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Open letter concerning the continuation of a ban on distillation using British grains

Open letter concerning the continuation of a ban on distillation using British grains, and instead promoting the use of sugar crops from the West Indies.]

WEST INDIES ; ?MERCATOR? Single sheet, typographically printed recto and verso. 260 x 215mm. Split at old horizontal fold, holding with no loss. [2]pp. Liverpool, n.p. 10th February, An unrecorded offprint of a letter submitted to The Tradesman, or Commercial Magazine concerning distillation from corn and the sugar markets of the West-Indies. In an attempt to curb inflation of food prices following a bad harvest, an act of parliament was passed in 1809 to prohibit the use of British grain crops in the production of alcohol. This act was effective for only a limited time (until 4th March 1810), and the author of the present letter is proposing the extension of the ban. By analysing the impact of the anticipated revocation of the British ban on the Irish oat market, the author predicts the devastating inflation which would accompany the removal of the ban. He goes on to outline the British dependence on ?Foreign Corn? from hostile France, proving the following statistics: ?In last month (January) the import into London alone of Foreign Wheat amounted to 142,379 quarters, of Oats to 39,562 quarters; valuing the first at 80s , and the last at 30s per quarter, they amount to the large sum of £628,859 paid to our enemies for Corn in one month by London only; thus feeding their resources, and encouraging their agriculture, whilst complaints are made by some, that markets are wanted for the sale and consumption of our own growths? The proposed solution is to continue to condone the exclusive use of sugar from the British plantations in the West Indies in the distilleries, and prioritise domestic grains over continental imports for food. The author then outlines the vulnerable dependence of the West Indies plantations on British manufacture, trade and supplies. This gives a telling insight into the continued concerns of slave labour produced exports in the global markets following the 1807 Slave Trade Act. Unsurprisingly, many of those who opposed the parliamentary removal of the temporary ban had slave owning interests in the West Indies, a notable example being Joseph Foster Barham who spoke to this effect in parliament. This letter was printed in The Tradesman, or Commercial Magazine Vol IV, No. 22. April 1, 1810. pp.295-298. The pseudonym ?Mercator? is perhaps an allusion to the 16th century Dutch cartographer Gerardus Mercator, and is a nod to the global nature of this proposition. This offprint was likely distributed by the author, we have traced no other copies.
Millard's Review of the Far East

Millard’s Review of the Far East, published Weekly. Mileshi ping lun bao

MILLARD Thomas Franklin Fairfax Vol. XI, XII, XIII. 3 vols. Each volume with 13 numbers of ca. 50pp, illustrated with adverts throughout. Folio. Bound in late 20th century black library cloth, light browning to first volume, title vol. XI, no. 2 loose, but overall a close to fine set. Blind-stamp of the ?Miami University Library, Oxford Ohio?, ‘withdrawn’ stamp in each volume. 660; 676, [xii]; 726, [xii] pp. Shanghai, Millard Publishing Company, 1919- Millard’s Review was a weekly newspaper founded by Thomas Franklin Fairfax Millard (1868-1942) in 1917. The Review differed from other newspapers by being openly anti-imperialist (this included Japan), staunchly liberal, and openly supportive of the socialist policies of Sun Yat-sen as propagated through the KMT. The newspaper provided a weekly survey of a wide range of political, social, economical and commercial issues in China. Apart for the adverts there are very few illustrations in the paper except for one or two photographic portraits of notables in the military and politics under the heading ‘Who’s who in China’. From its first issue on June 9th, 1917 it was also the official organ of the U.S. Court for China under Judge C. S. Lobingier. In June 1921 the co-founder J. B. Powell renamed it The Weekly Review of the Far East: Devoted to the Economic, Political and Social Development of China and Its Intercourse with other Nations and in the following year Powell acquired Millard’s share of the Review. The Review provides a fascinating glimpse into life and politics in Shanghai during the 1920s.
The Memorable Year: Of the war in China; the mutiny in India; the Opening up of the Resources of Siam; the Projected Movement upon Cochin-China; and the Monetary Crisis in Europe and America;

The Memorable Year: Of the war in China; the mutiny in India; the Opening up of the Resources of Siam; the Projected Movement upon Cochin-China; and the Monetary Crisis in Europe and America;

NYE Gideon being a record of periodical reflections and comments elicited by the course of events in the East, with incidental notices of political and commercial affairs in the West and some special papers upon political and geographical topics of the period; and including a sketch of the inflation and collapse of Mr. High-Commissioner Yeh. First edition. Quarto. Later half calf over papered boards, a presentation copy inscribed by the author on the title page ?Captain Roe, N.M., with Mr. Nye?s Compts.? A close to fine copy. [vi], [4 blank], [13], 8-360pp. Macao, [Privately Printed], A contemporary and largely first-hand account of events in China, the adjacent regions, and the rest of the world during the year 1857. Gideon Nye (1812-1888), an American diplomat and merchant, arrived in Canton in 1831 and lived there for over 50 years. For the last ten years of his life he held the position of American Vice Consul at Canton. In the present book Nye charts Chinese and international events during one year and this may well be the first attempt ever to draw connections (both commercial and political) between seemingly unrelated events world-wide during one specific year. 1857 was eventful in many respects, starting with the Second Opium War hostilities, the Taiping rebellion, the appointment of Lord Elgin as envoy to China, etc. Further afield he discusses the efforts of the French to gain access to Thailand and Vietnam, the Indian Mutiny, as well as the causes and effects of the US financial crisis of September 1857. Rare. Cordier BS. 2374.
Sketches by ?Boz

Sketches by ?Boz,? Illustrative of every-day People and everyday Life

DICKENS Charles [in 2 volumes, with] Sketches by Boz: Second series. Steel-engraved plates by George Cruikshank. First editions. 3 volumes. 8vo. Original green mille-feuille cloth and original pink sand-grain cloth, housed together in a handsome early case. London, John Macrone. A very attractive set: tape stains to the endpapers of both volumes of the first part, with some foxing, particularly to the early leaves, joints slightly weak, a few splash marks to the bindings, upper fore edge corner bumped, but binding unworn and unsophisticated. The second part also has some very small tape stains to the endpapers and the binding has been skilfully recased, with repair the to head and tail and the upper hinge, although there is still a bit of a gap before the pictorial title page. The first part has the bold contemporary ownership inscription of ?F.N. Tyrwhitt-Drake Feb 1836? (the month of publication) on the title pages, with a pencil note below ?lent to Reeves?: the Tyrwhitt Drakes, based in Amersham, were one of the wealthiest families of the 18th and early nineteenth century, commissioning the beautiful Shardeloes House from architect Stiff Leadbetter, with decoration by the young Robert Adam. The second part has an inscription (still attractive though someone has attempted to deface the family name) on the front paste-down endpaper ?A trifling memento from Robert Fox to his brother Edward Christmas Day 1836.?The Second Series was rushed out for the Christmas trade, and there is a baffling combination of variants, none of which Smith concludes as ?having a consistent relationship? Given that this copy is unambiguously early (it has a gift inscription dated only eight days after publication), it has no list of illustrations (this indicates an early issue for Eckel), the plates have the erroneous imprint ?Volume III?, and the binding has no black panels on the spine.
The General Theory of Employment

The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money

KEYNES John Maynard First edition, first printing. 8vo (220 x 145mm). [2], xii, 403, [1] pp. Original dark blue cloth, spine lettered and ruled in gilt, ruling continued to boards in blind (). London, Macmillan and Co., Limited. First edition of Keynes’ greatest work and surely the most influential text of twentieth-century economics. Prompted by the world wide-slump following 1929, Keynes set upon an ?explanation of, and new methods for controlling, the vagaries of the trade-cycle. First in A Treatise on Money, 1930, and later in his General Theory, he subjected the definitions and theories of the classical school of economists to a penetrating scrutiny and found seriously inadequate and inaccurate. . [Keynes’] programme for national and international official monetary policies [was based on the premise that the] national budget, over and above its function of providing a national income, should be used as a major instrument in planning the national economy. The regulation of the trade-cycle – that is to say the control of booms and slumps, the level of employment, the wage-scale and the flow of investment – must be the responsibility of governments. Lost equilibrium in a national economy could and should be restored by official action and abandoned to laisser faire? (PMM). The grip of Keynesian economics took hold almost immediately, informing aspects of Roosevelt’s ‘New Deal’, the formation of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, as well as many of the policies of the post-war British Labour government. PMM, 423; Moggridge A10.
Essais de Messire Michel Seigneur de Montaigne chevalier de 'ordre du Roy

Essais de Messire Michel Seigneur de Montaigne chevalier de ‘ordre du Roy, & gentil-homme ordinaire de sa chambre. Ljure premier & second

MONTAIGNE Michel de Second state of the title page with Montaigne’s titles and arabesque ornament. 8vo (149 x 95mm). 246 of 252ff (lacking Dd 2-7). French mottled calf (c. 1700), spine gilt (spine neatly repaired at head and foot, joints weak but holding). Bordeaux: S. Millanges, First volume of the first edition, with second-state title page, of one of the most important works written and published in French in the sixteenth century. Montaigne’s groundbreaking essays on an eclectic array of subjects – from cannibals to solitude, sleep to sadness – constituted an entirely unique and unprecedented literary genre, and a philosophy of knowledge that was based on his own personal experience and observations and epitomized sixteenth-century enlightened scepticism. The publishing history of this work is complex, both for the rather careless printing of this first edition in 1580, and in large part because the changes to the text between editions were considerable; Montaigne’s text was by no means static but rather, constantly evolving under the eye of the author who ‘considered each new edition as the last’. The Bordeaux Copy of the 1588 edition (Paris, L’Angelier), heavily annotated by Montaigne himself, contains the following, telling note in his hand: ‘My book is always one. Except that at each new edition, so that the buyer may not come off completely empty-handed, I allow myself to add, since it is only an ill-fitted patchwork, some extra ornaments. There are only overweights, which do not condemn the original form, but give some special value to each of the subsequent ones, by a bit of ambitious subtlety.’ These ‘ornaments’ were significant reworkings and additions(see the fully searchable text on Philippe Desan’s online Montaigne Project that juxtaposes the texts of the three editions). This first edition was printed by Millanges in the spring of 1580, and is unsophisticated and rather hastily composed, as betrayed by innumerable misprints, font and type inconsistencies, errors in page numbering and textual variants. This edition has G2 and 2A5 missigned as 2G and A5, 2A2 correctly signed as Aa2 (not as Aa; see Sayce & Maskell, p.2), and the corrected states of C8 and O8 (Sayce & Maskell, p.5, no.7), as well as the letters ‘gsit’ accidentally printed at the foot of Gg3 (Sayce & Maskell, p.5, no. 9). Sayce & Maskell also note the sonnets by La Boetie that disrupt the chapter numbering – published as ‘Chapter 29′, while the new Ch.29 is numbered wrongly as Ch.28. The irregular spacing of lines on the page – occaisonally very cramped – indicates composition by forme. This second-state title page has an arabesque ornament rather than Millanges’ device, and Montaigne’s noble title – ‘Messire’ – and functions, in contrast to the rarer first state, which provided only the title of the work and the author’s name without any of his designations. Copies of early editions of Montaigne’s work are extremely rare. Fewer than 100 examples are estimated to exist in private and institutional collections worldwide, suggested by some to point to a small original print run of only 3-400 copies (Bibliotheca Desaniana, no8, 2011; Balsamo, p.160). Some leaves lightly browned, title-page slightly loose, stained. OCLC: (US: Huntington, UCLA, Newberry, Indiana, Harvard, Williams, Virginia, Yale, Clark Art Institution, Morgan. UK: Cambridge, NLS, Aberdeen, University of London, Manchester, BL.) P. Desan, ‘Montaigne’s Essays’, and J. Balsamo, ‘Publishing History of the Essays’ in P. Desan (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Montaigne (Oxford, 2016), pp.1-13, 158-78. PMM, 95. Brunet III, 1835. Sayce & Maskell, A Descriptive Bibliography of Montaigne’s Essais 1580-1700, 1.
Oeuvres]

Oeuvres]

MAROT Clement Fine portrait of Marot on title-page with the legend L.M.N.M. ?La mort n’y mord? and 22 woodcut illustrations by Bernard Salomon (blocks a little worn), typographical frame surrounding title of second part. 2 parts in one vol. 16mo. [13]ff, 597, [1]pp; 314pp, [1]f. Contemporary calf, panelled in blind with triple fillet border, fleuron cornerpieces and central ornament, spine with four raised bands, remains of label in second compartment, hinges reinforced with waste vellum MS (extremities bumped, neat repairs to head and foot of spine, traces of worming at head). Lyon, Jean de Tournes, This uncommon, 1573 edition of Marot’s work is based on that first published by de Tournes in 1553, with some textual changes and the inclusion of the medallion with Marot’s portrait on the title page, found for the first time in the 1558 edition. According to Cartier, the portrait is very similar to one owned by Marot’s collaborator, Théodore de Béze. It has been attributed to Bernard Salomon, who was responsible for the woodcuts that appear in Ovid’s Metamorphosis in the second part. A prolific and influential Renaissance poet, Marot employed many different forms, from epigrams to allegorical poetry and classical translation. The first part of this volume contains his poetic works; the second is his translation of classical works. Court poet to Margaret of Navarre and Francois I, his influence extended to Elizabethan England, notably evident in the work of Edmund Spenser. Early Tournes editions of Marot’s work are scarce. Loss, possibly of repairs, at outer edge of pp.105, 107, 107 with repairs to lower and outer margins touching text in one place, minor worming (repaired) at head of some leaves in first part, minor waterstains. Cartier, 558. BMC (French), 303. Brunet III, 1457. Not in Adams. [OCLC: UK: Manchester, Oxford, BL. North America: Harvard only].
Teij odae. [Odes]

Teij odae. [Odes]

ANACREON Estienne’s device on title page, one woodcut initial, two woodcut headpieces. Greek, Roman and Italic type. 4to (205 x 145mm). [8], 110pp. (lacking final blank). Vellum over pasteboard, spine with paper labels at head, red speckled edges (spine chipped and slight worming, vellum stained and scuffed, corners bumped). Paris, Henri Estienne, Editio princeps of an important collection of what were thought to be odes authored by Anacreon, only much later identified as the work of anonymous imitators in his style. This was the first volume to be published by Henri Estienne the Younger, although Schreiber asserts that it was Guillaume Morel who likely printed the text as Estienne did not own a press at this early stage in his career. Based on two manuscripts, one discovered in Italy and the other owned by Thomas More’s friend, John Clements, the Greek text and its commentary make use of the three sizes of the grecs du roi typeface. The commentary is Henri Estienne’s, and the Latin translation that follows the Greek has also been attributed to him. On its publication it was an influential and popular work, provoking the praise and imitation of Ronsard and Belleau, among others. In recognition of those of his verses that celebrated wine and conviviality, an ‘Anacreontic Society’ was established in London in the mid-eighteenth century. Provenance: Note on front paste-down in eighteenth-century hand, and verso of front free endpaper in different hand, suggest that this volume was part of the Kromayer library, likely in a sale of the library of Johann Heinrich Kromayer (1689-1734), philologist, who died four months before the date, ‘1734 6 Oct.’ inscribed on the paste-down. Bibliographic information inscribed on recto of front free endpaper. Sparse marginal annotation in same eighteenth-century hand throughout, underlining in pencil and ink, and poems numbered by hand. Neat repair to lower fore-corner of title page, not touching text. Hinges cracked but holding. Occasional minor staining, otherwise in very good condition. Adams, A1001. BMSTC (French), 16. Brunet I, 250 (?aussi belle que rare?). Schreiber, 139. Renouard (Estiennes) I, 115.1.
L'Heptameron. remis en son vray ordre. par Claude Gruget Parisien

L’Heptameron. remis en son vray ordre. par Claude Gruget Parisien

MARGUERITE d' ANGOULEME , Queen Consort of Navarre Title within a woodcut frame, woodcut initials. 4to (210 x 147mm.) [4], 212 [=210, ff.193 & 194 omitted], [2]ff. 20th-century dark maroon niger morocco janse niste by the binder Auguste Bernasconi (1879-1967), maroon morocco doublures, silk liners, gilt edges, in slip-case. Paris: B. Prevost, 1560. The Heptameron (a name created by the editor Gruget from the Decameron of Boccaccio) is by the sister of Franc ois I of France, the ?first lady? of French literature, and a woman of strong religious beliefs, some of them akin to Protestantism, Marguerite d?Angoule^me (1492- 1549). In 1527 she married for a second time Henri d?Albret and became queen of Navarre (her grandson was Henri V). Distinguished for her piety, and the author of a number of works in different genres, these stories are all true; her concern was ?dire verite ? The work is divided into 8 days, all except the last (which has two) having ten short stories or nouvelles. She shows herself aware of contemporary happenings, such as the murder of Alessandro de Medici (1537) and the expedition to Canada of Jean Franc ois Roberval recounted in the seventh nouvelle (Cc1-2) – ?Roberval feit un voyage sur la mer. en l?isle de Canadas, auquel lieu auoit delibere , si l?air du pays eust este commode.? The 4to edition edited by Gruget rst appeared in 1559 (colophon dated 7 April), and containing 72 ?nouvelles? (the first edition had only 67). This was an e dition partage e, with various names sometimes appearing in the imprint, including that of Eloi Gibier at Orle ans. This 1560 edition is an exact reprint down to the error in pagination but the imprint at the end has no date of acheve d?imprimer. The work was immensely popular, reprinted in a variety of formats, and in 1654 was translated into English. Her Miroir de l?ame pe cheresse was translated into English in 1548 ( A godly meditacyon. .) and published in Marburg. Claude Gruget the editor was the translator of Mexia?s Silva from the Spanish and other works from the Italian and Greek (Epistres de Phalaris, 1550). It was he who titled the work Heptameron. It has originally been published as Histoire des amans fortunez. Provenance: 16th/17th century signature on title-page of Jo: Lancaster (? Bp. of Waterford) , a few notes in Latin and English e.g. f. 33 ?lapider? glossed as ?to stone to death?, all heavily washed. On f. 172verso the words from the Mass ?Dominus vobiscum? and ?Ite missa est? have been underlined. Washed and with some leaves repaired, title-leaf laid down and mounted. Brunet III, 1416. BMC (French), 301.
Le sepmaine ou creation du monde

Le sepmaine ou creation du monde

SALUSTE DU BARTAS Guillaume de Printed in italic, device on title-page. 12mo in 8s (140 x 70mm). 104 (=108)ff. 19th-century Janse niste dark blue morocco by Delanoe jeune, upper hinge repaired. Paris: J. Febvrier, First published by Febvrier in 1578 Saluste du Bartas?s (1544-90) hugely popular poem on the seven days of Creation, was many times reprinted and translated into English by Joshua Sylvester (various editions, including an OUP ed. of 1979), Italian, Dutch, Latin, and German. His Judith was even translated into Polish. Today he is largely forgotten although his works are important for historians and have received the canonical status of a Pléiade edition. In this poem reference is made to all sorts of subjects including language and astronomy. Early on (f. 5recto) it is explained that the world is a book where the sovereign?s admirable skill is writ in large letters, and which the simple can read, with the eye of faith, with no need of foreign languages or a knowledge of Hebrew pointing or Greek accents – ? Le monde est un gros livre, où du souverain/ L?admirable artifice en grosse lettre?/?Pour lire là dedans, il ne nous faut entendre/ Cent sortes de jargons: il ne nous faut aprendre/ Les caracteres Turcs, de Memphe les portrets,/ Ni les points des Hebrieus, ni les accens des Grecs./ L?Antartique brutal? [2 lines]/ Y lit passablement, bien que dépourveu d?art./ Mais celuy, de qui l?oeil prend la Foi pour lunetes/Passe de part en part les cercles des Planetes/ Comprend le grand Moteur de tous ces mouuemens, / Et lit bien plus courant ces vieux Documens? Provenance: bookplate of Arthur Tilley (1851-1942), fellow of King’s College, Cambridge and writer on the French Renaissance. Adams D960. Brunet V, 98.
De Vitis

De Vitis, dogm. & apophth. clarorum philosophorum, Libri X

DIOGENES LAERTIUS Printers device on title page, woodcut headpieces and initials throughout. Greek and Roman type. 8vo (180 x 125mm). [16], 888pp. (1-364, [4], 365-884); 120, [8]pp.; 47 [25]pp.; 88pp. Vellum over pasteboard, vellum slips, overlapping fore-edges (vellum stained, spine and fore-edges discoloured). [Geneva], Henri Estienne, Second issue (first in 1593) of the revised Estienne edition of Diogenes Laertes’ lives of ancient philosophers. Accompanied by the notes and commentary of Isaac Casaubon, Henri Estienne’s son-in-law, many of the passages in Estienne’s editions were first discovered in manuscript form by Estienne himself (Schreiber); the corrections and additions to the 1570 text evident here make this the superior edition (Renouard, Brunet). Also present in this edition is a tract by grammarian Hesychius. Laertes’ work accounts for the lives and doctrines of ancient philosophers from Thales to Epicurus; the whole of the final book is dedicated to Epicurus. ‘The book is a tissue of quotations industriously compiled, mostly from secondary sources [.]’; in this text Diogenes refers to over 200 authors and 300 texts (OCD). He also makes references to his own poetry throughout although, described by one commentator as ‘wretched’, perhaps mercifully they do not feature here at any length. Additional blank leaves bound into the end of this volume might indicate that this was intended as a text for study. Annotation/Provenance: Two ownership inscriptions at foot of title page, with a third deleted. Library stamp on verso of title page. Repair to outer blank margin of title page, not affecting text. Stains to gutter of Hesychius p.1, with repair, touching text, and portion of title supplied in MS facsimile. ‘Diogenes Laertes’, Oxford Classical Dictionary (3rd ed., Oxford, 1996). Adams, D484. Renouard (Estiennes) I, 156, no.5. Schreiber, 178 (1570 ed). Brunet II, 719.
Argonauticon libri octo

Argonauticon libri octo

VALERIUS FLACCUS Caius Colines’ ‘Tempus’ device on title page, 3-6 line initial spaces, all with guide letters. Italic type. 8vo (160 x 110mm). 103, [1]ff. (ff.97-100 misbound), ruled in brown ink. C18th calf, covers with triple gilt fillet, spine gilt with red morocco label, gilt edges, marbled endpapers (joints split but holding, chipped at head and foot of spine, corners bumped and worn). Paris, Simon de Colines, Colines? first edition of Roman poet Valerius Flaccus? (45- 90 A.D.) epic, recounting the adventures of Jason and the Argonauts in their quest for the Golden Fleece. This is the second edition of the text to have been edited by Engentinus (Philipp Engelbrecht, 1490-1528), as indicated by the date of his dedication in this volume, borrowed from the Strasbourg edition of 1525. Engentinus was professor of poetics at the university of Freiburg. A contemporary and acquaintance of Erasmus, he was an attendee at the Diet of Worms in 1521 and subsequently wrote in defence of Martin Luther. Flaccus? epic was never completed. The poet drew heavily on the only text about the Argonauts that preceded his, that of Apollonius the Rhodian, yet additions and omissions of his own mark Flaccus? writing as being entirely independent. Provenance: Note in brown ink on recto of final leaf. Small bookplate on rear paste-down, remnant of wax at foot of title. Small, closed tear to title page, not touching text. Waterstaining to fore-edge of gathering ?e? Small burnmark to f.86, slightly a ecting text. Adams, V78. BMSTC (French), 433. Renouard (Colines), 200. Schreiber, 90. Schweiger 1099.
Sophoclis tragoediae septem

Sophoclis tragoediae septem

SOPHOCLES Woodcut printers device on title page, woodcut headpieces and initials throughout. Roman and grecs du roi type. 2 parts in one vol. 4to (260 x 167mm). [8], 461, [1]pp.; 142 (i.e.242)pp. (lacking final blank leaf). Nineteenth-century panelled calf with simple, ornamental border and cornerpieces in central panel, spine with five raised bands, black label with title lettered in gilt in second compartment (rebacked rather unsympathetically, joints weak, corners and edges worn, covers scuffed). Geneva, Henri Estienne, The important Estienne edition of the collected plays of Sophocles, accompanied by scholia, and followed by the commentary of Joachim Camerarius, Greek humanist (1500- 74). The editio princeps of the tragedies was the Aldine edition of 1502; this edition was seen to be an improvement upon those printed in the interim, most notably Turne`be?s (1552-3), upon which Estienne?s edition is based. It is attractively printed in varying sizes of the Estiennes? characteristic grecs du roi type. Provenance: Ownership inscription of Charles Skene and John Brown on title page; note in Brown?s nineteenth-century hand appears on recto of flyleaf, citing J. W. Moss? Manual of Classical Bibliography (1825). Nineteenth-century bookplate of the Library of the United Presbyterian College, Edinburgh. Occasional pencil markings throughout. Very occasional worming of lower blank margins, minor staining throughout.CHAR(13) + CHAR(10) A. Grafton et al. The Classical Tradition (Harvard, 2010), 897. Renouard (Estiennes) I, 131 no. 3. Hoffman III, 414. BMSTC (French), Supplement, 69. Adams, S1448.
Oeuvres poétiques

Oeuvres poétiques

SAINT-GELAIS Melin de Text printed in italic letter, woodcut on title-page of woman at fountain, arabesque ornaments. 16mo (115 x 66mm.) [32(last leaf a blank)], 295, [1]pp. Late 17th-century (c. 1700) red morocco, spine gilt in compartments, gilt edges. Lyon: Benoit Rigaud, The lengthy dedication/ preface by Antoine de Harsy (d. 1607 and one of the Lyonnese printing family), dated 1 July 1574 is addressed to Jérôme de Chatillon (d. 1587) conseiller du Roi, and after a lengthy discourse on the merits of numerous Greek poets from Homer and Pindar to the dramatists, introduces the ‘ce beau fruit postume’ of the poems, in various styles, of Saint-Gelais (1491-1558). An earlier edition (1574) had been published by de Harsy, of which this is an almost exact copy. Mellin de Saint-Gelais (1491-1558) born illegitimate, rose to prominence at the court in the reign of François I, becoming his librarian at Blois, and holding many benefices. He seems to have begun to cultivate French poetry after 1530 and his sojourn in Spain, but is really a ‘poète d’occasion’ weak in inspiration, although he was much admired as well as criticised by the Pléiade poets. He was himself a considerable musician and many of his poems were set to music by others, Arcadelt and Lassus among them. Tiny rust hole on leaf affecting a couple of letters on recto (p. 109), and ink stains on p. 111 slightly affecting a couple of words. Brunet V, 46.CHAR(13) + CHAR(10) OCLC: (UK: BL, Oxford. US: University of Virginia only).
Long Shadow of Little Rock

Long Shadow of Little Rock

BATES Daisy First edition. 8vo. A very good copy in publisher’s cloth, an old tape mark to ffep. Dustjacket cockled. Presentation inscription on the front free endpaper. 234pp. New York, David Mackay Co., It’s uncommon to find a copy that’s both inscribed and includes the dustjacket. Here the inscription reads: ?Best wishes from the Author, Daisy Bates.? Bates (1914-1999) was a vital figure in the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. An activist, journalist and publisher, she founded the Arkansas State Press with her husband, Lucius, in 1941. Through her own press she covered the civil rights movement and it became the largest circulating black-owned newspaper in the state. In 1952 she was appointed president of the Arkansas Conference of Branches of the NAACP and mentored the nine black children who were the first to attend the all-white Central High. This work is an account of that experience which was a seminal event in the process of de-segregation. ADB summarises Bates’s achievements: ?Because of her lifelong crusades against segregation and her leadership in one of the landmark integration campaigns, she occupies an enduring place in the movement. Her accomplishments emphasize how local communities could influence national civil rights policies, and how African American women in the movement served crucial roles as strategists, organizers, and fighters.? With a foreward by Eleanor Roosevelt.