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HERMANN ZAPF AND THE WORLD HE DESIGNED: A BIOGRAPHY

HERMANN ZAPF AND THE WORLD HE DESIGNED: A BIOGRAPHY

Kelly, Jerry 6.125 x 9.5 inches. Hardcover. 368 pages. Published to accompany the Grolier Club exhibition "Alphabet Magic: A Centennial Exhibition of the Work of Hermann & Gudrun Zapf," curated by Jerry Kelly and Steven Galbraith, on show at the Club February 20-April 27 2019, in celebration of the centenary of Zapf’s birth. This is the first comprehensive biography of Hermann Zapf (1918-2015), whom Robert Bringhurst has called "the greatest type designer of our time, and very possibly the greatest type designer of all time." 2018 marked the 100th anniversary of the birth of both Hermann Zapf and Gudrun Zapf von Hesse. Hermann Zapf’s contribution to type design and calligraphy is immeasurable. His typographic work alone has greatly expanded the language of letterforms through ubiquitous fonts such as Palatino, Optima, and Zapfino (to name a few). Zapf’s typefaces have become among the most used — and most admired — of all time, and he is arguably the most important type designer of the 20th century. No less important, though perhaps less well known, is his work in typography and book design. Zapf has also been at the forefront of type technology. His Marconi alphabet design was the first typeface ever created specifically for digital typography. Also noteworthy is Zapf’s calligraphic art. It first became widely disseminated in his writing manual Pen and Graver (1949), and has since been seen in numerous books and exhibitions, and has been a major influence on generations of calligraphers. In 1951 Hermann Zapf married Gudrun von Hesse. She was a master in her own right and across several disciplines. In addition to a remarkable career in the fields of calligraphy and type design, she is recognized as one of the finest bookbinders of the 20th and 21st centuries. Numerous illustrations throughout, in black and white, and color. Colophon: "Set in Hermann Zapf’s Palatino Nova and Optima Nova types. Printed on Yulong paper by C&C Offset, China. Design and typography by the author."
TWO AMERICAN POETS: WALLACE STEVENS AND WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS

TWO AMERICAN POETS: WALLACE STEVENS AND WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS

Klein, Alan, Paul Muldoon, and Daniel Halpern1`33458 6 x 9 inches. Paperback. 256 pages. Catalogue of the exhibition at the Grolier Club, January 16-February 23, 2019, photographically illustrated and with essays by biographer Paul Mariani, poets Paul Muldoon and Daniel Halpern, and collector Alan Klein. Illuminating the parallel and overlapping careers and relationships of Wallace Stevens and William Carlos Williams, the exhibition juxtaposes the two poets with unique material on view for the first time. It provides a remarkable opportunity to better understand the overlapping careers of Stevens and Williams, their development as poets, the progression of their reputations and the development of American modernism. Wallace Stevens and William Carlos Williams are widely recognized as two of the towering giants of mid-twentieth-century American poetry, but are rarely thought of together despite their mutual admiration and personal relationship spanning over forty years. Almost exact contemporaries, they met in New York in 1914 at a formative point in their development as poets. These collections of Stevens and Williams, about 250 items assembled over the past twenty years include fascinating and unique items ranging from each of Stevens’s and Williams’s school days in the 1890s throughout their lives until shortly before Williams’s death in 1963. With 87 illustrations in color. Designed by Jerry Kelly.
ALONSO VÍCTOR DE PAREDES' INSTITUTION

ALONSO VÍCTOR DE PAREDES’ INSTITUTION, AND ORIGIN OF THE ART OF PRINTING, AND GENERAL RULES FOR COMPOSITORS [MADRID: CA. 1680]

Alvarez, Pablo 8vo. cloth, dust jacket. 466 pages. Pablo Alvarez offers the first complete English translation of Alonso Víctor de Paredes Institucion, y origen del arte de la imprenta, y reglas generales para los componedores [Institution, and Origin of the Art of Printing, and General Rules for Compositors]. This 96-page printing manual set and printed by Paredes himself was issued in Madrid around 1680. It opens with an introductory digression on the origin of writing and printing, followed by ten technical chapters on each of the tasks that are necessary to print a book, including a detailed description of the different kinds of type sizes and their use, the rules of orthography and punctuation, the setting of numeric systems, imposition, casting off, the printing of university dissertations, and the correction of proofs. Some of the chapters are of unique relevance for the understanding of early printing in Europe. Chapter 8, for example, is the first recorded, comprehensive account of the practice of printing by forms/formes. Alvarez transcription, translation, and notes greatly facilitate access to this important historical work, which is in fact the earliest known printing manual published in Europe Joseph Moxons Mechanick Exercises was published in 1683 and an extraordinary rarity: there are only two extant copies in the world. The book also features a foreword by Don W. Cruickshank and full reproductions of the copies held in rare-book collections at the Providence Public Library and at the University of Valencia, Spain. Dr. Alvarez is Curator at the Special Collections Research Center, University of Michigan Library.
AN ELEGY FOR X.

AN ELEGY FOR X.

Burgess, Anthony 8vo. stiff paper wrappers. unpaginated. Introducing a series of Occasional Essays and Poems by Anthony Burgess selected by Andrew Biswell, Director of the International Anthony Burgess Foundation. Each of the uniform series will have a contextual introduction, and in this first book that is by Dr Graham Foster, archivist at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester. Originally published in 1991 as part of an alphabet book commissioned by David Hockney and Stephen Spender to raise money for Aids Crisis Trust, Burgess’s Elegy for X combines his vast knowledge of languages and culture, his amusement in unusual vocabulary, and his playful wit. Contributors to Hockney’s alphabet included Margaret Drabble, Iris Murdoch, Gore Vidal, William Boyd, and Erica Jong. Five Nobel Laureates: T.S. Eliot, Seamus Heaney, William Golding and Kazuo Ishiguro also participated. An Elegy for X is set in 14 and 16 point Baskerville, the title page in Weiss roman. Stephen Raw designed the calligraphic author’s name that is used for both the series title and the title page. The linocut portrait of Burgess that forms the half-title is by John Watson. The book is printed on Zerkall mould-made paper and sewn into printed card covers for the paperbacks. The hardbacks are cased in black paper over boards, with a black cloth spine. The display titling is silver ink. This project was one of many artistic collaborations that Burgess enjoyed throughout his career. It serves to underline that his engagement with the work of his contemporaries extended far beyond book reviewing. He was an active participant in the cultural landscape of the twentieth century.
AESOP'S FABLES

AESOP’S FABLES

small 8vo. self paper wrappers. 12 pages. The ageless teacher of both adults and children, Aesop’s fables was first printed in English by William Caxton in 1484. Our edition is based on a much later (and smaller) chapbook that was also printed in London. The printer’s name is unknown, and the book is undated, but it was probably produced after 1790. The text for this chapbook comes from a popular version of the fables published in a variety of editions during the eighteenth century: Aesop’s Fables: with his Life, and Morals and Remarks. The ‘Remarks’, which follow after the moral, provide these fables with a simplistic gloss. The illustrations are also similar (although not identical) to the woodcuts in the full-sized book. We edited the text slightly for the eight fables we chose in order to suit Incline sensibilities, the illustrations, copied from the original chapbook are unchanged. Very few copies of this scarce little book have been recorded. Because of their fragile nature, the few chapbooks that have survived are rarely seen or handled. The copy of Aesop’s Fables in the collection at Chetham’s has been digitised as part of ‘The Ballad of Chetham’s Library’. Funding for this project has helped photograph and catalogue many of the chapbooks and broadside ballads in the Library’s holdings so that they can eventually be read online. Our chapbook was made to be distributed as part of another facet of this project: a storytelling day at the Library, where stories adapted from chapbooks and ballads were told. Although it does not have the patina of age that makes the original so fragile, our small book was printed in much the same fashion as an eighteenth-century chapbook: individual letters of metal type, set in to words, inked and then pressed on to paper. It is almost as small as its prototype: 175 x 115 mm. For the fables we used 10 pt Monotype Joanna cast at the Effra Press. It was hand set by Graham before being printed on a grey Zerkall-Bütten paper. The 12-pages are illustrated with magnesium reproductions of the woodcuts taken from the original chapbook. Susana Sanchez-Gonzalez, the Chetham’s Library project officer has written an introduction that has been printed on the back and inside pages of the illustrated grey card cover.
GALLIMAUFRY OF EPHEMERA. |A

GALLIMAUFRY OF EPHEMERA. |A

Moss, Graham (compiled by) large 4to. quarter cloth, marbled paper covered boards. unpaginated. From Graham Moss: Many a person new to letterpress printing begins with something ephemeral. Gutenberg did, printing Indulgences and no doubt learning the limits of the process that would define the book work developed in his printing house. The same purpose is served to this day with beginning letterpress printers learning the art with poetry sheets, business cards and cd covers. Ephemera is the name given to the printed matter that is not really expected to survive, like train and bus tickets. So Amos Paul Kennedy’s posters are artwork, curated in galleries and collected in museums and other art collections. On the other hand, the poster advertising the Wednesday night film show is ephemera, not expected to survive once the film has been screened. The intended function of the printed piece defines ephemera, not its art, its beauty, or the social significance that might subsequently be discovered. Ephemera is printed to be discarded, lost, disregarded, no matter how much effort went into the design or execution. This sort of printing was once the work of a whole class of printers, and no town would be without a few jobbing printers who could make something good out of any text brought through the shop door. Mostly these printers have gone to the wall now, as much of this sort of work was transferred to the computer printer and standard sized white ‘copier’ paper. Paper bags rarely carry the name of the locally owned shop; notices for lost cats dribble away in the rain as modern printer ink is fugitive; letters, those few that have not been replaced by email now flow straight from computer to printer and include the address of the sender, so even the job of printing personal headed notepaper has been lost. Now we please ourselves with our books; that is the biggest part of the definition of a private press. Over the past couple of years particularly, a lot of ephemera has come from the Press. Too preoccupied with other matters to properly focus on the long and complex job of designing books, we have found in these single sheets a way to continue working. They can be developed in conversation, verified in proof, corrected, then printed all on the same day. There is something pleasing about this instant gratification! Thus we have continued to print, sometimes just for fun, sometimes to support friends in their endeavours, and in the process supplying our Subscribers with amusing bits and pieces in lieu of the books they expect from us. Some of this ephemera will go with detailed explanations in a planned pair of themed volumes, but there are many leftovers. Rather than throw them away, we have designed a portfolio to suit, covered in marbled paper made by Louise Brockman, and closed with ribbon ties. Within it are over forty pieces of ephemera, the smaller ones tipped onto backing sheets. No bus tickets, but a gallimaufry of song sheets and illustrated postcards, commemorative cards, handbills and silent agitators, a beer mat, keepsakes and trade cards, jar labels and notices, bookmarks and even a battledore of sorts. There is no text other than on the items themselves, but a decent spread of typefaces in wood and metal, prints from lino and wood, uncommon borders and a few fair fists to point the way. Take a look at it in our Shop and you will find a few more photos to add to those seen here. quarter cloth, marbled paper covered boards
NOW WESTLIN WIND

NOW WESTLIN WIND

Burns, Robert 4 3/8 x 2 5/8 inches. cloth, decorated paper covered boards, paper label on spine. 15 pages. A little book by Robert Burns with illustrations by Thomas Bewick As the 25th of January approaches each year, various Robert Burns’ songs make their way to the front of the pile of CDs in the workshop. In 2018 our favourite has been Dick Gaughan’s CD of Handful of Earth, which includes his tender rendition of ‘Now Westlin Wind’. Robert Burns wrote the song in 1775 when he was a 16-year old schoolboy studying mathematics in Kirkoswald. In five lyrical eight-line verses, he manages to set out the four main themes which can be found throughout his subsequent work: a love of all nature; an abiding opposition to all forms of oppression; a keen appreciation of the meaning of hard work, especially farm labour; and a happy delight in being charmed by joy in other people. The illustrations we chose are from Thomas Bewick’s engravings of the nine birds mentioned in the poem, taken from the two-volume British Birds, first published in 1797 (vol. 1) and 1804 (vol 2). Here printed from line blocks, they are reduced to quarter-size to suit our page, although the two vignettes are both the same size as the original tail-pieces. The type is Eric Gill’s Joanna in 10 point roman and italic, newly cast for our cases at the Effra Typefoundry in Yorkshire. The paper is 90gsm Zerkall-Bütten. The book is 15 pages, 4 3/8 x 2 5/8 inches and bound with a cloth spine and patterned paper over board. The cover paper is handmade and decorated in India. We have shared the binding with Roger Grech at his Papercut Bindery in Shipley. The edition is of about 180 numbered copies, with sheets for hand binders available. cloth, decorated paper covered boards, paper label on spine
MATTER OF SIZE: MINIATURE BINDINGS & TEXTS FROM THE COLLECTION OF PATRICIA J. PISTNER.|A

MATTER OF SIZE: MINIATURE BINDINGS & TEXTS FROM THE COLLECTION OF PATRICIA J. PISTNER.|A

Pistner, Patricia and Jan Storm van Leeuwen 8 x 11.5 inches. Hardcover, dust jacket. 436 pages. Curated by Patricia J. Pistner and Jan Storm van Leeuwen; edited by George Ong. With numerous color illustrations, most at actual size. Published to accompany the eponymous Grolier exhibition on show at the Club March 5-May 19 2019. Size does matter! In this collection of diminutive books and bindings the size restriction ranges from a grand height of 4 inches to less than 1 millimeter. Spanning 4,500 years, on view are 275 miniature examples of cuneiform tablets and other antiquities, mediaeval manuscripts, early printed books, and contemporary artists books and design bindings representing a variety of artistic styles. The tiny tomes are from the extensive collection of Pat Pistner, who contributes the Introduction. With prefatory essays by Jan Storm van Leeuwen and Todd Pattison, followed by detailed descriptions of the books in the exhibition, each description the work of an expert or scholar in binding, typography, illustration, or some other aspect of the printed book. A uniquely valuable (and uniquely entertaining) survey of landmarks in printing art and history as revealed through miniature books. Set in Arno and Fakt by Tina Henderson. Printed on GardaPat Kiara paper by Trifolio SRL in Verona, Italy. Photography by Tom Grill. Design by Rebecca Silvers, Production by Claire Bidwell, Miko McGinty, Inc.
WISE MEN FISHED HERE: A CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION IN HONOR OF THE GOTHAM BOOK MART

WISE MEN FISHED HERE: A CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION IN HONOR OF THE GOTHAM BOOK MART, 1920-2020

McKnight, David12 8.5 x 11 inches. Embossed paper covers with French flaps. 180 pages. Catalog for the exhibition of books, magazines, and ephemera from the Gotham Book Mart collection at the University of Pennsylvania from February 18 – May 20, 2019. Full-color catalog, fully illustrated, Includes essays on the history of the Gotham Book Mart, small-press publishing, literary movements, GBM imprints, and Edward Gorey. In 2008, the University of Pennsylvania was gifted the contents of the Gotham Book Mart, the legendary New York City bookstore founded by Frances Steloff in 1920. To mark the 100th anniversary of the store’s founding, the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts mounted an exhibition in honor of Frances Steloff and her famous bookshop. For decades the Gotham Book Mart was, as Steloff prosaically put it, "the headquarters of the avant-garde." The exhibition explores the shop’s role in assembling, publishing, and promoting groundbreaking experimental writers, as well as its later years under the ownership of Steloff’s hand-chosen successor, Andreas Brown, focusing on Brown’s passion for postcards and collaborations with graphic artist Edward Gorey. For eight years, Penn Libraries curators and staff unpacked and processed over 200,000 items and unveiled one hundred and fifty linear feet of archival materials. From this mass of "stuff," Curator David McKnight, with the assistance of Katherine Aid and Camille Davis, selected 300 pieces ranging in date from 1900 to 2000. Drawing upon the collection’s vast array of material evidence — books, periodicals, manuscripts, and ephemera — this catalogue narrates the history of the shop from its earliest beginnings to its demise in 2005. Embossed paper covers with French flaps