did, and Toshi and Ono became regulars of Cage’s circle of friends by 1959. After leaving New York in 1962, where she had exhibited at George Maciunas’ AG Gallery, amongst others, Yoko Ono’s then-husband Anthony Cox suggested she collect her scores together. Maciunas, had apparently been trying to reach her in Tokyo with the aim of printing a similar book in New York, as part of his series of Fluxkits, but his letters hadn’t reached her; she sent some of the scores and a prepublication advertisement to be published in his Fluxus newspaper in February 1964 when contact was finally established. The name ‘Grapefruit’ was chosen as the title because Ono believed the fruit to be a hybrid of an orange and a lemon, and thus a reflection of herself as ‘a spiritual hybrid’. It also seems likely that it is a playful allusion to Brecht’s Water Yam. This first edition contains over 150 ‘instruction works’; virtually all are in English, with about a third translated into Japanese. They are divided into five sections; Music, Painting, Event, Poetry and Object. The instructions are preceded by dedications to figures including John Cage, La Monte Young, Nam June Paik, Isamu Noguchi and Peggy Guggenheim, and also includes documentation relating to Ono’s recent exhibitions and performances. [Ref. Kellein – Frohliche Wissenschaft. Das Archiv Sohm, p. 88].
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An Extensive Collection of Ephemera. 61 items.

ROTH, Dieter. Various formats. Various sizes. – ‘Vergrà sserte Kleinigkeiten von Diter Rot’. Invitation to the vernissage of the exhibition at Galerie Rudolf Zwirner, Cologne on April 18th, 1968. Cream card with printed text in black recto only. – ‘kà lner rheinbogen’. Postcard produced for Klaus Staeck’s Edition Tangente ‘Originalgrafik – Serie 1: Kà ln’ in 1968. Card with offset colour illustration by Roth recto and details verso. – ‘DITER ROT "Verschiedenes"’. Invitation to the vernissage at Galerie Urula Lichter, Frankfurt on January 14th, 1970; the exhibition continued until February 14th. Card with printed text in black and red recto only. – ‘DIeter Rot – Zeichnungen, Objekte, Druckgrafik und Bücher’. Invitation to the vernissage at the Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden from Galerie Cornels on September 29th, 1972. Card with reproduction of a work by Roth in black recto – a lithograph limited to 50 copies produced for the exhibition – and details verso. – ‘Dieter Roth – Graphik und Bücher 1947 – 1971′. Invitation to the vernissage of the exhibition at Der Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen with Roth in attendance on June 15th, 1973; the exhibition continued until September 2nd. White folded card with printed text in black. – Dieter Roth – Listening’. Postcard with colour reproduction of the work ‘Listening’ recto and postcard layout verso. Printed for the Jahresgabe des Kunstvereins Braunschweig in 1973. – ‘bücher – bilder – zeichnungen – graphiken – objekte – multiples von dieter roth’. Announcement for the publication by (?) Galerie Steinmetz, Bonn of ‘Roth-Dokumentation 1967 – 74’. Red card with printed text in black recto only. – ‘Diter Rot – DIE GESAMTE SCHEISSE / DIETER ROTH – Die DIE GESAMTE SCHEISSE / DIETERICH ROTH – die Die DIE VERDAMMTE SCHEISSE . etc.’ Invitation to the vernissage of the exhibition at Galerie Stähli, Zurich on February 25th, 1977; the exhibition continued until March 26th and was accompanied by a catalogue that included an original work. Card with printed text in red recto and verso, recto with exhibition title and details, verso Galerie Stähli details and address. – ‘Dieter Roth – Ausstellung II / 1978’. Poster for the exhibition at Felix Handschin with details of the vernissage on April 15th, 1978, with Roth present; the exhibition continued until May 14th. Large sheet with colour reproduction of a work by Roth recto only. – ‘Dieter Roth’. Catalogue for the exhibition at Galerie Anton Meier, Geneva from October 18th to November 10th, 1979. Glosst white wrappers with title to front cover in red, colour and monochrome illustrations and text on 6 leaves. – ‘katalog 2, 1979 (Dieter Roth)’. Catalogue for the Kunstagentur Wolfgang Wunderlich, Munich issued in 1979. Printed text and 12 monochrome illustrations of works by Roth: im angebot weitere zeichnungen, mappenwerke, collagen, bilder und montierte objekte sowie die bücher, schallplatten und editionen aus der verlag hansjà rg mayer und dieter roths familienverlag.’ – ‘DIETER ROTH – Boeken en grafiek (deel 2) en ander spul’. Announcement for the exhibition at the Haags Gemeentemuseum on April 11th, 1980; the exhibition continued until June 1st, 1980. Folded sheet of thin paper with monochrome reproduction of a work by Roth over covers, printed text within. – ‘DIETER ROTH, Grafik, Bücher, u.a.m. aus den Jahren 1971 – 79’. Announcement for the exhibition at the Kunstmuseum Luzern held from January 27th to March 9th, 1980. Card with reproduction of a work by Roth recto and with printed details of the exhibition verso. – ‘DIeter Roth: Bilder – Objekte – Zeichnungen’. Catalogue / booklet for the exhibition at Galerie Holtmann, Cologne announcing the vernissage on May 29th, 1981 with Roth present; the exhibition continued until July 4th. Folded card with titles and a colour reroduction of a work by Roth to cover, exhibition details within together with a monochrome reproduction of a chocolate sculture (‘Turmselbst’, 1970) and a colour reproduction of ‘Heraldsische Bild mit Musik’, 1978 / 1979 to rear cover. – ‘Opas Salat von Dieter Roth’. Invitation to the vernissage at Galerie Klewan, Munich on June 3rd, 1982. Card with colour illustration of a work by Roth recto, printed details in black verso. – (‘Dieter Roth’). Catalogue / list for Renate Fassbender, Munich with details of her participation at Art Basel. Large folded sheet with text and details of works by Roth, listed also are the other artists represented. – ‘Dieter Roth, Sammlung Karl Vogel’. Invitation to the vernissage at Der Bonner Kunstverein on September 21st, 1983; the exhibition was from September 22nd to October 23rd. Folded card with work by Roth in monochrome and typographic titles to front cover, printed details within and announcement of the subsequent exhibition to rear cover. – ‘DIETER ROTH – Zeichnugnen, Objekte, Lithographien, Radierungen, Bücher, Plakate’. Invitation to the vernissage of the exhibition at Oldenburger Kunstverein on October 14th, 1984; the exhibition continued until November 11th. Large card with colour reproduction of a work by Roth recto and printed details verso, addressed and mailed to Armin Hundertmark. – ‘Dieter Roth (mit Bjà rn und Vera Roth) – EIN TAGEBUCH – A DIARY’. Announcement / order form for the book in German and English published by the Dieter Roth Verlag, Basel in conjunction with the exhibition ‘von hier aus’ from September 28th to December 2nd, 1984. Card with printed details recto only. – ‘Dieter Roth – Tränemeer-Zeichnungen’. Leaflet / catalogue for the exhibition at Museum für Gegenwartskunst Basel from September 27th to November 23rd, 1986. Large folded sheet with printed text by Dieter Koepplin and monochrome illustration of works by Roth; this copy hole-punched at left. – ‘Roth’s Verlag – Boeken en Platen / Books and Records’. Leaflet for the exhibition at Boekie Woekie, AMsterdam in February 21987. Folded sheet of paper with reproduction of a work by Roth to front cover, quotations by Diet
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rot. Nos. 1 – 62. (All Published).

rot. (Bense, Max and Elizabeth Walther, Eds.). 56 issues. Square 8vo. (Each c.150 x 150 mm). + Single issue. 4to. (280 x 230 mm). Printed text throughout in various languages, monochrome illustrations and reproduction photographs to various issues (the final issue the sole number with colour reproductions), several issues with text in red and black, with visual poems, concrete poems, calligrammes, manipulated text and so on as issued. Original publisher’s printed wrappers by Walter Faigle, each issue stapled, perfect bound or in leporello format as issued and with serial variant design and typography in red and white to front covers, issue number in black and white rear cover with red or black quotation by Ernst Bloch. A scarce complete set of the periodical ‘rot’ founded by Max Bense and Elizabeth Walther to explore the boundaries between science, literature and art. ‘Es gibt auch rote Geheimnisse in der Welt, ja, nur rote.’ (Ernst Bloch’s quotation to the rear cover of each issue). From the edition limited to 180 – 1,177 copies, with most numbers issued in between 300 – 500 copies. The philosopher, writer, mathematician, physicist, geologist and lecturer Max Bense (1910 – 1990), founder of the review ‘Augenblick’, author of the ‘Theory of Texts’ (1962) and an important proponent of information aesthetics, founded ‘rot’ in 1960 together with Elizabeth Walther (later, as his partner, Elizabeth Walther-Bense), supremely significant in her own right in the fields of semiotics and aesthetics. Given the shared interests of Bense and Walther, it comes as no surprise to find that ‘rot’ walks the line between science, literature and art, featuring a stellar list of contributors from the avant-garde in the fields of experimental poetry, painting particularly in terms of the mathematically and computer generated image, visual and concrete poetry, semiotics and linguistic theory and philosophy. The varied content of ‘rot’ – lowercase text is de rigueur – and the interests of its founders ensured the treatment of early and important examples of algorithmic and computer art: #8 features the ‘erstses manifest der permutationellen kunst’, #24 Burckhardt’s ‘strukturen’ and siegfried maser’s ‘berechnungen’, #37 George David Birkhoff’s ‘einige mathematische elemente der kunst’, and #45 – 50 with Carole Spearin McCauley’s ‘six portraits / wild birds on a winter mountain’ etc. Perhaps of most importance however, is #19, which includes Bense’s text ‘projekte generativer ästhetik’ with ‘stochastiche graphik’ illustrations produced by George Nees’ programming. These graphic works appear to be the first examples of ‘computer-generated, algorithmic art’ and were exhibited at the Studiengalerie of TH Stuttgart, in February, 1965 and Bense’s text is, therefore, the manifesto of computer-generated art. Linguistic experimentation was another area of particular focus and ‘rot’ is filled with visual and concrete poetry with language itself as art, and most specifically the word as an artistic unit, in and of itself. While many issues include examples of concrete poetry, it is perhaps more important to highlight the relevance of ‘rot’ as a vehicle for experimental poetry and the wide, international range of its practitioners: from Germany there are contributions by Diter Rot (in the incarnation prior to Dieter Roth), Helmut Heißenbüttel, Ludwig Harig, Reinhard Dà hl, Hansjorg Mayer, Friedrike Mayrà cker, Franz Mon, Timm Ulrichs, and of course others. Brazil features strongly – one of the scarcest issues with a limitation of 180 copies is #7 ‘noigrandes konkrete text’ devoted to Brazilian concrete poetry- with contributions from Harold de Campos, Dà cio Pignatari, Augusto de Campos, Ronaldo Azeredo, João Cabral de Melo, Mira Schendel, Aloisio Magalhães et al. Francis Ponge, Jean Genet, Pierre Garnier and Witold Wirpsza were also contributors while #36 features Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s ‘vorlesungen über die ästhetik’. In the visual poetry field, it must be noted that the following numbers are of particular interest: #7, ‘noigrandes konkrete text’; #13 ‘alphabet’ by Hansjà rg Mayer; #21 ‘konkrete poesie international’ with numerous contributors; #22 ‘en gros & en detail’ by Konrad B. Schäuffelen; #26 ‘alphabetenquadrate’, again by Hansjà rg Mayer; #32 ’80 wolken’ by Diter Rot; #33 ‘lesarten und schreibwesen’ by Timm Ulrichs (his card ‘Je Suis Jesus!’ from ‘Geiger’ #3 is loosely inserted); #40 ‘poem structures in the looking glass’ by Klaus Burkhardt and Reinhard Dà hl; #41 ‘konkrete poesie international 2’, again with numerous contributors. A final mention must be made of the three issues devoted to the subject of Elizabeth Walther’s particular interest, the father of modern semiotics, Charles Sanders Peirce: #20 ‘über zeichen’, #44 ‘graphen und zeichen: prolegomena zu einer apologie des pragmatizismus’ and #52 ‘zur semiotischen grundlegung von logik und mathematik’. ‘Chaque numà ro est redigà et illustrà par un artiste diffà rent.’ (see Le Fonds Paul Destribats, pg. 312). We can trace no complete sets of ‘rot’ in the UK, Europe or the US. A complete listing of the issues and their contributors is available on request. [Das Archiv Sohm, pp. 140 – 141, 143; Le Fonds Paul Destribats 860 (4 issues only); not in Allen].
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Mit Braunkreuz. ( . With Browncross). Original Letter by Beuys to ‘Monsignore Mauer’ Concerning the Seminal Multiple.

BEUYS, Joseph. 4to. (297 x 210 mm). Single leaf of cream A4 paper with triple circular watermark ‘MK / PAPER’ with Beuys’ manuscript in black ink recto and verso, dated ‘Düsseldorf, den 16 November 1966′ and addressed to Sehr geehrter, lieber Monsignore Mauer!’, recto with small drawing of the multiple with explanatory annotations, additional marginalia to verso, signed ‘Herzliche Grüsse / von Joseph Beuys’ at foot of verso; text in German throughout. Two punched holes (for filing) at right of sheet edge restored. A highly important letter from Joseph Beuys to Monsignor Otto Mauer of Galerie Nächst Saint Stephan concerning the early multiple ‘ . mit Braunkreuz’. The multiple ‘ … mit Braunkreuz’ is of particular significance for Beuys’ oeuvre as it incorporates so many of the themes and currents, here still in development, that came to dominate his work. It seems clear from the letter that Beuys seeks to convey that significance to Mauer, a man whose intellect would allow him to grasp it and whose influence would allow its dissemination. Stemmler (see below) notes that an entire book could be written about the interplay of theme, content and interpretation and the interrelated signifcances thereof. Beuys opens his letter effusively, greeting Mauer as ‘Sehr geehrter, lieber Monsignor Mauer!’ before thanking him for his thoughts (referring to an earlier letter to Beuys) and beginning his explanation of his multiple ‘ . mit Braunkreuz’ published by Edition Renà Block earlier in the same year. In addition to Beuys’ explanation, which takes up much of the letter, the artist has sketched an explanatory drawing, towards the foot of the first page showing each element: at left, ‘Kassette’ with two texts, ‘Text I’ and ‘Text II’, at centre the felt piece ‘halb. Filzkreuz’ and at right the ‘Zeichnung mit 2 braunen Kreuze in Ölfarbe’. Beuys continues ‘Es ist einfach, aber für mich eine wichtige Arbeit ein ziemliches Mysterium’ (It is simple, but for me an important work, a relative mystery). Overleaf, Beuys explains the content of the multiple, consisting as per his drawing, of two framed typed texts, ‘GIOCONDA III’ (i.e. ‘Text I’ of the drawing) and ”BÜHNESTÜCK I’, (i.e. ‘Text II’), elucidating his allusive prose and following the typography of each of them – both refer to actions and performances by Beuys – as published. The two texts, each important in terms of reference and interleaved with Beuys’ artistic philosophy, experiential mysticism and thought processes (referring to Greek mythology, Leonardo, the Swedish chemist, Berzelius, the theatre and cooking) are the source of much speculation and exegesis (see below) and it seems clear that he was concerned to convey the detail in toto to Mauer. The other parts of the multiple, illustrated in the drawing, are the half felt cross and the original drawing with the cross painting, a symbol that became – at least from this multiple onward – very significant for Beuys. Beuys soon returns to less complicated matters: the sale of drawings to the Albertina and the sale of ‘ . mit Braunkreuz’ by Block. Beuys suggests that half of the edition of 26 copies has already been sold and that Block is preparing to raise the price for the remaining copies. Beuys signs off with his typical ‘Herzliche Grüsse’ before adding a postscript suggesting that Mauer may want two or three copies of ‘ … mit Braunkreuz’. Monsignor Otto Mauer, was a Catholic priest and collector who founded the Galerie Saint Stephan (later the Galerie nächst Saint Stephan) in Vienna’s Grünangergasse next to the Stephansdom. Cited as the ‘driving force behind the revitalisation of Austrian art after the Second World War’, Mauer was a keen proponent of abstraction and conjoined with his intellectual leanings, founded the gallery as a place for the exchange of ideas and a platform for the avant garde. Mauer remained director of the gallery until his death and was an early champion of performance and installation – Beuys’ work included – as well as contemporary art in all its forms and varieties. A full transcription of the letter is available on request. ‘Browncross: This term designates a type of brown primer frequently used by Beuys. ‘ . brown . is a densely covered red – the will to sculptural form. Brown is earth, suppressed red, earthly warmth, dried blood. But it’s through this suppression that the colors of light or of the spectrum are thrown up by contrast and emphasized.’ (Beuys, in: Coyote, pg. 28; see Schellman, pg. 428). ‘The divided cross motif initially occurred in connection with the notion of ‘EURASIA’. To Beuys’ way of thinking, the political division of the contiguous landmass of of Europe and Asia into East and West was accompanied by a spiritual distinction between Eastern and Western Man. The bisected cross was a symbol of this division, and at the same time a new symbol of unity.’ (Uwe M. Schneede in ‘Die Aktion’, pg. 129; see Schellman, pg. 428). ‘In multiples such as ‘ . mit Braunkreuz’ ( . with Browncross), 1968, (No. 3) – about which a separate book could be written due to the twenty-six different accompanying drawings that correspond to the edition and the use of nearly every key motif in Beuys’ early work – these possibilities [‘the plurality of energetic relationships among several elements’] converge without losing their wealth of associations. While the homogeneous felt shape bears a correspondence with the more compact ‘Bühnestück I’ (Stage Piece I), the open, differentiated, and twenty-six times exchangeable drawing corresponds with the more complex two-second piece ‘Gioconda III’. Nevertheless, all 4 parts of the multiple are linked in terms of meaning. The two movable pieces, felt and drawing, e.g., are linked not only externally by the brown crosses (‘Braunkreuze’) on the periphery of the images . the brown crosses function as a sign of integration. As such they are a confessional sign, and at the same time a demarcation of fields of tension. The ‘BEUYS’ stamp
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Poà sie Ron-Ron.

PICABIA, Francis. Small 8vo. (195 x 125 mm). [32 leaves]. Leaf with title, limitation verso, leaf with Picabia’s introductory note: ‘La mode, / est une feuille morte. / F. P.’ and Picabia’s verse, final leaf with ‘Terminà e a Lausanne, / le 24 fà vrier 1919’ and note (see below). Original publisher’s red glazed printed wrappers, titles gilt to front cover. One of the rarest of Francis Picabia’s dada publications. From the edition limited to 100 copies on papier vergà . Composed by Picabia late in 1918, ‘Poà sie Ron-Ron’, published in Switzerland the following year, is among the small groups of books featuring Picabia as a dada poet; the word ‘dada’ is included towards the end of Picabia’s verse (‘dada veut dire queue d’à là phant’, pg. 49). Picabia’s Swiss period (as opposed to his subsequent Paris dada affiliation) saw him writing poetry rather than painting but he did collaborate with Hans Arp, Tristan Tzara (the two met shortly after the composition of ‘Poà sie Ron-Ron’) and the dadaists of Zurich (issue 8 of ‘391’ was published there). Picabia was committed to dada for another two years before he abandoned it in early 1921. ‘Cette poà sie n’a ni commencement ni fin, figurez-vous qu’il n’y a pas de couverture et qu’elle est relià e avec des anneaux de cuivre !’ (From the final page of text). Picabia’s literary dada works include: ‘Poà mes et Dessins de la Fille Nà e Sans Mà re’ (1918), ‘Rateliers Platoniques’ (1918), both published, as was the present collection in Lausanne, as well as the Paris publications ‘Pensà es Sans Langage’ (1919), ‘Jà sus-Christ Rastaqouà re’ (1920) and ‘Unique Eunuque’ (1920). [not in Ades].
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A Group of Vintage Monochrome Photographs of Works in Situ.

BUREN, Daniel. Various formats and sizes (see below). 11 original monochrome photographs of works by Daniel Buren (see below). Loose in glassine folder. A highly interesting group of photographs of early Buren works in situ including a very scarce record of his controversial contribution ot the Guggenheim International Exhibition 1971. Since 1967, Daniel Buren has employed alternating vertical stripes in white and colour, each stripe measuring exactly 87 mm in width, for his works in situ. Often of pre-fabricated canvas cloth which Buren would then paint and position according to an established system, the stripes, their placement and manipulation were intended to explore art’s relationship to its physical environment, usually mischeviously and subversively, whether in a gallery or a museum, or as these photographs also demonstrate in an outside context. For these outside contexts, Buren would often employ his guerilla technique of ‘affichages sauvages’; documentation, sometimes the sole record, of Buren’s works in situ and his guerilla acts are therefore central to his practice. These photographs, largely from the early 1970s, provide a glimpse of the period when Buren was both an enfant terrible criticising the mainstream of art, and was beginning to achieve recognition and acclaim through solo and group shows in that mainstream. Of particular interest are the photograph (annotated by the artist) of Buren’s early exhibition at the Galerie Yvon Lambert ‘Indication à lire comme indication de ce qui est à voir’ where his work was vandalised, and the photograph of the work – it became highly controversial, was never exhibited and this photograph is a scarce record – he contributed to the Guggenheim International Exhibition 1971. – Monochrome photograph (239 x 181 mm) of Buren’s work in situ for ‘Invitation à lire comme indication de ce qui est à voir’ at Galerie Yvon Lambert (December 2, 1970 – January 5, 1971) comprising a double-sided white and green striped painting (‘Peinture acrylique blanche sur toile de coton tissà à raures blaches et vertes, alternà es et verticales de 8.7 cm de large chacune, câbles; 300 x 300 cm) hanging above the street; annotated by Buren beneath in green and red inks: ‘Paris / Dà cembre 1970 Rue de l’Echaudà / Paris / Peintre blanc et verte / recto verso’; Buren’s work was vandalised during the exhibition and had to be taken down. [see T IV 82]. – Monochrome photograph (239 x 180 mm) of Buren’s work in situ for the ‘Guggenheim International Exhibition 1971’ at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (1971) comprising a large striped cloth hanging beneath the cupola (‘Peinture acrylique blanche sur toile de coton tissà à rayures blanches et bleues, alternà es et verticales de 8.7 cm de large chacune; 2,000 x 1,000 cm); Buren’s large work caused Donald Judd, Dan Flavin and Michael Heizer to object and after their pressure the museum removed the work despite protest from the other exhibitors (Sol LeWitt, Carl Andre, Laurence Weiner, Jan Dibbets, Hanne Darboven and others); a second work by Buren was never exhibited and Andre and LeWitt removed their own works. [see T IV 99]. – Monochrome photograph (240 x 180 mm) of Buren’s work in situ at the Wide White Space Gallery, Antwerp (the gallery is easily identifiable from its projecting ship prow balcony); the photograph annotated in pencil verso: ‘White + Transparent, 1972 [altered to 1971] / Antwerpen / (Private) / Cellophane (no glue)’. Although Buren had multiple exhibitions at Antwerp’s Wide White Space in the early 1970s, we cannot trace this work, executed by Buren in the circular window with balcony beneath the prow of the protruding ship’s prow, suggesting that it was unconnected to Buren’s series of three exhibitions at the gallery in 1969, 1971 and 1972 (or was perhaps for a vernissage only) or that it was executed at a later date as Buren continued to exhibit there. [see T III 65; T IV 116; T IV 217]. – Monochrome photograph (238 x 180 mm) of Buren’s work in situ for the exhibition ‘Including the Walls’ at Houston, Texas’ Cusack Gallery, opening 22 May, 1975. – Monochrome photograph (202 x 254 mm) of Buren’s work in situ (‘Chez Georges – Blanc et Orange’) at the restaurant ‘Chez Georges’, on the corner of rue du Dà barcadà re and Boulevard Pà reire, 17à me Arrodissement, Paris, (1974); pencil annotations verso: ‘2nd. Blue. / Paris, 1974. [1976] / Orange. / (White stripes / from window)’. – Four monochrome photographs (each 202 x 254 mm) of Buren’s works in situ for ‘These Elements that are Manipulated’, his contribution to the group exhibition ‘Museums by Artists’ at Canada’s Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto (the Sam and Ayala Zacks Wing), April 2nd – May 15th, 1983; Buren exhibited alongside Marcel Broodthaers, Robert Filiou, General Idea, On Kawara, James Lee Byars, Jannis Kounellis et al. Each photograph with attribution label verso from the David Bellman Gallery, Toronto. – Two monochrome photographs (254 x 204 mm and the reverse) of unlocated works in situ by Buren. [References cited are to Buren’s catalogue raisonnà ].
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An Illustrated Description of the Diorama of Upper India, the Ganges, the Cities of Calcutta, Benares, Agra, with the Rock Temples and Temple of Juggernaut and the Scenes of the Military Insurrection.

INDIA. (Wyld, James). Small square 12mo. (160 x 155 mm). [19 leaves incl. fold-out plate; pp. 32, (iv)]. Leaf with title (a repeat of the cover without border) recto, contents verso, leaf with explanation recto, introduction and text illustrated with 11 monochrome plates and one large folding plate ‘Panorama of Benares’ (160 x 498 mm), leaf with advertisement for ‘The Model of the Earth’ recto, list of views with printer’s credit verso. Original publisher’s green stitched paper wrappers with printed titles to front cover and advertisements to rear in black, advertisements to inner wrappers. The scarce pictorial programme for the ‘Diorama of Upper India’ shown daily at James Wyld’s Great Globe, Leicester Square in 1857. James Wyld’s ‘Diorama’ presented a series of views of Indian scenes and cities as an entertainment for the curious at his ‘Great Globe’ in Leicester Square, a venue of attraction and transport that during the Great Exhibition enjoyed a considerable success. Opening with a ‘View of Calcutta, the City of Palaces’, the spectator then undertakes a ‘journey’ through the scenes ;f ‘Hog Hunters’, ‘Rock-Cut Temples’, the ‘Black Pagoda’ (‘the celebrated Temple of the Sun’), ‘Dawk Travelling’, by ‘palanqueen to proceed into Juggernaut’ (the following plate and text), for ‘the great festival of Râth Jattra’, ‘Benares’ (depicted in the fold-out panorama), then ‘up the river’ Ganges to ‘Chunar or Chandelgurh’ (‘situated on a rock projecting into the river’), via a ‘Banyan Tree’ to ‘Bindachul’, thence to ‘Allahabad’, ‘Agra’ where there is a ‘Halt of Travellers’ to view before seeing ‘The Palace of Agra and the Taj Mahal’ where the ‘journey’ ends. Each of the scenes is illustrated in the guide and is accompanied by a descriptive text. ‘The present Diorama embraces only a portion of India. It illustrates, however, the principal Anglo-Indian capital of the country, and two of the principal Hindoo, and one of the finest Mohammedan, cities in the world, with its intermediate scenery; and the attention of the spectator cannot be counted upon for more than one hour and a-half, which is the time occupies by the Exhibition, but during that period the most interesting points, both of historical, pictorial, and geographical interest are exhibited.’ (From the Introduction). This descriptive catalogue is scarce and we can locate only two copies: a copy at Edinburgh in Scotland and that at Tufts in the US.
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konkrete poesie international. (rot. no. 21).

rot. Square 8vo. (150 x 150 mm). Original publisher’s printed wrappers. The scarce ‘konkrete poesie international’ issue of Max Bense’s ‘rot’ with a number of the contributions signed. The artist / poets involved comprise Diter Rot (Iceland), Edwin Morgan (Scotland), Ian Hamilton Finlay (Scotland), Vagn Steen (Denmark), Emmet Williams & Peter Greenham (USA), Ladislaw Novak, Josef Hirsal (Czechoslovakia), Bohumila Grà gerova (Czechoslovakia), Paul de Vree (Belgium), Pierre Garnier (France), John J Sharkey (England) and dom sylvester houà dard (Guernsey), Yüksel Pazarkaya (Turkey), Mathias Goeritz (Mexico), Carlo Belloli (Italy), Eugen Gomringer (Switzerland), Gerhard Rühm (Austria), Ernst Jandl (Austria), Kurt Sanmark (Finland), Ake Hodell (Sweden), Leif Nylà n (Sweden), Hans-Jà rgen Nielsen (Denmark), Jorgen Nash (Denmark), Augusto de Campos (Brazil), Ronaldo Azeredo (Brazil), Haroldo de Campos (Brazil), Jose Lino Grunewald (Brazil), Franz Mon (Germany), Dà cio Pignatari (Brazil), Reinhard Dà hl (Germany), Timm Ulrichs (Germany), Konrad Balder Schäuffelen (Germany), Edgard Braga (Brazil), Pedro Xisto (Brazil), Claus Bremer (Germany), Helmut Heißenbüttel (Germany) and Max Bense (Germany). This copy has the contributions signed by Max Bense, Emmett Williams, Pierre Garnier, Yuksel Pazarkaya, Eugen Gomringer, Gerhard Rühm, Franz Mon, Timm Ulrichs, Konrad Balder Schäuffelen. A short text by Bense is included after the poems.
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La Premià re Aventure Cà là ste de Mr Antipyrine.

JANCO, Marcel. Tzara, Tristan. 8vo. (235 x 166 mm). [8 unnumbered leaves]. Printed title with blank verso and seven leaves with Tzara’s verse drama ‘La Premià re Aventure Cà là ste de Mr Antipyrine’ with 6 full-page woodcut plates in azure and black and final monochrome woodcut tail-piece by Marcel Janco; three corrections in manuscript to text: ‘LA PARABOLE’ for ‘LA PARAPOLE’ (in red ink), ‘chacun’ for ‘chaq’ un’ (in ink) and ‘s’aplatisse’ for ‘s’aplatissa’ (in ink), justification printed to rear wrapper recto. Original publisher’s blue / grey stapled printed wrappers with typographic woodcut title by Janco in black with manuscript price: ‘2 Fr.’ to front cover, printed advertisements to rear cover. A very good copy of the first edition of Tzara’s first book and the first publication of Zurich dada. Although the edition is unspecified on the justification other than ten examples on ‘Hollande’ with hand-coloured woodcuts, Castleman gives an entire edition of 510 copies. ‘ . La Premià re Aventure Cà leste de M. [sic] Antipyrine, une belle impression, hasardeuse, balbutià (les coquilles sont corrigà es à la main); le texte est un poà me-thà âtre dont le lyrisme intense malmà ne l’attendu poà tique . Rien n’est plus à mouvant que cette danse du text et des compositions somptueuses en regard . un livre on ne peut plus simple, artisanal, parfait dans son imperfection.’ (see ‘Marcel Janco – Gravures et Reliefs’ by Yves Peyrà ). ‘When Janco went to Zurich to study architecture he met Arp and his own countryman Tzara. Together they constituted the core of Dada, bringing to the Cabaret Voltaire their tastes in art for exhibitions and their unconventional antics. After he and other Dada artists went to Paris he became disenchanted, particularly with those who were inclined to the theories that would mature into Surrealism.’ (Castleman). ‘It is the first volume of the Dada series and the first book published by Tzara, who was 19 at the time. Mr. Antipyrine’s name comes from the pills the poet used to take against headaches and not from a certain type of fire extinguisher, as suggested sometimes. The volume includes a selection of his early poems, ‘Cântece africane (African Songs)’, the first Dada manifesto under his own name, not under the ones of his characters.’ (‘Tzara. Dada. Etc.’). [Berggruen 1; A Century of Artist’s Books 176; Tzara. Dada. Etc. 5; Ex-Libris 5, 294; see ‘Dada’, Editions du Centre Pompidou, 2006].
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Troisià me Front. Poà mes de Guerre Suivi de Pià ces Dà tachà es Illustrà par l’Auteur / Third Front & Detached Pieces Translated by Roland Penrose & the Author.

MESENS, E[douard]. L[à on]. T[hà odore]. 8vo. (210 x 148 mm). [24 leaves; pp. 47, (i)]. Half-title (with Mesens’ presentation), ‘by the same author’ verso, printed title with biography verso, leaf with ‘Table’ recto and ‘Contents’ verso, section titles ‘Troisià me Front / Third Front’ and ‘Pià ces Dà tachà es / Detached Pieces’ and Mesens’ verse in English and French on facing pages illustrated with 5 monochrome illustrations by Mesens (the first double-page and negativised for the translation, i.e. the French image is a negative of the English positive), the final illustration is an artistic interpretation of a musical score titled ‘La Partition Complete / The Complete Score’; printed text in the original French and English translation throughout. Original publisher’s turquoise printed wrappers with titles to front cover and spine in black, yellow printed dust-jacket with matching titles to front cover and spine, advertisements to rear cover and flaps. Benjamin Pà ret’s copy with a warm presentation from Mesens and an additional manuscript with two of Mesens’ poems from ‘Alphabet Sourd Aveugle’. From the edition limited to 500 numbered copies on unwatermarked Arnold & Foster paper signed by Mesens, this inscribed ‘H. C.’ in red ink and with Mesens presentation in blue and black ink to the half-title: ‘A mon trà s cher Ami / Benjamin Pà ret, / [ce livre qui lui fût dà jà / envoyà au Mexique / pendant la guerre], avec / le cachet de garantie / de mon admiration de / toujours. E. L. T. M.’ Also included, loosely inserted, is a folded sheet of cream paper with the watermark ‘EXTRA STRONG’ (274 x 214 mm) from the ‘Hà tel Canterbury’ in Brussells, the verso with Mesens’ two manuscript 7-line poems ‘I’ and ‘L’ in black ink (each line of each poem begins with the title letter – a transcription is available on request) with the note ‘(1930 – "Alphabet sourd aveugle").’ beneath. A further note beneath a ruled line reads: ‘La letter I a à tà rà imprimà e dans ‘Petite Anthologie poà tique du Surrà alisme’ (page 107 – Editions Jeanne Bucher, Paris 1934) et dans ‘Antologia del Surrealismo’ (page 246 – Editioni [sic] di Uomo – Milano 1944). Sur ces deux rà impressions / le mot ‘IMMENSE’, qui termine le poà me fait dà faut.’ The first volume in the ‘London Gallery Editions’ series ‘Collections of Recent French Poetry’, edited by Mesens, translated by Roland Penrose and Mesens. Illustrated throughout with diagrams, drawings and a musical score.
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L’Arbre des voyageurs.

MIRO, Joan. Tzara, Tzara. Large 8vo. (252 x 174 mm). pp. 98, (ii), (i). Leaf with half-title, ‘Du Même Auteur’ verso, leaf with printed title, leaf with printed dedication and Tzara’s verse illustrated with 4 original monochrome lithographs by Joan Mirà , ‘Table’ and final leaf with justification recto and achevà d’imprimer verso. Original publisher’s printed wrappers with titles and publisher’s vignette in black to front cover and titles to spine. A very good unopened copy of Joan Miro’s first illustrated book. From the edition limited to 503 numbered copies, with this one of 65 on và lin d’Arches signed by Tzara and Mirà and with Miro’s four original lithographs. ‘L’Arbre des Voyageurs’ was Joan Mirà ‘s first illustrated book to feature original prints. Only the first 101 copies are signed and have the four lithographs. ‘I should tell you that [Tzara] was one of the first to see and like my painting. On my end, I have long considered his poetry to be of great spitirual value and his ‘dada’ position has always been extremely appealing to me, as clairvoyance and as a method of action . If I have done the lithographs in the way I have done them, it was because his poetry – desertlike, with blinding showers of sand – suggested them to me.’ (Mirà writing to Renà Gaffà about his motivation for the lithograph illustration – see ‘Surrealist Prints’, pg. 21). [Cramer 1].
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Yvette Guilbert. (SÃ rie Anglaise).

TOULOUSE-LAUTREC. Folio. (506 x 386 mm). Leaf with justification verso, half-title, title printed in red and black with publisher’s vignette, list of plates and biographical text concerning Guilbert (pp. iii) and 8 lithographs by Toulouse-Lautrec, each on tinted paper with tissue guardleaf with printed title. Original publisher’s green cloth-backed printed boards, front board with monochrome lithograph by Toulouse-Lautrec and titles. The English edition of Toulouse-Lautrec’s ‘Yvette Guilbert’, a From the edition limited to 350 copies, with this copy unnumbered, as with most sets. At the initiative of W. H. B. Sands, Toulouse-Lautrec prepared this series of lithographs of the famous and enormously popular songstress Yvette Guilbert, proponent of the Yvette-style, which required the delivery of spicy lyrics in a neutral and deadpan manner with no theatricality or gesture. Not to be confused with the illustrated book published by L’Estampe Originale in 1894, this edition – entirely different in form and content – features a text by Arthur Byl translated into English by Alexander Texeira de Mattos. ‘There are both laughter and tears in Yvette’s rà pertoire. She is really a very great artist, this thin, undulating, almost ugly woman. Life is kind to her today, and she deserves to be congratulated. She has known days of misery: it is but just that she should now enjoy long years of happiness and success.’ (Byl writing in the text). [Wittrock 271 – 279].
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to be with art is all we ask.

GILBERT & GEORGE. 8vo. (204 x 122 mm). [4 leaves; pp. 8]. Printed text with single monochrome photographic plate entitled ‘Frozen into a gazing for you, Art.’ as frontispiece. Original publisher’s printed wrappers with titles in black to front cover and justification to rear cover, loose in the original mailing addressed envelope with the stamp "To be with art is all we ask". An excellent copy of Gilbert & George’s so-called ‘Second Booklet’ with the original signed letter of presentation. From the edition limited to 300 numbered copies, numbered in ink to the rear cover and with the ‘GG’ stamp in red to the final page of text. The artists’ preface reads: "This booklet illustrates with words and one plate our feelings as sculptors on the subject of Art / When we did it we felt very light and we hope that you read it in the same light". This copy also includes, loosely inserted, the typewritten presentation letter from the artists signed in pink ink, printed on their ‘Art for All’ headed paper (252 x 202 mm) recto only and dated 16th November 1970: ‘Dear Van Graevenitz [in sepia ink], / We have taken the liberty of sending / to you this, our new booklet entitled ‘To be with / Art is all we ask’. / As this work contains certain elements of news and / need we felt a great obligation to present it dir- / ectly to you in this way. / Please accept it in the spirit in which it is in- / tended together with our compliments and best wishes. / Yours Sincerely / Gilbert and George [in pink ink] / London. 1970.’ Gerhard von Graevenitz (1934 – 1983) was a German kinetic artist, one of the founders of Nouvelle Tendance and a member of the op-art movement. [(Eindhoven) Gilbert & George 1968 to 1980, pg. 81; Die Sammlung Marzona in der Kunstbibliothek pg.120].
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Underneath the Arches’. Anniversary. (The most fascinating, realistic, beautiful, dusty and serious art piece you have ever seen).

GILBERT & GEORGE. Single sheet of folded card, (198 x 252 mm) Small colour illustration showing Gilbert & George signed by each beneath their image, printed text with manuscript and the ‘G & G’ stamp recto only, the card folded as issued for mailing and with address and stamp verso. One of the earliest items of Gilbert & George ephemera, the scarce signed invitation to one of the first public performances of ‘The Singing Sculpture’, in a railway arch in East London. The card reads as follows: ‘We would very much like you to be present at 3pm [in ink] on 26th [also in ink] October when we present the above piece in the most naturalistic form, revealing to you a clear picture of avant garde art. Heading East from the Tower of London along Royal Mint Street brings you to Cable Street where we have chosen Railway Arch No. 8 for the historical occasion of our anniversary of ‘Underneath the Arches’.’ The exact time and date have been hand written within the printed text, leading one to assume that there were several performances on different days (the artists were known to have performed the sculpture for seven hours per day for a week); the only other example we have seen featured the same date. Printed above the text is a reproduction of a drawing of Gilbert & George standing either side of a gramophone record player. Their faces are hand coloured and each has signed in ink under their portrait. The card carries the standard red ‘GG’ stamp, and when folded was sealed for postage using a small circular red seal which is still present; this copy was addressed and mailed to Ritsaert ten Cate’s legendary Dutch ‘Gallery Mickery’ (the franking is dated ’21 OCT / 1969′) in Loenersloot and features the manuscript notes ‘Roland Rees / Pip Simmons / Gilbert / George’ in black ink recto.
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S. M. S. (Shit Must Stop). Deluxe Issue. Nos. 1 – 6. (All Published).

S. M. S. Copley, William. 6 portfolios. (346 x 290 mm). A collection of over 70 original multiples, almost all of which are signed, in various formats and techniques, kept in 6 portfolios. Each portfolio with cover designed by a different artist, loose in original printed card mailing boxes as issued. A complete set of the deluxe issue of William Copley’s S. M. S. (Shit Must Stop) periodical. From the edition limited to 2,000 copies (although fewer were assembled), with this one of the rare deluxe sets with the majority of the multiples signed by the participating artists. ‘S[hit]. M[ust]. S[top]. is a portable gallery of contemporary hyper-awareness.’ (From a manifesto for The Letter Edged in Black Press). In the deluxe issue, almost every item in the set is signed by the contributing artist. Notable exceptions are Autograf, the Russian writer who contributed to issue 3, who was unable to sign his work for political reasons: ‘Autograf is a pseudonym for a poet in Moscow . it is important for him to maintain his anonymity’. Congo, the infamous chimpanzee with a taste for abstract painting did not sign his cover for issue 5: ‘S. M. S. regrets we are unable to obtain his signature for these deluxe copies’. Highlights of the periodical, which contains a large collection of multiples in various techniques and materials (paper, board, plastic, facsimiles, letters, books, objects, tapes, etc.), include Man Ray’s piece depicting Leonardo da Vinci smoking a cigar, Richard Hamilton’s nostalgic signed postcard with the inscription ‘Wish you were here’, Yoko Ono’s plastic bag with poem, glue and the instruction that urges you to break your favourite cup and repair it with the glue and the poem, as well as signed pieces by Lichtenstein, James Lee Byars, Bruce Nauman, Meret Oppenheim, Christo, Claes Oldenburg, Alain Jacquet, Ray Johnson, Dick Higgins, Arman, Mel Ramos, John Cage, Di[e]ter Rot[h], La Monte Young, Marcel Duchamp (the cover for issue 2 which was never signed due to Duchamp’s death) and others. Each issue has the a leaf listing the works included signed by Copley. SMS 1: James Lee Byars, Christo, Richard Hamilton, La Monte Young & others. SMS 2: Marcel Duchamp, Alain Jacquet, Meret Oppenheim, George Reavey & others. SMS 3: Enrico Baj, Dick Higgins, Joseph Kosuth, Roland Penrose, Man Ray, Terry Riley & others. SMS 4: Arman, John Cage, On Kawara, Roy Lichtenstein, Domenico Rotella & others. SMS 5: William Copley, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Mel Ramos, Lawrence Weiner. SMS 6: Dieter Roth, Ronoldo Ferri, Claes Oldenburg, Jean Reavey, Bernar Venet. William Copley founded his S. M. S. studio in the spirit of the late sixties, the students’ revolts, the experiments in art, literature, painting etc. It was during this period that Pop Art, Concept Art, Performance, Minimal Art, and Fluxus were born. In these six portfolios all this is to be found. Copley ensured that money was no object to the realisation of any proposal, which made it possible to replicate a fragment of each artist’s oeuvre with great accuracy. ‘No manifesto made the claim then, so one must make it now: SMS turned art into the vehicle of Utopian wishes. First, it removed all boundaries between the mediums. Everything . received equal treatment . Moreover, SMS bypassed the hierarchical labyrinth of museums and established galleries . sending art into the world through the mail, it immersed art in the currents of real time . It [SMS] is a reminder of what is possible when artists have the opportunity to work without impediments. To have an impulse is to realize it. SMS makes a brilliant case for art in real time.’ (Carter Ratcliff).
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Aphrodite. Moeurs Antiques. Eaux-Fortes Originales en Couleurs Gravà es par Edouard Chimot.

CHIMOT, Edouard. Louÿs, Pierre. Small folio. (338 x 274 mm). pp. xiv, (i), 257, (i), (i). Half-title with justification verso, original etching by Chimot as frontispiece in five states, leaf with Louÿs dedication to Albert Bernard, ‘Prà face’’Livre Premier’ to ‘Live Cinquià me’ of Louÿs’s text, ’Table’ and final leaf with achieve d’imprimer illustrated with 15 original etchings together with the five additional ‘planches libres’ (issued only with certain copies), all in a number of states, together with the ‘dossier complete d’une planche [libre] – see below; head- and tail-pieces and four-line initials throughout. Full dark green crushed morocco by Mercier with his signature gilt (‘Mercier suc de son pere 193?’), copper plate for one of the Chimot illustrations inlaid in the front board, doublures in red morocco with colour and gilt acanthus borders, additional border of brown morocco with gilt star tools, burgundy silk moirà guards, marbled endpapers, banded spine with gilt titles in six compartments, original publisher’s etched printed wrappers by A. Laroche and backstrips (also for suites &c.) preserved, a.e.g., morocco-backed marbled board chemise and matching slipcase. Copy number 1 on Japan Blanc Supernacrà of Pierre Louÿs’ erotic text illustrated by Edouard Chimot with an original copper plate, original drawings and Chimot’s ‘planches libres’ included only with special copies. From the edition limited to 325 copies, with this copy number 1 of 5 à dition de tête examples on ‘Japon Blanc Supernacre contenant le dossier complet d’une des cinq planches libres, quatre à tats des vingt et une planches, le bon à tirer et le cuivre original barrà ’; the ‘dossier complet’ includes a number of proofs and original drawings and watercolours. The additional material is as follows: 1. The 21 plates (including the 5 planches libres,) in 4 or 5 states (etched proof in monochrome, etched proof with remarques, etched proof in colour without black, etched proof in different colour and final state in colour); all plates in 5 states save plate 15 which is in 4 states: only 4 are called for. 2.’Cinq Planches Libres d’Edouard Chimot’: These 5 etchings, each in 5 states, are bound within the text; the original wrapper and backstop for these plates is preserved. 3. ‘Dossier Complet d’une Planche’: The ‘dossier’ is for the plate ‘Elle se fit à genius deviant Rhodis … ‘ and includes an original coloured crayon drawing and 2 other drawings (one is the drawing on tracing paper for the transfer to the copper plate) signed in violet ink, 10 different states of the plate, 6 are annotated and signed or initialled (2 of these are inscribed Bon à Tirer) – 13 leaves in total; the original wrapper and backstop for the dossier is preserved. ‘Les ornements et culs-de-lampe ont à tà extraits de la collection à gyptienne Champollion le Jeune.’ (From the achevà d’imprimer).
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491. 50 Ans de Plaisir. 4 Mars 1949.

PICABIA, Francis. Tapià , Michel. (Ed.). Large folio. (650 x 500 mm). [2 bifolia]. Printed text in black recto and verso beneath opening banner headline, orange printed text overlaid, dada typography throughout and 18 monochrome illustrations of works by Picabia. Folded as issued, but in exceptional condition without the usual browning and tears. The scarce large format catalogue / single issue periodical ‘491’ issued for Francis Picabia’s retrospective ’50 Ans de Plaisir’. In the spring of 1949, a large retrospective exhibition on Francis Picabia – the year 1949 saw Picabia turn 70 – was organized by the Galerie Renà Drouin. The catalogue for the exhibition, titled ‘491’, was published in a newspaper format, its title recalling Alfred Stieglitz’s ‘291’ (1915 – 1916), to which Picabia made important contributions, Picabia’s own ‘391’ (1917 – 1924) and prefiguring ‘591’ (1952) published by PAB (Pierre-Andrà Benoit) with poems and illustration by Picabia shortly before his death, and the final ‘691’ (1959), a collaboration between Arp, Duchamp and Tzara (with a cover by Picabia) published in memoriam by PAB after Picabia’s death in 1953. ‘491’ features text by Michel Tapià (’50 Ans de Plaisir’), Andrà Breton (‘Jumelles pour Yeux Bandà s’), Michel Seuphor (‘Rà bus’), Charles Estienne (‘Une Pierre de Scandale’), Gabrielle Buffet (‘Raccourci’), Camille Bryen (‘La Saint Picabia’), Pierre de Massot (‘Le Magicien’), Francis Bott (‘It’s A Long Way to Tipperary’) as well as other hommages, poems and appreciations. The 18 illustrations, all in monochrome throughout, are of works by Francis Picabia, ranging from a post-impressionist lseascape of 1905, through his Cubist phase to the dada period (‘Parade Amoureuse’ and ‘La Double Monde’ for example), paintings of the ’20s (Le Beau Charcutier’, ‘Carnaval’ and ‘Barcelone’) and on to works of the ’30s and ’40s. The final page of the catalogue lists the 136 works displayed dating from 1897 to 1949; many of the works were lent by the contributors to ‘491’ and other friends and patrons of Picabia. Michel Tapià de Celeyran (he wrote under the name Michel Tapià ) was a cousin of Toulouse-Lautrec and one of the most important French critics and theorists of the twentieth century. An early exponent of Abstract Expressionism through his essay Un Art Autre and, indeed, a Tachist (the European arm of Abstract Expressionism as expressed by Wols, Tapià and Georges Mathieu) in his own right, Tapià was also responsible for the Turin-based International Centre of Aesthetic Research, was linked to the Japanese Gutai group and had a direct influence on Fluxus. Folded as issued, this copy is in remarkable condition with no splits, tears, or wear at the folds.
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Mi Opinion Sobre la Exposicion de Artistas Norteamericanos. (Contribucion al Problema del Arte en America).

TORRES-GARCIA, J[oaquin]. 8vo. (228 x 162 mm). [10 leaves; pp. 19, (i)]. Blank leaf with monochrome drawing in ink by Torres-Garcia verso (see below), printed title and eight leaves with Torres-Garcia’s text recto and verso dated ‘Montevideo, 5 de Setiembre de 1941’ at foot of text to final recto. Original publisher’s printed wrappers stapled as issued, monochrome illustration and titles in black to front cover, additional protective portfolio and wool-lined black card box with red leather label with gilt title to spine. A scarce copy of Torres-Garcia’s critical lecture on North American art and artists with an original drawing by the artist. Torres-Garcia’s original drawing, executed in black ink to the verso of the initial blank and signed with his initials ‘J. T. G.’ at lower left, is typical of his Universal Constructivist oeuvre, depicting a bottle, a jar, a mark, the sun, a fish, a man and a building, each within its own section but unified by the page and Torres-Garcia’s drawn frame. ‘During the late 1930s and ‘40s, Torres-GarcÃa devoted himself to developing and propagating his theories on Constructivist art. Written while he was delivering his lessons on ‘Universalismo constructivo’, this lecture contains many of aspects of his theory of a new art for Latin America, including his convictions that American artists must embody the ‘new man’; that new forms of art must be based on Creole sources; and that these sources must be mined for new abstract forms, new rhythms, and tones. In this text Torres-GarcÃa stresses that this ‘new man’ or ‘nueva raza’ encompasses the entire hemisphere, Latin and Anglo-Saxon America. Here, as in other texts, the poet Walt Whitman (1819 – 1892) exemplifies this universal American man for Torres-GarcÃa.’ (Maria C. Gaztambide, Museum Fine Arts Houston). The painter, sculptor, muralist and book illustrator and designer Joaquin Torres-Garciá (1874 – 1949) was born in Uruguay to a Catalan father and an Uruguyan mother. The family settled in Barcelona in 1891 where Torres-Garciá studied art, eventually taking the reins of Catalan modernism. By 1900 Torres-Garcia had begun to associate with Picasso and others who frequented the cafe Els Quatre Gats in Barcelona, a city that was central to his artistic inspiration and persona. After a spiritual crisis, the artist began assisting Gaudi with stained glass, first for the cathedral in Palma, Mallorca and later for the Sagrada Familia. Torres-Garciá is credited as the father of South American modern art, but was, perhaps, more important for his fusion of Cubism and Constructivism which was labelled Universal Constructivism. A highly regarded figure, Torres-Garciá was an artists’ artist and was much admired by artists as diverse as Picasso, Mondrian, van Doesburg, Hà lion and Arp.
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The Limericks. A Postal Sculpture in Eight-Parts. (Complete Set).

GILBERT & GEORGE. 8 folded sheets of card. (Each c.125 x 200 mm). Each card illustrated with a photo-based design printed in black to the front, dedication and title verso (the dedication as per the addressed envelopes), printed poetic text caption within the card and signatures of the artists in red ink; cards are printed alternately on cream or white paper with deckle edges. Cards presented loose in the original addressed and mailed G & G envelope, with the artist’s red ‘Towards Progress and Understanding in Art’ stamp to the front, and their stamped initials to the rear flap. An excellent complete set of Gilbert and George’s second and decidedly most elusive postal sculptures. Each element was mailed during the course of 1971, the cards themselves with the printed dates 11th March – 19th May, the franking revealing they were sent April – October. The cards are reflective of Gilbert & George’s socio-philosophic ‘dead-pan’ concerns / enthusiasms: boredom, manliness, worldliness, etc. Each card is signed in red ink by Gilbert & George and each has printed dedication to Mr. and Mrs. von Graevenitz and manuscript address of Mr. and Mrs. von Graevenitz on each envelope. Cards are entitled as follows: 1st Limerick – Lost Day, 11 March, 1971. 2nd Limerick – Shyness, 29th March 1971. 3rd Limerick – Experience, 2nd April, 1971. 4th Limerick – Worldliness, 13th April, 1971. 5th Limerick – Idiot Ambition, 24th April, 1971. 6th Limerick – Normal Boredom, 1st May, 1971. 7th Limerick – Manliness, 15th May, 1971. Last Limerick – Artist’s Culture, 19th May, 1971. Gerhard von Graevenitz (1934 – 1983) was a German kinetic artist, one of the founders of Nouvelle Tendance and a member of the op-art movement. [(Eindhoven) Gilbert & George 1968 to 1980, pp. 86 – 87; Die Sammlung Marzona in der Kunstbibliothek pg.120].
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Table of Elements.

LEAVITT, Nancy. Alexander, Pamela. 8vo. (184 x 126 mm). [34 unnumbered leaves]. Leaf with manuscript title, leaf with mounted gouache and calligraphic text in a variety of inks with hand-painted decoration throughout on white and marbled paper, mounted gouaches, inserted leaves of marbled paper with excisions to form windows, mounted leaves to form folding plates and so on, final leaf with colophon with Leavitt’s signature and dated ‘1989’. Original black marbled handmade cloth, original gouache pasted to spine, marbled endpapers, matching cloth box with mounted gouache to spine. Nancy Leavitt’s unique handmade calligraphic artist book for Pamela Alexander’s poem ‘Table of Elements’. A beautiful example of the work of Nancy Leavitt incorporating her work as an artist, calligrapher, and binder. For this book, made entirely by hand, Leavitt chose Pamela Alexander’s meditative 62-line poem ‘Table of Elements’ and has written and illuminated the whole. Large capitals predominate, with smaller lowercase flourishes to create the rise en page, which Leavitt has then illuminated with watercolour, inserted leaves of marbled paper, small mounted gouaches, leaves stitched-in to create folding pages, and additional elements derived from the text itself. The colophon, signed by Leavitt in pencil, and written in a variety of coloured inks, is instructive: ‘COLOPHON / POETRY – Pamela Alexander / PAINTING & Marbled / Papers / CALLIGRAPHY / BINDING – c. Nancy Leavitt, 1989’; Leavitt’s signature and the date are beneath in pencil and at right the note ‘Gouache on TH Saunders’. Leavitt has created more than 100 unique books since the mid-1980s and this work, dated 1989, appears to be the fifth she created. Inspired by nature and biology (Leavitt states ‘ . I could not have had a better background in art than the one I had in biology . ‘), Leavitt’s exceptional work is held in prestigious institutions and private collections worldwide. A calligraphic version – plausibly derived from the present version – was published in the ‘Calligraphy Review’ in 1992.