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Autograph Manuscript] British Troops in America: Colonel Napier’s Speech at Bath

War of 1812]. Mitchell, John 6 pp. with integral address. Folio. 10.5 x 16.5 inches. Manuscript with numerous corrections and additions concerning the failure of the British military in the War of 1812. In late 1835 then Colonel William Francis Patrick Napier (1785-1860) member of the British Army and a military historian, gave speech at Bath which the Sunday Times reported, claiming he had criticized the British soldiers in the War of 1812 as failing because they "stood as patriots and freemen, on less firm and less elevated ground than the Americans themselves" which John Mitchell notes at the very beginning of this article published in the January 1836 issue of "United Service Journal and Naval and Military Service Magazine" (pp. 84-92). Defending the soldiers, Mitchell goes on to launch an attack on Napier’s speech and the British command and their tactics. "The failure of the British troops at New Orleans was as complete as possible; but patriotism or want of patriotism, had nothing to do with the business. The military policy of England, guided by men, ignorant alike of the strength and the weakness of armies, swayed besides by the influence of philanthropic and economical patriots, whose evil counsel fell, like a death-bearing pestilence, on the ranks of the army-shone out in all its poor and paltry littleness: in the constant striving to save farthings, millions of treasure were wasted, and thousands of gallant lives were remorselessly sacrificed. The valour everywhere exhibited by the troops, the zeal, ability, high spirit, and devotedness displayed by so many matchless officers, the number of gallant blows struck, and noble feats of arms performed,- were not, it must be allowed, sufficient to counterbalance the folly, ignorance, and presumption, that marked the official management of that most miserable war. But, I repeat, the fault was not with the troops" The failure is not just at New Orleans. "The British failed at Sacket’s Harbour, Platsburgh, and New Orleans; to which, for argument sake, we will add Baltimore. At Sacket’s Harbour and Platsburgh the British forces retired from phantom hosts and imaginary foes. At Baltimore something of the same kind happened." After a detailed analysis of the military’s failures, he ends his unrelenting attack: "But the soldiers of a great nation must know that they are equal to any contest. An American war, like every war in which brave men are to be encountered, has its difficulties; and it is only by looking those difficulties fairly in the face that they can be overcome. Had we listened to the liberal and patriotic despondency which so long represented us incapable of contending against the French, we should at this moment have been crouching beneath the lash of Napoleon, or his successor on the throne of the Grand Empire." Needless to say, many jumped to the defense of Napier, who wrote in his letter to the editor that the Sunday Times report of his speech was pure fiction and that he never criticized the troops; in fact, he states he never mentioned the war at all. John Mitchell (1785-1859) was an army officer and writer who served in the West Indies in the Peninsular War, and on diplomatic missions for Wellington. He wrote much on the defects of the British army, tactics, and a number of volumes including "The Fall of Napoleon" and "Biographies of Eminent Soldiers." Postmarked London, December 22, 1835. Addressed to Major [Thomas Henry] Shadwell Clerke, who was editor of "The United Service Journal and Naval and Military Service Magazine." Good. Separated at folds, edge worn and torn, a few chips, one affecting a few words at the end of about a dozen lines of text, light soiling.
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Broadside Advertisement] Don’t Fail to read these General Directions carefully a number of times, until you clearly understand them, then preserve the same for your information and guidance until your case is completed

Weeden, E. S. [Elnathan] 1 sheet. Illus. with 1 woodcut of Union soldiers charging. 8 x 3.5 inches. An advertisement handbill by a former Civil War prisoner whose specialty as an attorney was filing claims for government pensions. Elnathan S. Weeden (1841-1912) served four years in the Union, was shot in the hand, and later taken prisoner at Stones River, Tennessee. Later was an officer with the 68th U.S. Colored Troops, mustering out in 1866. After the war became an attorney in Chicago, edited, "The Army and Navy" (1874-?) "Devoted to the interests of soldiers sailors and their heirs, and settlers on western lands." By 1894 he was in California active in real estate development (Richard L. Kenyon: Weeden Families). Then as now, it was onerous to complete the government paperwork for disability claims as this broadside clearly indicates, and issues were complicated by the new law: "The 1873 Pension Consolidation Act compensated veterans for conditions contracted during military service that subsequently resulted in a disability. Given the state of medical diagnostic knowledge in the 1870s, the legislation posed difficulties for physicians responsible for screening applicants. Eligibility criteria led to charges that corrupt doctors validated veterans’ false and exaggerated claims of disability. Press accounts referred to ‘bogus’ pension applicants and labeled their pension lawyers as ‘bounty hunters’." (Peter Blank & Chen Song: Civil War Pension Attorneys and Disability Politics, in LHPDC, 2002). OCLC locates a trade card for Weeden at the American Antiquarian Society, printed just a bit later than this broadside, as it lists only Weeden’s new address, whereas this lists his older address then overstamped with the new one. A very scarce ephemeral item. A very good copy, folded, one corner crease.
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Archive] 41 Letters, Deeds, Indentures, and other documents concerning the Plattsburgh Pioneer, Revolutionary War Major John Addams & Family & the War of 1812

New York. Plattsburgh. War of 1812] Addoms, John. [also Addams] 41 Documents. 86 pp. Various sizes. An extensive collection chronicling the Addom’s family (alternately spelled Addams), a founding family of Plattsburgh New York including the acquisition of the original land forming the town of Plattsburgh from Zephaniah Platt on which Major John Addams’ Plattsburgh home was constructed in 1790. "Zephaniah Platt, Peter Tappen, Zaccheus Newcomb, Nathaniel Platt, Platt Rogers, Charles Platt, Thomas Treadwell, Simon R. Reeves, Melancton Smith, Jonathan Lawrence, Israel Smith and John Addams met at the house of Judge Zephaniah Platt in Poughkeepsie and mutually agreed ‘to be jointly concerned in the building of a saw-mill, grist-mill and a forge on the river Saranac the next summer, each to advance an equal proportion of money. I could wish none but sober, industrious men to settle in said Township, such as bid fair to do well for themselves’ said Judge Platt in offering terms to early settlers’" on 12/30/1784 (Clinton County Historical Association, December 30, 2015). 20 indentures show the evolving land acquisitions of John Addoms around Plattsburgh and later in Vermont, where he moved his family, once he foresaw that the Cumberland Head area in New York would be a route for invasion during the War of 1812. 18 letters, some to Major Addoms, but mostly between Addoms’ children, Rev. John Townsend and Charity, detail not only family life, but the rigors and horrors of the War of 1812. A family background and lineage is found in a four page concerning the elder Addom’s Revolutionary War service received by his son and a four page application for membership to the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution filed in 1913. John Addoms (1737-1823) entered the Continental Army at the start of the Revolutionary War with the rank of Captain. He served under Washington, Putnam, and Lee, and was one of the officers present at the execution of Major Andre where it was rumored that he had held Andre’s hat. He was a Civil Engineer by profession, and was in charge of division of engineers that laid the chain that blocked British ships from infiltrating the Hudson River and West Point. John Townsend Addoms (1781-1868), his son, was a well-known Methodist Episcopal minister involved in the anti-slavery movement. He married Harriet Young and there are documents from the Young family included. He traveled extensively along the border areas during the War of 1812. Full list upon request. Some browning and soiling, few documents torn with occasional loss, but very good overall.
Print] Niagara Falls (Canada Side)

Print] Niagara Falls (Canada Side)

Hamilton, James Sheet size: 27 1/2 x 14 7/8 inches; image size: 25 1/4 x 11 inches. Hand-colored engraving. A low, broad view of Niagara Falls, which shows the steamship Maid of the Mist at the foot of the falls, a house across the river, and figures beside the falls. Captions below the image read: Painted by J. Hamilton from a sketch by T. Taylor; Published by Wm. Smith, 702 So. 3rd Street, Philadelphia; Engraved at J.M. Butler’s establishment, 242 Chestnut St. Philada. James Hamilton (1819-1878) was an Irish/American painter, mainly self-taught through the study of engravings, though he did attend the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts for a while, and by 1852 was regarded by the well-known engraver John Sartain "as occupying a place in the very front rank of American artists" and he "confidently predict[ed] for him a still higher position in his profession," (See Jacobowitz: James Hamilton, 1819-1878, American Marine Painter, p.9). After a year abroad in 1854 to study the works of Turner, whom he much admired, and other great landscape painters, he returned home establishing himself as an illustrator and teacher of Thomas and Edward Moran. Hamilton was known in his lifetime as ‘the American Turner’ because of Turner’s influence. "From the 1840s until the artist’s death, James Hamilton’s paintings of stormy seas and bustling ports were exhibited widely in Philadelphia and across the United States. Several works were translated into popular black-and-white prints that circulated broadly through the print clubs of the country’s major cities," (See Woodmere Art Museum). John M. Butler (11809-1868) was an engraver, copperplate printer, and portrait artist owning one of the largest establishments in Philadelphia. He would join forces with Joseph R. Carpenter in 1863, to form Butler & Carpenter’s, the first printer of U.S. Revenue stamps. The original image, one of two of the Falls, the other being of the American side, was not colored, and was produced in 1845 with no mention of the publisher William Smith, who was also a Philadelphia framemaker and print dealer. The earliest record we could find of Wm. Smith at 702 So. 3rd Street was 1850. Rare. We could locate no copies of this hand-colored version on OCLC. Of the first issue, uncolored, OCLC locates only one copy, at the American Antiquarian Society. The copy mentioned by Dow at the Grosvenor Library, now resides at the Buffalo & Erie CPL’s Rare Book Room. ABPC and Rare Book Hub show no other copies at auction since 1903, at Anderson Galleries (2/9/03: lot 234). Dow: Anthology and Bibliography of Niagara Falls (1921), Vol. 2, p. 900; not in Jacobowitz: James Hamilton, 1819-1878, American Marine Painter. Some toning, a few closed tears, chip to lower corner touching border, shallow curved chip at right edge about 1/4 inch at maximum into image of trees, easily covered by mat.
Print] Niagara Falls (American Side)

Print] Niagara Falls (American Side)

Hamilton, James Sheet size: 27. 1/2 x 14 7/8 inches; image size: 24 7/8 x 11 inches. Intaglio engraving. A low, broad view of Niagara Falls, which shows the stairs on the American side. Captions below the image read: Painted by J. Hamilton from a sketch by T. Taylor; Engraved at J.M. Butler’s establishment, 242 Chestnut St. Philada. James Hamilton (1819-1878) was an Irish/American painter, mainly self-taught through the study of engravings, though he did attend the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts for a while, and by 1852 was regarded by the well-known engraver John Sartain "as occupying a place in the very front rank of American artists" and he "confidently predict[ed] for him a still higher position in his profession," (See Jacobowitz: James Hamilton, 1819-1878, American Marine Painter, p.9). After a year abroad in 1854 to study the works of Turner, whom he much admired, and other great landscape painters, he returned home establishing himself as an illustrator and teacher of Thomas and Edward Moran. Hamilton was known in his lifetime as ‘the American Turner’ because of Turner’s influence. "From the 1840s until the artist’s death, James Hamilton’s paintings of stormy seas and bustling ports were exhibited widely in Philadelphia and across the United States. Several works were translated into popular black-and-white prints that circulated broadly through the print clubs of the country’s major cities," (See Woodmere Art Museum). John M. Butler (11809-1868) was an engraver, copperplate printer, and portrait artist owning one of the largest establishments in Philadelphia. He would join forces with Joseph R. Carpenter in 1863, to form Butler & Carpenter’s, the first printer of U.S. Revenue stamps. Rare. We could locate no copies on OCLC. The copy mentioned by Dow at the Grosvenor Library, now resides at the Buffalo & Erie CPL’s Rare Book Room. ABPC and Rare Book Hub show no other copies at auction since 1903, at Anderson Galleries (2/9/03: lot 234) and one shortly thereafter for sale at Goodspeed’s in 1906. Dow: Anthology and Bibliography of Niagara Falls (1921), Vol. 2, p. 900; not in Jacobowitz: James Hamilton, 1819-1878, American Marine Painter. Toned, old damp stains to lower margin and verso, a few edge tears, one an inch long, but all marginal not affecting image, earlier tissue mounted to reinforce verso.
Drawing] Original Pen and Ink Drawing of Governor of Adlai E. Stevenson as Sketched by E. Maurice Bloch. Inscribed by Stevenson

Drawing] Original Pen and Ink Drawing of Governor of Adlai E. Stevenson as Sketched by E. Maurice Bloch. Inscribed by Stevenson

Stevenson, Adlai E., II; Bloch, E. Maurice 12 x 9.5 sheet mounted on 10.5 x 14.5 inch matte. Ink portrait of Illinois Governor, Adlai E. Stevenson (1900-1965), three years after his first unsuccessful presidential campaign against Dwight D. Eisenhower and one year before his next run and loss. Drawn and initialed by E. Maurice Bloch and signed and inscribed by Stevenson. Adlai E. Stevenson (1900-1965), governor, diplomat, and two-time candidate for president, stepped in when Harry Truman decided not to run again. Known as a dove in the Kennedy Administration, he proved tough against the Russian Ambassador at the U.N.,during the Cuban missile crises, but "Stevenson’s great impact came from his revitalization of the Democratic party in the 1950s. His lofty conception of politics, his impatience with liberal (and conservative) clichés, his call for new ideas, and his belief that history offered no easy answers set the tone for a new political era. He not only redefined the party mission but brought a new generation of idealists and activists into politics and thereby prepared the way for the Kennedy presidency. More than either of them recognized or admitted, Kennedy was the heir and executor of the Stevenson revolution" (Arthur M. Schlesinger in ANB: article.0700287). E. Maurice Bloch (1915-1989) was an art historian, writer, and teacher, who, in 1955, was Keeper of Drawings and Prints at the Cooper Union Museum and would later become a founding director of UCLA’s Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts. Included is a typed thank you letter from Stevenson’s personal secretary, Carol Evans, dated September 8, 1955. Near fine, faint toning on matting.
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Two Manuscript Letters Signed Concerning Political Maneuvers at the Sullivan County, NY, Democratic Convention, in 1853

New York. Sullivan County]. Holly, John C.; Niven, Archibald C. [2 pp.] bifolium, 1 sheet. 8 x 10 inches. The first letter, written prior to the convention, is dated Monticello, August 30, 1853, from John C. Holly, who had been elected Sheriff the prior year, is addressed to "Friend [James K.] Gardner" (1805-1860) one of the most prominent citizens of Barryville, which he help found; in 1852 he was elected to the New York State Legislature, and held numerous other offices. Holly complains about the jockeying before the convention: "The time has arrived when the friends of the several candidates throughout the county were up and doing and the love of contention appears to be this fall who shall go to the Senate and it appears to be determination of the General and his aids to have the doctor on the course, and if he cannot do it in one way, why in some other. The game appears to be this that the doctor is to get as many delegates throughout the county as he can and the General as many as he can and when they come to the convention all go in for the doctor. Now Lord [George W. Lord, prominent Monticello lawyer ] is a candidate for nomination and have understood that you was and I think the best way is to write your forces. Lord is not in any way anxious for the nomination and would rather throw his votes in [with] you . than in the hands of the General." The second letter, was written after the convention, by Archibald C. Niven (1803-1882), a Surrogate of Sullivan County, New York from 1828 to 1840, Adjutant General of the New York State Militia in 1844, Democrat to the 29th United States Congress (1845-1847), and District Attorney of Sullivan County (1847-1850), most likely also to Gardner (though there is no salutation, and it is marked dpl.) on September 10th, 1853; "it would seem that Lord had determined to be Senator & among other things asserted that he had a letter from you & that you were in his favor. This, of course, was unpalatable to those who are unfavorable to Lord?, for he was defeated at our town Caucus by a decided majority. Well, the county convention . and (as I am told only 10 towns were represented, making 30 delegates, and as Col. Tremain & others were determined to go for me, they counted and found I had 17. Woodbridge has said or at least a letter was received here from Albany stating that he had there said, that he could or would control your vote & had done so during the session. All this, excited prejudices and free-soilers with Curtis (Major James C. Curtis) at the head, set to work & by trickery." Very good, lightly browned edges and folds.
Autograph Letter Signed] Colonel William "Billy" Mitchell to James B. Pond
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Autograph Letter Signed] First Hand Account of 1866 Fenian Invasion of Canada by a Resident of Franklin, Vermont

Irish American] Dow, Ellen [4] pp. Bifolium. 5 x 7 inches. Ellen Dow ends a heartbreaking letter to her aunt about the hardships in Northern Vermont, the lack of work, or if work, extremely low pay pitting worker against worker, with news of the Fenians who swept through her town of Franklin on their way to Canada just two weeks earlier: "There was some families moved out of Canada on count of the Fenians. I do not know whether they were dead or not. There was two or three thousand Fenians went through this place. They did not do any hurt here. There[sic] object seemed to be to plunder Canada. They went to Slab City [Frelighsburg] and found it deserted and they robbed the stores almost of their contents. What they could not get easy off they destroyed. They said they meant to pay for the St. Albans raid. They went to some farm houses and stole things to eat and other things, but they did not hurt anybody." The Fenian Brotherhood launched a number of attacks on Canada hoping to take the country hostage to help the Irish in Ireland. The thrust into Canada at the Vermont border was by about 1000 men who had embarked from Boston aboard special trains led by General Samuel Spear. From St. Albans they traveled northeast, crossing from Franklin in Frelighsburg, Quebec, which they occupied along with Pigeon Hill, St. Armand, and Stanbridge, before surrendering. The Fenian’s would try again about five years later, meeting with no more success than on this first occasion. A rare first hand account of the Fenian’s 1866 raid. With original stamped envelope. Very good, edges browned, tears at the folds without loss.
Printed Documents Signed. Broadside with Letter] Governor of New Hampshire Transmits State's Resolution on Proposed Constitutional Amendment concerning Nobility Titles to the Governor of Pennsylvania

Printed Documents Signed. Broadside with Letter] Governor of New Hampshire Transmits State’s Resolution on Proposed Constitutional Amendment concerning Nobility Titles to the Governor of Pennsylvania

New Hampshire] [Plumer, William] 2 lvs, attached to form bifolium. 7.75 x 9.5 inches. The Titles of Nobility Amendment, a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution, which adds to the prohibition of both the Federal and State governments from issuing titles of nobility, passed the 11th Congress on May 1, 1810, by a vote of 87-3 after having been approved a few days earlier by the Senate 19-5. It read: "If any citizen of the United States shall accept, claim, receive or retain, any title of nobility or honour, or shall, without the consent of Congress, accept and retain any present, pension, office or emolument of any kind whatever, from any emperor, king, prince or foreign power, such person shall cease to be a citizen of the United States, and shall be incapable of holding any office of trust or profit under them, or either of them." Twelve states then ratified it, New Hampshire being the last on December 9, 1812, a copy of which ratification broadside appears as the first leaf of this document, signed in ink by Samuel Sparhawk (N.H. Secretary of State), followed on the second leaf by a printed letter signed and dated in ink, Dec. 12, 1812 by William Plumer (1759-1850) Governor of New Hampshire, with an integral envelope on the verso, addressed to his excellency the Governor Pennsylvania. The amendment never passed, as it was rejected by four states, two before New Hampshire and two after, though officially it is still pending. Scarce. Streeter lists a similar Kentucky broadside in 1811 of a resolve by its legislature; with a separate printed letter of transmittal signed by its governor Vol. 3, p. 1252, item 1645. The only other similar item we have seen at auction is a New Hampshire letter of transmittal without a copy of the resolve broadside. Very good, tear along fore edge of second leaf, not affecting text, light browning at margins and folds, a few expert repairs where the seal was broken and at the joint.
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Nobiliario de el Valle de la Valdorba

Nobiliario de el Valle de la Valdorba, illustrada con los escudos de armas de sus palacios; y casas nobles. Con eltracto de la conquista de el Ytza en la Nueva España: por el conde de Lizárraga-Vengoa, natural del Valle. Y Expressión del significado de toda suerte de armas y sus empressas

Elorza Y Rada, Francisco de [17] leaves, 380 [i.e. 388] pp., [6] leaves index. Error in pagination repeating 81-88. Illus. with b/w engravings. Sm. 8vo. In addition to being one of "the most important and one of the rarest books on the history of the Basque provinces", containing much information on many of America’s colonizers, "it is of special interest" for its first description of "the conquest of the province of Ytza by Martin de Ursua y Arizmendi, count of Lizarraga Vengoa, native of the valley of Valdorba" (Le Clerc 1878) on pages 207 to 279. Martín de Ursúa y Arizmendi (1653-1715), a Spanish Basque conquistador in Central America headed the 1696-97 military expedition which led to the fall of the last significant independent Maya stronghold, Nojpetén, located on an island in Lake Petén Itzá in the northern Petén Basin region of present-day Guatemala. "This political and ritual center was densely covered with temples, royal palaces, and thatched houses, and its capture represented a decisive moment in the final chapter of the Spanish conquest of the Mayas. The capture of Nojpeten climaxed more than two years of preparation by the Spaniards. The conquest, far from being final, initiated years of continued struggle between Yucatecan and Guatemalan Spaniards and native Maya groups for control over the surrounding forests. Despite protracted resistance from the native inhabitants, thousands of them were forced to move into mission towns, though in 1704 the Mayas staged an abortive and bloody rebellion that threatened to recapture Nojpeten from the Spaniards" (Grant Jones: The Conquest of the Last Maya Kingdom. Stanford U. P., 1998). Martín de Ursúa would go on to become Governor and Captain General of the Provinces of Yzta, Cozumel and Tabasco and later Governor and Captain General of the Philippines. Sabin 23365, 55377. Palau 79237. Medina: BHA 2233. European Americana 714/45. A very good copy, vellum rubbed, minor wear, hinge strengthened, scattered foxing, marginal finger soiling, small dampstain to corner of several leaves, some offsetting to engravings, minor tears, one chip affecting a few lines of text, scattered creasing, one marginal notation inked in. Full contemporary vellum with manuscript title, string closures
ALS] Early translation of Christopher Columbus' Letter to Bank of Saint George

ALS] Early translation of Christopher Columbus’ Letter to Bank of Saint George, dated April 2, 1502 [with] Enclosed Introduction Letter, sent to Secretary of Navy, James Kirke Paulding

Columbus, Christopher] Percival, James Gates [1 pp] Bifolium; [2 pp] Bifolium. 8 x 10 inches. Not until August 29th, 1829, 327 years after it was written, was Columbus’ letter to the Bank of Saint George rediscovered in an old file. It was removed and kept under glass at the Genoa City Hall and shown to visiting dignitaries about once per week. Who prepared this translation is not clear, but it and the original were verified by [Robert] Campbell Consul in Genoa [1822-1834; 1837-1839], who sent it back to New York in 1839. In June it appear in Niles National Register. A manuscript copy was sent by James Gates Percival (1795-1856), an American poet, surgeon, and geologist to James Kirke Pauling (1778 -1860), Secretary of the Navy at the time, who had previously been a writer, associated with the Knickerbocker Group, In the covering letter, dated June 14, 1840, Percival writes "I have the honor to enclose the letter which I mentioned to you at my departure from Washington. I feel confident from the long residence and the high esteem in which Mr. Campbell, our much-honored consul at "Genoa" is held, that he could not have been easily deceived as to the correctness of the original autographical letter of which the enclosed is a copy." The document is titled "Translation from the Spanish Language into English of an autograph letter of Christopher Columbus dated 2nd April, 1502, addressed to the Bank of Saint George at Genoa." In addition to the translation, there is a description of the cover and a facsimile signature. This copy is most likely in the handwriting of Percival. For more information on this letter and its discovery see Henry Harrisse: Christopher Columbus and the Bank of Saint George (Ufficio di San Giorgio in Genoa) Two letters addressed to Samuel L.M. Barlow, esquire (New York : Priv. print., 1888). Very good, bright copies, faint soiling, few tears to verso of one bifolium, not affecting text.
Varios Cuentos

Varios Cuentos

Roa Bárcena, José María 149, [1] pp. Impr. de Ignacio Escalante, 16mo. Edicion de 60 ejemplares. José María Roa Bárcena (1827-1908) -academic, novelist, and poet, collaborator on the newspapers El Universal, La Cruz and El Tiempo and editor of El Nuevo Mundo, El Eco Nacional and La Sociedad, and member of the Board of Notables that voted for the monarchy- has been an outcast author in the Mexican panetheon, except for his stories such as the much anthologized "Lanchitas" according to Julio Jiménez Rueda. Also included in this volume are "El rey y el bufon" and the novela "Noche al Raso." An author hard to categorize according to Luisa F. Rico Mansard: "Consideramos que la longevidad de Roa (81 años) y los constantes conflictos del México decimonónico por los que pasó, fueron moldeando poco a poco su estilo. No fue un romántico liberal, no fue un clásico consumado, no se encerró en una escuela literaria determinada, sino que más bien fue respondiendo a los estímulos de su tiempo de una manera propia que no nos permite encasillarlo dentro de una u otra escuela, sino que tuvo influencia y proyección de las tres arriba mencionadas," (Semblanza de Don Jose Maria Roa Barcena (p. 16). Rare. A second edition was published the following year. OCLC locates only four copies: SUNY Stony Brook, Univ. Kansas, Unv. Texas at Austin, and BN Mexico. Contemporary quarter black morocco over pebbled cloth, ruled and decorated in blind, gilt decorations and titles on spine, marbled endpapers
Shina Seibatsu Sugoroku

Shina Seibatsu Sugoroku

Games. Sino-Japanese War]. Tomioka, Eisen 1 folded sheet : color illustrations ; 74 x 103 cm, folded to 26 x 19 cm. 74 x 102.7 cm. Illustration of the Sino-Japanese War; in form of a sugoroku game board. Composed of of image blocks depicting military and naval battle scenes. The game finishes at the final space of a map of Asia. Sugoroku is "a common game with Japanese children, usually played at the New Year. The diagram or board, which is printed in colors, is divided into a number of divisions distinguished by pictures. One of the most popular forms is called do chiu, or "traveling" sugoroku, and is played upon a large sheet of paper on which are represented the various stopping places on a journey. The moves are made according to the throws with one or more dice, or with a teetotum (Japanese coma). New games are published in Japan at each recurring New Year. Like the corresponding games at the present day in Europe and America, they frequently reflect whatever is uppermost in the popular mind. Thus, in 1894-95 the war with the Chinese gave rise to the Shina sei batsu sugoroku, or "Punishing China surgoroku," a specimen of which is in the University Museum (Cat. No. 17687)" (Stewart Culin: Chess and Playing Cards: Catalogue of Games and Implements for Divination. Smithsonian, 1898). Tomioka Eisen (1864-1905) was born Tomioka Hidetaro in Nagano Prefecture. He moved to Tokyo at an early age to become an artist. From 1882 he studied with Kobayashi Eitaku and from 1902 onwards devoted himself to the production of kuchi-e, prints for frontispieces of books or to accompany the circulation of newspapers and magazines, which was very fashionable towards the end of the Meiji era. He was well paid by his publishers and won a silver medal at the first joint exhibition organized by the Japan Institute of Arts and the Japan Painting Association. He died in 1905 at age 41, while the Kuchi-e movement is still in its golden age. (See Artlino: Eisen Tomioka and Wikipedia). OCLC locates one at Univ. Cal. Berkeley.
Manuscript Document] Resolves Criticizing British Aggression in the Years Leading to War of 1812 and Nominating Daniel Tompkins and John Broome as Governor and Lt. Governor

Manuscript Document] Resolves Criticizing British Aggression in the Years Leading to War of 1812 and Nominating Daniel Tompkins and John Broome as Governor and Lt. Governor

War of 1812. New York] [2] pp. 7.5 x 13 inches. Unsigned and unpublished manuscript draft of a series of resolves supporting the Madison administration’s policy towards Britain and ending with support for the nomination of Daniel Tompkins for Governor of New York and John Broome for Lt. Governor for the election of 1810. "The alarming condition to which our country is reduced by the repeated aggressions of the belligerent powers of Europe makes it the indispensable duty of every true American to lay aside party animosity, and to stand forth in defiance of the violated rights of his country. and to tell them that we are determined to support our liberty and independence, at the hazard of our lives, against my power, whatever. therefore Resolved: That we deem it high time for every citizen, who has the good of his country at heart, to rally around the standard of his government, to support our administration in every lawful attempt to resist foreign aggressions, and should they deem it necessary to have recourse to arms, we will cheerfully sacrifice our lives in defiance of our liberty Resolved: That we approve the conduct of the President in dismissing Frances James Jackson, otherwise Copenhagen Jackson, for insulting our government, in charging it with a falsehood Resolved: That we highly approve of the just rebuke of Thomas Sammons in defense of Jackson’s conduct Resolved: That we concur in the nomination of Daniel Tompkins for Governor and John Broome for Lt. Governor, as fit persons for those offices & whose capacity, has been tried to our satisfaction & that we will support them to the utmost of our power. A wonderful document elucidating the issues and emotions driving the country apart and leading to the War of 1812. Very good, folded, few edge tears, one obscuring a small portion of text, light soiling & ink bleed, contents legible.
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Legal Manuscript Archive of Elijah Skenandoah] Collection of Seventeen Letters, Documents, and Acts Pertaining to the Skenandoah Claims for Compensation for Butternut Orchard in Oneida, NY

Oneida Indians. John Skenandoah [Green Bay Party] [32 pp.]. 4to. The archive details the torturous attempt (from before 1833 to 1870) of the heirs of John Skenandoah, Chief of the Oneida Nation in New York, who were forced onto a reservation in Green Bay, Wisconsin, to received compensation for improvements to lands taken from them by treaty. Despite Skenandoah’s "unwavering devotion to the cause of the American colonies in their struggle for independence; during which the Oneidas alone, through the sagacity and influence of Skenandoah. seem to have been the only entire tribe among the six nations of New-York Indians who adhered to the American cause" (Documents of the Assembly of the State of New York, Volume 3, p. 71. Mar. 19, 1853), the State dragged its feet in helping his family. The missionaries were even worse. In the letter dated 8 February 1864, Thomas Loomis, acting in their behalf, wrote to J.W. Lippitt of the NYS Assembly Committee: "The Skenandoah family, on account of their devotion to the cause of religious & literary instruction among the Oneidas had for several years given up the use of their old homestead to the mission established at that place (as the most comfortable quarter for the purpose) receiving a moderate rent therefore up to about the year 1821 as I am credible assured and he lived since which time they have received no payment for rent on improvement. In the year 1825, as I think, an Act of Legislature was passed prohibiting the survey on general from selling the Butternut Orchard Lot and providing for the sale of this lot back to the Indians in exchange for other lands of the Indians – for the purpose of having the lot devoted to Missionary purpose. "This exchange provided for by the act never took place, but the cunning missionary, the Reverend Solomon Davis, who lobbied the act through, continued in possession of the lot until the convenient time (some two or more years afterwards) came for lobbying another act through the Legislature giving him the preemption right to the land." Aside from the letters, notes, and legal documents, there are seven different versions of "An Act For the determination and settlement of the claim of Sally (widow) Honyoust, Christine Skenandoah and Rachel Cornelius" each proposing different compensations from $8 an acre to $10 and acre, some with caps, some without. 1. Affidavit of Elijah Skenandoah. 10 March 1852. 3 pp. 2. Christine Skenandoah to son Elijah. POA. 23 Sept. 1863. 1 p. 3. Thomas T. Loomis for Elijah Skenandoah to Hon. J. W. Lippitt of the NYS Assembly Committee. 8 Feb. 1864. 7 pp. [Thomas T. Loomis was Justice of the Peace in Oneida and a former NYS Assembly member from Madison County]. 4. The Claims of the Skenandoah Family. n.d (but after 1853, probably by legislative staff around 1860s. 2 pp. 5. Margaret Silas & Jenny Cooper to brother, Elijah Skenandoah. POA. 31 Jan. 1866. 2 pp. 6. Thomas Loomis to Hon. Caleb Calkins, member of NYS Assembly. 30 Jan 1866. 2 pp. 7. Elijah Skenandoah, Margaret Silas, & Jenny Cooper to Daniel Bread. POA 1869. 1 p. 8. Elijah Skenandoah to Thomas Loomis. 8 Jan. 1870. 1 p. 9. Copy of NYS Assembly request to review old Assembly files. n.d. (but after 1864). 1 p. 10. Extract from William L. Stone’s "Life of Joseph Brant-Thayendanegea in Relation to Skenandoah". n.d. 1 p. 11. An Act For the determination and settlement of the claim of Sally (widow) Honyoust, Christine Skenandoah and Rachel Cornelius. $8/acre. nd. 2 pp. 12. An Act For the determination and settlement of the claim of Sally (widow) Honyoust, Christine Skenandoah and Rachel Cornelius. $8/acre. nd. 2 pp. 13. An Act For the determination and settlement of the claim of Sally (widow) Honyoust, Christine Skenandoah and Rachel Cornelius. $8/acre; max. $1350. n.d . 1 p. 14. An Act For the determination and settlement of the claim of Sally (widow) Honyoust. $10/acre- no total amount. nd. 2 pp. 15. An Act For the determination and settlement of the claim of Sally (widow) Honyoust. $10/acre; max. $1900. n.d. 1 p. 16. An Act For the determination and settlement of the claim of Sally (widow) Honyoust, Christine Skenandoah and Rachel Cornelius. $10/acre; max. $2000. nd. 2 pp. 17. An Act For the relief of Christine Skenandoah, Sally (widow) Honyoust, Rachel Cornelius, and Elijah Skenandoah. $2000; max. $500/each. n.d. 1 pp. Very good collection overall, some tearing and browning along edges and folds, scattered ink bleed.
Autograph Letter Signed] Entrusting Antoine-Augustin Renouard with Two Drawings and copies of Dibdin's 'Typographical Antiquities' for Brunet and Van Praet

Autograph Letter Signed] Entrusting Antoine-Augustin Renouard with Two Drawings and copies of Dibdin’s ‘Typographical Antiquities’ for Brunet and Van Praet

Dibdin, Thomas Frognall [1] pp. Bifolium with intergral address leaf. 7.5 x 9 inches. Dated April 29, 1816, this letter by Thomas Frognall Dibdin (1776-1847) to Antoine-Augustin Renouard touches on most of the great French bibliophiles of that era. Dibdin asks Renouard, who was currently in London, to bring two drawings for engraving to Paris as well as copies of his "Typographical Antiquities" to two other bibliophiles as well as one in trade for a catalogue. "You will very much oblige me by taking the charge of two copies of my Typographical Antiquities. One for Monsr. Van Praet – the other for Monsr. Brunet Le . In your own copy, (in exchange for Count McCarthy’s Catalogue) you will find the two drawings for the engravers to execute at Paris. They must each be upon a separate piece of copper, 4 inches by 3, and I beg you will be particular in urging the artist to be as accurate & faithful as possible. He must also engrave them in a soft, yet brilliant manner. The letters, in outline, show the original to be gold! Let him take the greatest possible care of the drawings." Joseph-Basile Bernard Van Praet (1754-1837) who’d been at the bookseller Desaint, then at Guillaume de Bure, was Keeper of Printed Works at the Bibliothèque nationale for fifty-seven years. Jacques-Charles Brunet’s (1780-1867) bibliographical dictionary, Manuel du libraire et de l’amateur des livres, had come out in 1810. Antoine-Augustin Renouard (1765-1853) was French bibliophile, book dealer, printer and bibliographer. The two drawings would most likely have been for Dibdins "The bibliographical decameron, or, Ten days pleasant discourse upon illuminated manuscripts, and subjects connected with early engraving, typography, and bibliography," which was to be published the following year. Very good, folded, faint edge wear, reinforced at fold
ALS] Japanese Naval Officer Stationed on the Flagship 'Kuma' Writes from Tsingtao

ALS] Japanese Naval Officer Stationed on the Flagship ‘Kuma’ Writes from Tsingtao, China

Japanese Navy] Hamanaka, K. [Kyoho] 5 pp. 8.5 x 11 inches. July 28, 1928 with envelope addressed to: Mrs. J.D. Keith / 218 Carlisle Street /Gettysburg, PA. (wife of John D. Keith, prominent attorney and director of many companies). Officer Hamanaka writes this while the Kuma was on patrol in Tsingtao, under the ".service of protecting our nationals, as well as foreigners such as Americans, British, French, etc. , against the disorderly Chinese." The Japanese occupied the city in 1914, but Chinese rule, under the Republic of China, was returned in December 1922. However, the Japanese maintained its economic control and hence the Kuma’s presence. The Kuma, lead vessel of the five Kuma-class light cruisers in the Imperial Japanese Navy, had been originally assigned to cover the landings of Japanese troops during the Japanese intervention in Siberia against the Red Army. The contents are a mix of greetings to people in Gettysburg and military anecdotes. Officer Hamanaka tells Mrs. Keith, "Since I took my new duty in the Chinese waters, I have met many of my old friends at Washington. As you know, your country has sent more that 60 men of war to the Chinese waters, and ours about 40. So, naturally, we are always in contact with some of your officers.It was just a month ago that we exchanged wardroom officers’ call between the "Trenton" (one of your cruisers lately came to Chinese waters from America directly) and our "Kuma" , and during the merriest time we had in talking, one of your officers said to one of ours that he knew a Japanese officer called "Hama" at Washington. I was just a few steps apart from him, but could not hear what he said. The Japanese officer who was spoken to said, "Hama? Wasn’t he rather a short fellow?" "He’s here before you." said he, tapping my shoulder. It was indeed very funny that both he and I could not recognize each other. I spent one evening with him at a dinner in Washington, and yet both could not recognize here at a port in China, because both wore uniforms this time instead of civilian clothes." Kyoho Hamanaka had been assistant naval attached in Washington in 1926, and beginning in 1936 naval attaché to the Japanese legation in Mexico City. The Mexico Embassy was responsible for sending Washington intelligence back to Japan and for trying to keep the Mexicans and Latin America neutral. He was arrested in February 1942, the FBI also believing he boasted of planning for an invasion of Mexico. Very good, light browning and chipping to edges, tiny tears along folds, contents fine.
Blunt's Stranger's guide to the city of New-York: Comprising a description of public buildings

Blunt’s Stranger’s guide to the city of New-York: Comprising a description of public buildings, dwelling houses . &c. To which is prefixed, an historical sketch, general description, plan and extent of the city. With an appendix . Embellished with a plan of the city, and engravings of public buildings

Blunt, Edmund M. [Busby, Charles A.; Hooker, William] xvi, (13)-306, +[6] ad pp. Illus. with engraved folding plan and three engraved plates. adv. with three wood engravings. 12mo. 14.5 x 9 cm. (5 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches). One of the earliest guidebooks of New York, preceded only by Mitchill’s "A Picture of New York" (1807). Blunt notes in his introduction that Mitchell’s work possessed "considerable merit" but since it was not improved or updated, New York’s progress had gone unrecorded: "Until the recent triumphs of the arms of the United States, the inhabitants of these fertile regions were regarded, in many parts of Europe, particularly in the mother country, as a nest of demi-barbarians, utterly unacquainted with the useful arts, and destitute of every social virtue! . . By giving correct views of our establishments, the strong hold of prejudice, now shaken to the centre, will ultimately be broken down," (p. iv). The map of lower Manhattan, "Plan of the City of New York" running from the Battery to 29th street (28.5 x 32 cm), engraved by W[illiam] Hooker, identifies ninety-eight points of interest. William Hooker (1782-1856) had worked for Blunt when Blunt was located in Newberryport, Mass., and eventually returned to New York City in 1815 to assist in the production of this work and produce the city plan for it, which would be the basis for a series of pocket plans and maps of New York by Hooker. The three plates, (engraved by Hooker) illustrate the Prison, the Almshouse, and City Hall, and were drawn by C[harles] A[ugustin] Busby (1786-1834), an English architect. A more complete sense of its contents can be gleaned from the book’s full subtitle: "Comprising a description of public buildings, dwelling houses, including population, streets, markets, public amusements, the bay, harbour, docks, slips, forts and fortifications:–with an account of the literary, philosophical, medical, law, religious, and benevolent institutions, commercial establishments, manufactures, &c.: To which is prefixed, an historical sketch, general description, plan and extent of the city: With an appendix, containing the time and sailing, and departure of steam-boats, stages, &c. with the fares: rates and regulations of hackney coaches, carters, porters, chimney-sweepers, weigh-masters and measurers: market regulations, assizes of bread, money tables, corporation laws and ordinances, inspectors of native produce, masters and wardens of the port, pilots, slave regulations, &c. &c." A contemporary review noted: "This is a very useful publication; full and accurate. The body of the work is important to the stranger, as it points out whatever is worthy of examination in the city, and, also,the readiest means of access to the repositories of literature and the arts. The appendix contains an abstract of the municipal regulations of New York, and will be found a great convenience both to the resident and foreigner, as it enables them to guard against imposition, and points out the proper modes of redressing the injuries, to which every person ignorant of the law, is continually liable. It contains well-executed engraved views of some of the most considerable public buildings, and is accompanied by an excellent map, which exhibits not only a plan of the city. but also a directory to all the public buildings of every description," (American Monthly Magazine, No. 1, Vol. II Nov. 1817, p. 72) . Subsequent editions were published by A. T. Goodrich under title: The Picture of New York, and [or the] Stranger’s Guide. Uncommon, especially with the map intact. Sabin 6033. Howes B557. Amer. Imprints 40278. Rink: 327. Eberstadt 115-0787. DAB IX: pp. 200-201. A very good copy, calf rubbed, worn just at the lower fore corner, edges, preliminaries, and rear matter foxed with some minor staining, map with edges soiled and minor wear, a few pin holes and some archival repairs to the fold with minor loss. Contemporary calf, red morocco spine lable titled in gilt
The Battle of Buena Vista

The Battle of Buena Vista, with the Operations of the ‘Army of Occupation’ for One Month [with three bound-in letters]

Carleton, James Henry vii, 238 pp., [1], 8 pp. adv + 2 fold-out maps + 3 fold-out letters. Illus. with 2 folding maps. 12mo. Highly detailed account of the Battle of Buena Vista (also known as the Battle of Angostura), including a comprehensive appendix, documenting this 1847 battle. [Carleton] "combines personal observations with a study of official documents to give what is still probably the best account of the Battle of Buena Vista. Appendices contain letters and reports from Americans as well as Mexicans, reproduce in part or in whole letters and reports from Americans as well as Mexicans, and print in part or in whole letters to and from Carleton, Marcy, Micheltorena, Taylor, Santa Anna, and Colonel Roger S. Dix. Lists casualties and gives information about prisoners" (Tutorow, The Mexican American War, p. 252). With three letters bound in: 1. ALS. General Gideon Johnson Pillow at Camp Huihita, to his wife Mary, dated December 24, 1846. Postmark of Port Isabel. 3 pp. Containing war commentary, disclosing rumors about Santa-Anna, detailing the horrors of war. Gideon Johnson Pillow (1806-1878) was a major general in the Mexican-American War and was wounded at Cerro Gordo and Chapultepec. He was court-martialed for insubordination after a disagreement with General Winfield Scott. 2. TLS. Lutz Wahl. Dated June 19, 1926. 1 p. Statement of the Military Service of A.H Vories. Lutz Wahl (1869-1928) was a major general in the United States Army. Vories served in the Kentucky Cavalry during the Mexican-American War and was most likely from Frankfort, KY. 3. ANS. Humphrey Marshall replies to a request for his autograph. No date. 1 p. Humphrey Marshall (1812-1872) became Colonel of the 1st Kentucky Cavalry in 1846 during the Mexican-American War, where he fought at the Battle of Buena Vista. James Henry Carleton (18141873) was a dragoon during the Mexican-American War, an officer in the U.S. Army, and a Union general during the American Civil War, and later an Indian fighter in the southwestern United States. Sabin 10905. Howes (FE) C147. Tutorow 3397. Haferkorn, p. 43. Garrett & Goodwin, p. 139. A very good copy in a near fine binding, minor wear to spine, first map remounted, contents lightly foxed throughout, tears along the edges and folds of both maps. Later full green morocco, gilt rules, 5 raised bands, gilt dentelles, top edge gilt, marbled endpapers, original decorated cloth spine and covers bound in rear
Manuscript Document Signed] Colonel Albert Lockwood Farewell Address to the Troops Under His Command

Manuscript Document Signed] Colonel Albert Lockwood Farewell Address to the Troops Under His Command

War of 1812]. Lockwood, Albert; Allen, Barnabas 1 sheet. 7.5 x 12.5 inches. Signed by Barnabas Allen, who recorded this farewell address of Colonel Albert Lockwood of the 4th Regiment, from Connecticut. The address was some time after the conclusion of the War of 1812, as Barnabas Allen served in that war. "Gentlemen of Commission of the Staff, non commission officers and soldiers of the 4th Regiment. My old age, my long service in office together with any bodily infirmities call me to resign my commission and return back to that places of rest where all ranks and grades of officers and men one day or other expect to meet. Gentlemen Officers- Having had the honor this day to command you in the 4th brigade, your escertions in informing yourselves in the rules and discipline of war, your punctual obedience to the order of the day, and for your officer-like conduct, I return you my hearty thanks Fellow Soldiers- Not forgetting myself under the highest obligations to you for the protection of own life, liberty, and my property. Your compliance with the laws of your country, [cut here]equipping yourselves with arms to defend your lives and the lives of others. Your punctual obediences to the order of the day and for the martial appearance, I return to you my hearty thanks. With full confidence I now dismiss into the hands of that God who superintends all things, hoping and praying that he will order and direct the Legislature of this state when my resignation comes before them, to appoint some officer or man over you who will be more adequate to the task of commanding you than I have ever been. I have my hand, my heart, and my aid with you. Farewell gentle officers and Soldiers of the 4th regiment." Most likely Albert Lockwood (b. 10 Apr. 1757, d. 16 Feb. 1846) married to Grace Godfrey of Weston Ct. (see Revolutionary War Records of Fairfield, Connecticut, Volume 3). Lockwood served in the American Revolution and the War of 1812. Torn and separated along the folds, affecting a few lines of text, scattered soiling and ink smudging, contents otherwise legible.
Reales Ordenanzas para la direccion

Reales Ordenanzas para la direccion, Regimen y Gobierno del Importante cuerpo de la Mineria de Nueva-Espana, y de su Real Tribunal General. De orden de su Magestad

Galvez, Josef de; compiler. New Spain. Tribunal de minería [2 lvs], xlvi, 214 pp. Illus. with an engraving by Joaquin Fabregat of the Spanish arms and depicting mining implements. Folio. Signed in ink with Galvez’ paraph under his printed name. First edition of this "rare and valuable compendium of the old mining laws and mineral customs, printed only for the use of the parties concerned," (Sabin) and meant to govern the workings of silver mining in New Spain. Galvez was a special Minister of the Indies who was instructed to reform the mining laws of Mexico. In this work, which could only be owned by Spanish-born miners, he not only transcribed all the royal decrees concerning mining in New Spain but also provided information concerning mining operations, training, discovery of new mines, and technology and governance. Signed in manuscript with his rubric attesting to the accuracy of the copy. Further editions were published in 1785/6 in Lima (both folio and quarto) and in Santiago in 1833. Sabin 56260. Palau 203088 & 251937. Medina BHA V: 5040. Maffei/Figueroa Bibl. Esp. Minerales. Boards worn with some loss to the tail of the spine hinges split though firm, dampstained along bottom edge, some ink smudges especially to edges of frontispiece, section titles in manuscript on each page, otherwise contents quite sharp, and overall about very good. Full contemporary cat’s paw vellum
La Invasion Americana. 1846 a 1848. Apuntes del subteniente de artilleria

La Invasion Americana. 1846 a 1848. Apuntes del subteniente de artilleria

Balbontin, Manuel [4] preliminary leaves, [9]-137 pp., [blank], [2] pp. 4 folding maps. Illus. with b/w drawings and 4 folding lithographic maps, two hand colored. 8vo. Written as a journal beginning 27 July 1846 before the Battle of Monterrey and continuing until 18 September 1847. Balbontin was captured in September of 1846 but exchanged. Describes all the major battle and troop movements of the Mexican army with a great deal of insight. "This is one of the better written works on the Mexican side of war," (Garrett / Goodwin, The Mexican-American War of 1846-1848 : a bibliography, p. 7). "One of the first serious histories of the War between Mexico and the United States to be published in Mexico. It remains one of the best balanced and is a very important source for the history of the war," (Lathrop Harper, Catalogue 12, Texas Mexico 1813-1850: 421). Maps include: 1.Croquis de las fortificaciones de Monterrey; 2. Croquis de la batalla de la Angostura; 3. Croquis de la accion de Padierna; 4. Croquis del combate de Churubusco. Manuel Balbontin (1824-1894) was a Mexican army officer who fought not only in the Mexican-American War but in the War of Reform, the French Intervention, and against the monarch’s forces during the Hapsburg rule. Palau 22326. Howes B54. Haferkorn p.9. Tutorow 3601. A very good copy, edge worn & lightly rubbed boards & spine, scattered soiling, clean contents, folding maps sharp, one closed marginal tear and one with a few extra creases. Quarter red cloth over marbled boards, spine titled and ruled in gilt, decorated in blind
Recopilacion de leyes de los reynos de las Indias. Mandadas imprimir y publicar por la Magestad Católica del rey Don Carlos II

Recopilacion de leyes de los reynos de las Indias. Mandadas imprimir y publicar por la Magestad Católica del rey Don Carlos II, nuestro señor: va dividida en quatro tomos, con el indice general, y al principio de cada tomo el indice especial de los titulos, que contiene. [Four Volumes]

Spanish Colonial Law] [6], 299; [3], 298; [3], 302; [2], 364 leaves. Illus. with title page vignettes of the royal coat of arms of Charles II by Juan de la Peña. Folio. "Initiated by order of the Council of the Indies in 1624, [Recopilacion de leyes de los reynos de las Indias] tried to systematize laws promulgated since Columbus’s exploration of the New World. Antonio de León Pinelo was the principal author of the work, but Juan de Solórzano Pereira’s contribution in settling the final form of the collection also deserves recognition. The draft was completed in 1636, but several successive financial crises prevented its publication for decades. Finally, 3,300 copies were printed in 1681. In addition to organizing more than eleven thousand laws for imperial officials, the Recopilación, in D. A. Brading’s words, ‘demonstrated the justice and legitimacy of Spanish rule in the New World’." "The Recopilación consists of nine parts (libros) which ordered legislation related to the following major topics: the church, clerics, educational institutions, and publishing (I); councils, audiencias, and related staff associated with the provision of justice (II); viceroys, presidents, the military, and lesser offices (III); discovery, conquest, settlement, local government and services, and mines and commerce (IV); district administration, the supervision of the medical profession, judicial procedures, residencias (V); the native population and its treatment and financial and labor obligations, encomiendas and repartimientos (VI); special investigations, the black and mulatto population, jails and judicial sentences (VII); taxes and their collection, the sale of offices, treasury and accounting offices and their responsibilities (VIII); the House of Trade, oversight of trade to and from the Indies, naval personnel, travel and travelers to and from the Indies, the merchant guilds of Mexico City and Lima (IX). Fortunately, the Recopilación contains a detailed index." "Described by Clarence H. Haring as ‘one of the most humane, and one of the most comprehensive, codes published for any colonial empire,’ the Recopilación contains legislation that illuminates much of the colonies’ institutional structure and procedure. Nearly all of its prescriptions should, however, be read as statements of good intentions rather than actual statutes that were enforced." (Mark Burkholder in "Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture," New York: Scribner’s, 1996: Vol. 4, pp. 545-5). This second edition appeared in 1756 and was followed by three more: 1774, 1794, and the fifth and last, in 1841. Sabin 68387. Palau 137462 & 252517. Medina BHA 3763. See Brunet IV, col. 1138. Leclerc 2920 (3rd ed.). See Harisse p. 395n. Very good copies, some minor wear and rubbing at the edges, slight loss top corner of volume III, vellum soiled, occasional but minor dampstain at the edge, title leaves repaired at lower fore corners, private library stamp of owner on endpapers, occasional tick mark in text. Full contemporary vellum with manuscript titles on spines, ties
Three Autographed letters signed to Che Guevara from Alberto Granada (his Motorcycle Diaries Companion) and Ernesto Guevara Lynch (his father)

Three Autographed letters signed to Che Guevara from Alberto Granada (his Motorcycle Diaries Companion) and Ernesto Guevara Lynch (his father)

Guevara, Che] 10 pp. 1. Letter from Alberto Granada (1922-2011), who was Che’s travel partner on his famous motorcycle journey), to Che Guevara. June 21, 1955. This was written to Che in Mexico City, dated just one day before he met Raul Castro. Six pages (bifolium plus 1 sheet). 4 1/2 x 6 1/4 inches. With envelope. Addresses Che as "Dear Pig", since Che was famous for his uncleanliness. Discusses his trip to Europe, complaining that he has been "too tired to write to you but, brother, let me tell you that if you have not been to Rome, Florence and Venice you would not know how the human spirit can achieve sublimation. I have been to Madrid and I can say that the people from that city are the most hospitable in the world. I have also managed to see the aesthetic differences between the artistic legacy of the Arabs and the palace of Charles V. I was also fortunate enough to have seen the artifacts at the Louvre, made 9 or 10,000 years ago." He then talks about his plans to save 2,000 dollars in order to travel around India for two years and work in leper colonies, as well as his long term plans to create a laboratory in Caracas, "which I think will be the place where I will settle down." In reference to his trip, he signed it "Pandit Alberto." 2. Letter from Ernesto Guevara Lynch (1900-1987), Che’s father, to Che Guevara. September 20, 1954. Two sheets on rectos only. 6 3/4 x 10 1/2 inches. With envelope. Though the letter was addressed to Che while he was in Guatemala, during which time his revolutionary ideals began to foment, the date would indicate the letter missed him and was presumably routed to him there, or perhaps received by his soon-to-be wife, Hilda Gadea, a Peruvian economist who was well-connected politically as a member of the left-leaning Alianza Popular Revolucionaria Americana. Unaware or unwilling to deal with his son’s transformation, he mentions to Che "I think that a stay in the United States would help you to do well in your career as a medical doctor," ending with "a big hug." 3. Letter from Ernesto Guevara Lynch (1900-1987) to Che Guevara. January 19, 1956. Two sheets on rectos only. 8 1/2 x 11 inches. With envelope of Guevara Lynch y Cia. Addressed to Che in Mexico via the Argentinean Consulate. While his father sends him hugs and mentions receiving his letters and gifts, that "Mum and Ani are in Bahia Blanca and Juan Martin is currently in Pantanillo", as well as noting the upheavals in Argentina, Che at that time was undergoing hard physical training for the revolution under the direction of Arsacio Vanegas, who had been recruited by Fidel Castro. Provenance: From the estate of Hilda Guevara, Che’s daughter. Very good letters, last with some ink burn to a few characters and ragged edges; envelopes with stamps torn away.