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John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller

Souvenirs d'un Voyage dans la Tartarie

Souvenirs d’un Voyage dans la Tartarie, le Thibet, et la Chine.

Huc, (Evariste). Paris: Librairie de Adriene le Clere et Cle, 1853. 2 vols. 4to. 440 pp. and 518 pp. Full brown buckram, gilt on backstrip. Library number in white on covers. Second edition, an ex-library copy with the usual markings but complete with the folding map. An important account of a European traveling to Tibet: "At the urging of the vicar apostolic of Mongolia, he set out on an expedition to Tibet in 1844. After much suffering and crossing the punishing Ordos Desert, his party reached the Tibet border in Jan. 1845, where he stayed for a few months at the famous Kunbum Lamasery where he studied Tibetan and Buddhism. The party eventually reached Lhasa 19 Jan. 1846, but Chinese authorities ordered him to Canton in Oct. 1846, where he remained for nearly 3 years before returning to Europe in shattered health in 1852. The present book was famous in its day and was translated into English by William Hazlitt in 1851. "[Huc’s] works are written in a lucid, racy, picturesque style, which secured for them an unusual degree of popularity. The SOUVENIRS is a narrative of a remarkable feat of travel, and contains passages of so singular a character as in the absence of corroborative testimony to stir up a feeling of incredulity. That Huc was suspected unjustly was amply proved by later research. But he was by no means a practical geographer, and the record of his travels loses greatly in value from the want of precise scientific data." – Ency. Brit., 11th edition. (Steven Temple)
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Histoire Naturelle, Regne Animal (The Animal Kingdom) Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers. Plates vol. 6

Diderot, Denis. Paris (1768) and the Supplementary Plates Volume (1777). Folio, 253 x 393mm. 42 pages of descriptive text & 35 loose plates with their accompanying 7 text sheets from the volume of plates. Slight browning to margins, a little spotting otherwise very good. The 29 plates and descriptive text for the entry of Histoire Naturelle, Regne Animal from volume VI of plates, with an additional 6 plates from the Supplementary Plates Volume. The twenty-nine plates from volume VI are numbered 1-29 with seven accompanying text sheets. This suite includes plates on land quadrupeds and sea mammals in particular.The six supplementary plates come in two sets. The first set contains four plates, numbered 1-4, and these cover frogs and zoophytes in particular. The second set contains 2 plates, numbered 2 & 3, and these cover hermaphrodites. Unfortunately the first plate is this set is missing.Also with the relevant entries listed under Animalité in the Table Analytique et Raisonnée du Dictionnaire des Sciences, Arts et Métiers. Vol I (1780)12 pages (88, 89, 98, 99, 122 & 468-476) from volume I of the Encyclopédie (1751) including Plus il approche de l’adolescence, plus il croît lentement, La durée de sa vie peut se mesurer par celle de tems de l’accroissement, Sels animaux, Sels qui se trouvent dans le corps de l’animal, Action animale and Animal, Histoire Naturelle.3 pages (214, 318 & 813) from volume II of the Encyclopédie (1751) including Animal, Bête, Brute, Bonté animale and Cendres animales4 pages (31-33 & 596) from volume III of the Encyclopédie (1753) including Chaleur de l’animal; principaux phénomenes qu’elle présente and La dilatation & la contraction des dimensions extérieures du corps sont essentielles à la vie de l’animal1 page (363) from volume VI of the Encyclopédie (1756) including Facultés animales4 pages (35, 36, 51 & 110) from volume VII of the Encyclopédie (1757) including Plus les autres visceres sont petits dans un animal, à proportion du sujet, plus le foie est grand, Fonctions animales and Accroissement & décroissement de la force de l’animal1 page (236) from volume VIII of the Encyclopédie (1765) including De l’animal selon la philosophie de Hobbes1 page (841) from volume X of the Encyclopédie (1765) including Mouvement animal7 pages (360-366) from volume XI of the Encyclopédie (1765) including Economie animale3 pages (39, 585 & 586) from volume XV of the Encyclopédie (1765) including La premiere notion dans l’animal, Substances animales and De l’acide animal 1 page (175) from volume XVI of the Encyclopédie (1765) including information on Les corps terreux naturels tirés de regne animal: leur usage en médecine2 pages (435 & 436) from volume I of the Supplément à l’Encyclopédie (1776) which includes information on Les animals en général 1 page (490) from volume II of the Supplément à l’Encyclopédie (1776) which includes information on Caractere distinctif de l’animalWith some browning to a few leaves.Contributed by François-Nicolas Martinet (1731-1800), famous for his ornithological engravings, these plates display many noted mammals, reptiles and amphibians. Martinet was well regarded because of his ability to depict the creatures realistically, and many of his subjects are now scarce or endangered. Perhaps his most famous illustrations were those for Mathurin Jacques Brisson’s Ornithologia, sive Synopsis Methodica (1760-63). These visually compelling plates show creatures of all sorts, from elephants to capybara, and apes, sloths, and monkeys to cabasssou armadillos, surinam toads and chameleons. Martinet’s illustrations are detailed and informative, although, in places, are charmingly naïve. Several relevant text entries follow, and these include Animal by Diderot and Louis-Jean-Marie Daubenton, a French naturalist of note. Futher articles were contributed by Pierre Tarin, Paul Jacques Malouin and Baron de Haller.
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Histoire Naturelle, Regne Minéral (Fossils and Minerals)Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers. Plates vol. 6.

Diderot, Denis. Paris (1768). Folio, 253 x 393mm. 30 pages of descriptive text & 47 loose plates with their accompanying 2 text sheets from the volume of plates. Slight browning to margins, a little spotting otherwise very good. The 47 plates and descriptive text for the entry of Histoire Naturelle, Regne Minéral from volume VI of plates. Plates come in seven sets. The sets are on Fossils (14 numbered plates), Crystalization (9 numbered plates), Metalic Crystalizations (3 numbered plates), Mountains (3 numbered plates), Glaciers (3 numbered plates, with one double plate), Volcanoes (8 numbered plates, with four double plates and one triple plate), and finally on Mines (7 numbered plates with two doubles).Also with the relevant entries listed under Fossiles in the Table Analytique et Raisonnée du Dictionnaire des Sciences, Arts et Métiers. Vol I (1780)1 page (779) from volume I of the Encyclopédie (1751) including Astroïtes fossiles1 page (194) from volume III of the Encyclopédie (1753) including Charbon fossile1 page (184) from volume IV of the Encyclopédie (1754) including Coquilles fossiles4 pages (209-211 & 623) from volume VII of the Encyclopédie (1757) including information on Les fossiles, Minéralogie en général and Diverses observations sur les fossiles1 page (776) from volume VIII of the Encyclopédie (1765) including Fossiles nommés infalita4 pages (63, 64, 486 & 489) from volume IX of the Encyclopédie (1765) including Ivoire fossile, Licornes fossiles trouvées en Sibérie and Liége fossiles3 pages (686, 687 & 752) from volume XI of the Encyclopédie (1765) including Ossemens fossiles and Pain fossile2 pages (915 & 927) from volume XIV of the Encyclopédie (1765) including information on Les sels fossiles1 page (469) from volume XVI of the Encyclopédie (1765) describing Les fossiles trouvés à Langensaltza en Thuringe8 pages (91-97 & 777) from volume III of the Supplément à l’Encyclopédie (1777) which includes Fossiles, Oryctologie en général and Bois fossile décourvert près de Lons-le-Saunier 4 pages (212, 223, 224 & 371) from volume IV of the Supplément à l’Encyclopédie (1777) which includes Oursins de mer fossiles, Exposition d’une nouvelle hypothese sur l’origine de divers fossiles, comme encrinites, astéries, trochistes, &c. and Pierres fibreuses
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Seven original watercolors of birds and animals.

Zoological Illustrations]. No date [circa 1810-1825]. 7 original watercolors on individual sheets (c.180 x 220 mm), handwritten notes in ink on versos recording the name of the animal in English, French and Latin, and, in some cases, comments on its appearance and habits, matted alike. Marginal browning, seemingly caused by the mats, images lightly toned, very good. Apparently amateur copies of (or possibly original sketches for?) illustrations from natural history colorplate periodicals. Three of the paintings relate to identified engravings: (1) Striped-cheeked hummingbird, c.f. The naturalists’ miscellany. Vol.13 (facing G2), (2) Tamatia macrorhychos (Greater pied puff-bird), c.f. Swainson’s Zoological Illustrations. Vol II 1821-22, Plate 99. and (3) Fringilla oryzivora (Paddy bird, Rice bird, or Java Sparrow). c.f. Swainson’s Zoological Illustrations. Vol.III , 1822-3, Plate 156. No published images corresponding to the remaining four have yet been identified; unlike the three paintings above, each of these has an inked number above the image and more extensive handwritten notes on the verso: they are (with their numbering): [1.] Toco Toucan, [47.] Bradypus Sloth, [52.] Blue tailed crow, [58.] Nine banded armadillo. The sheet bearing the Toucan contains a fleur-de-lis watermark dated 1813. The quality of the seven images varies from somewhat crude to quite skilled. Intriguing.
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Autograph Letter Signed to Henry Lee.

Darwin, Charles. December 23, 1871. 8vo, 2 pp., 25 lines in ink written on rectos only; first sheet with printed letterhead "Down, Beckenham, Kent." With original stamped and postmarked envelope. Letter and envelope both in fine condition and fully legible. Custom quarter leather portfolio case with inset portrait. A short but characteristic letter to the naturalist Henry Lee confirming the identification of specimens of Lepas anatifera, the pelagic gooseneck barnacle. A nice glimpse of Darwin’s daily working correspondence and of his generosity in assisting in the enquiries of fellow naturalists, even as he was hard at work correcting proof-sheets for the 6th edition of the Origin of Species.".I have now looked at both lots of specimens, & I think both are the variable L. anatifera.? I have disarticulated the right-hand scutal valve in both & the umbonal teeth are plain in both. This with position of the carina suffices, though the latter ought to be disarticulated and cleaned. But I have hardly any doubt that both are L. anatifera."Henry Lee was the director at the Brighton aquarium. The year before this letter was written he was a founder of the Croydon Microscopical and Natural History Club. Five letters from Darwin to Lee have so far been traced: Lee providing Darwin with his observations on the distribution of the sexes in trout populations and Darwin assisting Lee with the identification of barnacle specimens.University of Cambridge Darwin Correspondence Project, Letter No. 8118B.
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Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty’s Ships Adventure and Beagle, between the Years 1826 and 1836, Describing their Examination of the Southern Shores of the South America, and the Beagle’s Circumnavigation of the Globe.

Darwin, Charles. Fitzroy, Robert, and King, Philip Barker. London: Henry Colburn, 1839. 3 vols. in 4 (vol. 2 having a separate appendix), 8vo, xxviii, [iv], [1]-559, 556-597 pp. with 17 engraved plates and 3 folding maps; xiv, [2] [1]-694, [2] pp. with 25 engraved plates and 2 folding maps; viii, 352 pp. with 6 engraved plates and 2 folding maps; [iii]-xiv, 629, [1], [609]-615 pp. with 2 folding maps. In total 9 folding maps (all now bound in) and 48 plates and charts. A very good copy with minimal wear and a few repaired tears to the folding maps, rebound sympathetically and well in half speckled calf and marbled boards, backstrips elaborately gilt with morocco labels and raised bands, in two slipcases. First edition, first issue of the account of the most famous voyage in the history biological science. Volume III is the first issue of Darwin’s Journal, his first published book, containing the observations and fieldwork that would form the basis for On the Origin of Species. "The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin’s intellectual life and in the history of biological science. Darwin sailed with no formal scientific training. He returned a hard-headed man of science, knowing the importance of evidence, almost convinced that species had not always been as they were since the creation but had undergone change. (DSB III, 566). Darwin’s Journal, "is one of the most interesting records of natural history exploration ever written and is one of the most important, for it was on this voyage that Darwin prepared for his lifework, ultimately leading to The Origin of Species" (Hill 104-5). Vol.1 contains Captain King’s account of the first voyage, which surveyed the coasts of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego; Vol 2., with the appendix, contains Captain Fitzroy’s account of the second voyage of the Beagle which visited Brazil, Argentina, Tierra del Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Galapagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia among other islands and countries. A beautiful copy of these incomparably important books. Freeman 10. Hill 104-105. Norman 584.
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Algae and Corallines of the Bay and Harbour of New York, Illustrated with Natural Types.

Durant, C[harles]. New York: George P. Putnam, 1850. 4to, 43, 2 pp. and 40 leaves with 195 mounted specimens plus 11 duplicates laid in separately, plus 2 additional large specimens collected by Durant laid-in each inscribed by his daughter Emma Durant with a 2pp. ALs from her presenting "the last copy of the book I know of" to "an appreciative friend of the author". Publisher’s burgundy pebble-grain morocco, ornately gilt, backstrip and corners restored pre 1928 (mentioned in the A.L.s). Box. One of fifty copies printed of which only a few were finished with the mounted specimens. The first work on algology printed in America, this is the family copy with additional inserted specimens and a handwritten letter by the author’s daughter about the book. The author Charles Durant is better known as the the first successful American balloonist, ascending on September 9, 1830 from New York’s Castle Garden and scattering copies of poem he had written on the joys of flight from on high. After his marriage in 1837 he was convinced to give up the dangerous pursuit and instead won renown as the fabricator of the first American native silk, opened a lithography business, entered politics, and began collecting seaweed. The admiring press reported that "Mr Durant has waded at least a thousand miles in the waters of the New York Bay to procure these specimens, and has expended upwards of two thousand hours in their preparation". He was compared with Audubon. Published at $100 a copy, it is estimated that only around 15 copies were completed with the mounted specimens. 13 copies have been located in institutions; only two have appeared at auction in the past century.
Grand Canyon of Arizona From Hermit Rim Road.

Grand Canyon of Arizona From Hermit Rim Road.

Moran, Thomas. New York: 1912. Elephant folio chromolithograph print, 34 1/4 x 25 inches, plus margins. In fine condition, beautifully archivally framed. According to Graham Arader, this magnificent print was published by the American Lithography Company of New York City in an edition of 2,500 copies. "At the time, Moran was the nation’s best known landscape painter, noted especially for his depictions of the Far West and its parks and monuments. The Santa Fe Railway was the first to lay a line to the Grand Canyon, in 1901. To promote tourism, Santa Fe officials later had copies of this lithograph framed and distributed to schools, libraries, civic organizations, and railroad customers throughout the country.To the great majority of Americans who did not have the resources or daring to travel to the West, Moran provided this image of the country’s infinite potential as symbolized by its dramatic, unique landscape. The artist showed American expansion as a fated conclusion, a glorious destiny indelibly written in the literal stone of the country’s landscape. . Yet for all of his nostalgia, Moran was a realist. He recognized that the beauty of the West needed no embellishment, and his portrayals and views of the West presented it as it was." The Reese Co. adds of their example: "This majestic print is the largest and most dramatic of Thomas Moran’s printed works. It was published by the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad in 1912, after the original oil commissioned for (and still owned by) the line. It shows a tremendous sweep of the scenery of the Grand Canyon from the Hermit Rim, with the bright colors of the Canyon shown dramatically against the turbulent sky. Thomas Moran, famous for his superb landscapes of the West, first painted the Grand Canyon in 1873 when he painted his "Chasm of the Colorado," which he sold to Congress the following year. In 1892 he visited the Canyon as a guest of the Santa Fe Railroad, whose line now brought tourists within easy reach, and painted a large canvas for the line in return for a free trip. The Santa Fe Railroad completed a spur line to the rim in 1901, and consistently sponsored "artist’s excursions" there from 1901 to 1912, as well as purchasing paintings to serve as a basis for promotional efforts. In 1912 the railroad capped twenty years of association with Moran by commissioning this picture and producing this large chromolithograph. Almost all copies of this Moran print were soon distributed by the Santa Fe Railroad as a promotional gift. Few of these have survived, generally being badly framed, usually without glass, and displayed in poor conditions."
The Writings. Uniform Edition.

The Writings. Uniform Edition.

Wilde, Oscar. London and New York: A.R. Keller, 1907. 15 vols., 8vo, illustrations in every volume. Original de luxe binding of half dark green morocco, gilt tops, backstrips uniformly ages to brown, gilt decorations and lettering still bright. In all, a very good set Limited to 800 sets, usually found in cloth, within which this is the Florentine edition limited to 450 sets in a special binding. The contents are: [v.1] A house of pomegranates. The happy prince, and other tales.-[v.2] Lady Windermere’s fan. The importance of being earnest.-[v.3] Lord Arthur Savile’s crime. The portrait of Mr. W.H., and other stories.-[v.4] Poems, including Ravenna, The ballad of Reading Gaol, The sphinx, etc., with an introd. by Richard Le Gallienne.-[v.5] The picture of Dorian Gray.-[v.6] Intentions.-[v.7] A woman of no importance. An ideal husband.-[v.8] Essays, criticisms and reviews.-[v.9] What never dies; a romance by Barbey d’Aurevilly translated into English by Sebastian Melmoth (Oscar Wilde).-[v.10] Epigrams: phrases and philosophies for the use of the young.-[v.11] Salome. The Duchess of Padua. Vera.-[v. 12] Poems in prose.-[v.13] De profundis, from the original unexpurgated German edition, translated by Henry Zick.-[v.14] Essays and stories by Lady Wilde (Speranza).-[v.15] His life, with a critical estimate of his writings. The illus. to Salome in v.11 are by Aubrey Beardsley.
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An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations.

Smith, Adam. Dublin: Printed for Messrs. Whitestone, Chamberlaine, Watson, et al., 1776. 3 vols., 8vo, [viii], [1]-391; [viii-, [1]-524, [3, ads]; [iv], [1]-412 pp. Diced calf with gilt rules, recently rebacked. Lady Davy’s bookplate and inscription in each vol., purple ink signature of a later owner upon each bookplate, occasional marginal staining, closed tear to p.259 of vol. 3. Preserved in an archival clamshell box. The Adam Smith-John Playfair-Humphry Davy copy, an incomparable association. First Dublin edition, the only edition printed in the same year as the first (London) 1776. Lady Davy’s copy with her bookplate and ink inscription in each volume stating the books were given by Adam Smith to John Playfair. As a tangible record of the connections between these three influential Enlightenment figures this book is intriguing. Adam Smith (1723-1790), who established the foundations of modern economics with this book, and John Playfair (1748-1819), the mathematician and geologist, were friends in later life. They both belonged to the Oyster Club in Edinburgh and each owned copies of the other’s books. Smith’s library catalogue lists a presentation copy from Playfair and the sale catalogue (1820) of Playfair’s library includes books by Smith (but not this one). Jane Davy, formerly Apreece (1780-1855), was a well-known and widely-travelled literary hostess. As a young, wealthy widow she rejected a proposal of marriage from John Playfair in favour of Humphry Davy (1778-1829), whom she married in 1812 a few days after he had received his knighthood. The binding style with wove paper endpapers and diced calf boards postdates Smith’s death in 1790. The first volume has the binders ticket ‘Lycett Nelson Street (City Road)’ and records show that the firm was declared bankrupt in 1829 making it possible that Jane Davy received the book perhaps as a gift from Playfair during their courtship or on his death. Both Playfair and Davy visited London and could have commissioned the binding.This copy is the only evidence we have that Smith owned a copy of this Dublin edition, which appeared in the same year as the first and is the only other edition printed in that year but surely Lady Davy’s attestation suffices. The copy has a small ink correction to page 368 in vol. 3. This correction was not made to the printed text until the 4th edition. Smith was known to make authorial marginal notes in books; though the hand that made this correction cannot be known, it is unlikely that anyone else would have felt emboldened to emend the great man’s text. More about the relationships between Adam Smith and John Playfair, and John Playfair and Jane Davy remains to be discovered, stimulated by the discovery of this extraordinary association copy. A fascinating copy of a great Enlightenment text. PMM 221.
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The celebrated library of Boies Penrose Esq, FSA, FRGS, removed from Barbados Hill, Devon, Pennsylvania. The first portion: Travel & exploration, navigation & trade, A-L § The second portion: travel & exploration, navigation & trade, M-Z; Fourteen geographical manuscripts, English & Continental books of the fifteenth, sixteenth & seventeenth centuries

Pensrose, Boies (collection) London: Sotheby, 1971. Two vols., (2) 106 (4) pp., [4] leaves of plates, text illustrations: 161 (3) pp. (some folding), folding color frontispiece, [9] leaves plates, text illustrations. Original green boards. The Stonehill copy with a few minor markings. Robin Halwas noted of his set: "Fine collection of pre-1641 travel and exploration, containing a manuscript of Sir John Mandevilles’ travels in English (extracted from the Clopton Manuscript, a devotional miscellany, c. 1403-1425; now Princeton University, R.H. Taylor Ms 10), a 1520 manuscript by Marco Polo, an early 15th-century manuscript of Chaucer’s Treatise on the astrolabe (ex-E.P. Goldschmidt; now Toshiyuki Takamiya Collection, Japan), the Basel Columbus Letter of 1494, and important maps and atlases. A magnificent English manuscript map of Guiana of c. 1596-1599 was bought by the Duke of Northumberland. Penrose commenced collecting in 1926 and had sold books previously at Sotheby’s in 1934 and at Parke-Bernet in 1945-1947. Percy Muir, "Private Libraries, VII: Boies Penrose" in The Times Literary Supplement, 17 September 1938, p.604; cf. Donald C. Dickinson, Dictionary of American Book Collectors (New York 1986), pp.256-257; William H. Helfand, in Grolier 2000: a further Grolier Club biographical retrospective (New York 2000), pp.284-286." Of interest is that the highest price at the sale was paid by Colin Franklin, closely followed by Ken Nebenzahl and Bernard Breslauer. Sadly auction houses no longer publish prices and buyers, just prices.