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Kagerou Bunko

Odysseia

Odysseia

Homer [original text by] : Monro, D.B. A handsome copy of Homer`s `Odyssey` bound by German bookbinder and graphic designer Frieda Thiersch (1889-1947), printed in the Greek types designed by R. Proctor [Robert George Collier Proctor (1868_1903)] based on type found in the Complutensian Polyglot Bible. Thiersch, influenced by the simple beauty of Doves Press bindings and taught for a period by Doves Bindery finisher Charles McLeish, is considered to have played a key role in the development of the German book art movement after World War I. Thiersch volunteered as a nurse in World War I, later working at the Bremer Bindery and then founding a bookbinding school after economic conditions worsened as a result of the start of the Second World War. As head of the Bremer Bindery she was responsible for the design and execution of all bindings of the Bremer Presse. In the 1930s and `40s, with the remaining staff of the Bremer Presse, Thiersch produced document folders, guest books, photo albums, cassettes and representative gift booklets for powerful figures of the Nazi regime. Many of her assignments were directly for Hitler’s private needs. Due to a bombing in 1944 many of her books were destroyed, and early bindings are scarce. This copy is simply bound in black morocco with a gilt-ruled border to both boards, five raised bands and six gilt- ruled compartments to spine, and title and year of publication tooled in gilt also to spine. One of a limited edition of 225 copies printed by Horace Hart at the Oxford University Press. A beautifully printed book bound by one of the most skilled female bookbinders of the twentieth century. Black morocco binding by Frieda Thiersch, simple gilt-ruled border to both boards. A little wear to spine and extremities of boards. Spine lightly sunned. Upper hinge professionally repaired by female conservators Coralie Barbe and Florence Malo. Very light occasional foxing to some pages. Offsetting on a lower fly and lower free endpaper from the insertion of a piece of paper (now removed). All edges gilt. Marbled endpapers. 1 v., complete. 20.5×25.5cm. 457 unnumbered p. [227 leaves]. Text in Ancient Greek. Extra shipping charges may be applied due to size and weight of item.
La Petite Sirene

La Petite Sirene

Andersen, Hans Christian [original text by]. An original work by Marcel Perdrieux and French artist and embroider Marie Monnier (1894-1976) (sister of bookseller, writer and publisher Adrienne Monnier (1892-1955)). The text, completely hand-written and decorated by Perdrieux in Paris in December of 1948, includes 12 leaves of charming hand-painted aquarelles by Monnier, each either signed or initialed by her. The title page records the publisher as `Georges Guillot, Editeur, 7, Rue Perronet, Paris`, perhaps indicating there were plans to publish the book. A page before the start of the text records (in French) that `the twelve aquarelles of Marie Monnier which illustrate Andersen`s `Little Mermaid` make this a unique and original copy, these originals never having been reproduced before`. The second sentence reads `this book was made especially for`, but a place for the name has been left blank. Monnier was a friend of Paul Valery, wife of Paul-_mile B_cat, and mistress of L_on-Paul Fargue, whose work `Les Ludions` she illustrated. A charmingly illustrated and hand-decorated copy of a classic children`s tale. Original French softcover folder, lightly foxed, title in blue to upper wrapper. Signatures loosely inserted into folder. Some pages slightly foxed. Comes with original box, title stenciled to spine, hinges worn and cracked. 1 v., complete. 32.4×25.3cm. 70 loose pages, including 12 leaves of illustrations. Text in French. Extra shipping charges may be applied due to size and weight of item.
Godaishu-chu: Kaitei Ryoko

Godaishu-chu: Kaitei Ryoko

Verne, Jules [original text by] ; Ohira, Sanji [translated by] ; Hattori, Seiichi [corrected by]. The first Japanese edition of Jules Verne`s classic science fiction novel `Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea` (originally published in 1870) published under that title, complete in two volumes and with numerous black and white illustrations. This translation by Ohira Sanji was published 7 months after the first Japanese translation (titled `Sixty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea`). Considering that Japanese translations of English classics in the Meiji period were typically published several decades after the original, this translation was produced fairly quickly, suggesting the slightly earlier edition proved popular. Translations of Verne`s works are now credited with being at least partially if not wholly responsible for introducing the genre of science fiction to Japan. In 1886, after the publication of this set, the word `kagaku shosetsu` was introduced into the Japanese language as a direct translation of `science fiction`. The translation of `Twenty Thousand Leagues` was particularly notable for introducing a style typical of `pulp science fiction` (i.e. emphasis on action over characterisation and narrative style) to Japan. Many science fiction novels by Japanese authors published after Verne`s translations strongly bore his influence, like Shunro Oshikawa`s famous `Undersea Warship` series. Original boards. Ex-ownership stamp to first page of v.1. Each volume includes 12 leaves of black and white illustrations (including one duplicate). 2 v., complete. 18.2×12.2cm. 223 + 7, 262 p. Text in Japanese.
Goshushi

Goshushi

Matsuzaki, Mannojo [text by] ; Inglott, R.J., Matsuzaki, Kuranosuke [preface by]. Believed to be the first history of Australia published in Japanese (excluding Japanese translations of foreign works). The text covers the discovery of Australia to Federation in 1901, as well as Australian politics, culture, and economics. Also included are a folding map of Australia, two leaves of illustrations (featuring four photographic images), and a copy of a letter from Inglott to Matsuzaki. A record from `Changing Histories: Australia And Japan` (2001) states that Fusajiro Kanematsu of F. Kanematsu, the first Japanese-based trading company to open in Australia, established in Sydney in 1890, sent Mannojo Matsuzaki to Melbourne for work. Another record in `Bridging Australia and Japan` (Sissons, 2016) mentions an unknown man called Matsuzaki living in Jackton St., Sydney. Other articles in the `Northern Star`, `The Tasmanian`, etc., also refer to auctions of Japanese goods held under the instruction of a `Mr. M. Matsuzaki`. A scarce record by an early Japanese resident of Australia. Original boards, lightly scratched and marked. Head and foot of spine chipped. Title and image of Australia blind-stamped to upper board. Light discolouration and foxing to text, mainly to title page. Stain to lower margin of last few pages. Ex-ownership stamps to upper fly, title, verso of last page, and verso of advertisements. In very good to near fine condition. 1 v., complete. 22.3×14.7cm. [2] leaves of plates, 2, 2, 2, 11, 287 p. Text in Japanese.
Chikuhou no Kodomotachi" [The Children of Chikuho] and "Rumiechan wa Otosan ga Shinda" [Rumie`s Father is Dead] (Two Volume Set)

Chikuhou no Kodomotachi" [The Children of Chikuho] and "Rumiechan wa Otosan ga Shinda" [Rumie`s Father is Dead] (Two Volume Set)

Domon, Ken A very clean and bright two volume set of photo-books by celebrated Japanese photojournalist Ken Domon (1909-1990). `The Children of Chikuho`, published in January of 1960, follows the lives of the children of miners living in Chikuho, Fukushima, in the late 1950s. While the Japanese government at the time insisted that Japan`s economy was strong, the photos Domon took of children living in decaying houses proved otherwise. There is some minor rubbing to the corners and edges of this book, as well as some foxing. The covers are very bright and without any foxing or major damage. The second book, `Rumiechan wa Otosan ga Shinda`was published in November of the same year as `The Children of Chikuho`. After leaving Chikuho to publish the first book, he returned late in 1960 only to find that the father of Rumie-chan (a girl he had photographed for his first book), had died in a mining accident, leaving Rumie-chan and her sister without parents (their mother had died a few years earlier). The photos show Rumie-chan and her sister adjusting to their new lives in an orphanage. There is a small tear to the spine and to the margin of p.9-10. There are also occasional small nics to other page edges, light browning to the contents, and a little bumping to the corners of the covers. Copies as clean and undamaged as these are extremely rare. Text in Japanese. 95 p., 96 p.
Ikari to Kanashimi no Kiroku: Shashinshu [A Record of Rage and Grief: A Photo-Collection]

Ikari to Kanashimi no Kiroku: Shashinshu [A Record of Rage and Grief: A Photo-Collection]

Hamaya, Hiroshi ; Kanno, Umezaburo (binding, layout by) A first edition of this black and white photographic record of the Anpo Protests, by famous photographer Hamaya Hiroshi. `In May and June of 1960 Japan was rocked by some of the largest protests in its history. They erupted over the passage of a revised security treaty between Japan and the United States, titled the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security (Sogo Kyoryoku Oyobi Anzen Hosho Joyaku), and have become known as the gAnpo h protests from the Japanese shorthand for that treaty. Hundreds of thousands of people came onto the streets day after day, ten million signed petitions against the treaty, thousands were injured, and one person was killed. The protests forced cancellation of a planned visit to Japan by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, toppled the conservative prime minister Kishi Nobusuke, and have come to be recognized as the most significant political crisis of the postwar period. Sympathetic to the protestors, Hiroshi Hamaya fs photographs allow us to see a great deal about the long-simmering tensions the postwar military alliance with the U.S. engendered within Japan. Since 1951, when it was first signed, the security treaty had been harshly criticized by those who saw it as exposing Japan to unnecessary dangers in the cold war while undermining the principles of peace and democracy. The prospect of the treaty fs revision and renewal pitted a conservative government, intent on protecting the alliance, against a loose coalition of opposition forces whose aspiration was that Japan become a neutral and unarmed nation a decisive break with U.S. cold-war policy, and with its own militarist past. Hamaya, a well-established freelance photographer, was the author of a number of photo books. Soon after the 1960 protests, he became the first Japanese contributor to the Magnum Photos collective. As a subject, the protests are an outlier in his oeuvre, which is otherwise dominated by nature photography and ethnographic studies of life in Japan fs hinterlands. Hamaya fs interest in Anpo was driven primarily by an awareness of the momentousness of the events and a personal sympathy with the aims of the protests. His photographic record begins May 20 and ends on June 22, covering the period when the protests were at their height. It is estimated he took 2,600 photos altogether, which he narrowed down to 203 in preparation for publication as a book. This selection was narrowed further to 138 pictures, and the resulting book titled Ikari to kanashimi no kiroku (A Record of Rage and Grief) was published by Kawade Shobo Shinsha in August 1960. Some of Hamaya fs photographs were also published in the French news magazine Paris Match and the Japanese photography journal Kamera Mainichi` (MIT, 2012). Comes with rare original plastic protective jacket, torn and with chipping at extremities, flap glued in one place to the upper wrapper. Light wear to extremities of wrappers. Original obi, spine browned, also included. Text-block edges also lightly browned. Ex-bookseller sticker to lower pastedown. Light bump to lower opening corner of all pages. Very light minor foxing to endpapers, otherwise contents and photographic illustrations in fine condition. Text in Japanese.