Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books Archives - inBiblio
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Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books

NEWSPAPER DAYS

NEWSPAPER DAYS

MENCKEN, H. L. 223 x 253 mm. (8 3/4 x 6"). 1 p. l., xi, [v], 313, [3] pp. FIRST EDITION. Publisher’s oatmeal colored buckram, blind-stamped red and blue, with original dust jacket, price unclipped. With frontispiece portrait of the author as a teenager. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR on the front free endpaper. Dust jacket a little worn and chipped along edges, spine slightly toned, a few small smudges to lower wrapper, but still a very good copy, one opening a little browned from an old newspaper clipping being laid in, otherwise pristine. This is a very good copy of the second volume of H . L. Mencken’s three volume memoir, signed by the author. Henry Louis Mencken (1880-1956) was an American journalist, scholar, and critic best known for his study of spoken English in the United States ("The American Language"), and for his work at the Herald and Baltimore Sun, including coverage of what he scathingly dubbed the Scopes "Monkey Trial." This second volume covers the years 1899-1906, from the author’s first job at the Morning Herald at the age of 18. It was preceded by "Happy Days, 1880-1892" (1940) followed by and "Heathen Days, 1890-1936" (1943). This is a very good copy of the second volume of H . L. Mencken’s three volume memoir, signed by the author. Henry Louis Mencken (1880-1956) was an American journalist, scholar, and critic best known for his study of spoken English in the United States ("The American Language"), and for his work at the Herald and Baltimore Sun, including coverage of what he scathingly dubbed the Scopes "Monkey Trial." This second volume covers the years 1899-1906, from the author’s first job at the Morning Herald at the age of 18. It was preceded by "Happy Days, 1880-1892" (1940) followed by and "Heathen Days, 1890-1936" (1943).
MEMORIAL

MEMORIAL

BINDINGS - THE FRENCH BINDERS). (LOWMAN, JOHN HENRY) 242 x 158 mm. (9 1/2 x 6 1/4"). 28 pp. Very pretty full red levant by The French Binders (stamp-signed on front-turn in), covers with numerous closely spaced gilt rules, upper cover and spine with gilt lettering, raised bands, gilt ruled compartments, gilt ruled turn-ins. With frontispiece portrait of Lowman. A breath of wear to front joint and few negligible spots of chalky residue on covers (from binding process?), otherwise faultless. This modest, privately printed memorial, celebrating the life of tuberculosis expert John Henry Lowman, has been given the royal treatment with a luxurious full levant binding. The French Binders consisted of Henri Hardy, Leon, Maillard, and Gaston Pilon, all, as one would expect, native Frenchmen brought to the states by Country Life Press just after the First World War. According to an early advertisement in Publisher’s Weekly, the press opened the bindery "With the purpose of bringing together distinguished members of the craft to afford them opportunity to work under the most advantageous conditions . . . it is planned to add other experts of reputation at a later date." The French Binders worked out of Garden City, New York, as indicated by their signature on the front turn-in. This modest, privately printed memorial, celebrating the life of tuberculosis expert John Henry Lowman, has been given the royal treatment with a luxurious full levant binding. The French Binders consisted of Henri Hardy, Leon, Maillard, and Gaston Pilon, all, as one would expect, native Frenchmen brought to the states by Country Life Press just after the First World War. According to an early advertisement in Publisher’s Weekly, the press opened the bindery "With the purpose of bringing together distinguished members of the craft to afford them opportunity to work under the most advantageous conditions . . . it is planned to add other experts of reputation at a later date." The French Binders worked out of Garden City, New York, as indicated by their signature on the front turn-in.
CORIDON'S SONG AND OTHER VERSES FROM VARIOUS SOURCES

CORIDON’S SONG AND OTHER VERSES FROM VARIOUS SOURCES

THOMSON, HUGH, Illustrator 260 x 178 mm. (10 1/4 x 7"). xxxi, [1], 163 pp. ONE OF 152 LARGE PAPER COPIES. Attractive early 20th century full olive-brown crushed morocco by Zaehnsdorf (stamp-signed on front turn-in and with oval blind-stamp on rear pastedown), raised bands, compartments gilt ruled or with gilt lettering, gilt turn-ins, dark teal silk endleaves, ENTIRELY UNOPENED. Decorative initials, headpieces, tailpieces, illustrated titles, frontispiece, and 74 illustrations (71 full-page) from engravings by Hugh Thomson. Spine uniformly darkened to brown, top edge of covers just slightly darkened, a few small nicks along edges, but still a very handsome binding with no major flaws; occasional light offsetting, light crease to final page, but a bright, clean copy, clearly very little used. This is a finely bound, large paper copy of a charming collection of popular English verse, accompanied by a bevy of illustrations by the prolific Irish artist Hugh Thomson. Best known for his spritely pen and ink drawings, Thomson (1860-1920) also provided illustrations for memorable editions of works by Shakespeare, Austen, Dickens, and Gaskell, capturing the imagination and spirit of the waning Victorian age with his delicate work. The present book contains a curated selection of minstrel and pastoral verse from the 17th-19th centuries, including excerpts from Walton’s "Complete Angler." This is a finely bound, large paper copy of a charming collection of popular English verse, accompanied by a bevy of illustrations by the prolific Irish artist Hugh Thomson. Best known for his spritely pen and ink drawings, Thomson (1860-1920) also provided illustrations for memorable editions of works by Shakespeare, Austen, Dickens, and Gaskell, capturing the imagination and spirit of the waning Victorian age with his delicate work. The present book contains a curated selection of minstrel and pastoral verse from the 17th-19th centuries, including excerpts from Walton’s "Complete Angler."
INITIAL OPENING TEXT OF 1 SAMUEL

INITIAL OPENING TEXT OF 1 SAMUEL

AN ILLUMINATED VELLUM MANUSCRIPT LEAF WITH AN HISTORIATED INITIAL OF ELKANAH, HIS WIVES, AND CHILDREN, FROM A BIBLE IN LATIN 185 x 125 mm. (7 1/4 x 5"). Double column, 48 lines in a lovely pearl script. Rubrics in red, running titles in red and blue, one eight-line puzzle initial in red and blue with penwork inside the initial and extending into the margins, ONE EIGHT-LINE HISTORIATED "F" featuring Elkanah at a table with his two wives and children, the extender in multiple colors and reaching to the bottom of the columns. Several marginal corrections in a distinct hand. Slight wrinkling to the very thin vellum, but A VERY FINE LEAF IN PRISTINE CONDITION. This beautifully preserved leaf, with paint exceptionally fresh and margins clean and wide, boasts an excellent historiated initial with fine details and composition. The biblical narrative portrayed here is the story of Elkanah and his two wives: the barren Hannah and the fruitful Peninnah. Hannah’s prayers for a son are eventually answered and she becomes pregnant with the prophet Samuel. Our initial portrays a moment before Samuel’s birth, with Elkanah in the middle flanked by his two wives. To the right, Peninnah hold four children in her arms while Hannah, on the left, is childless and dressed all in white (perhaps about to go pray at the temple?). In addition to the excellent molding of the faces the artist also cleverly hints at the family dynamics through the physicality of the main characters. Tension between the wives is suggested by their physical distance, with Peninnah’s head tilted down, towards her children, and Hannah’s face lifted upward towards the destination of her hopes and prayers. Meanwhile, Elkanah, although closer to Peninnah and his children in the picture plane, is entirely focused on his preferred wife, Hannah. Thus, in a very small space, the artist gives us a fully fleshed out scene that provides a lovely space to rest the eye and invites further contemplation by the viewer. This beautifully preserved leaf, with paint exceptionally fresh and margins clean and wide, boasts an excellent historiated initial with fine details and composition. The biblical narrative portrayed here is the story of Elkanah and his two wives: the barren Hannah and the fruitful Peninnah. Hannah’s prayers for a son are eventually answered and she becomes pregnant with the prophet Samuel. Our initial portrays a moment before Samuel’s birth, with Elkanah in the middle flanked by his two wives. To the right, Peninnah hold four children in her arms while Hannah, on the left, is childless and dressed all in white (perhaps about to go pray at the temple?). In addition to the excellent molding of the faces the artist also cleverly hints at the family dynamics through the physicality of the main characters. Tension between the wives is suggested by their physical distance, with Peninnah’s head tilted down, towards her children, and Hannah’s face lifted upward towards the destination of her hopes and prayers. Meanwhile, Elkanah, although closer to Peninnah and his children in the picture plane, is entirely focused on his preferred wife, Hannah. Thus, in a very small space, the artist gives us a fully fleshed out scene that provides a lovely space to rest the eye and invites further contemplation by the viewer.
SUMMA THEOLOGICA PARS I.

SUMMA THEOLOGICA PARS I.

ANTONINUS FLORENTINUS 310 x 210 mm. (12 18 x 8 1/8"). [254] leaves. Part I, only, of four separately printed parts. Second Printing. Excellent retrospective dark brown sheepskin tooled in blind, covers with plain rule and floral roll frame, central panel diapered, with rosette stamps within the lozenge compartments, raised bands. Capitals struck with red, hand-painted initials and paragraph marks in red or blue, TWO LARGE (12-lin and 15-line) MAIBLUMEN INITIALS in red, blue, and green, with descenders running the length of the text, that on the larger initial extending across the tail edge, THE INITIALS AND DESCENDERS HIGHLIGHTED WITH BURNISHED GOLD. Goff A-872; BMC V, 179. A touch of rubbing to extremities, boards lightly chafed in a few spots, a couple of openings faintly browned, minor worming to last couple of quires, isolated trivial stains, but A FINE COPY INTERNALLY, clean, crisp, well-margined, and mostly bright, in a sturdy sympathetic binding. This is a handsomely decorated copy of an early printing (following the first by one year) of the first part of the principal work by a great Medieval churchman; it is printed by one of the two or three most celebrated of incunabular printers; and, as a bonus, the volume boasts two beautiful illuminated initials. As a whole, the "Summa," the work upon which the theological fame of Antoninus (1389-1459) rests, is, in the words of the Catholic Encyclopedia, "probably the first–certainly the most comprehensive–treatment from a practical point of view of Christian ethics, asceticism, and sociology in the Middle Ages. It gives to Antoninus the place of honor in moral theology between St. Thomas and St. Alphonsus Ligouri." The present first and introduction part addresses the soul and its faculties, the passions, sin, and the law. As was the case with other expansive 15th century printings, the individual parts of this work were treated by their early printers (and have ever since been similarly treated) as distinct works. Andreas de Paltascichis, for example, printed the third tome only, and Heilbronn, Drach, Marinus Saracenus, and the partners Colonia and Manthen each printed only the first or second part. Jenson printed part I in December 1479, part II in June 1480, part III in 1477, and part IV in April 1480. And even when one printer issued all four parts, as in the present case, the complete work is seldom found today at the same location. Although he was in business for only a decade, Nicolaus Jenson (1420-80) was one of the greatest printers of the 15th century. Operating as many as a dozen presses at one time, he is thought to have produced some 100 or more editions, and all of them touched with beauty. Issued five months before our printer’s death in September of 1480, the present book was not printed in Jenson’s renowned roman font, but rather in a rounded and readable gothic type, made even more pleasing to the eye by the spacious margins here. Jenson used gothic for legal and theological texts, and, in fact, during the second half of his career, he used the roman face only sparingly, for classical texts. In all, a tally based on BMC indicates that Jenson printed approximately 40 percent of his books wholly or largely in gothic type. Haebler says that "Jenson’s authority was no less important in the development of gothic types than in that of roman. As early as the year 1474 he had already cut a gothic text type which was imitated more than any other type of the XVth century," coming into common use throughout Italy, Germany, and Switzerland in the 1480s. The beauty of Jenson’s type and printing is enhanced here by the unusually elaborate initials and burnished gold that open the prologue and main text. This is a handsomely decorated copy of an early printing (following the first by one year) of the first part of the principal work by a great Medieval churchman; it is printed by one of the two or three most celebrated of incunabular printers; and, as a bonus, the volume boasts two beautiful illuminated initials. As a whole, the "Summa," the work upon which the theological fame of Antoninus (1389-1459) rests, is, in the words of the Catholic Encyclopedia, "probably the first–certainly the most comprehensive–treatment from a practical point of view of Christian ethics, asceticism, and sociology in the Middle Ages. It gives to Antoninus the place of honor in moral theology between St. Thomas and St. Alphonsus Ligouri." The present first and introduction part addresses the soul and its faculties, the passions, sin, and the law. As was the case with other expansive 15th century printings, the individual parts of this work were treated by their early printers (and have ever since been similarly treated) as distinct works. Andreas de Paltascichis, for example, printed the third tome only, and Heilbronn, Drach, Marinus Saracenus, and the partners Colonia and Manthen each printed only the first or second part. Jenson printed part I in December 1479, part II in June 1480, part III in 1477, and part IV in April 1480. And even when one printer issued all four parts, as in the present case, the complete work is seldom found today at the same location. Although he was in business for only a decade, Nicolaus Jenson (1420-80) was one of the greatest printers of the 15th century. Operating as many as a dozen presses at one time, he is thought to have produced some 100 or more editions, and all of them touched with beauty. Issued five months before our printer’s death in September of 1480, the present book was not printed in Jenson’s renowned roman font, but rather in a rounded and readable gothic type, made even more pleasing to the eye by the spacious margins here. Jenson used gothic for legal and theological texts, and, in fact, during the second half of his career, he used the roman face only sparingly, for classical texts. In all, a tally based on BMC indicates that Jenson printed approximately 40 percent of his books wholly or largely in gothic type. Haebler say
SIR ROGER DE COVERLEY

SIR ROGER DE COVERLEY

THE SPECTATOR. [ADDISON, JOSEPH] 183 x 130 mm. (7 1/4 x 5 1/4"). vii, [5], 227 pp. First collected edition thus. Appealing 19th century olive colored pebbled morocco by Johnson & Rawson of Manchester (their ticket to rear pastedown), covers with thick gilt frame around blind stamped panel, raised bands, compartments heavily gilt and with gilt lettering, gilt turn-ins, all edges gilt. With 12 large engraved headpieces by John Thompson after designs by Frederick Taylor, woodcut initials and decorative head- and tailpieces. Front pastedown with the heraldic bookplate of the Ashton family. Illustrative notes by W. Henry Wills. Light wear to extremities, occasional scattered foxing to margins (a little more noticeable on a few leaves), but a most agreeable copy in very good condition inside and out. In a lovely binding of stately cast, this is the first lengthy collection of the entertaining essays from "The Spectator" about the fictional rustic gentleman "Sir Roger De Coverley." Created by Joseph Addison, the character was a lovable but somewhat eccentric and risible English country squire whose behavior and disposition mildly satirized that rural stereotype. English essayist, poet, playwright, and politician Joseph Addison (1672-1719) was co-founder with Richard Steele of "The Spectator," the popular early 18th century London daily periodical that aimed to "enliven morality with wit, and to temper wit with morality" and succeeded. Its innovative conceit was to create "The Spectator Club," the roster for which was comprised of imaginary members representing business, politics, the military, towns, and society who would amusingly echo the sentiments of the publishers. The adventures, opinions, and conversations of "Sir Roger De Coverley" appeared in 30 issues of "The Spectator," and 26 of the De Coverley essays are found in this volume. For readers unfamiliar with the early 18th century references, rituals, and customs mentioned within the essays, detailed endnotes provide context. Little is known about our binder, Johnson & Rawson of Manchester, beyond that they were also stationers and printers. It is unknown whether they purposely bound the book in this ironically formal manner, for what we have is a delightful combination of a dignified binding covering a collection of gently mocking essays that take the pomp out of pomposity. In a lovely binding of stately cast, this is the first lengthy collection of the entertaining essays from "The Spectator" about the fictional rustic gentleman "Sir Roger De Coverley." Created by Joseph Addison, the character was a lovable but somewhat eccentric and risible English country squire whose behavior and disposition mildly satirized that rural stereotype. English essayist, poet, playwright, and politician Joseph Addison (1672-1719) was co-founder with Richard Steele of "The Spectator," the popular early 18th century London daily periodical that aimed to "enliven morality with wit, and to temper wit with morality" and succeeded. Its innovative conceit was to create "The Spectator Club," the roster for which was comprised of imaginary members representing business, politics, the military, towns, and society who would amusingly echo the sentiments of the publishers. The adventures, opinions, and conversations of "Sir Roger De Coverley" appeared in 30 issues of "The Spectator," and 26 of the De Coverley essays are found in this volume. For readers unfamiliar with the early 18th century references, rituals, and customs mentioned within the essays, detailed endnotes provide context. Little is known about our binder, Johnson & Rawson of Manchester, beyond that they were also stationers and printers. It is unknown whether they purposely bound the book in this ironically formal manner, for what we have is a delightful combination of a dignified binding covering a collection of gently mocking essays that take the pomp out of pomposity.
MARK TWAIN'S (BURLESQUE) AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND FIRST ROMANCE

MARK TWAIN’S (BURLESQUE) AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND FIRST ROMANCE

CLEMENS, SAMUEL L.]. "MARK TWAIN," Pseudonym 194 x 130 mm. (7 1/2 x 5"). 47, [1] (ad) pp. FIRST EDITION, First State (without advertisement for Ball, Black & Co. on copyright page). Publisher’s green cloth, blind-stamped border, upper cover with gilt titling. With 12 in-text illustrations (11 of which are full-page). Front free endpaper with ownership signature in purple ink. BAL 3326. Corners a little worn and one slightly bumped, paper a shade less than bright and with a couple of negligible stains or smudges internally, but overall a near fine copy in very good condition. This is an attractive copy of Clemens’ third book, in which the author concocts two fanciful "autobiographical" short stories, neither of which have anything to do with his real life or relations. The illustrations here are equally unconnected: they illustrate the children’s nursery rhyme "The House that Jack Built," replacing the original characters with satirical representations of robber barons and corrupt politicians. This is an attractive copy of Clemens’ third book, in which the author concocts two fanciful "autobiographical" short stories, neither of which have anything to do with his real life or relations. The illustrations here are equally unconnected: they illustrate the children’s nursery rhyme "The House that Jack Built," replacing the original characters with satirical representations of robber barons and corrupt politicians. FIRST EDITION, First State (without advertisement for Ball, Black & Co. on copyright page).
THE PLAYS

THE PLAYS

GALSWORTHY, JOHN 225 x 145 mm. (9 x 5 3/4"). [viii], 1150 pp., 1 leaf. FIRST COLLECTED EDITION. Lovely green levant by Bayntun (stamp-signed on front turn-in, raised bands, spine with gilt rules and lettering, simple gilt ruled turn-ins, housed in green cloth slip case. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR on the limitations page. Spine very slightly darkened, otherwise A PRISTINE COPY inside and out. Beautifully printed on handmade paper and handsomely bound in Kelly green levant, this work contains the collected plays of John Galsworthy, best known for the "Forsyte Saga" trilogy of novels. Galsworthy (1867-1933) was interested in illuminating the darker places of society (prisons, industry, the family), and his plays often deal with class struggle and social ills. The first play in this collection, "The Silver Box," examines the repercussions of a similar crime on members of opposite social classes; his play "Justice" was part of a larger campaign for prison reform; "Strife" is set amidst a labor strike at a factory. Galsworthy won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1932. Beautifully printed on handmade paper and handsomely bound in Kelly green levant, this work contains the collected plays of John Galsworthy, best known for the "Forsyte Saga" trilogy of novels. Galsworthy (1867-1933) was interested in illuminating the darker places of society (prisons, industry, the family), and his plays often deal with class struggle and social ills. The first play in this collection, "The Silver Box," examines the repercussions of a similar crime on members of opposite social classes; his play "Justice" was part of a larger campaign for prison reform; "Strife" is set amidst a labor strike at a factory. Galsworthy won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1932.
TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES

TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES

AN ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT LEAF FROM A BOOK OF HOURS IN LATIN, WITH A SMALL MINIATURE OF ST. CHRISTOPHER 176 x 114 mm. (7 x 4 1/2"). Single column, 27 lines in an elegant batarde hand. Rubrics in pink, one one-line initial in gold on blue ground, one two-line initial painted blue and white on gold and pink ground, A SEVEN-LINE MINIATURE OF ST. CHRISTOPHER, three-quarter border of acanthus leaves flowers, and bezants on gold ground. Border a little rubbed in one corner, upper and lower margins trimmed quite close, a touch of general mild soiling, otherwise a lovely leaf, the miniature particularly well preserved and with a good amount of detail. This charming and attractively priced leaf features a petite miniature of the patron of travelers, gardeners, and bookbinders, St. Christopher. The story of how this holy helper carried the Christ child across a river gained wider traction in the later Middle Ages, and was included in Jacob de Voraigne’s "Golden Legend." Its smaller size is typical for this section of the Book of Hours, the Suffrages, which would have contained portraits of and prayers to numerous saints. The detail work here, especially in the faces, is quite good, and the gold border adds an element of richness and warmth to the page. This charming and attractively priced leaf features a petite miniature of the patron of travelers, gardeners, and bookbinders, St. Christopher. The story of how this holy helper carried the Christ child across a river gained wider traction in the later Middle Ages, and was included in Jacob de Voraigne’s "Golden Legend." Its smaller size is typical for this section of the Book of Hours, the Suffrages, which would have contained portraits of and prayers to numerous saints. The detail work here, especially in the faces, is quite good, and the gold border adds an element of richness and warmth to the page.
THE MIRROR OF THE WORLD

THE MIRROR OF THE WORLD

UZANNE, OCTAVE 300 x 228 mm. (11 3/4 x 9"). 4 p. l., [iv], 160 pp. FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. No. 35 OF 100 LARGE PAPER COPIES ON JAPANESE VELLUM. Pleasant blue-green three-quarter morocco over blue cloth by Stikeman & Co. (stamp-signed in ink on front free endpaper), raised bands, spine heavy gilt. With 160 illustrations, many printed in color, by Paul Avril. Corners rubbed to boards, a breath of wear to extremities, paper with a hint of toning along top edge, but a very good copy, entirely clean and pleasingly bound. As with many of his other works, Uzanne here collaborated with artist Paul Avril (1849-1928), whose witty, ingenious illustrations merge with and overlap the text in an unusual but ultimately successful manner. The illustrations appear in a range of colors, from midnight blue to burnt sienna, and many several have been highlighted with metallic gold. It was originally published in French the year before, as "Le Miroir du Monde." In addition to producing a number of books like this one, on the foibles of society, Uzanne (1852-1931) also wrote biographies and books about books, including significant works on bookbinding. As with many of his other works, Uzanne here collaborated with artist Paul Avril (1849-1928), whose witty, ingenious illustrations merge with and overlap the text in an unusual but ultimately successful manner. The illustrations appear in a range of colors, from midnight blue to burnt sienna, and many several have been highlighted with metallic gold. It was originally published in French the year before, as "Le Miroir du Monde." In addition to producing a number of books like this one, on the foibles of society, Uzanne (1852-1931) also wrote biographies and books about books, including significant works on bookbinding. FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. No. 35 OF 100 LARGE PAPER COPIES ON JAPANESE VELLUM.
TEXT FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAD

TEXT FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAD

AN ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT LEAF ON VELLUM WITH A MINIATURE DEPICTING A FUNERAL PROCESSION, FROM A BOOK OF HOURS IN LATIN 170 x 114 mm. (6 3/4" x 4 1/2"). Single column, verso with 14 lines in a gothic bookhand. Attractively matted. Rubrics in red, six one-line initials in gold on blue and pink ground, one three-line initial painted pink and filled with curling ivy on a gilt ground, A HALF-PAGE MINIATURE OF A FUNERAL PROCESSION SURROUNDED BY A FULL BORDER of colorful acanthus leaves and vinestems with gold leaves, verso with a three-quarter border similarly decorated, pink and blue line fillers punctuated with gold. A touch of mild soiling to vellum and gilt a tiny bit rubbed in places, fore-edge just cutting into vinestem border on recto, face of one of the coffin bearers slightly chipped, but A FINE SPECIMEN, the gilt and color bright and well-preserved. Apart from those relatively few copies with illustrated calendars, the miniatures found in Books of Hours are almost entirely devoted to retrospective Bible scenes that are obviously outside the experience of the illuminator; it is only in the present kind of funeral scene at the beginning of the Office of the Dead that we can see a contemporaneous rendering of a scene from the daily life of the Middle Ages. Miniatures that begin the Office of the Dead vary more in iconographic terms than any of the others that recur in the Book of Hours, and while our painting is typical in subject matter and design, it is unusual in a few different ways. The depiction of the coffin in transit between the church and the graveyard is rarely found in similar images opening the Office of the Dead; the young boy ringing bells at the head of the group and spade and hoe laid upon the open grave are similarly uncommon details. The black sky with gilt detailing, matching the cloth laid upon the coffin, is perhaps the most striking and notable detail here–a fittingly somber shade to match the grief stricken looks upon the faces of the monks. The parent manuscript from which this leaf came was sold at Sotheby’s in 1982 (and subsequently broken up). It was written for the Use of Coutances in Normandy, and its calendar contained several dates of importance to the region, including the dedication of the Coutances Cathedral, making it highly likely that the manuscript originated in this area. Beyond its unusual details and origins, this leaf is an excellent example of a high quality provincial manuscript, and the profusion of gold points to a patron of means. Apart from those relatively few copies with illustrated calendars, the miniatures found in Books of Hours are almost entirely devoted to retrospective Bible scenes that are obviously outside the experience of the illuminator; it is only in the present kind of funeral scene at the beginning of the Office of the Dead that we can see a contemporaneous rendering of a scene from the daily life of the Middle Ages. Miniatures that begin the Office of the Dead vary more in iconographic terms than any of the others that recur in the Book of Hours, and while our painting is typical in subject matter and design, it is unusual in a few different ways. The depiction of the coffin in transit between the church and the graveyard is rarely found in similar images opening the Office of the Dead; the young boy ringing bells at the head of the group and spade and hoe laid upon the open grave are similarly uncommon details. The black sky with gilt detailing, matching the cloth laid upon the coffin, is perhaps the most striking and notable detail here–a fittingly somber shade to match the grief stricken looks upon the faces of the monks. The parent manuscript from which this leaf came was sold at Sotheby’s in 1982 (and subsequently broken up). It was written for the Use of Coutances in Normandy, and its calendar contained several dates of importance to the region, including the dedication of the Coutances Cathedral, making it highly likely that the manuscript originated in this area. Beyond its unusual details and origins, this leaf is an excellent example of a high quality provincial manuscript, and the profusion of gold points to a patron of means.
LE CORBEAU. (THE RAVEN)

LE CORBEAU. (THE RAVEN)

EASTON PRESS). (FACSIMILE). POE, EDGAR ALLEN 540 x 364 mm. (21 1/4 x 14 5/16"). [12] pp. Authorized Facsimile Edition. Original dark blue quarter morocco over blue marbled boards, slightly raised bands, with gilt tools and lettering. Frontispiece image of a raven’s head printed on thin paper, and four facsimile plates of illustrations by Edouard Manet. With Easton Press bookplate, a large ex-libris plate with raven, and a four page pamphlet printed by the Library of Congress, all loosely laid in. A hint of wear to extremities of binding, CONTENTS PRISTINE. This facsimile faithfully recreates the famous 1875 edition of Edgar Allan Poe’s "Le Corbeau," translated by Stéphane Mallarmé and illustrated by Edouard Manet. According to the Library of Congress’ prospectus, the original work "marks an important turning point in the history of the illustrated book. . . . the bilingual volume was a bold, early attempt at a new type of artistic collaboration–the livre d’artiste, a genre which was first to flourish in the twentieth century." Although the limitations page notes that there were 240 copies made, recent research suggests that only 150 were ever printed. As both a rare and very important book this work routine fetches robust five figure prices at auction, making the present facsimile an attainable and highly attractive alternative. This facsimile faithfully recreates the famous 1875 edition of Edgar Allan Poe’s "Le Corbeau," translated by Stéphane Mallarmé and illustrated by Edouard Manet. According to the Library of Congress’ prospectus, the original work "marks an important turning point in the history of the illustrated book. . . . the bilingual volume was a bold, early attempt at a new type of artistic collaboration–the livre d’artiste, a genre which was first to flourish in the twentieth century." Although the limitations page notes that there were 240 copies made, recent research suggests that only 150 were ever printed. As both a rare and very important book this work routine fetches robust five figure prices at auction, making the present facsimile an attainable and highly attractive alternative.
HAPPY DAYS

HAPPY DAYS

MENCKEN, H. L. 223 x 253 mm. (8 3/4 x 6"). 1 p. l., xi, [i], 313, [3] pp. FIRST EDITION. Publisher’s oatmeal colored buckram, blind-stamped red and blue. Original dust jacket, price clipped. With frontispiece portrait of the author as a young boy. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR on the front free endpaper. Dust jacket a little tattered along the edges and with one quarter-inch tear, spine somewhat toned, a few light scratches, binding with a touch of soiling at foot of spine, but still a very good copy overall and the contents pristine. This is a very good copy of the first volume of H . L. Mencken’s three volume memoir, signed by the author. Henry Louis Mencken (1880-1956) was an American journalist, scholar, and critic best known for his study of spoken English in the United States ("The American Language"), and for his work at the Herald and Baltimore Sun, including coverage of what he scathingly dubbed the Scopes "Monkey Trial." This first volume covers the years 1880-92, from the author’s birth to age 12, ending with the death of his paternal grandfather. It was followed by "Newspaper Days, 1899-1906" (1941) and "Heathen Days, 1890-1936" (1943). This is a very good copy of the first volume of H . L. Mencken’s three volume memoir, signed by the author. Henry Louis Mencken (1880-1956) was an American journalist, scholar, and critic best known for his study of spoken English in the United States ("The American Language"), and for his work at the Herald and Baltimore Sun, including coverage of what he scathingly dubbed the Scopes "Monkey Trial." This first volume covers the years 1880-92, from the author’s birth to age 12, ending with the death of his paternal grandfather. It was followed by "Newspaper Days, 1899-1906" (1941) and "Heathen Days, 1890-1936" (1943).
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AN ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT LEAF FROM A BREVIARY IN LATIN, WITH AN HISTORIATED INITIAL OF A BISHOP 175 x 123 mm. (6 7/8 x 4 3/4"). Double column, 29 lines in s small gothic bookhand. Rubrics in red, 10 two-line initials painted gold on blue, red, or brown ground, one three-line inhabited initial, verso with a three quarter border surrounding left column, painted lilac, blue, and gold and conaining acanthus leaves, floral motifs, and a small bird. Text ink slightly faded in a few places (not affecting legibility), ground of large initial a little chipped, but a beautiful leaf with clean margins, the paint bright and well preserved. This charming leaf contains a brightly colored and animated border enclosing, rather unusually, only one of the two columns on the verso side. Whether it was part of the original plan for the leaf or added later by a different owner is difficult to ascertain, but it certainly adds an element of whimsy and interest more commonly seen in Books of Hours of this period. The small but beautifully composed initial features a bishop with his mitre and crozier, his hand raised as though in the midst of a blessing. This charming leaf contains a brightly colored and animated border enclosing, rather unusually, only one of the two columns on the verso side. Whether it was part of the original plan for the leaf or added later by a different owner is difficult to ascertain, but it certainly adds an element of whimsy and interest more commonly seen in Books of Hours of this period. The small but beautifully composed initial features a bishop with his mitre and crozier, his hand raised as though in the midst of a blessing.
THE GENTLE SHEPHERD

THE GENTLE SHEPHERD, A PASTORAL COMEDY

FOULIS PRESS). RAMSAY, ALLEN 290 x 233 mm. (11 3/8 x 9 1/4"). 2 p.l., x, [2], 111, [3] pp., followed by 17-page glossary and 18 pages of engraved sheet music First Illustrated Edition. Recent navy half morocco over blue marbled boards, raised bands, spine with red morocco label with gilt lettering. With portrait frontispiece, 12 numbered uncolored aquatints by David Allan ("the Scottish Hogarth"). Gaskell 688. Top corners slightly bumped, a hint of rubbing to extremities and a small scratch on one cover, but the newer bindings perfectly solid and not unpleasing; mild soiling and thumbing throughout, some moderate foxing to plates, first few leaves with a narrow dampstain along top edge, one plate a little tattered along edges, occasional minor marginal smudge or ink stain, but overall a good copy with nothing approaching a major defect. Of humble Scottish origin, Ramsay (1686-1758) was apprenticed to an Edinburgh wig maker before becoming a bookseller. He was later the founder of a prototypical literary club called the Easy Club, the editor of an important Scots verse collection called "The Tea-Table Miscellany," and in general a promoter of Scots poetry and poets. His own chief composition was the present pastoral comedy, first printed in 1725, a work that attained great popularity but that went for many years without being published in English. It has been called the first true pastoral work after Theocritus. Our edition was one of only two books published by the Foulis Press during 1788. The illustrator, David Allan (1744-1796), studied painting at the Academy of Glasgow (recently established by the printers Robert and Andrew Foulis) and in Italy, where in 1773 his painting won the gold medal for historical composition. Afterwards in Edinburgh, he mostly abandoning historical painting to concentrate on droll sketches of Scottish character, earning for himself the designation as the "Hogarth of Scotland." His popularity was dramatically increased because of the designs he did for the present work as well as for a "Collection of Scottish Airs" by Burns. The present work is not uncommon on the marketplace, but our copy is especially well priced without having to compromise too much in terms of condition. Of humble Scottish origin, Ramsay (1686-1758) was apprenticed to an Edinburgh wig maker before becoming a bookseller. He was later the founder of a prototypical literary club called the Easy Club, the editor of an important Scots verse collection called "The Tea-Table Miscellany," and in general a promoter of Scots poetry and poets. His own chief composition was the present pastoral comedy, first printed in 1725, a work that attained great popularity but that went for many years without being published in English. It has been called the first true pastoral work after Theocritus. Our edition was one of only two books published by the Foulis Press during 1788. The illustrator, David Allan (1744-1796), studied painting at the Academy of Glasgow (recently established by the printers Robert and Andrew Foulis) and in Italy, where in 1773 his painting won the gold medal for historical composition. Afterwards in Edinburgh, he mostly abandoning historical painting to concentrate on droll sketches of Scottish character, earning for himself the designation as the "Hogarth of Scotland." His popularity was dramatically increased because of the designs he did for the present work as well as for a "Collection of Scottish Airs" by Burns. The present work is not uncommon on the marketplace, but our copy is especially well priced without having to compromise too much in terms of condition.
EPISTOLAE FAMILIARES

EPISTOLAE FAMILIARES, OB SINGULAREM ELEGANTIAM ADOLESCENTUM STUDIIS ET CAPTUI ACCOMMODATAE EX TOTO EPISTOLARUM LIBRO EXCERPTAE. OPUS NOVUM ET RECENS NATUM

BINDINGS - EARLY BLIND-STAMPED). ERASMUS, DESIDERIUS 162 x 105mm. (6 3/8 x 4 1/4"). 8 p.l., 688 pp., [16] leaves. Second Westheimer Edition. FINE CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN GERMAN BLIND-STAMPED CALF, covers framed by chalice and banner roll enclosing an inner frame highlighted with floral stamps and a narrow central panel with a partial roll of "Cogni[tio] – Tempe[rantia] – Forti[tudo]," raised bands, two brass clasps. VD16 E2958. For the binding: Haebler II, p. 226 no. 34; EBDB workshop w004422, rolls r003575 and r004087, stamp s033270. Half-inch spot of worming to upper cover, isolated tiny rust spots, but AN EXTREMELY FINE COPY, clean, fresh, and bright internally, in a sound binding with stamps in high relief. This is a handsomely bound edition of Erasmus’ letters to friends and colleagues, with blind-stamped decorations in especially sharp relief. First published in 1538, the letters selected here are intended for the edification of "students and adolescents," letter writing being an essential part of Latin education in the Renaissance. Erasmus had died in Basel in 1536, and our printer has included a number of tributes to the greatest scholar of the Northern Renaissance. According to Haebler, the binding here was done by an unidentified workshop operating in Bavaria in the 1540s and 1550s; examples of their bindings are preserved in libraries in Munich, Salzburg, and Nuremberg. The very crisp impression of the rolls may be due to the fact that our volume, issued in the early years of the bindery’s existence, was perhaps decorated with rolls that had seen little previous use. The years–and previous owners–have been kind, and the stamps here exceed all expectations for clarity and sharpness. This is a handsomely bound edition of Erasmus’ letters to friends and colleagues, with blind-stamped decorations in especially sharp relief. First published in 1538, the letters selected here are intended for the edification of "students and adolescents," letter writing being an essential part of Latin education in the Renaissance. Erasmus had died in Basel in 1536, and our printer has included a number of tributes to the greatest scholar of the Northern Renaissance. According to Haebler, the binding here was done by an unidentified workshop operating in Bavaria in the 1540s and 1550s; examples of their bindings are preserved in libraries in Munich, Salzburg, and Nuremberg. The very crisp impression of the rolls may be due to the fact that our volume, issued in the early years of the bindery’s existence, was perhaps decorated with rolls that had seen little previous use. The years–and previous owners–have been kind, and the stamps here exceed all expectations for clarity and sharpness.
BILL OF SALE OF THE EFFECTS OF P. D. KERN

BILL OF SALE OF THE EFFECTS OF P. D. KERN, DECEASED

SLAVERY). A MANUSCRIPT BIFOLIUM ON PAPER 337 x 404 mm. (13 1/4 x 15 1/2"). [4] pp. A few creases, central crease with to very small tears, paper lightly toned, but in very good condition overall, with no major defects. This sobering document records the sale of the various properties owned by a Mr. P. D. Kern, including several slaves. The majority of the effects listed here are farm equipment, home goods, and livestock; the latter is followed by the names of a total of nine slaves including two men (Anthony and Andrew), three children sold with their mother (Miny), one boy (Morris), and two girls (Peggy and Jenny). To see these names listed among horses and water pails is a grim reminder of our not-so-distant past. We were not able to locate any information on P. D. Kern, but a relation, Sarah Kern, is listed here as the purchaser of several slaves and other effects. Further research into the other names listed here may furnish more fruitful results. This sobering document records the sale of the various properties owned by a Mr. P. D. Kern, including several slaves. The majority of the effects listed here are farm equipment, home goods, and livestock; the latter is followed by the names of a total of nine slaves including two men (Anthony and Andrew), three children sold with their mother (Miny), one boy (Morris), and two girls (Peggy and Jenny). To see these names listed among horses and water pails is a grim reminder of our not-so-distant past. We were not able to locate any information on P. D. Kern, but a relation, Sarah Kern, is listed here as the purchaser of several slaves and other effects. Further research into the other names listed here may furnish more fruitful results.
HEATHEN DAYS

HEATHEN DAYS

MENCKEN, H. L. 223 x 253 mm. (8 3/4 x 6"). 1 p. l., x, [iv], 299, [3] pp. FIRST EDITION. Publisher’s oatmeal colored buckram, blind-stamped red and blue. Without the dust jacket. With frontispiece portrait of the author. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR on the front free endpaper. Buckram on corners just very slightly frayed, a touch of glue showing through at head of spine, top edge of text block with small water stains (but not affecting the pages themselves), overall a very good copy, contents entirely clean. This is a very good copy of the third volume of H . L. Mencken’s three volume memoir, signed by the author. Henry Louis Mencken (1880-1956) was an American journalist, scholar, and critic best known for his study of spoken English in the United States ("The American Language"), and for his work at the Herald and Baltimore Sun, including coverage of what he scathingly dubbed the Scopes "Monkey Trial." This third volume covers the years 1890-1936, covering "a wider range of time than either of its predecessors" and including "a serious of random reminiscences . . . at ages ranging from the agonies of nonage to the beginnings of senility." It was preceded by "Happy Days, 1880-1892" (1940) and "Newspaper Days, 1899-1906" (1941). This is a very good copy of the third volume of H . L. Mencken’s three volume memoir, signed by the author. Henry Louis Mencken (1880-1956) was an American journalist, scholar, and critic best known for his study of spoken English in the United States ("The American Language"), and for his work at the Herald and Baltimore Sun, including coverage of what he scathingly dubbed the Scopes "Monkey Trial." This third volume covers the years 1890-1936, covering "a wider range of time than either of its predecessors" and including "a serious of random reminiscences . . . at ages ranging from the agonies of nonage to the beginnings of senility." It was preceded by "Happy Days, 1880-1892" (1940) and "Newspaper Days, 1899-1906" (1941).
THE FIRST TEMPTATION OF SAINT ANTHONY

THE FIRST TEMPTATION OF SAINT ANTHONY

FLAUBERT, GUSTAVE 240 x 150 mm. (9 3/8 x 5 7/8). xlv, [i], 231, [1] (blank) pp. Attractive full red polished calf by Bayntun Riviere (stamp-signed in ink on front free endpaper), gilt doubled ruled border, raised bands, compartments gilt, blue and green morocco labels with gilt titling, heavily gilt turn-ins. With frontispiece and 19 plates (11 in color), and 25 in-text illustrations, all by Jean de Bosschère. A few very light scratches to covers, a touch of rubbing to extremities, contents pristine. This is a very handsome copy of Flaubert’s Faustian novel, with colorful illustrations that are at once alluring and disturbing. First published in 1874, according to Britannica, "Flaubert called the subject of the narrative his ‘old infatuation,’ which he had begun developing in 1839 as an attempt to create a Faust in the French language. The work is notable for its imagery and its depiction of spiritual torment." Accompanying the text are memorable illustrations by Jean de Bosschère, a writer and illustrator interested in the occult. His provocative and highly imaginative imagery, clearly influenced by his fascination with the sexual and obscure, makes a beguiling companion to the text. This is a very handsome copy of Flaubert’s Faustian novel, with colorful illustrations that are at once alluring and disturbing. First published in 1874, according to Britannica, "Flaubert called the subject of the narrative his ‘old infatuation,’ which he had begun developing in 1839 as an attempt to create a Faust in the French language. The work is notable for its imagery and its depiction of spiritual torment." Accompanying the text are memorable illustrations by Jean de Bosschère, a writer and illustrator interested in the occult. His provocative and highly imaginative imagery, clearly influenced by his fascination with the sexual and obscure, makes a beguiling companion to the text.
IN SATYRAS SEX. [bound with] TERENTIUS AFER

IN SATYRAS SEX. [bound with] TERENTIUS AFER, PUBLIUS. COMOEDIA ADELPHI

BINDINGS - EARLY BLIND-STAMPED). PERSIUS FLACCUS, AULUS 225 x 145 mm. (8 3/4 x 5 3/4"). 4 p.l., 198 [i.e., 168] pp., [4] leaves (final blank); 232 pp., [8] leaves (final blank); 1 p.l., 192 pp., [7] leaves. Two separately published works in one volume. SUPERB CONTEMPORARY BLIND-STAMPED CALF over bevelled wooden boards BY JOBST KALHART OF LAUINGEN, covers panelled with two rolls, the outer roll showing putti engaged in various activities, the inner roll showing full-length figures of the Virtues, WITH VERY DETAILED CENTRAL PANEL STAMPS DEPICTING TWO OF THE VIRTUES, that on the upper cover depicting Fides and Spes with their attributes sitting in the foreground, a city and mountains in the distance, and God the Father blessing them from above, below them the legend "Impetrat Alma Fides Christo Quam Dante Saliutem Ex Pectare Soror Spes Animos"; panel on lower cover showing Fortitudo and Justitia similarly situated, with a large wheel of Fate between them, below them the legend "Fortuna Fortes Metuit Ignavos Premit Justicia Per Se Exigua Res Est"; the rolls and panels all signed with the initials I. K., raised bands, two brass clasps (upper joint and headcaps expertly repaired, neat leather repair around catches). Printers’ devices on title pages. Title page with ownership inscription of Heinrich Vaget [Henricus Vagetius], dated 1622. Front pastedown with bookplate of the Sunderland Library. First work: Schweiger II, 709; Adams P-745; VD16 P1629. Second work: Schweiger II, 1074; Adams T-387; VD16 T531. Corners a bit rubbed, small chip to tail edge of lower board, occasional minor browning, more noticeably affecting the last three quires in the second work, but A VERY FINE COPY, clean and crisp internally, IN A BINDING WITH REMARKABLY WELL-DEFINED STAMPS. This sammelband containing two rare classical editions was beautifully decorated by an eminent binder with exquisite stamps and rolls that remain in remarkably sharp relief more than four centuries later. The six satires of the first century playwright Persius were influenced by his teacher, the Stoic philosopher Cornutus, to whom our writer bequeathed his not-inconsiderable estate (the Stoic refused the money, but accepted the books). The Oxford Companion remarks favorably on Persius’ works, noting their "elevated moral tone, with occasional passages of genial humor, and forcible graphic expression, showing the poet’s keen observation of life." The second work here is a scarce edition of Terence’s "Adelphi" (The Brothers"), edited by Nathan Chytraeus (1543-98), an important humanist poet and professor who founded the library at the University of Rostock. An exploration of the merits of strict versus liberal child rearing, the play is considered Terence’s masterpiece, and inspired later dramas, including Moliere’s "School for Husbands." Our binding’s beautiful panels and rolls depicting the Virtues are the creation of Bavarian binder Jobst Kalhart, who wed the widow of Lauingen bookbinder Balthasar Werner in 1576 and took over the bindery, continuing in business until the early 1600s. He was one of the binders who did work for bibliophile Pfalzgraf Philipp Ludwig von Neuburg (1547-1616). The stamps here are extremely well preserved, due in part to the method of creating panel-stamped bindings. Needham notes that "binders’ panels, or dies were engraved in metal. They were stamped not by hand, but by a screw press. This provided considerably greater pressure than hand-stamping (such as used for small tools) could do, and panel-stamping over wooden boards often provides very sharp detail and firm reliefs." ("Twelve Centures of Bookbindings," p. 92) That is certainly true here, and Kalhart’s designs are little changed from the day they left his workshop. In fact, in 40 years of bookselling, we have never handled a 16th century binding with sharper, clearer decoration in blind. Former owner and humanist scholar Heinrich Vaget [Henricus Vagetius] (1587-1659) was a professor of logic and metaphysics at Hamburg and a correspondent of Hugo Grotius. This volume was later in the famous library (comprising more than 20,000 books), formed by Charles Spencer, third Earl of Sunderland (1674-1722), one of the greatest of all English book collectors. When the library was sold in five memorable auctions from 1881-83, nearly 14,000 lots changed hands, a large share going to Quaritch, who had an engraved bookplate (as seen here) made for each volume purchased. This sammelband containing two rare classical editions was beautifully decorated by an eminent binder with exquisite stamps and rolls that remain in remarkably sharp relief more than four centuries later. The six satires of the first century playwright Persius were influenced by his teacher, the Stoic philosopher Cornutus, to whom our writer bequeathed his not-inconsiderable estate (the Stoic refused the money, but accepted the books). The Oxford Companion remarks favorably on Persius’ works, noting their "elevated moral tone, with occasional passages of genial humor, and forcible graphic expression, showing the poet’s keen observation of life." The second work here is a scarce edition of Terence’s "Adelphi" (The Brothers"), edited by Nathan Chytraeus (1543-98), an important humanist poet and professor who founded the library at the University of Rostock. An exploration of the merits of strict versus liberal child rearing, the play is considered Terence’s masterpiece, and inspired later dramas, including Moliere’s "School for Husbands." Our binding’s beautiful panels and rolls depicting the Virtues are the creation of Bavarian binder Jobst Kalhart, who wed the widow of Lauingen bookbinder Balthasar Werner in 1576 and took over the bindery, continuing in business until the early 1600s. He was one of the binders who did work for bibliophile Pfalzgraf Philipp Ludwig von Neuburg (1547-1616). The stamps here are extremely well preserved, due in part to the method of creating panel-stamped bindings. Needham notes that "binders’ panels, or dies were engraved in metal
ELEMENTAR-GYMNASTIK

ELEMENTAR-GYMNASTIK, ODER ZERGLIEDERTE, STUFENWEISE ANLEITUNG ZU JENEN LEIBES-ÜBUNGEN, WELCHE VORZÜGLICH GEEIGNET SIND, DEN MENSCHLICHEN KÖRPER ZU ENTWICKELN, AUSZUBILDEN UND ZU STÄRKEN . . . NACH DEN WERKEN DER . . . GYMNASTIKER UND PROFESSOREN CLIAS UND GUTS-MUTHS

EXERCISE - GYMNASTICS). YOUNG, EDUARD JOHANN, Editor 246 x 160 mm. (9 3/4 x 6 1/4"). xvi, 327 pp. Translated from the Italian by S. Poschacher. First Edition in German. A Large Paper Copy. Unusual contemporary red straight-grain morocco decorated in gilt and blind, covers with gilt Greek key frame, large blind-stamped centerpiece of cathedral design, flat spine divided into compartments by decorative gilt rolls, botanical centerpiece, gilt titling, gilt-rolled turn-ins, edges untrimmed. With engraved frontispiece and title page, and 22 FOLDING ENGRAVED PLATES, as called for. Extremities a little rubbed, small dark spot to spine, front board with shallow three-inch scratch and two small divots, occasional faint foxing or minor dust soiling to untrimmed edges, a couple of short marginal tears (from rough opening), but AN ESPECIALLY FINE COPY, quite clean, fresh, and bright internally, in a solid, lustrous binding. Printed on thick, smooth handmade paper and very handsomely bound–almost certainly for presentation–this is a lovely copy of an early work on gymnastics and exercise, complete with instructive illustrations. First printed in 1819 in French and appearing later in Italian and English, "Elementary Gymnastics, or Step-By-Step Instructions for those Learning Exercises which Are Suitable To Develop, Train and Strengthen the Human Body" is based on the teachings of pioneering gymnasts and instructors Peter Heinrich Clias (1782-1854) and Johann Christoph Friedrich GutsMuths (1759-1839). The frontispiece here shows an exercise facility outside a military institute in Milan, and the first folding plate is a diagram of the arrangement of its equipment. The remaining plates contain multiple images (139 figures in all) of muscular young men executing various gymnastic moves. Clias was born in Boston to Swiss parents, and his father was an officer in the American army during the Revolutionary War. His parents sent him back to Europe to be educated, and Clias began studying gymnastics in Holland and Germany, becoming an instructor in the discipline by 1810 and following the methods introduced by GutsMuth, an educator who is considered the "grandfather of gymnastics." Believing that physical activity was vital for young men, he introduced a system of physical education into schools, basing his program on the gymnasium in ancient Greece. GutsMuth published "Gymnastics for Youth" in German in 1793, with an English edition appearing in 1800. Inspired by these writings, Clias produced his own guide for beginners in 1806, followed by the 1819 work on which our volume was based. We have been unable to find any information on the editor Young; OCLC attributes only the Italian and German editions of this work to him. With its expensive handmade paper, large margins, fine press work, and morocco binding, this volume was surely meant as a gift for a person of importance, since the subject matter would normally invite a much more pedestrian packaging. In any case, the quality of the materials used is a major factor in its present fine condition. The unsigned binding combines elements of several popular 19th century styles–Neoclassical, Cathedral, and Romantic–into a very pleasing composition. Copies of this edition are uncommon, especially outside of Germany, with only three copies recorded in North American libraries. Printed on thick, smooth handmade paper and very handsomely bound–almost certainly for presentation–this is a lovely copy of an early work on gymnastics and exercise, complete with instructive illustrations. First printed in 1819 in French and appearing later in Italian and English, "Elementary Gymnastics, or Step-By-Step Instructions for those Learning Exercises which Are Suitable To Develop, Train and Strengthen the Human Body" is based on the teachings of pioneering gymnasts and instructors Peter Heinrich Clias (1782-1854) and Johann Christoph Friedrich GutsMuths (1759-1839). The frontispiece here shows an exercise facility outside a military institute in Milan, and the first folding plate is a diagram of the arrangement of its equipment. The remaining plates contain multiple images (139 figures in all) of muscular young men executing various gymnastic moves. Clias was born in Boston to Swiss parents, and his father was an officer in the American army during the Revolutionary War. His parents sent him back to Europe to be educated, and Clias began studying gymnastics in Holland and Germany, becoming an instructor in the discipline by 1810 and following the methods introduced by GutsMuth, an educator who is considered the "grandfather of gymnastics." Believing that physical activity was vital for young men, he introduced a system of physical education into schools, basing his program on the gymnasium in ancient Greece. GutsMuth published "Gymnastics for Youth" in German in 1793, with an English edition appearing in 1800. Inspired by these writings, Clias produced his own guide for beginners in 1806, followed by the 1819 work on which our volume was based. We have been unable to find any information on the editor Young; OCLC attributes only the Italian and German editions of this work to him. With its expensive handmade paper, large margins, fine press work, and morocco binding, this volume was surely meant as a gift for a person of importance, since the subject matter would normally invite a much more pedestrian packaging. In any case, the quality of the materials used is a major factor in its present fine condition. The unsigned binding combines elements of several popular 19th century styles–Neoclassical, Cathedral, and Romantic–into a very pleasing composition. Copies of this edition are uncommon, especially outside of Germany, with only three copies recorded in North American libraries. First Edition in German. A Large Paper Copy.
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AN UNCOMMON AND BEAUTIFULLY ILLUMINATED VELLUM MANUSCRIPT LEAF, FROM JOHN OF WALES' "SUMMA COLLATIONUM, SIVE COMMUNILOQUIUM." 356 x 241 mm. (14 x 9 1/2"). Double column, 48 lines, written in an extraordinarily regular gothic book hand. Heading in blue with red penwork or red with purple penwork, capitals struck with yellow, paragraph mark in red, rubrics in red, WITH A SIX-LINE INITIAL IN ORANGE, GREEN, BLUE, MAGENTA, AND WHITE ON A BURNISHED GOLD GROUND WITH MARGINAL EXTENSIONS of spiky leaves PAINTED IN VARIOUS COLORS EXTENDING THE LENGTH OF THE TEXT AND PIROUETTING ENERGETICALLY INTO BROAD MARGINS at head and foot, these generating five wispy tendrils terminating in charming flowers in various colors and gold and accented with eight gold bezants (the leafy marginal extensions at head about three inches long, and those at foot more than five inches long). Text a little faded in spots, a hint of soil to head edge, otherwise IN VERY FINE CONDITION, THE VELLUM QUITE CLEAN, AND THE PAINT AND GILT EXCEPTIONALLY RICH AND BRIGHT. In addition to being in remarkable condition, this leaf is very substantial in size, being nearly 360 mm. tall; it has unusual, finely executed, and very pleasing decoration as well as a scribal hand so regular as to make the text appear at first glance to be printed; it is from a work almost never seen for sale in manuscript; and it seems to be of Spanish origin, a category of illuminated materials that, aside from later choir books and grants of arms, is among the scarcest on the market. As is discussed below, it may even have been meant for a queen. A Franciscan scholar active in the second half of the 13th century, Johannes Gallensis (John of Wales), who may have been a native Welshman, is first documented in 1259-60 as lector in Oxford. By 1270, he was in Paris, where he seems to have died in 1285. His reputation rests on a series of pastoral handbooks for preachers, full of quotations from ancient and patristic authors, the most important and successful of these being the "Communiloquium." John’s aim in writing it was to provide priests with basic, practical information on how to lead a good life, so that in sermons and conversation, they could instruct individuals of all classes and conditions in the norms of ethical conduct, reinforced by the example of the ancient world as provided by the quoted texts. The "Communiloquium" is divided into seven sections, the first three dealing with secular society, the next three with the church, and the final one with death and dying. The work in its entirety contains no fewer than 1,500 extracts from some 200 works by more than 100 authors, including 170 from Seneca and 103 from Cicero. Jenny Swanson, whose work "John of Wales," published in 1989, is the source of much of this discussion, has found more than 100 manuscripts of the work in institutional collections, and as might be expected of a practical handbook, almost all of the extant exemplars are either copies carelessly written and obviously intended for personal use or manuscripts written by professional scribes but unadorned. Only a few, intended for important patrons, are illuminated or richly decorated, like the fragmentary copy from which these leaves come. Swanson points out that the "Communiloquium" appealed to a much larger audience than its author had intended; she indicates that beyond its use by priests as a preaching aid, the book was mined by other writers for quotations from ancient authors. And it was used by laymen, including, perhaps most notably, 14th century Spanish kings (one of whom ordered a copy for his queen) as a source for ideas on government. The illumination here seems to have been done by the same hand as the Valerius Maximus manuscript of ca. 1400, done in Barcelona and now in that city’s archives (ms. L/26; cf. J. Alturo I Perucho, "El libro manuscript a Catalunya, origins I esplendor," the plate on p. 165). The most famous manuscript with borders in this flamboyant Catalan style (but not done by our same artist) is the Breviary of Martin of Aragon (Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Rothschild 2529). Though there is no way of knowing if our leaf comes from a manuscript with royal provenance, the decoration is certainly grand enough to make such a possibility reasonable. In addition to being in remarkable condition, this leaf is very substantial in size, being nearly 360 mm. tall; it has unusual, finely executed, and very pleasing decoration as well as a scribal hand so regular as to make the text appear at first glance to be printed; it is from a work almost never seen for sale in manuscript; and it seems to be of Spanish origin, a category of illuminated materials that, aside from later choir books and grants of arms, is among the scarcest on the market. As is discussed below, it may even have been meant for a queen. A Franciscan scholar active in the second half of the 13th century, Johannes Gallensis (John of Wales), who may have been a native Welshman, is first documented in 1259-60 as lector in Oxford. By 1270, he was in Paris, where he seems to have died in 1285. His reputation rests on a series of pastoral handbooks for preachers, full of quotations from ancient and patristic authors, the most important and successful of these being the "Communiloquium." John’s aim in writing it was to provide priests with basic, practical information on how to lead a good life, so that in sermons and conversation, they could instruct individuals of all classes and conditions in the norms of ethical conduct, reinforced by the example of the ancient world as provided by the quoted texts. The "Communiloquium" is divided into seven sections, the first three dealing with secular society, the next three with the church, and the final one with death and dying. The work in its entirety contains no fewer than 1,500 extracts from some 200 works by more than 100 authors, including 170 from Seneca and 103 from Cicero. Jenny Swanson, whose work "John of Wales," published in 1989, is the source of much of this discussion, has found more than 100 manuscripts of the work in i
BESCHREIBUNG EINER NEUEN FLUGMASCHINE

BESCHREIBUNG EINER NEUEN FLUGMASCHINE

AVIATION). DEGEN, JAKOB 265 x 210 mm. (10 3/8 x 8 1/4"). viii, 39 pp. (complete, but with pp. iii-vi bound at end). FIRST EDITION. Attractive recent tree calf, smooth spine with two gilt air balloon motifs and red morocco label with gilt titling, patterned floral endpapers. With one folding plate as called for, and EXTRA-ILLUSTRATED with one hand-colored engraving by F. Schaly, a lithograph plate in two states (plain and hand-colored), and one wood engraving. Liebmann & Wahl 1119; Brockett 3353. A hint of scuffing to the extremities and three short scratches to bottom edge of front cover, text with occasional offsetting due to quality of paper, a touch of light spotting to the added plates, but these faults all very minor. Overall AN EXCELLENT COPY with large, clean margins. In wonderful condition and enhanced with additional illustrative material, this fanciful treatise describes an early attempt at a man-powered flying machine designed by a Swiss watchmaker. The mechanically inclined Jakob Degen (1760-1848) is considered a pioneer of aviation, experimenting with flying machines from about 1807. The present work details his plans for an "ornithopter" with an enormous wing-span, illustrated to fine effect by the large folding plate depicting an Icarus-like figure in mid-air. Once airborne, and with the assistance of a huge hydrogen-filled balloon to provide some buoyancy, the wings could be flapped by the wearer to control the altitude and direction of flight. Although Degen managed to complete several successful demonstrations of his flying machine, his failures were also spectacular, as illustrated by the comical lithographs portraying an ill-fated attempt in Paris on October 5, 1912. According to the National Air and Space Museum, "When he failed to fly on this occasion, the crowd overwhelmed him and destroyed his apparatus and balloon. Deghen [sic] is shown on the ground with men around him holding onto his ornithopter as the balloon is pulling him away." This work is quite rare with only a handful of copies at institutions and two copies (in middling condition) located on RBH and ABPC. In wonderful condition and enhanced with additional illustrative material, this fanciful treatise describes an early attempt at a man-powered flying machine designed by a Swiss watchmaker. The mechanically inclined Jakob Degen (1760-1848) is considered a pioneer of aviation, experimenting with flying machines from about 1807. The present work details his plans for an "ornithopter" with an enormous wing-span, illustrated to fine effect by the large folding plate depicting an Icarus-like figure in mid-air. Once airborne, and with the assistance of a huge hydrogen-filled balloon to provide some buoyancy, the wings could be flapped by the wearer to control the altitude and direction of flight. Although Degen managed to complete several successful demonstrations of his flying machine, his failures were also spectacular, as illustrated by the comical lithographs portraying an ill-fated attempt in Paris on October 5, 1912. According to the National Air and Space Museum, "When he failed to fly on this occasion, the crowd overwhelmed him and destroyed his apparatus and balloon. Deghen [sic] is shown on the ground with men around him holding onto his ornithopter as the balloon is pulling him away." This work is quite rare with only a handful of copies at institutions and two copies (in middling condition) located on RBH and ABPC.
HOROLOGIUM DEVOTIONIS. [bound with] BERNARDUS CLARAEVALLENSIS. SPECULUM DIVINI AMORIS. [bound with] GERARDUS DE ZUTPHANIA. DE SPIRITUALIBUS ASCENSIONIBUS

HOROLOGIUM DEVOTIONIS. [bound with] BERNARDUS CLARAEVALLENSIS. SPECULUM DIVINI AMORIS. [bound with] GERARDUS DE ZUTPHANIA. DE SPIRITUALIBUS ASCENSIONIBUS

WOODCUTS - INCUNABULAR). (SAMMELBAND). BERTHOLDUS 150 x 100 mm. (5 7/8 x 4"). Bertholdus: [65] leaves (lacking final blank); single column, 30 lines in gothic type. Bernardus: [80] leaves; single column, 26 lines in roman type. Gerardus: [68] leaves; single column, 29 lines in gothic type. Three separately published works in one volume. Only Separate Edition of "Speculum Divini Amoris." Pleasing early 16th century pigskin, upper cover with lighter rectangle (where label once was) and beneath this an etched circle containing a six-petalled flower, raised bands, ink titling and shelf marking to head and tail spine panels, original brass fore-edge clasp, top and bottom edges with faded red and yellow designs. Bertholdus and Gerardus rubricated in red, Gerardus with three-line initials in red, Bertholdus WITH 36 WOODCUTS BY THE "MEISTER DES HAINTZ NARR,"ATTRACTIVELY COLORED BY A CONTEMPORARY HAND. First title page with ink inscription of the Carthusian monastery in Gaming, Austria; A5r with faint ink stamp in tail margin. Bertholdus: BMC III, 753; Goff B-506; for the woodcuts: BSB-Ink B-398. Bernardus: VD16 B 1963; USTC 694246. Gerardus: BMC III, 752; Goff G-177. Pigskin lightly soiled and with around a score of tiny wormholes to boards, rear pastedown and free endpaper with two-inch patch of worming, a couple of small ink stains to head margin, otherwise A CHOICE COPY, notably clean, fresh, and bright internally with ample margins, the coloring clear and vivid, and the unsophisticated binding quite sound. Housed in a near-contemporary binding and in remarkably fine condition throughout, this theological sammelband consists of one early 16th century and two incunabular works, one of the latter containing numerous woodcuts by a known engraver, pleasingly colored by a contemporary hand. Our engraver, the "Master of the Haintz Fool," so-named for his memorable illustrations in Sebastian Brant’s "Das Narrenschiff" ["Ship of Fools"] (1494), was active in Basel around 1490 and contributed to several publications of this period (including, notably, the 1494 Basel edition of Christopher Columbus’ "Epistola de insulis nuper inventis"). The woodcuts in our copy of Berthodus’ "Horologium Devotionis" are attributed to his hand by the Bavarian State Library (BSB). The Horologium was a popular devotional work containing prayers for every hour of the day, each celebrating a moment from the life of Christ–in this case, with accompanying illustrations, from the Annunciation to the Last Judgment. Though most of the woodcuts here are only about 70 mm. tall, the specificity of location and number of figures packed into each scene is impressive. The coloring, no doubt by a contemporary hand, is vivid, favoring bright greens, golds, pinks, and oranges, with occasional splashes of blue and purple. This first Basel edition of the Horologium (the ISTC notes four earlier printings in Paris, Cologne, Augsburg, and Nuremberg) was printed by Johann Amerbach (1430-1513) who, according to Pollard, issued his first work from a Basel establishment in 1478, and in his career printed about 100 incunabula, all in Latin and mostly works on theology or Bibles. He was the first printer in his city to use roman type. He also used several fonts that are nearly identical to those of Anton Koberger of Nuremberg, for whom he likely worked at some point in his career. Amerbach also printed the other incunable in this Sammelband, "De Spiritualibus Ascensionibus" by Gerard Zerbolt of Zütphen, a man described by Post (in "The Modern Devotion") as "the most fertile and the most successful writer the Brothers [of the Common Life] ever produced." The final work here, "Speculum Divini Amoris" by Bernard of Clairvaux is the only post-incunable in this sammelband, and the only separate edition of this work found by OCLC and KVK. It is also quite rare: USTC finds 10 copies worldwide, with only one in North America. As a whole, these three works are an absolute delight to handle and in as fine condition as one can hope to find, being clean, fresh, and entirely unsophisticated, safe within the carefully preserved period binding. Housed in a near-contemporary binding and in remarkably fine condition throughout, this theological sammelband consists of one early 16th century and two incunabular works, one of the latter containing numerous woodcuts by a known engraver, pleasingly colored by a contemporary hand. Our engraver, the "Master of the Haintz Fool," so-named for his memorable illustrations in Sebastian Brant’s "Das Narrenschiff" ["Ship of Fools"] (1494), was active in Basel around 1490 and contributed to several publications of this period (including, notably, the 1494 Basel edition of Christopher Columbus’ "Epistola de insulis nuper inventis"). The woodcuts in our copy of Berthodus’ "Horologium Devotionis" are attributed to his hand by the Bavarian State Library (BSB). The Horologium was a popular devotional work containing prayers for every hour of the day, each celebrating a moment from the life of Christ–in this case, with accompanying illustrations, from the Annunciation to the Last Judgment. Though most of the woodcuts here are only about 70 mm. tall, the specificity of location and number of figures packed into each scene is impressive. The coloring, no doubt by a contemporary hand, is vivid, favoring bright greens, golds, pinks, and oranges, with occasional splashes of blue and purple. This first Basel edition of the Horologium (the ISTC notes four earlier printings in Paris, Cologne, Augsburg, and Nuremberg) was printed by Johann Amerbach (1430-1513) who, according to Pollard, issued his first work from a Basel establishment in 1478, and in his career printed about 100 incunabula, all in Latin and mostly works on theology or Bibles. He was the first printer in his city to use roman type. He also used several fonts that are nearly identical to those of Anton Koberger of Nuremberg, for whom he likely worked at some point in his career. Amerbach also printed the other incunable in thi
SUMMA CASUUM CONSCIENTIAE [SUMMA ROSELLA]. [with] SIXTUS IV. BULLA "ETSI DOMINICI GREGIS" 30 DEC. 1479. RUBRICAE IURIS CIVILIS ET CANONICI

SUMMA CASUUM CONSCIENTIAE [SUMMA ROSELLA]. [with] SIXTUS IV. BULLA "ETSI DOMINICI GREGIS" 30 DEC. 1479. RUBRICAE IURIS CIVILIS ET CANONICI

TROVAMALA DE SALIS, BAPTISTA 188 x 102 mm. (6 1/2 x 4 1/2"). 14 p.l., 479 leaves (leaf numbers 393-97 skipped, but text complete). Double column, 49 lines in gothic type. Contemporary pink blind-stamped pigskin decorated with floral stamps and "Maria" banners, rebacked with white pigskin at an early date, raised bands, remnants of inked paper shelf label to spine, each cover with two brass bosses, two corner guards and two edge guards, upper cover with early vellum title label but lacking central brass ornament, one brass clasp (strap renewed), FRONT PASTEDOWN A FRAGMENT FROM A NINTH CENTURY MANUSCRIPT BIBLE (Matthew II, 1; Caroline minuscule), final leaf of text serving as rear pastedown, original tiny vellum tabs to fore edges, marking sections of the text. With one four-line and one six-line hand-painted blue initial on aa1r. Verso of a10 with later (17th century?) ink ownership inscription of the monastic library at St. Peter’s Abbey in Salzburg. BMC V, 460; Goff S-50; ISTC is00050000. Four small holes to pigskin on boards, head of spine with shallow chip, leather a bit rubbed, but the binding entirely sound and the early manuscript fragment quite legible. Occasional mild marginal foxing or small ink stains to edge of leaf, otherwise A FINE COPY INTERNALLY, clean and crisp. This is an excellent portable edition of an influential manual of confession written by Franciscan monk Battista Trovamala in 1483 and first printed in 1484. Intended to guide priests in performing the office of confessor in an informed and judicious manner, such manuals began to be produced after the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215. The present item is a revised and expanded version of the 1484 original from distinguished Venetian printer Paganino de Paganini (fl. 1483-1538), who began his career with the press of Giorgio Arrivabene before marrying the daughter of German printer Franz Renner (Francesco Della Fontana), who operated in Venice from 1471 to 1496. Though he primarily issued religious books or legal and medical works for the university, he is best remembered for printing the first Quran in Arabic. Our volume, with its helpful index tabs, offered a quick reference guide for the Benedictine fathers at St. Peter’s Abbey in Salzburg Austria, founded in 696 and still operating today. The Abbey’s library is the oldest in Austria, particularly rich in early manuscripts, Benedictine works, church history, and items relating to Salzburg and its history. Measuring 105 x 90 mm., the ninth century manuscript on the pastedown here comes from a Bible or Gospel Book. The visible section contains part of the opening of Matthew chapter 2, on the Magiseeing the star and journeyingto Jerusalem. The fragment is possibly French in origin, and quite likely from the first half of the ninth century (and maybe even the first third) based on the very early, archaic looking "a" resembling two sloping "i"’s (see for example "natus" in first line resembling "nutus," and "magi" in third line resembling "mugi"). At the top of the fragment, someone has re-copied part of the first three word "[Cu]m ergonatu[s]" in a more developed Caroline minuscule, using the normal ninth century"a." It almost goes without saying that leaves from this period are very rare and extremely desirable; the present fragment, with its dark, legible ink and earlier letter forms make it all the more so. This is an excellent portable edition of an influential manual of confession written by Franciscan monk Battista Trovamala in 1483 and first printed in 1484. Intended to guide priests in performing the office of confessor in an informed and judicious manner, such manuals began to be produced after the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215. The present item is a revised and expanded version of the 1484 original from distinguished Venetian printer Paganino de Paganini (fl. 1483-1538), who began his career with the press of Giorgio Arrivabene before marrying the daughter of German printer Franz Renner (Francesco Della Fontana), who operated in Venice from 1471 to 1496. Though he primarily issued religious books or legal and medical works for the university, he is best remembered for printing the first Quran in Arabic. Our volume, with its helpful index tabs, offered a quick reference guide for the Benedictine fathers at St. Peter’s Abbey in Salzburg Austria, founded in 696 and still operating today. The Abbey’s library is the oldest in Austria, particularly rich in early manuscripts, Benedictine works, church history, and items relating to Salzburg and its history. Measuring 105 x 90 mm., the ninth century manuscript on the pastedown here comes from a Bible or Gospel Book. The visible section contains part of the opening of Matthew chapter 2, on the Magiseeing the star and journeyingto Jerusalem. The fragment is possibly French in origin, and quite likely from the first half of the ninth century (and maybe even the first third) based on the very early, archaic looking "a" resembling two sloping "i"’s (see for example "natus" in first line resembling "nutus," and "magi" in third line resembling "mugi"). At the top of the fragment, someone has re-copied part of the first three word "[Cu]m ergonatu[s]" in a more developed Caroline minuscule, using the normal ninth century"a." It almost goes without saying that leaves from this period are very rare and extremely desirable; the present fragment, with its dark, legible ink and earlier letter forms make it all the more so.
DANIEL DERONDA

DANIEL DERONDA

ELIOT, GEORGE 182 x 120 mm. (7 1/8 x 4 3/4"). With errata slips in books 2 and 7, advertisements at front of each part (and also at end of book 7), and slips announcing the publication date of the following part at end of books 1-7. Eight books, as issued. FIRST EDITION, First Printing, First Issue, in eight parts (books). Attractive 20th century Venetian red morocco by Zaehnsdorf, boards with gilt rule border, raised bands, gilt-ruled spine compartments, gilt titling, gilt-rolled turn-ins, marbled endpapers, top edges gilt. With the original wrappers bound in at the front and rear of each of the books. Baker & Ross A-11.1.a1; Sadleir 813. A CHOICE COPY, with only the most trivial imperfections, THE CONTENTS, INCLUDING THE WRAPPERS, IN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE CONDITION, and the bindings unworn. This is a copy in outstanding condition of the original monthly installments of George Eliot’s final novel, and perhaps her most radical work. At a time when the works of such masters as Dickens and Trollope depicted Jewish characters in a most unflattering way, this novel is "notable for its exposure of Victorian anti-Semitism," with warm and sympathetic portrayals of Jews and Zionism that "evoked grateful praise from Jewish readers." (Encyclopedia Britannica) DNB notes that Eliot (1819-80) "had become interested in Judaism through her friendship with Emanuel Deutsch, an orientalist employed by the British Museum, who taught her Hebrew. Deutsch had a vision of a Jewish homeland in the East; he travelled to Palestine, and died in Alexandria in 1873. [Eliot] sympathized with his idealism, and was also irritated by the routine antisemitism she encountered among her acquaintances. She told [her publisher] that she had wanted in Daniel Deronda to ‘widen the English vision a little.’" Just as her Zionist Jewish hero was an anomaly in Victorian literature, so was Eliot’s empathetic depiction of a spoiled society girl who marries for money. Gwendolen Harleth is an intelligent woman, but when her family fortune is lost she chooses a loveless marriage to a wealthy man over life as a governess. Day observes that "marriage for the wrong reasons, usually monetary, is a familiar theme in the Victorian novel, but no contemporary matches George Eliot in the analysis of moral wretchedness and self-scorn as experienced by Gwendolen." According to Britannica, this "keen analysis . . . seems to many critics the peak of [her] achievement." The state of preservation here is remarkable, especially of the fragile wrappers, which, when they are found, are virtually always torn, wrinkled, or soiled. This is a copy in outstanding condition of the original monthly installments of George Eliot’s final novel, and perhaps her most radical work. At a time when the works of such masters as Dickens and Trollope depicted Jewish characters in a most unflattering way, this novel is "notable for its exposure of Victorian anti-Semitism," with warm and sympathetic portrayals of Jews and Zionism that "evoked grateful praise from Jewish readers." (Encyclopedia Britannica) DNB notes that Eliot (1819-80) "had become interested in Judaism through her friendship with Emanuel Deutsch, an orientalist employed by the British Museum, who taught her Hebrew. Deutsch had a vision of a Jewish homeland in the East; he travelled to Palestine, and died in Alexandria in 1873. [Eliot] sympathized with his idealism, and was also irritated by the routine antisemitism she encountered among her acquaintances. She told [her publisher] that she had wanted in Daniel Deronda to ‘widen the English vision a little.’" Just as her Zionist Jewish hero was an anomaly in Victorian literature, so was Eliot’s empathetic depiction of a spoiled society girl who marries for money. Gwendolen Harleth is an intelligent woman, but when her family fortune is lost she chooses a loveless marriage to a wealthy man over life as a governess. Day observes that "marriage for the wrong reasons, usually monetary, is a familiar theme in the Victorian novel, but no contemporary matches George Eliot in the analysis of moral wretchedness and self-scorn as experienced by Gwendolen." According to Britannica, this "keen analysis . . . seems to many critics the peak of [her] achievement." The state of preservation here is remarkable, especially of the fragile wrappers, which, when they are found, are virtually always torn, wrinkled, or soiled. FIRST EDITION, First Printing, First Issue, in eight parts (books).
CODEX MEDICEUS]. P. VERGILI MARONIS CODEX ANTIQVISSIMVS

CODEX MEDICEUS]. P. VERGILI MARONIS CODEX ANTIQVISSIMVS

TYPOGRAPHIC FACSIMILE - MANUSCRIPTS, ANCIENT). VERGILIUS MARO, PUBLIUS 260 x 175 mm. (10 1/8 x 6 7/8"). 2 p.l., xxxv, [1], 459 pp. With the half title. FIRST EDITION. RICHLY GILT CONTEMPORARY SLATE BLUE MOROCCO with wide filigree frames formed by multiple decorative rolls, floral centerpiece composed of small tools, raised bands, gilt compartments with fleuron centerpiece surrounded by small tools, curling cornerpieces, one compartment with date "1743," another with gilt titling, gilt-rolled turn-ins, marbled endpapers. Engraved title, medallion portrait on printed title, historiated engraved headpiece and initial, engraved typographic specimen in the text, decorative tailpiece. Printed in red and black. Front pastedown with book label of Gulielmi [William] O’Brien and library label of Milltown Park Jesuit Library; title page with library’s ink stamp. Forbes Collection, p. 9; Updike I, 171; Dibdin, p. 551; Brunet V, 1291; Graesse VII, 341; Schweiger II, 1174. Tiny chip to head of front joint, extremities a little rubbed, slight variations to color of boards, but the once-splendid binding solid and still bright with gilt. Isolated minor marginal smudges or stains, but A VERY FINE COPY INTERNALLY, clean, crisp, and quite bright, with deep impressions of the type. This is Joseph Manni’s intriguing attempt to give an exact textual and a convincing paleographical replication of the most important and complete ancient manuscript of Virgil, the famous "Codex Mediceus" in the Laurentian Library in Florence. As such, it is the first typographic facsimile of any manuscript, and qualifies as an important event in the history of printing. The manuscript is written in rustic capitals, which are imitated with some success in this typographic facsimile by a specially fabricated font of type; marginal and interlinear corrections are also included. The "Codex Mediceus" is of particular importance because it is complete except for the first part of the "Eclogues" (which are supplied here from another source) and because it is one of the few more or less precisely dated Latin literary manuscripts: a note in it says it was reviewed or corrected by Tucius Rufius Apronianus Asterius, who was one of the consuls in 494. Our volume was owned by Irish judge William O’Brien (1832-99), whose library was described by Sotheby’s, in the catalogue for its sale, as "a microcosm of the late nineteenth-century taste for book collecting." The auction house noted that his "interest in early printing led him to seek out books from as many different print shops as possible, from prolific printers such as Nicolas Jenson and Anton Koberger to more uncommon ones such as Leonhardus Aurl, and in particular from the earlier print shops in each town." O’Brien bequeathed his collection to the Jesuit Community at Milltown Park, Dublin, which decided to sell the books in 2017 to fund "the upkeep of churches, the care of invalid priests, relief of the poor and religious education." The sale at Sotheby’s raised nearly £2.8 million. This is Joseph Manni’s intriguing attempt to give an exact textual and a convincing paleographical replication of the most important and complete ancient manuscript of Virgil, the famous "Codex Mediceus" in the Laurentian Library in Florence. As such, it is the first typographic facsimile of any manuscript, and qualifies as an important event in the history of printing. The manuscript is written in rustic capitals, which are imitated with some success in this typographic facsimile by a specially fabricated font of type; marginal and interlinear corrections are also included. The "Codex Mediceus" is of particular importance because it is complete except for the first part of the "Eclogues" (which are supplied here from another source) and because it is one of the few more or less precisely dated Latin literary manuscripts: a note in it says it was reviewed or corrected by Tucius Rufius Apronianus Asterius, who was one of the consuls in 494. Our volume was owned by Irish judge William O’Brien (1832-99), whose library was described by Sotheby’s, in the catalogue for its sale, as "a microcosm of the late nineteenth-century taste for book collecting." The auction house noted that his "interest in early printing led him to seek out books from as many different print shops as possible, from prolific printers such as Nicolas Jenson and Anton Koberger to more uncommon ones such as Leonhardus Aurl, and in particular from the earlier print shops in each town." O’Brien bequeathed his collection to the Jesuit Community at Milltown Park, Dublin, which decided to sell the books in 2017 to fund "the upkeep of churches, the care of invalid priests, relief of the poor and religious education." The sale at Sotheby’s raised nearly £2.8 million.
THE POETICAL WORKS OF ROBERT BURNS WITH NOTES

THE POETICAL WORKS OF ROBERT BURNS WITH NOTES, GLOSSARY, INDEX OF FIRST LINES AND CHRONOLOGICAL LIST

BURNS, ROBERT 180 x 120 mm. (7 1/8 x 4 3/4"). xx, 636 pp.Edited by J. Logie Robertson 14th Printing. Attractive burnt orange morocco, covers with gilt filet border, raised bands, gilt in compartments with central fleuron, floral gilt turn-ins, top edge gilt. With frontispiece portrait of Robert Burns. Spine sunned to even tan color, very slight scratches on boards, small tear on fore margin of three leaves, not affecting text, otherwise very fine inside and out. This is an attractively bound edition of poetry by the immortal Scottish bard, Robert Burns, issued by an outstanding scholarly press. This edition was compiled and edited by Logie Robertson (1846-1922), a literary scholar and writer, who, in the words of DNB, was "an important figure in the reinvigoration and renationalization of Scottish cultural life in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries" through his editions of poetry by the likes of Allan Ramsey, Walter Scott, Thomas Campbell, and Burns. A poet who achieved notable popularity in his own day, Burns (1759-96) was immortalized after his death as Scotland’s national poet, and has remained a popular and influential force in the literary world. This is an attractively bound edition of poetry by the immortal Scottish bard, Robert Burns, issued by an outstanding scholarly press. This edition was compiled and edited by Logie Robertson (1846-1922), a literary scholar and writer, who, in the words of DNB, was "an important figure in the reinvigoration and renationalization of Scottish cultural life in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries" through his editions of poetry by the likes of Allan Ramsey, Walter Scott, Thomas Campbell, and Burns. A poet who achieved notable popularity in his own day, Burns (1759-96) was immortalized after his death as Scotland’s national poet, and has remained a popular and influential force in the literary world.
POEMS AND SONNETS

POEMS AND SONNETS

VALE PRESS). CONSTABLE, HENRY 235 x 148 mm. (9 1/4 x 5 3/4"). ci, [1] pp., [1] leaf (colophon, limitation). ONE OF 210 COPIES. Original maroon patterned paper boards, gray paper spine, printed label, untrimmed and ENTIRELY UNOPENED. Elaborate woodcut vine border on first page of text as well as fine decorative woodcut initials by Charles Ricketts. Tomkinson, p. 165. Corners rubbed to boards, edges and head and tail of spine a little worn, label chipped in a few places, edges of text block just slightly toned, but THE CONTENTS PRISTINE, the pages crisp, fresh, and showing no signs of use. Considered by his contemporaries to be one of the greatest of all lyric poets, Constable (1562-1613) produced a sequence of 23 sonnets called "Diana" in 1592 (later augmented) as well as some highly regarded pastoral verse in "England’s Helicon," published in 1600. He also wrote a number of intensely religious sonnets, which remained in manuscript until the 19th century. The present item contains representative samples of these various categories of his work in a limited edition, handsomely printed format. The Vale Press books, which Cave says were "far truer to the spirit of fifteenth-century printing than Kelmscott work," included nearly 50 titles issued during the eight-year life of the press (beginning in 1894), and both its impressive output and considerable artistic success can be attributed to the fact that Charles Ricketts (1866-1931), who was remarkably skilled as a designer, painter, and illustrator, was in control of every facet of the operation. Considered by his contemporaries to be one of the greatest of all lyric poets, Constable (1562-1613) produced a sequence of 23 sonnets called "Diana" in 1592 (later augmented) as well as some highly regarded pastoral verse in "England’s Helicon," published in 1600. He also wrote a number of intensely religious sonnets, which remained in manuscript until the 19th century. The present item contains representative samples of these various categories of his work in a limited edition, handsomely printed format. The Vale Press books, which Cave says were "far truer to the spirit of fifteenth-century printing than Kelmscott work," included nearly 50 titles issued during the eight-year life of the press (beginning in 1894), and both its impressive output and considerable artistic success can be attributed to the fact that Charles Ricketts (1866-1931), who was remarkably skilled as a designer, painter, and illustrator, was in control of every facet of the operation.
THE TALE OF KING FLORUS AND THE FAIR JEHANE

THE TALE OF KING FLORUS AND THE FAIR JEHANE

BINDINGS - SANGORSKI & SUTCLIFFE). (MOSHER PRESS). MORRIS, WILLIAM 133 x 85 mm. (5 1/4 x 3 3/8"). 72 pp., [2] leaves. Third Edition. ONE OF 425 COPIES on Japanese vellum. Attractive contemporary crimson morocco, gilt in the Arts & Crafts style, by Sangorski & Sutcliffe (stamp-signed on front turn-in), covers framed by four gilt rules, with rose-leaf quatrefoil at corners, central panel of upper cover with gilt titling, raised bands, spine gilt in double-ruled compartments with a trio of dots in each corner, gilt titling, turn-ins with three gilt rules, top edge gilt. Printer’s device on title page, decorative head- and tailpiece. Bishop 397.2 A touch of rubbing to extremities, faint marginal smudge, otherwise A FINE COPY, clean, fresh, and bright in a lustrous binding. A delightful little gem, this prettily bound edition of the classic chivalric tale comprises one of the four "Old French Romances" printed by Mosher and using William Morris’ translation. The story recounts the trials of Jehane, the lovely wife of a squire whose honor is maligned by a cad. Cast off by her husband, Jehane disguises herself as a boy, becomes her husband’s squire, and travels with him to Paris, where she earns a fortune baking bread. At last, her accuser admits his lie and Jehane and her husband are happily reunited. The husband then dies, leaving her a rich widow free to marry the childless King Florus and produce two heirs–and leaving us with justice, French bread, and guaranteed succession, all packaged in a charming little book in an Arts & Crafts style binding. A delightful little gem, this prettily bound edition of the classic chivalric tale comprises one of the four "Old French Romances" printed by Mosher and using William Morris’ translation. The story recounts the trials of Jehane, the lovely wife of a squire whose honor is maligned by a cad. Cast off by her husband, Jehane disguises herself as a boy, becomes her husband’s squire, and travels with him to Paris, where she earns a fortune baking bread. At last, her accuser admits his lie and Jehane and her husband are happily reunited. The husband then dies, leaving her a rich widow free to marry the childless King Florus and produce two heirs–and leaving us with justice, French bread, and guaranteed succession, all packaged in a charming little book in an Arts & Crafts style binding. Third Edition. ONE OF 425 COPIES on Japanese vellum.
A CATALOGUE OF ENGRAVERS

A CATALOGUE OF ENGRAVERS, WHO HAVE BEEN BORN, OR RESIDE IN ENGLAND

VERTUE, GEORGE (222 x 173 mm) 8 3/4 x 6 3/4" [2] p.l., 128, 14, 20 pp., [4] leaves (index), lacking final leaf of advertisements, found in some copies . FIRST EDITION. Inoffensive modern half brown morocco over cloth boards, raised bands flanked by gilt rules, with decorative garland and star tools or lettering in each compartment. With nine plates depicting portraits of engravers. Includes the "Direction to the Binder" before the title page. Extremities a bit rubbed but otherwise a perfectly sound binding, some occasional light scattered foxing with slightly heavier foxing on the last few pages and in the margins of one plate, a touch of offsetting from plates, a flat crease to the corner of two leaves, but overall a very pleasing copy without any major defects. This charming work focuses on the type of artist most frequently encountered by bibliophiles: the engraver. Each of the nine plates contains one or more portraits of well-known engravers of the 16th-18th centuries, including William Faithorne, Robert White, and even the diarist John Evelyn who, although not a professional artist, "loved, promoted, [and] patronized" the art. The text contains brief entries describing the artists’ life and work, and is based on the manuscripts of George Vertue (1684-1756), himself a prominent engraver, whose notebooks were purchased after his death by Horace Walpole. The "Direction to the Binder" note suggests that this work was intended as a companion or supplement to Walpole’s "Anecdotes of Painting in England," which were also based on Vertue’s notes and printed at Strawberry Hill. This charming work focuses on the type of artist most frequently encountered by bibliophiles: the engraver. Each of the nine plates contains one or more portraits of well-known engravers of the 16th-18th centuries, including William Faithorne, Robert White, and even the diarist John Evelyn who, although not a professional artist, "loved, promoted, [and] patronized" the art. The text contains brief entries describing the artists’ life and work, and is based on the manuscripts of George Vertue (1684-1756), himself a prominent engraver, whose notebooks were purchased after his death by Horace Walpole. The "Direction to the Binder" note suggests that this work was intended as a companion or supplement to Walpole’s "Anecdotes of Painting in England," which were also based on Vertue’s notes and printed at Strawberry Hill.
THE HISTORY OF DON QUIXOTE

THE HISTORY OF DON QUIXOTE

FORE-EDGE PAINTING). CERVANTES SAAVEDRA, MIGUEL DE 322 x 245 mm. (12 3/4 x 9 1/2"). xxviii, 737, [1] pp. Two parts in one. Substantial 20th century red half morocco over marbled boards, raised bands, heavily gilt in compartments, green spine label, all edges gilt. With frontispiece and 115 (of 118 plates) , and numerous illustrations by Gustave Dore, and A HANDSOME FORE-EDGE PAINTING inspired by one of Dore’s plates. Bottom edge of lower board a little bruised, extremities slightly rubbed, a little light soiling to leather and boards a touch scratched, but still an attractive and very sturdy binding; internally excellent with just a few marginal blemishes and lightly toned leaves. Accompanied by wonderful illustrations by Gustave Doré, this literary classic also contains a hidden delight: a large fore-edge painting inspired one of the plates in this book. The image depicts Quixote seated in a large chair, a book in one hand and brandishing a sword in the other; surrounding him are all manner of creatures, damsels in distress, and knights errant–the caption reads: "A world of disorderly notions, picked out of his books, crowded into his imagination." Although unsigned, it was probably completed when the book was rebound in the 20th century, judging from the partial marbling incorporated into the painting, matching that of the endpapers and boards. Clearly the work of a talented hand, the level of complexity, subject matter, and sheer size make this a particularly desirable fore-edge painting, and the profuse illustrations by one of the 19th century’s best known illustrators only add to the appeal. Accompanied by wonderful illustrations by Gustave Doré, this literary classic also contains a hidden delight: a large fore-edge painting inspired one of the plates in this book. The image depicts Quixote seated in a large chair, a book in one hand and brandishing a sword in the other; surrounding him are all manner of creatures, damsels in distress, and knights errant–the caption reads: "A world of disorderly notions, picked out of his books, crowded into his imagination." Although unsigned, it was probably completed when the book was rebound in the 20th century, judging from the partial marbling incorporated into the painting, matching that of the endpapers and boards. Clearly the work of a talented hand, the level of complexity, subject matter, and sheer size make this a particularly desirable fore-edge painting, and the profuse illustrations by one of the 19th century’s best known illustrators only add to the appeal.
IONICA

IONICA

CORY, WILLIAM JOHNSON] 168 x 102 mm. (6 5/8 x 4"). viii, 209, [1] pp., [1] leaf. Second Edition. Contemporary brown crushed morocco by Spottiswoode & Co. (stamp-signed on front turn-ins), raised bands, gilt titling, gilt-ruled turn-ins, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. Front flyleaf inscribed in ink: "G. V. Campbell / from H. Brinton. / on leaving Eton. / Dec. 1902." Small dark spot to front cover, a half dozen tiny spots of foxing to opening leaves, otherwise a fine copy, with no signs of use. Everything about this memento evokes Eton: a collection of poems by a beloved and influential Eton master, in a suitably masculine binding of very plain, but very fine, leather. Educated at Eton and at Kings College, Cambridge, William Johnson Cory (1823-92) was a passionate teacher and education reformer, as well as a poet. In his view, "you go to a great school not so much for knowledge as for arts and habits; for the habit of attention, for the art of expression, for the art of assuming at a moment’s notice a new intellectual position, for the art of entering quickly into another person’s thoughts, for the habit of submitting to censure and refutation, for the art of indicating assent or dissent in graduated terms, for the habit of regarding minute points of accuracy, for the art of working out what is possible in a given time, for taste, for discrimination, for mental courage, and for mental soberness." The poems collected here were first published, anonymously, in 1858 and 1877. The title gave a hint to the author’s identity: Johnson Cory’s nickname among his pupils was "Ionicus." Everything about this memento evokes Eton: a collection of poems by a beloved and influential Eton master, in a suitably masculine binding of very plain, but very fine, leather. Educated at Eton and at Kings College, Cambridge, William Johnson Cory (1823-92) was a passionate teacher and education reformer, as well as a poet. In his view, "you go to a great school not so much for knowledge as for arts and habits; for the habit of attention, for the art of expression, for the art of assuming at a moment’s notice a new intellectual position, for the art of entering quickly into another person’s thoughts, for the habit of submitting to censure and refutation, for the art of indicating assent or dissent in graduated terms, for the habit of regarding minute points of accuracy, for the art of working out what is possible in a given time, for taste, for discrimination, for mental courage, and for mental soberness." The poems collected here were first published, anonymously, in 1858 and 1877. The title gave a hint to the author’s identity: Johnson Cory’s nickname among his pupils was "Ionicus."
SOLDIER TALES

SOLDIER TALES

KIPLING, RUDYARD 190 x 122 mm. (7 1/2 x 4 3/4"). viii, 172 pp., with the half title. FIRST EDITION. Publisher’s blue cloth with gilt pictorial design on upper cover and on flat spine, all edges gilt. Vignette headpieces and tailpieces, frontispiece and 20 plates by A. S. Hartrick. Verso of front free endpaper with ink owner’s inscription of Constance Reynolds dated 14 February 1898. Stewart 157. Spine a bit cocked and faded, with a little fraying at tail edge, extremities lightly rubbed, a couple of small stains to upper cover, text slightly open at gutter at gathering D, occasional mild marginal foxing or faint fore-edge dampstain to plates (not affecting image), but a very good copy, clean and fresh with nothing approaching a fatal defect. Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) is most famous for his works portraying the lives of both natives and colonialists on the Indian subcontinent. An opponent of female suffrage and a staunch supporter of British imperialism, Kipling nonetheless had great sympathy for the traditions of India as well as the literary ability and desire to present it as a land of beauty and enchantment. He was born in Bombay, where his father ran a school of art, and he lived in India until the age of six. He was sent to school in England, but chose to return to the East at 18. His father had become director of the Lahore Museum in what is now Pakistan, and Rudyard became a journalist for the "Lahore Civil and Military Gazette." His first two collections of stories, "Plain Tales from the Hills" and "Soldiers Three," depict the lives of the British military in India; he proved to be a prolific author, writing novels, tales for children and adults, and many poems. Kipling’s wife was American, and they lived for a time in Vermont, but from 1896 the couple settled in England. Among his many honors are a Nobel Prize (1907) and the Gold Medal of the Royal Society of Literature (1926), which had previously only been awarded to Scott, Meredith, and Hardy. Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) is most famous for his works portraying the lives of both natives and colonialists on the Indian subcontinent. An opponent of female suffrage and a staunch supporter of British imperialism, Kipling nonetheless had great sympathy for the traditions of India as well as the literary ability and desire to present it as a land of beauty and enchantment. He was born in Bombay, where his father ran a school of art, and he lived in India until the age of six. He was sent to school in England, but chose to return to the East at 18. His father had become director of the Lahore Museum in what is now Pakistan, and Rudyard became a journalist for the "Lahore Civil and Military Gazette." His first two collections of stories, "Plain Tales from the Hills" and "Soldiers Three," depict the lives of the British military in India; he proved to be a prolific author, writing novels, tales for children and adults, and many poems. Kipling’s wife was American, and they lived for a time in Vermont, but from 1896 the couple settled in England. Among his many honors are a Nobel Prize (1907) and the Gold Medal of the Royal Society of Literature (1926), which had previously only been awarded to Scott, Meredith, and Hardy.
SIR EDWARD BURNE JONES

SIR EDWARD BURNE JONES

BURNE-JONES, EDWARD). BELL, MALCOLM 250 x 185 mm. (9 7/8 x 7 1/4"). 31 pp., followed by plates. Elegant contemporary black crushed morocco, gilt, covers with pretty floral frame, raised bands, spine compartments with central lily framed by ivy, gilt titling, densely gilt turn-ins, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. With 57 black and white reproductions of Burne-Jones paintings, tipped onto heavy stock. Joints a little worn, extremities lightly rubbed, a small dent to the head edges of rear board, one small marginal smudge, a couple of corner creases, otherwise an excellent copy, very clean and fresh in a lustrous binding. This is a celebration of the work of the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Burne-Jones (1833-98), described by DNB as "the most widely admired British painter of his generation." He is best known to bibliophiles for his collaborations with William Morris and his memorable woodcuts for great private press books, including the Kelmscott Chaucer. With a biographical essay by Malcolm Bell and photographic reproductions of paintings, it was part of the publisher’s series on British artists. The handsome binding is unsigned, but was executed with taste and skill. This is a celebration of the work of the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Burne-Jones (1833-98), described by DNB as "the most widely admired British painter of his generation." He is best known to bibliophiles for his collaborations with William Morris and his memorable woodcuts for great private press books, including the Kelmscott Chaucer. With a biographical essay by Malcolm Bell and photographic reproductions of paintings, it was part of the publisher’s series on British artists. The handsome binding is unsigned, but was executed with taste and skill.
IDYLLS OF THE KING

IDYLLS OF THE KING

BINDINGS - BUMPUS). TENNYSON, ALFRED, LORD 155 x 100 mm. (6 1/8 x 4"). 4 p.l., 421 pp. Very pretty rose pink crushed morocco by J. & E. Bumpus, Ltd. (stamp-signed on front turn-in) covers with double gilt rule frames, mitered corners, raised bands, spine gilt in compartments with flamboyant rose sprig surrounded by gilt dots, gilt titling, gilt-ruled turn-ins, all edges gilt (expert repair to head of spine). With frontispiece engraving of Guinevere. Front free endpaper with ink inscription: "Ruth Farmer / from / Muriel Higgins / 10th August 1917." Spine evenly sunned to rich tan, a hint of wear to joints and extremities, free endpapers with light offsetting from turn-ins, otherwise a fine copy, pristine internally, in a lustrous binding. This is an attractively bound copy of Tennyson’s most celebrated work, inspired by the legends of King Arthur. A private printing of the first two "Idylls" appeared in 1857, and the complete set of 12 parts collected in our volume was first issued in 1889. Bumpus bindings emanated from the bookselling firm of John and Edward Bumpus, which was founded in 1780, and the Bumpus name still held an honored place among London binderies well into the 20th century. This is an attractively bound copy of Tennyson’s most celebrated work, inspired by the legends of King Arthur. A private printing of the first two "Idylls" appeared in 1857, and the complete set of 12 parts collected in our volume was first issued in 1889. Bumpus bindings emanated from the bookselling firm of John and Edward Bumpus, which was founded in 1780, and the Bumpus name still held an honored place among London binderies well into the 20th century.
MALLEUS MALEFICARUM

MALLEUS MALEFICARUM

WITCHCRAFT). INSTITORIS, HENRICUS KRAMER, (called) 306 x 200 mm. (12 x 8 7/8"). xlv, [i], 277, [1] pp.Translated, with introduction, bibliography, and notes by Montague Summers. FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. ONE OF 1,275 COPIES. Pleasing full crushed morocco in the antique style, raised bands, gilt titling in compartments, edges untrimmed. Title in red and black. A couple of very light scratches to the boards, a breath of wear to extremities, but A FINE COPY, the contents clean, bright, and the book with virtually no signs of use. This is the first printing in English, translated from the 1489 edition, of one of the great classics of early witchcraft literature. Under Pope Innocent VIII, its author, Heinrich Kramer (who took the name of Institoris), was appointed (along with Jakob Sprenger, who is sometimes credited with being the co-author of this work) as general Inquisitor for the five dioceses of Germany. Although Institoris and Sprenger were assigned the task of ferreting out heterodoxy in general, they concentrated their attention on investigating reports of witchcraft and prosecuting suspected witches. The book is divided into three sections, the first dealing with the theological ramifications of a belief in witchcraft, the second with the practices of witches and protection against them, and the third with legal procedures for dealing with witches. This is the first printing in English, translated from the 1489 edition, of one of the great classics of early witchcraft literature. Under Pope Innocent VIII, its author, Heinrich Kramer (who took the name of Institoris), was appointed (along with Jakob Sprenger, who is sometimes credited with being the co-author of this work) as general Inquisitor for the five dioceses of Germany. Although Institoris and Sprenger were assigned the task of ferreting out heterodoxy in general, they concentrated their attention on investigating reports of witchcraft and prosecuting suspected witches. The book is divided into three sections, the first dealing with the theological ramifications of a belief in witchcraft, the second with the practices of witches and protection against them, and the third with legal procedures for dealing with witches. FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. ONE OF 1,275 COPIES.
THE CLOISTER AND THE HEARTH

THE CLOISTER AND THE HEARTH

READE, CHARLES 210 x 135 mm. (8 1/4 x 5 1/4"). Two volumes. Vibrant dark red half-morocco over textured fuchsia boards, raised bands with gilt rule, compartments with gilt lettering and tools, matching textured endpapers, edges untrimmed. Each volume with frontispiece and with numerous illustrations throughout. Two corners just slightly bruised, a breath of wear to extremities, but A FINE COPY, the contents in perfect condition and the bindings unworn. First published in 1861, Reade’s greatest novel follows a 15th century scribe and illuminator who becomes friar following erroneous news of his wife’s death. When the couple are reunited years later, the protagonist chooses the celibate life of the Church over obligations to his family. According to the DNB, Reade "read seventy-nine books . . . and filled three ‘gigantic cards’ with notes about hermits" in preparation this work, allowing him to write in great detail about life in the Medieval world. This work was also Reade’s most acclaimed, cited by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as one of his favorite novels and skyrocketing him to literary fame. The present edition is handsomely bound with unusually vivid and highly memorable textured boards and endpapers. First published in 1861, Reade’s greatest novel follows a 15th century scribe and illuminator who becomes friar following erroneous news of his wife’s death. When the couple are reunited years later, the protagonist chooses the celibate life of the Church over obligations to his family. According to the DNB, Reade "read seventy-nine books . . . and filled three ‘gigantic cards’ with notes about hermits" in preparation this work, allowing him to write in great detail about life in the Medieval world. This work was also Reade’s most acclaimed, cited by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as one of his favorite novels and skyrocketing him to literary fame. The present edition is handsomely bound with unusually vivid and highly memorable textured boards and endpapers.