Shapero Rare Books Archives - inBiblio
last 7 days
last 30 days

Shapero Rare Books

placeholder

Narrative of voyages to explore the shores of Africa, Arabia, and Madagascar; performed in H.M. ships Leven and Barracouta, under the direction of Captain W.F. Owen, R.N. by command of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty.

OWEN, William Fitzwilliam. First edition. 2 volumes, 8vo., xxiii, 434; viii, 420 pp., errata slip, 5 lithograph plates (lightly spotted), 4 folding charts and 6 vignettes, contemporary ink inscription at head of titles, with long loosely inserted autograph letter to the mother of Lt. Henry Gibbons relating the news of his death (the envelope taped to the page in the narrative containing details of his burial), note by Gibbons’ sister Mrs J. H. Pindar) tipped-in, contemporary half green calf, spines tanned, one label defective, modern green calf drop-backed box. Lt. Henry Gibbons served on H.M.S. Leven and died on December 26th 1822 from fever. The same fate was to befall Charles William Browne who wrote the letter to Gibbons’ mother. The narrative records that Gibbons’ remains were deposited in ‘a beautifully secluded spot with full military honours’ and continues with Browne’s eulogy to his friend. Owen’s orders were to commence his first survey at the mouth of the Keiskamma to Delagoa Bay and in a second survey travel between Delagoa Bay along the coasts of Sofala and Mozambique. His brief was to gather information regarding the numbers and character of the natives, their occupations, modes of subsistence etc., the nature of the soil and production. In the second instance he should investigate the navigability of the rivers, the Imhamban, the Sofala and Quilimaney to receive particular attention. Owen accurately charted the Arabian Peninsula. He also delineated both the Atlantic and Pacific coastlines of South Africa with great accuracy and also began the scientific exploration of the Zambezi. Mendelssohn p133.
placeholder

The North Pole. With an introduction by Theodore Roosevelt.

PEARY, Robert. 8vo., signed, limited "General Hubbard" edition, one of 500 copies signed by Peary, xxxii, 373, [1, blank] pages. With numerous illustrations, a folding map, and signed limitation page inserted throughout. Publisher’s deluxe binding of half blue levant morocco over blue cloth boards, an excellent copy. The narrative of Peary’s final polar expediton that culminated in him becoming the first man to reach the North Pole. Born in Pennsylvania in 1856, Robert Edwin Peary was an American explorer who faced great criticism in his day for claiming to be the first person to have reached the geographic North Pole. It is now suspected that he may have been 30 to 60 miles short of the Pole, but is still credited with the achievement. Peary was obsessed with the idea of being first to to North Pole. To prepare for his goal, between 1886 and 1897, Robert E. Peary led five expeditions to Greenland and Arctic Canada. After departing from New York City on July 16, 1905, aboard the Roosevelt, Peary sledged to within 175 miles of the Pole in 1906. Melted ice blocking the sea path thwarted the mission’s completion. (Peary’s 1905-1906 expedition had been backed by President Theodore Roosevelt, and his team was subsequently armed with the Roosevelt, which was considered a state-of-the-art vessel at the time and had the ability to cut through ice.) On a new expedition in 1909, once again via the Roosevelt, but this time employing 24 men, 19 sledges and 133 dogs, Peary finally succeeded in reaching it—or at least he claimed to have. Leading a party that consisted of himself, his African-American assistant Matthew Henson, and the Inuits Ootah, Egingwah, Seegloo and Ooqueah, Peary had to fight against moving ice floes that may have caused him to miscalculate his position. "Commander Peary has made all dwellers in the civilized world his debtors . He has performed one of the great feats of our time; he has won high honour for himself and for his country; and we welcome his story of the triumph which he won in the immense solitudes of the wintry north." (From Theodore Roosevelt’s introduction). Arctic Bib., 13230.
placeholder

A Geographical, statistical, and historical description of the district, or zila, of Dinajpur, in the province, or soubah, of Bengal . Published with the monthly numbers of the Gleanings in Science, and the Journal of the Asiatic society.

BUCHANAN, Francis. First edition. 8vo., xi, 342 pp., folding table at end, a little light spotting, modern brown half morocco, green morocco lettering piece, an excellent example. Rare. Buchanan, (1762–1829), East India Company surgeon and botanist, graduated MA from Glasgow in 1779 and MD from Edinburgh in 1783, and in 1784, hoping to establish himself as a botanist, he joined the East India Company’s service as a medical officer. To his disappointment, he had to serve as a ship’s surgeon for ten years before finally obtaining a land post in Bengal as an assistant surgeon in 1794. In 1795 he accompanied Captain Michael Symes on Britain’s first political mission to Ava and put together a sizeable Burmese herbarium. This he subsequently presented to the company in the hope of gaining scientific recognition and more elevated employment. In 1800 Lord Wellesley appointed him to survey the newly conquered kingdom of Mysore, a posting which enabled him to collect a vast number of new botanical specimens. In 1802 Buchanan joined the British embassy to Katmandu and began assembling a Nepalese herbarium. In 1804 Wellesley made him both his personal physician and director of the Natural History Project of India, an ambitious scheme to classify and illustrate all the birds and animals of south Asia. But Wellesley’s rift with the court of directors doomed the project from the start and with it the prospects of his favourites; hence when he sailed for London in August 1805 Buchanan went with him, abandoning the menagerie at Barrackpore. Back in London Buchanan was made a fellow of the Royal Society on 1 May 1806. In 1807 he was promoted to surgeon and dispatched to conduct a topographical survey of Bengal, a project which dominated the remainder of his life in India. As in Mysore, Buchanan moulded the survey to suit his botanical interests, but at the same time collected voluminous social, economic, and archaeological information on the districts he toured, albeit often patchy in quality and depth. In November 1814 Buchanan was finally appointed superintendent of the botanic garden at Calcutta, a post he had long coveted, but by then he was ready to retire. He left India in early 1815, embittered by Lord Moira’s confiscation of 750 of his drawings. His disappointments continued in London, where his gift to the court of directors of his entire natural history collection went largely unremarked. He had planned in retirement to edit his Bengal survey reports, but in the wake of his falling-out with the company he concentrated instead on writing up his natural history manuscripts, publishing in 1819 The Kingdom of Nepal and Genealogies of the Hindus, followed in 1822 by Fishes Found in the River Ganges. In later life he compiled systematic commentaries on the pre-Linnaean classics of south Asian botany by Rheede and Rumphius, four parts of which were published by the Linnean Society. The Bengal survey, which had cost £30,000, languished unnoticed in East India House until 1838, when R. M. Martin published a harshly edited version in three volumes, entitled The History, Antiquities, Topography, and Statistics of Eastern India. (ODNB).
placeholder

Unknown Mongolia; a record of travel and exploration in north-west Mongolia and Dzungaria.

CARRUTHERS, Douglas; J. H. Miller. First edition. Two volumes, 8vo., xviii, 318; x, 319-659pp., 2 frontispieces, 120 plates including folding panoramas, 4 folding maps, original blue cloth gilt, an excellent example. Fine copy of the first edition of this richly illustrated "classic work on travel, exploration, scientific endeavours, and big game hunting" (Czech). In 1910-11, the author’s party embarked on an expedition across southern Siberia to the Mongolian frontiers and the Yenisei Basin. He surveyed at Chuguchak, Hami, Guchen, Bogdo-Ola mountains, etc. An excellent association copy. John Frederick Baddeley was a British traveller, journalist and scholar, best remembered for his works on the Caucasus region and Russia, particularly his monumental Russia, Mongolia, China, 1919). The volumes were presented to him by Sir William Mather, the British industrialist and politician and to whom his 1919 work is dedicated, ‘To my friend John Baddeley with the wish that the year 1914 may record the success of his Magnum opus on ancient Mongolia.’. Beneath this inscription Baddeley wrote in 1932 ‘Sir William Mather’s writing. The war delayed publication of my book till 1919. I first met Carruthers at dinner at Mather’s home in Kensington Palace Gardens, in, I think, 1913. John F. Baddeley, Oxford, 8 Sept. 1932’. Czech, Asian, p45; Yakushi C65.
placeholder

The history of Persia. Containing, the lives and memorable actions of its kings from the first erecting of that monarchy to this time; an exact Description of all its Dominions; a curious Account of India, China, Tartary, Kermon, Arabia, Nixabur, and the Islands of Ceylon and Timor; as also of all Cities occasionally mention’d, as Schiras, Samarkand, Bokara, &c. Manners and Customs of those People, Persian Worshippers of Fire; Plants, Beasts, Product, and Trade. With many instructive and pleasant digressions, being remarkable Stories or Passages, occasionally occurring, as Strange Burials; Burning of the Dead; Liquors of several Countries; Hunting; Fishing; Practice of Physick; famous Physicians in the East; Actions of Tamerlan, &c. To which is added, an abridgment of the lives of the kings of Harmuz, or Ormuz. The Persian history written in Arabick, by Mirkond, a famous Eastern Author that of Ormuz, by Torunxa, King of that Island, both of them translated into Spanish, by Antony Teixe

STEVENS, John. First edition. 8vo., [16],263,266-306,305-416 pp.,engraved frontispiece, contemporary calf gilt, morocco lettering piece, joints cracked but firm, corners bumped, a very good copy. A translation, with additions, of Pedro Teixeira’s ‘Relaciones . d’el origen . de los reyes de Persia, . ‘, first published in 1610, and itself compiled from the histories of Mir Khwand and Turan Shah. The text is continuous despite pagination. Goldsmiths 5195.
placeholder
placeholder

Journal of an embassy from the Governor-General of India to the court of Ava . with an appendix, containing a description of fossil remains by Professor Buckland and Mr. Clift.

CRAWFURD, John. Second edition, 2 volumes, 8vo., x, 541; viii, 319, [1], 163 pp., large folding map, 2 plans (1 folding), 6 aquatint plates (4 folding), 5 vignettes in text, contemporary contemporary polished calf gilt, raised bands, apparently lacking half-titles, scattered spotting, map repaired, slight wear to extremities The rare description of the Kingdom of Burma by the British Envoy Crawfurd was first published in 4to in 1829 in one volume. John Crawfurd, 1783-1868, took a medical appointment in India, and served for five years with the army in the North-west Provinces. At the end of that time he was transferred to Penang, where he acquired an extensive knowledge of the language and the people. In 1811, he went on the expedition which ended in the conquest of Java. During the occupation of Java, i.e. from 1811 to 1817, Crawfurd filled some of the principal civil and political posts on the island; and it was only on the restoration of the territory to the Dutch that he resigned office and returned to England. In the he wrote a ‘History of the Indian Archipelago,’ 1820. Having completed this work he returned to India, only, however, to leave it again immediately for the courts of Siam and Cochin China, to which he was accredited as envoy by the Marquis of Hastings. This mission he carried through with complete success, and on the retirement of Sir Stamford Raffles from the government of Singapore in 1823, he was appointed to administer that settlement. cf. Abbey, Travel 405 (another edition).
placeholder

Journey from Madras through the countries of Mysore, Canara, and Malabar performed under the orders of the most noble the Marquis Wellesley, Governor General of India, for the express purpose of investigating the state of agriculture, arts, and commerce; the religion, manners, and customs; the history natural and civil, and antiquities, in the dominions of the Rajah of Mysore, and the countries acquired by the Honourable East India Company, in the late and former wars, from Tippoo Sultaun. Published under the authority and patronage of the Honourable the Directors of the East India Company.

BUCHANAN, Francis. First Edition. 3 volumes, 4to., (28cm) engraved portrait frontispiece, one further unnumbered portrait, one coloured folding map and 37 numbered plates (one hand-coloured), 5 folding tables, contemporary russia gilt, a fine set. A superb set from the library of Matthew Boulton, pioneer of the Industrial Revolution. An East India Company surgeon and botanist, Buchanan accompanied Captain Michael Symes on Britain’s first political mission to Ava in 1795 and put together a sizeable Burmese herbarium. This he subsequently presented to the company in the hope of gaining scientific recognition and more elevated employment. In 1800 Lord Wellesley appointed him to survey the newly conquered kingdom of Mysore, a posting which enabled him to collect a vast number of new botanical specimens. At the same time his survey, in both its portrayal of Tipu Sultan as a rapacious tyrant and its inventory of Mysore’s natural wealth, vindicated Wellesley’s controversial conquest, thereby earning Buchanan the governor-general’s continued affection.
placeholder

In Darkest Africa or the quest, rescue, and retreat of Emin Governor of Equatoria.

STANLEY, Henry Morton. First U.S. edition. Inscribed presentation copy. 2 volumes, 8vo., xv, 529; xv, 472 pp., 2 pages ads at end, 2 frontispieces, 3 folding maps (2 large with tears to folds), 37 plates, numerous text illustrations, modern brown half morocco gilt over old marbled boards. Inscribed by Stanley: "With the best wishes from / Henry M Stanley/ To Major J. B. Pond." Also with Pond’s bookplate. Pond was a well-known lecture agent in the United States who engaged Stanley in 1886 for an extensive lecture tour. Stanley had to break off the tour to lead the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition but was re-engaged in 1890, albeit at a much higher fee. Stanley’s remarkable account of his expedition from the East Coast through the heart of Africa to the land of the Nile. This expedition was originally intended as a rescue mission for Emin Pasha after Khartoum fell into the hands of the Mahdists and General Gordon was killed. Although failing in its primary objective, the expedition accomplished great things, Stanley discovered the great snow-capped range of Ruwenzori, the Mountains of the Moon, besides a new lake which he named the Albert Edward N’yanza, and a large south-western extension of Lake Victoria, and he had come upon the pigmy tribes who had inhabited the great African forest since prehistoric times. On his way down to the coast, Stanley had concluded treaties with various native chiefs which he transferred to Sir William Mackinnon’s company and so laid the foundation of the British East African Protectorate.
placeholder

Travels into the inland parts of Africa: containing a description of the several nations for the space of six hundred miles up the River Gambia; their trade, habits, customs, language, manners, religion and government; the power, disposition and characters of some negro princes; with a particular account of Job Ben Solomon . To which is added, Capt. Stibbs’s voyage up the Gambia in the year 1723, to make discoveries; with an accurate map of that river taken on the spot: and many other copper plates. Also extracts from the Nubian’s geography, Leo the African, and other authors antient and modern, concerning the Niger, Nile, or Gambia, and observations thereon .

MOORE, Francis First edition, 8vo., xi, xiii, 305, [1], 86, [4], 23, [1] pp., large folding map of the River Gambia (splits to folds), 11 engraved plates and plans (1 folding), contemporary sprinkled calf, double gilt fillets to covers, raised bands ruled in gilt, upper joint cracked but firm, head of spine worn, internally clean and fresh. Moore "was appointed in 1730 by the Royal African Company of England a writer at James Fort on James Island in the river Gambia. In January 1732 he was promoted to be factor at Joar in conjunction with William Roberts. He had much trouble with his colleague, who was a slave to drink and whose jealousy was extreme. Roberts finally betook himself to a town called Cower, about three miles away, along with all the servants of the factory, except the cook. He incited the natives to molest and threaten Moore, and was at length cashiered. Soon afterwards Moore went up five hundred miles inland, making careful observations and drawings. He left Africa in May 1735." (DNB).
placeholder

Ismailia: A narrative of the expedition to Central Africa for the suppression of the slave trade. Organized by Ismail, Khedive of Egypt.

BAKER, Samuel White. First edition. 2 volumes, 8vo., viii, 447; viii, 588 pp., 2 portrait frontispieces, numerous wood-engraved plates, 2 maps (1 large folding), original green cloth gilt, light wear to extremities, a fine example. In 1869, Baker, one of the greatest explorers of Africa, was appointed by the Khedive Isma’il to a four-year term as governor-general of the equatorial Nile basin, with the rank of pasha and major-general in the Ottoman army. It was the most senior post a European ever received under an Egyptian administration. According to the khedive’s firman, Baker’s duties included annexing the equatorial Nile basin, establishing Egyptian authority over the region south of Gondokoro, suppressing the slave trade, introducing cotton cultivation, organizing a network of trading stations throughout the annexed territories, and opening the great lakes near the equator to navigation. The expedition produced mixed results. Although he had suppressed the slave trade in some areas and had extended the khedive’s authority to Gondokoro and Fatick, he had failed to pacify the lawless region between these two places. Moreover, he was unable to annex the wealthy kingdoms of Bunyoro and Buganda. Despite Baker’s dubious performance, the khedive bestowed on him the imperial order of the Osmanieh, second class. Baker received a hero’s welcome on his return to England. Apart from various glowing newspaper accounts of his travels, the prince of Wales met him to learn first-hand of his experiences in Africa. On 8 December 1873 he received an enthusiastic reception at the Royal Geographical Society, and the following year he published the present account which further enhanced his popularity. Blackmer 66; Hilmy I, 49 (later edition); Czech p11.
placeholder

On a raft, and through the desert: the narrative of an artist’s journey through northern Syria and Kurdistan, by the Tigris to Mosul and Baghdad, and of a return Journey across the desert by the Euphrates and Palmyra to Damascus, over the anti-Lebanon to Baalbek and to Beyrout.

ELLIS, Tristram. First edition. 2 volumes, 4to., [iv], ii, [iv], 122 [ii (ads)]; [viii], 128, [ii (ads) pp., map and 38 etchings by the author, original parchment gilt, red roundel to upper cover, a little soiled, some small stains to covers, endpapers and preliminary leaves spotted, a good copy. Tristram Ellis (1844 – 1922), after studying painting in Paris, began to travel to sketch foreign scenes. In 1878, he spent six months in Cyprus, then under British occupation, where he contracted a fever. Despite this he returned with 50–60 watercolour sketches that were all sold to a dealer after their exhibition in Bond Street in April 1879. This success encouraged him to plan a more ambitious trip, and so on 1 October 1879 he boarded a steamship for Alexandria with the aim of visiting Syria, Asia Minor and Mesopotamia. Ellis succeeded in traveling from the Syrian coast, overland to Diyarbakir in southeast Turkey and then by raft down the Tigris to Mosul and Baghdad in Iraq.From Baghdad, Ellis traveled overland to Palmyra and Damascus in Syria and then to Beirut, Lebanon. After his return, he showed about 90 sketches from his travels, and sold them immediately. The present work contains the narrative of this journey. Blackmer 545.
placeholder

The American testimonial banquet to Henry M. Stanley. In recognition of his heroic achievements in the cause of humanity, science and civilization and a greeting to his chief officers. Portman Rooms, London. May 30th 1890.

STANLEY, Henry Morton]. First edition. 8vo., With a tipped-in photograph and an autograph letter by Stanley,12 printed leaves, on green or blue paper, mounted on thick white card. With photographic portraits of Stanley, W.G. Stairs, Thomas Heazle Parke, Robert Henry Nelson, and A.J. Mounteney-Jephson by Henry van de Weyde, London, mounted on 5 leaves, with two further photographic prints showing the Stanley Testimonial Shield and medallions designed by Henry Wellcome, both mounted on one page. Original calf, upper cover embossed with the shield of the United States emblazoned with the name ‘Stanley,’ and with the American eagle above, white-and-gold patterned endpapers, gilt edges, neatly rebacked, a very good copy. A scarce memorial of Stanley’s last expedition. Following the printed title, the text consists of a list of the Committee and honorary Stewards, eulogies on Stanley and the four other expedition members, a description of the Stanley Memorial shield, the menu, toast list and programme of music, and finally a list of those ‘present at the banquet.’ In 1890 a complimentary Dinner was given in London to Sir Henry Morton Stanley after his return from the Emin Pasha Relief Expediiton.
placeholder

Through the Dark Continent or the sources of the Nile around the great lakes of equatorial Africa and down the Livingstone River to the Atlantic Ocean.

STANLEY, Henry Morton. First edition, 2 volumes, 8vo., xiv, [1], 522; ix, 566pp., 2 frontispice portraits, 10 maps including 2 large folding maps in pockets at rear, 33 wood-engraved plates, illustrations in the text, original brown pictorial cloth gilt, neat repairs to spine extremities, an excellent set. The story of the Anglo-American expedition to Central Africa, commanded by Stanley and undertaken between 1874 and 1877. The discovery of the course of the Congo, though the greatest, was but one of the many geographical problems solved during this memorable expedition. Vast in size, "the procession that departed from Bagamoyo (Tanzania) on 17 November 1874 stretched for more than half a mile and included dozens of men carrying sections of the Lady Alice, the boat named for his seventeen-year-old fiancée, with which Stanley intended to explore Lakes Victoria and Tanganyika and Livingstone’s Lualaba River. During the next two and a half years, the expedition would struggle in temperatures reaching as high as 138 degrees; the powerful Emperor Mtesa of Uganda and the Wanyoro chief Mirambo would consume a great deal of Stanley’s time and test his diplomatic skills; he would have to negotiate with a notorious Arab ivory and slave trader named Tippu-Tib for safe passage of his men through the great rain forest; and he and his men would fight more than thirty skirmishes and battles on land and water against hostile tribes. The geographic prizes Stanley achieved on this expedition were unparalleled. He spent almost two months circumnavigating Lake Victoria, confirming that the only outlet was at Ripon Falls and hence establishing for good, he thought, the source of the Nile. He scouted Lake Albert, then moved south and west to Lake Tanganyika, which he also circumnavigated, proving it had no connection with Lake Albert. Stanley then solved the remaining geographical puzzle, determining that the Lualaba was not part of the Niger or Nile rivers but ultimately flowed into the Congo. He reached the Atlantic Ocean on 9 August 1877, after a journey of more than seven thousand miles, in utter exhaustion. Back in London, he learned that Alice had not waited for him" (Delaney). Mendelssohn II, p.380.
placeholder

Voyages and travels in India, Ceylon, the Red Sea, Abyssinia and Egypt in the years 1802, 1803, 1805, and 1806.

VALENTIA, George Annesley, Viscount. First edition, 3 volumes, 4to (37 x 26.5 cm), large paper presentation copy inscribed ‘Presented to the Royal Institution by the Author, April 16, 1810’, half-titles, 3 engraved vignettes, 69 engraved plates and maps, 11 double-page or folding, plate list at beginning of volume 1, advertisement leaf at end of volume 3, with 44 additional proof landscape engravings on India paper mounted, occasional faint spotting, occasional dusty margins, modern half morocco, lightly rubbed, covers lightly soiled, corners bumped, an excellent set. Rare large paper copy. George Annesley, Viscount Valentia, left England in June 1802 on the Minerva, for a Grand Tour of the East with Henry Salt. They were both antiquarians and avid collectors. Salt had earlier finished his training with the topographical draughtsman and diarist, Joseph Farington, and Valentia appointed him to be his official artist and secretary for the tour. The first volume deals with India and Sri Lanka – with sections on Benares, Calcutta, Lucknow, Ceylon, etc. – the second two volumes cover Abyssinia and the Red Sea, including much relating to Mocha. In Ethiopia Annesley visited Aksum, Adwa, and other parts of Tegré in 1805. There is a useful account of political developments since Bruce’s visit a quarter of a century earlier. ‘Salt’s work is notable not only because it continues the picturesque tradition, but also because by collecting views from different areas of the East he helped to visually reinforce the distinction between East and West. This polarization reflects the Orientalist-thinking of the time. Salt used the picturesque to conjure a vision of the East. He included elements of ‘exoticness’ such elephants and camels and unfamiliar foliage and vegetation. He also focused on the representation of numerous architectural ruins and religious buildings that seemed so foreign to a Western audience. While the construction of the landscape adhered to a Western tradition of painting, the content of his images was meant to showcase the diversity of the East for the purposes of Annesley’s displays back home.’ (Sara Miller McCune Collection, UCSB). Abbey, Travel 515 (note); Godrej and Rohatgi, p52; Hilmy, I, 38; Lowndes VII, 2747; Pankhust 12.
placeholder
placeholder

Collection of 35 official British Government reports and memoranda relating to East, West, and Central African affairs in the 1880’s and 1890’s.

AFRICA 1885-93. 35 items bound in three volumes, folio, contemporary red half morocco gilt, original wrappers not present, a very handsome collection. A beautifully presented collection of primary works concerning colonisation in Africa in the late nineteenth century. Includes much on slavery as well as the Emin Pasha Relief expedition. Volume 1: Correspondence respecting suppression of slave trade in East African water. 4 pp. [C.5559] 1888. Report on slave trade on the East coast of Africa: 1887-88. 87 pp. [C. 5578] 1888. Treaty between Her Majesty and His Majesty the King of Italy for the suppression of the African slave trade. [14. 9. 89] 6 pp. [C. 5901] 1890. General Act of the Brussels Conference, 1889-90; with annexed declaration. 37 pp. [C. 6048] 1890. Translations of protocols and general act of the slave trade conference held at Brussels, 1889-90; with annexed declaration. 191 pp. 1890. Papers relating to the trade in slaves from East Africa. 11 pp. [C. 6373] 1891. Protocols and general act of the West African conference. 313 pp. 1885. Correspondence relating to a petition from the Church Council of the Church of England in Natal. 14 pp. [C. 5489] 1888. Declarations exchanged between the government of Her Britannic Majesty and of His Majesty the King of Italy, for the demarcation of their respective spheres of influence in Eastern Africa. 3 pp. [C. 6316] 1891. Correspondence respecting the Expedition for the Relief of Emin Pasha: 1886-87. 25 pp. [C.5601] 1888. Paper respecting the reported capture of Emin Pasha and Mr. Stanley. 1 page. [C. 5601] 1888. Correspondence respecting Mr. Stanley’s Expedition for the Relief of Emin Pasha. 17 pp. [C. 5906] 1890. Return of import and export duties levied in the Niger Territories. 1 page. [C. 5555] 1888. Correspondence respecting the West African Agreement between Great Britain and France of August 10, 1889. 9 pp. [C. 5905] 1890. Volume II: Correspondence respecting the action of Portugal in Mashonaland and in the districts of the shire and Lake Nyassa. 231 pp. 1890. Correspondence respecting the action of Portugal in regard to the Delagoa Bay Railway. 74 pp. [C. 5903] 1890. Correspondence respecting the Anglo-Portuguese Convention of August 20, 1890, and the subsequent agreement of November 14, 1890. 37 pp. [C. 6212] 1890. Papers relating to the Anglo-Portuguese Convention signed at Lisbon, June 11, 1891. 5 pp. [C. 6370] 1891. Further Correspondence relating to Zanzibar. [In continuation of Africa No. 3: 1887]. 135 pp. 1888. Further Correspondence respecting Germany and Zanzibar. 104 pp. [C. 5603] 1888. Further Correspondence respecting Germany and Zanzibar. [In continuation of C. 5603] 97 pp. [C. 5822] 1889. Despatch to Sir E. Malet respecting the Affairs of East Africa. 3 pp. [C. 6043] 1890. Declaration between Great Britain and Zanzibar relative to the exercise of Judicial Powers in Zanzibar. Signed at Zanzibar, February 2, 1891. 1 page. [C. 6254] 1891. Correspondence respecting the punitive Expedition against Witu of November 1890. 24 pp. [C. 6213] 1890. Volume III: Further Papers relating to Uganda. [In continuation of Africa No. 8, 1892] 51 pp. [C. 6847] 1893. Further Papers relating to Uganda. 102 pp. [C. 6948] 1893. Further Papers relating to Uganda. [In continuation of Africa No. 1 (1893) C. 6847] 10 pp. [C. 6853] 1893. Papers relating to the Mombasa Railway Survey and Uganda. 2 maps, 147 pp. 1892. Papers relative to the suppression of Slave-Raiding in Nyassaland. 38 pp. [C. 6699] 1892. Papers relative to Slave Trade and Slavery in Zanzibar 8pp. [C. 6702] 1892. Correspondence relating to Great Britain and Portugal in East Africa. 278 pp. 1891. Treaty between Her Majesty and His Majesty the King of Portugal defining their respective Spheres of Influence in Africa. Signed at Lisbon, June 11, 1891. 9 pp. [C. 6375] 1891. Return of import duties levied in the Niger Territories. 1 page. [C. 6640] 1892. Further Correspondence respecting the Claims of British subjects in the German Protectorate on the South-West Coast of Africa. [In continuation of C. 4262 and 4265 of December 1884]. Map, 84 pp. [C. 5180] 1887.
placeholder

In darkest Africa or the quest, rescue, and retreat of Emin Governor of Equatoria.

STANLEY, Henry Morton. First edition. 2 volumes, 8vo., xv, 529; xv, 472 pp., 2 pages ads at end, 2 frontispieces, 3 folding maps (2 large in pockets at end of each volume), 37 plates, numerous text illustrations, special publisher’s presentation binding, full crimson hard-grained morocco gilt, covers with wide gilt borders, gilt facsimile of Stanley’s signature to upper covers, spines gilt in compartments, all edges gilt, with a gilt morocco, ad personam presentation label on the upper pastedown, first volume lightly foxed throughout, an excellent set of a scarce issue. One of very few copies specially bound for presentation by the Emin Pasha Relief Committee. The list of subscribers to the Relief Fund on p. 35 identifies fifteen individuals (including the comtesse de Noailles) and three organisations (the Royal Geographical Society, the Egyptian Government, and Messrs. Gray, Dawes & Co. of London), of which only Sir William Mackinnon, Bt and the Egyptian Government subscribed sums larger than de Noailles’ generous sum of £1,000; on the basis of this list, it seems likely that there were only about eighteen sets of this issue for subscribers to the Relief Fund. This important association set was presented to Comtesse Helene de Noailles, who had gifted the Relief Fund £1,000 in order that A.J. Mountenay Jephson could join the expedition. Despite his lack of experience of tropical travel, Mountenay Jephson played an important role in the expedition’s success – he was the first officer to meet Emin – and he wrote Emin Pasha and the Rebellion at the Equator (London, 1890), a bestselling account of his experiences during the expedition, on his return. Although his familial relationship to de Noailles is unclear, they were close to one another, and he lived with her at Eastbourne as a young man. Stanley’s remarkable account of his expedition from the East Coast through the heart of Africa to the land of The Nile. This expedition was originally intended as a rescue mission for Emin Pasha after Khartoum fell into hands of the Mahdists and General Gordon was killed. Although failing in its primary objective, the expedition accomplished great things, Stanley discovered the great snow-capped range of Ruwenzori, the Mountains of the Moon, besides a new lake which he named the Albert Edward Nyanza, and a large south-western extension of Lake Victoria, and he had come upon the pigmy tribes who had inhabited the great African forest since prehistoric times. On his way down to the coast Stanley had concluded treaties with various native chiefs which he transferred to Sir William Mackinnon’s company and so laid the foundation of the British East African Protectorate.