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Invitation to private reception following Whitman's lecture

Invitation to private reception following Whitman’s lecture, "The Death of Abraham Lincoln"

Whitman, Walt; [Lincoln, Abraham] Invitation to Walt Whitman’s private reception after his celebrated lecture, "The Death of Abraham Lincoln," at Madison Square Theatre on April 14, 1887. Whitman had given public readings of his Lincoln lecture, variously edited, since 1879; one version was published in Specimen Days in 1882-1883. Scheduled on the twenty-second anniversary of Lincoln’s assassination, the 1887 event was staged as a benefit for the ailing Whitman, who remained seated throughout his sold-out tribute to the Union’s "Martyr Chief": "there is a cement to the whole people, subtler, more underlying, than any thing in written constitution, or courts or armies – namely, the cement of a death identified thoroughly with that people, at its head, and for its sake." As William Pannapacker notes, Whitman’s passionate public identification with Lincoln was central to his emergence as "The Good Gray Poet," a national treasure: "Whitman’s experiments in self-creation finally succeeded with a major segment of the public when he enclosed his persona within the halo encircling the martyred President" (Revised Lives, 22). The New York audience for Whitman’s performance included Mark Twain, John Hay, Augustus St. Gaudens, James Russell Lowell, and Charles Eliot Norton; Andrew Carnegie could not make it, but purchased a box for $350. At the end of his performance, Whitman was surprised by a gift of lilacs from poet E.C. Stedman’s young granddaughter, a reference to his great elegy for Lincoln, "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d." In New York City for a single night, Whitman hosted a reception in his rooms at the Westminster Hotel after the lecture; this invitation was printed for the occasion. The evening was an important one for New York literary society, a celebration "at least as spectacular as the event itself," according to the New York Sun. Looking "like a painting of Jove," Whitman entertained a constant stream of admirers, relieved only by the performance of the Afro-Cuban violinist Claudio Brindis de Salas Garrido, "El Paganini Negro," who serenaded Whitman on a seventeenth-century Ruggeri violin: "Walt was mightily pleased with the music." A surprising survival, a near-fine artifact of the nineteenth-century American literary scene. Ivory card, measuring 2.75 x 3.75 inches, printed recto only: "Walt Whitman / At Home — Thursday Evening / April 14th 1887 / Westminster Hotel, Irving Place and 16th St., New York." Penciled bookseller note to verso: "April 14, 1887 for his most famous lecture (Lincoln) / WW in NY for only one (1) night." Card lightly toned; half-inch closed tear to head, expertly repaired. Housed in envelope fragment with penciled inventory number, bookseller note, and collector’s note: "Whitman card / gift from Capt. Cohn — / House of Books / Aug 7 1950.".
Letters from a Cat. Published by Her Mistress for the Benefit of All Cats and the Amusement of Little Children

Letters from a Cat. Published by Her Mistress for the Benefit of All Cats and the Amusement of Little Children

H.H. [Jackson, Helen Hunt]; Ledyard, Addie (illustrator) Early edition of this illustrated children’s book by Helen Hunt Jackson, best remembered for her popular 1884 novel Ramona. In 1836, Jackson’s mother mailed her five-year-old daughter, then traveling, a series of letters in the voice of the family cat: "until I grew to be a big girl, I never doubted but that Pussy printed them all alone by herself, after dark." Decades later, Jackson revisited the letters, which record Pussy’s adventures and misadventures back home: she is frightened by an unusually thorough house cleaning, befriended by a "splendid black cat" named Caesar, and injured by a fall into the "soft, slimy, sticky" soap barrel, which burns off her fur. In Jackson’s introduction, she recalls her devotion to her childhood pet, whose death was a turning point in her childhood: "My kind mother offered to get another kitten for me, but I did not want one. . . . I was as true to my Pussy as she was to me; and from that day to this, I have never had another Pussy!" Widely reprinted, Letters from a Cat first appeared in 1879 (BAL 10438). A near-fine copy. Small quarto, measuring 7.5 x 6 inches. Original green pictorial cloth stamped in gilt and black, grey floral endpapers. Decorative headpieces throughout text, seventeen black and white illustrations. Presentation inscription to flyleaf. Corners and spine ends lightly bumped, occasional smudge to text.
China Days. Temple Hill Cut-Outs

China Days. Temple Hill Cut-Outs

BOOK ARTS] Handmade scrapbook created by Chinese students at the Ai Dao Bible School, a Presbyterian mission affiliated with the Chefoo School at Temple Hill in Shandong Province, China. Students produced the distinctive "cut-outs of Temple Hill," based on "figures of animals, plants, insects, dragons, etc., cut by the women of Shantung for unknown generations," creating souvenir paper goods to benefit the mission. Most of the surviving Temple Hill books are short collections of Chinese myths and folklore; this volume, entitled China Days, is one of the much scarcer Temple Hill folios, with a broader focus. The volume features cut-paper vignettes to first and last pages, and ten chapters illustrated with dozens of individual hand-cut designs: Landscapes, Travel and Transportation, Customs and Habits (including a printed chart and letterpress description of the Chinese Birth-Year Cycle), Occupations, Curios and Curiosities, Chow and How! (including printed recipes), Chinese Expressions, Chinese Children, Myths and Legends (including many of the tales included in the smaller myths and folklore collections), and My Chinese Friends. Especially striking are the colorful designs created with silk inlays. A stunning near-fine example of traditional Chinese paper arts. Oblong folio, measuring 14 x 10.5 inches. Contemporary flexible boards covered in gold silk brocade with red stitching. Letterpress description of "the cut-outs of Temple Hill" mounted to front pastedown. 42 pages, 24 of which are decorated with tissue-guarded hand-cut black and red paper designs (many inlaid with colored silk), and one letterpress page of traditional Chinese recipes, interleaved with blanks. Pastedown endpapers cracked, occasional light offsetting from cut paper designs.
Shonen Tanteitan

Shonen Tanteitan, "Juvenile Detective"; Sherlock Holmes in Japanese]

Doyle, Arthur Conan; Leblanc, Maurice; McCulley, Johnston; Kikuchi, Kan (translator); Shigeru, Hatsuyama (designer); Toshi, Michioka (illustrator); Nobuo, Imamura (illustrator); Seihachiro, Emori (illustrator) Illustrated edition of three popular mysteries, one each from America, England, and France, including what is likely the earliest Japanese translation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sign of Four, published for the use of schoolchildren. This collection is Volume 45 in the short-lived but ambitious series Shogakusei Zenshu, "Complete Works for Primary School Students," which ran to 88 volumes between 1927 and 1928. Sherlock Holmes had been a wildly popular character in Japan since the first translation of The Return of Sherlock Holmes in 1926, followed by this edition of Sign of Four and a second translation of the same novel by Ken Nobuhara the same year (Universal Sherlock Holmes). While only one story in this volume is by Doyle, two feature Holmes. The first story is "The Hollow Needle," Maurice Leblanc’s tale of Arsène Lupin, a gentleman burglar who serves as a nemesis to Sherlock Holmes (changed to "Holmlock Shears" after Doyle’s objection). Holmes and Lupin each get the better of the other by turns, yet the central storyline follows a boy of seventeen, a detective in the making. The second story, "Subway Sam," features a New York City pickpocket, a modern Robin Hood figure created by Johnston McCulley, a prolific mystery writer for the pulps and creator of Zorro. The final story is Doyle’s Sign of Four, in which Mary Morstan asks Holmes’s help in solving a mystery of murders, pearls, and the Agra treasure. This translation begins at the very end of Doyle’s chapter one, when Mary Morstan’s card is presented – leaving out the opening discussion of Holmes’s cocaine use and Watson’s alcoholic brother. The translator of this edition, Kan Kikuchi, was a successful writer whose play Madame Pearl (about a woman attempting to overcome the limits of her patriarchal society) brought him national acclaim. He went on to found two of the most influential literary prizes in Japan, the Akutagawa and the Naoki Prizes. OCLC locates only two copies, one in the University of Minnesota’s Sherlock Holmes collection and the other at the National Diet of Japan. Text in Japanese. A very good copy of a scarce title, an early appearance of one of modern Japan’s most beloved Western characters. Single volume, 8.75 x. 5.75 inches, [6], 246, [6] pp. Original half blue cloth over color pictorial wrappers depicting a stylized Sherlock Holmes and Mary Morstan, blue cloth ornamented and lettered in black and gilt, purple pictorial endpapers. Illustrated title page printed in magenta, two full-page color plates of the first and second stories, and 25 full-page black-and-white plates. Some foxing to rear wrapper and endpapers, mild rubbing.
A Midsummer-Night's Dream

A Midsummer-Night’s Dream

Shakespeare, William; Rackham, Arthur (illustrator) Signed limited first edition, number 701 of 1000 copies, of illustrator Arthur Rackham’s legendary treatment of A Midsummer-Night’s Dream: "And as imagination bodies forth / The forms of things unknown, the poet’s pen / Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing / A local habitation and a name." Rackham was at his best in imagining the personality and play of fairies. His famous color plates capture the elegant hauteur of Titania, the impish plotting of Puck, and the comic confusion of Bottom, but the success of the book stems as much from Rackham’s vignettes and frames, glimpses of the fairy mischief on the margins of Shakespeare’s world. A very good example of a classic gift book, one of the high spots of the Golden Age of Illustration. Quarto, measuring 11.5 x 9 inches: [6], 134, [2]. Original full vellum, front board lettered and decorated in gilt with tree design, spine lettered in gilt, top edge gilt, all other edges uncut, stiff brown endpapers. Half-title, with limitation signed by Rackham on verso. Title page printed in brown and black. Frontispiece and 39 full-page color plates tipped onto heavy brown paper with printed tissue guards; dozens of black-and-white illustrations, including full-page designs, vignettes, frames, headpieces and tailpieces. Lacking silk ties. Light soiling to binding and toning to spine, some toning to pages adjacent to brown paper leaves.
Hansel and Gretel

Hansel and Gretel, and Other Stories by the Brothers Grimm

Grimm, Jacob and Wilhelm; Nielsen, Kay (illustrator) Signed limited first edition of Kay Nielsen’s illustrated tales from the Brothers Grimm, number 12 of 600 copies. Danish-born Nielsen was one of the most popular artists of the Golden Age of Illustration, creating dynamic new interpretations of classic works for the flourishing gift-book market of the early twentieth century. His distinctive style, often flat and minimalist, nevertheless creates depth through his unexpected use of color and playful attention to texture. Publishers Hodder and Stoughton open this collection with "Hansel and Gretel," accompanied by Nielsen’s eerie depiction of the children approaching the candy cottage; other classic fairy tales included are "Rumpelstiltskin," "Rapunzel," and "Snowdrop," the inspiration for Snow White. A beautiful, near-fine copy. Single volume, measuring 11.75 x 9.5 inches: [10], 276. Publisher’s full white pictorial cloth, front board stamped in gilt and blue with design by Nielsen, spine decorated in gilt and blue, top edge gilt, patterned red and gilt endpapers designed by Nielsen. Limitation page signed by Nielsen, followed by half title. Title page printed in red and black. Frontispiece and eleven full-page tipped-in color illustrations with printed tissue guards, twelve full-page black-and-white illustrations, and historiated initials printed in red and black. Light soiling to cloth, spine toned and spotted. Housed in custom blue cloth clamshell box with red morocco spine label.
Stories from Hans Andersen

Stories from Hans Andersen

Andersen, Hans Christian; Dulac, Edmund (illustrator) Signed limited first edition, number 389 of 750 copies signed by illustrator Edmund Dulac. With the exception of the folktales recorded by the Brothers Grimm, no European fairy tales have been more influential than those of Danish-born storyteller Hans Christian Andersen. Among the tales included here are "The Snow Queen," "The Emperor’s New Clothes," and "The Real Princess," better known as "The Princess and the Pea:" "Nobody but a real princess could have such a delicate skin." Dulac’s characteristically saturated images feature stylistic nods to Chinese and Japanese art; his illustrations for "The Little Mermaid" are particularly celebrated. A very good copy of a classic Golden Age gift book. Quarto, measuring 12 x 10 inches: [2], viii, 250, [2]. Original full vellum, front board and spine lettered and stamped in gilt with design by Dulac, ties renewed, olive-patterned pictorial endpapers, top edge gilt, all other edges uncut. Limitation page signed by Dulac before frontispiece, title page printed in olive and black. Frontispiece and 27 full-page color plates tipped onto pages with frames printed in olive; text also framed in olive, with ornamental headpieces and tailpieces. Light soiling to vellum; a number of pages marked with faint traces of flowers once pressed inside the book. Housed in custom blue cloth clamshell box with red morocco spine label.
Yours Truly: My Autograph Album
The Arthur Rackham Fairy Book: A Book of Old Favourites with New Illustrations

The Arthur Rackham Fairy Book: A Book of Old Favourites with New Illustrations

Rackham, Arthur (illustrator); (Andersen, Hans Christian); (Grimm, Jacob and Wilhelm); (Irving, Washington); (Perrault, Charles) Signed limited first edition of this collection of fairy tales from around the world, number 444 of 460 copies signed by illustrator Arthur Rackham. Stories from The Arabian Nights, including "Sindbad the Sailor" and "The Story of Aladdin," appear beside European fairy tales like "Beauty and the Beast," "The Ugly Duckling," "Cinderella," "Little Red Riding-Hood," and "Hansel and Grethel." Also featured are the traditional English folktale "Jack and the Beanstalk" and Washington Irving’s American legend, "Rip Van Winkle." In his introduction, Rackham praises the imaginative legacy of these "old favourites" of the nursery: "their incidents, characters, and even phrases have become part of our everyday thought and expression, and help to shape our lives." Rackham’s intricate, otherworldly illustrations, rendered in rich muted tones, tie the wide-ranging tales together. A near-fine copy. Octavo, measuring 9 x 6 inches: 287, [1]. Original full vellum, front board lettered and triple-ruled in gilt, spine lettered and illustrated in gilt, pictorial endpapers printed in gold, top edge gilt, all other edges uncut, brown silk ribbon marker. Half title with limitation signed by Rackham on verso. Color frontispiece and seven full-page color plates on glossy paper; black-and-white illustrations throughout text, many full page. Faint spotting to binding, spine gently toned. Housed in custom blue cloth clamshell box with red morocco spine label.
A Song of the English

A Song of the English

Kipling, Rudyard; Robinson, W. Heath (illustrator) Autograph Edition de Luxe of Rudyard Kipling’s verse tribute to the British Empire, number 24 of only 50 copies signed by Kipling. "A Song of the English" first appeared in 1893 in the English Illustrated Magazine, along with six companion poems: "The Coastwise Lights," "The Song of the Dead," "The Deep-Sea Cables," "The Song of the Sons," "The Song of the Cities," and "England’s Answer." The series was collected in The Seven Seas in 1896, and reprinted in 1909 in this Autograph Edition de Luxe of 50 copies, alongside a limited edition of 500 copies signed by illustrator W. Heath Robinson and the trade edition. Hearkening back to Francis Drake and the Age of Discovery, Kipling glorifies the English spirit of exploration: "We have strawed our best to the weed’s unrest / To the shark and the sheering gull. / If blood be the price of admiralty, / Lord God, we ha’ paid in full!" Kipling’s fervor is reflected in W. Heath Robinson’s vibrant illustrations of seafaring and shipwreck. Perhaps most striking are the images of colonial cities — Bombay, Rangoon, Quebec, Capetown, Sydney, and others – imagined as indolent young women awaiting their English master. A near-fine example of a popular touchstone of British imperialism, signed by Kipling. Large quarto, measuring 12 x 9.5 inches: [124]. Original brown pigskin, spine lettered and decorated in gilt, upper board double-ruled in gilt with central device of rosebush rooted in book, helmet, sword, and musket, with English crown supported in branches. Top edge gilt, other edges uncut. Limitation signed by Rudyard Kipling facing half title, pictorial title page printed in red and black. Frontispiece and twenty-nine color plates mounted within printed color pictorial frames, captioned tissue guards, black and white illustrations throughout text. Traces of insect damage to endpapers only, a few light abrasions to upper board. Housed in custom blue cloth clamshell box with red morocco spine label.
Archive of original midcentury porcelain designs
Walt. The Good Gray Poet Speaks for Himself
Comus

Comus

Milton, John; Rackham, Arthur (illustrator) Signed limited edition, number 540 of 550 copies signed by Rackham, of his treatment of John Milton’s 1634 Comus (A Masque Presented at Ludlow Castle), in which the enchanter of the title kidnaps a principled young woman and attempts to corrupt her: "List, Lady: be not coy, and be not cosen’d / With that same vaunted name Virginity; / Beauty is natures coyn, must not be hoorded, / But must be currant." Milton’s drama of chastity triumphing over license may seem an odd choice for Rackham, but the poem’s dense classical allusions and invocation of "the pert Fairies and the dapper Elves" inspired some of the illustrator’s most beautiful work, as in his portrait of "root-bound" Daphne fleeing Apollo. A very good example of a classic Golden Age gift book. Quarto, measuring 11.5 x 9 inches: xviii, 76, [2]. Original vellum spine lettered in gilt, pictorial gilt-stamped parchment boards, pale blue and white pictorial endpapers, top edge gilt, all other edges uncut, text block partially unopened. Half-title, with limitation signed by Rackham on verso; pictorial title page. Frontispiece and 23 full-page color plates tipped onto heavy brown paper with printed tissue guards; dozens of black-and-white illustrations, including full-page designs, vignettes, frames, headpieces and tailpieces. Binding toned with small stray mark to base of upper board, light pink line to verso of front free endpaper.
The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors

The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even. A Typographic Version by Richard Hamilton of Marcel Duchamp’s Green Box, Translated by George Heard Hamilton. With: presentation card from dedicatees Bill and Noma Copley

Duchamp, Marcel; Hamilton, Richard (designer); Hamilton, George Heard (translator); [Copley, William and Noma] First edition of this English translation and typographical interpretation of Marcel Duchamp’s Green Box, a collection of ninety-three notes related to his ambitious sculpture The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), assembled between 1915 and 1923. A decade after the sculpture’s completion, Duchamp oversaw the first printed edition of Green Box, with each of his original notes meticulously reproduced in collotype, hand-torn to size, and issued loose. In 1960, pop artist Richard Hamilton produced this English translation of Green Box, using typography and graphic design to communicate the variety of the original collection of ephemera in a new format. Duchamp praised the result: "We are crazy about the book. Your labour of love has given birth to a monster of veracity and a crystalline [transubstantiation] of the French Green Box . . . The Bride must be blossoming ever more." Laid into this copy is a presentation card from the edition’s dedicatees Bill and Noma Copley, printed with their Montlhéry address outside Paris, and inscribed in ink: "Greetings from Bill & Noma." A longtime friend of Duchamp, Bill Copley was a noted American painter, art dealer and collector, whose circle also included Man Ray, Max Ernst, and René Magritte. A near-fine copy, with an excellent Surrealist association. Octavo, measuring 9 x 6 inches: [122]. Original green paper boards lettered in black and white dots. Text printed in black, orange, and blue. Illustrated with photolithographed annotations and vignettes, full-page drawings, diagrams, photographs of Duchamp’s work (including one folding plate), and musical notation. Appendices at rear. Inscribed presentation card from dedicatees Bill and Noma Copley laid in. Top two inches of front board sunned, lightest edgewear.
Undine

Undine

De La Motte Fouqué, Friedrich; Rackham, Arthur (illustrator); Courtney, W.L. (translator) Signed limited first edition, number 425 of 1000 copies, of Arthur Rackham’s illustrated version of this German tale, first published in 1811. Celebrated for his depictions of fairy creatures, Rackham is ideally suited for this tale of a water spirit seeking a soul: "below sparkle, stately and solemn, many noble ruins, washed by the loving waters which win from them delicate moss-flowers and entwining clusters of sea-grass. Those who dwell there are very fair." Rackham’s wave designs, in particular, lend a Japanese woodblock-inspired Art Nouveau element to the work, as in the image of Undine sinking into the Danube. A near-fine example of the best of the Golden Age of Illustration. Quarto, measuring 11.5 x 9 inches: viii, 136. Original full vellum, front board lettered and decorated in gilt with vignette by Rackham, spine elaborately ornamented in gilt, top edge gilt, other edges uncut, stiff brown endpapers. Half-title, with limitation signed by Rackham on verso. Title page printed in green and black. Frontispiece and fourteen full-page color plates tipped onto heavy brown paper with printed tissue guards; black-and-white headpieces and tailpieces by Rackham throughout text. Lacking silk ties. Light bowing and soiling to boards, with a few faint abrasions, some toning to pages adjacent to brown paper leaves.
The Poetic Reader

The Poetic Reader, Containing Selections from the most approved authors, designed for Exercises in Reading, Singing, Parsing, Hermeneutics, Rhetoric and Punctuation; to which are prefixed Directions for Reading

Emerson, Joseph (editor); Milton, John; Pope, Alexander; Young, Edward; Goldsmith, Oliver; Gray, Thomas; Cowper, William; Thomson, James; Byron, George Gordon, Lord; Coleridge, Samuel Taylor First edition of American educator Joseph Emerson’s Poetic Reader, a collection of literary selections designed to be read aloud. Influenced by the work of English reformer Hannah More, Emerson and his wife Rebecca Hasseltine founded an academically rigorous women’s seminary in 1816, moving the school to Wethersfield, Connecticut in the 1820s. The seminary trained young women as teachers, providing a systematic, advanced curriculum for female students at a time when a woman’s education was considered primarily ornamental. Emerson’s progressive approach influenced Mount Holyoke founder Mary Lyon, who counted Emily Dickinson at one point among her students. The Poetic Reader opens with lengthy instructions on how to read aloud in public, including notes on articulation, stress, and cadence. Nearly two hundred reading exercises follow, passages drawn from popular English poets including John Milton, Alexander Pope, and Thomas Gray: "Full many a flow’r is born to blush unseen, / And waste its sweetness on the desert air." A very good copy, rarely seen in acceptable condition. Octavo, measuring 8 x 5 inches: 95, [1]. Contemporary three-quarter sheep, marbled boards, spine lettered and double-ruled in gilt, all edges speckled blue. Wear to spine, first blank excised, with part of the clean cut affecting gutter of title page, dampstain in gutter of title page, text block with expected light embrowning and infrequent foxing.
Mirror for Magistrates (three volumes); WITH: The Palace of Pleasure (three volumes)

Mirror for Magistrates (three volumes); WITH: The Palace of Pleasure (three volumes)

Shakespeare, William]; Haslewood, Joseph (editor) Deluxe large-paper reissues of two classic sixteenth-century source texts, the inspiration for some of the most important Elizabethan and Jacobean plays. Featuring chapters by a number of English poets, Mirror for Magistrates was at first suppressed by the Lord Chancellor in 1555, then published under Elizabeth in 1559, and expanded by new contributors over the decades to come. The anthology offers pointed verse portraits of historic rulers, good and bad, with an eye to instructing those in power; Philip Sidney, in his Defence of Poesy, recommends "Mirrour of Magistrates meetly furnished of beautiful parts." The chapter on "Queene Cordila" served as a key source for Shakespeare’s King Lear: "I must assay your friendly faithes to prove: / My daughters, tell mee how you doe mee love." The Palace of Pleasure, first published in 1566 by William Painter, and expanded in subsequent editions, translates dozens of sensational tales from Continental sources, including the first English translations of Boccaccio’s Decameron and Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptameron. The anthology provided English playwrights with a rich supply of plots, inspiring The Rape of Lucrece, Titus Andronicus, Romeo and Juliet, All’s Well That Ends Well, Timon of Athens, The Duchess of Malfi, Love’s Cruelty, Insatiate Countess, and The Revenger’s Tragedy. As the Cambridge History of English Literature observes: "it would be difficult to find a plot that has not had its origin, or its counterpart, in Painter’s treasure-house." Sixteenth-century editions of Mirror for Magistrates and The Palace of Pleasure are exceptionally scarce. Editor Joseph Haslewood, a founder of the Roxburghe Club, strove to bring neglected Renaissance texts to the attention of nineteenth-century readers and collectors; these lavishly produced sets, issued in editions of 150 copies, were part of his mission. These volumes were splendidly bound by Charles Lewis, "the leading figure in English binding of the first years of the nineteenth century" (Maggs 1075). A fine collection of Shakespearean source material. Six quarto volumes, contemporary full brown crushed morocco gilt, gilt-ruled blindtooled boards, raised bands decorated in gilt, spine compartments decorated in blind, maroon endpapers, all edges gilt. Letterpress titles in Mirror for Magistrates printed in red and black, decorative engraved titles throughout all three volumes, small woodcut vignettes in Volume III; two engraved half-titles in Palace of Pleasure. Crease to front free endpaper of first volume of Mirror for Magistrates, lightest occasional foxing.
Notes on Nursing: What It Is

Notes on Nursing: What It Is, and What It Is Not

Nightingale, Florence; [Hayhurst, Susan] Early American printing of Florence Nightingale’s classic treatise on the care of the sick, the copy of Susan Hayhurst, the first female pharmacist in the United States. Nightingale’s brisk common sense is fully on display in Notes on Nursing, a treatise aimed not at medical professionals, but at women nursing ailing family members at home. Nightingale stresses the importance of fresh air, light, cleanliness, and quiet in the sickroom, and offers pointed advice on diet: "To leave the patient’s untasted food by his side, from meal to meal, in hopes that he will eat it in the interval is simply to prevent him from taking any food at all." Notes on Nursing was an immediate success in England when it appeared in 1859; the first American edition, in 1860, was similarly well-received. The owner of this 1861 printing, the Quaker Susan Hayhurst, earned her degree in medicine from the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1857. A lifelong public health educator, she chaired the Committee of Supplies of the Pennsylvania Relief Association during the Civil War. In 1883, Hayhurst became the first woman to receive a pharmacy degree in the United States, going on to mentor generations of women pharmacists at the Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia until her death in 1909. A very good copy of a classic work of nursing, bringing together two pioneering women in medicine. Single volume, measuring 7.75 x 4.75 inches: (3), 4-140, (4). Original full brown textured cloth, boards blind-ruled and lettered in gilt, pale yellow coated endpapers. Four pages of publisher’s advertisements at rear. Bookplate of Susan Hayhurst to front pastedown, early ownership stamp of A.M. Fullerton to front free endpaper. Light spotting and rubbing to binding, especially spine ends; upper hinge weak; short closed tear to gutter of front free endpaper.
The Colloquies

The Colloquies, or Familiar Discourses of Desiderius Erasmus of Roterdam, Rendered into English

Erasmus, Desiderius; "H.M. Gent" (translator, Henry More or Henry Munday) First edition in English of the complete Colloquia Familiaria of Erasmus, first published in 1518 and expanded by Erasmus over the next fifteen years, a lively collection of Latin dialogues that found a readership far beyond the Renaissance schoolroom. Originally intended to model colloquial conversation for students of Latin, the dialogues feature pointed, free-thinking exchanges on modern political, religious, and philosophical questions. In "Of the Abbot and Learned Woman," an ignorant abbot tries and fails to get the better of the classically educated Magdalia, a character almost certainly based on Thomas More’s eldest daughter: "I think thou art some sophistress, thou protest so wittily." Magdalia: "I will not tell thee, what I think thou art." And later: "I have often heard it usually spoken, that a wise woman is twice a fool." Magdalia: "Indeed it useth to be said so, but by fools." The Colloquia Familiaria was widely read and debated across Europe, drawing immediate notice for its anticlerical satire: "its influence on the dialogues of Reformation Germany and Tudor England is a critical commonplace" (Zlatar, Reformation Fictions, 11). The original purpose of the Colloquies as a text for teaching Latin postponed its direct translation; this first complete English edition was published more than 150 years after the work’s first appearance. The edition opens with a short life of Erasmus, and concludes with the first appearance in English of De utilitate colloquiorum, Erasmus’s 1526 defense of the Colloquies, published after the Sorbonne condemned the book for impiety. In response, Erasmus makes a case for the educational value of his dialogues’ humor: "I cannot tell whether any thing be learned more successfully than that which is learned in playing." Despite his efforts, the Colloquies would remain on the Papal Index of banned books through the end of the nineteenth century. Wing E-3190; PMM 53. A very good copy of a humanist landmark, in a handsome contemporary binding. Octavo, measuring 6.5 x 4.25 inches: [8], 555, [1]. Contemporary Cambridge-style full speckled calf, boards ruled and ornamented in blind, raised bands, red morocco spine label lettered and decorated in gilt, top edge stained. Engraved frontispiece portrait of Erasmus. Final leaf, containing second page of bookseller catalogue, excised. Joints and spine head expertly repaired; evidence of bookplate removal on front pastedown; effaced signature on title page; some running titles shaved.
Dalekohled aneb Kdo Neveri

Dalekohled aneb Kdo Neveri, at Tam Bezi [Binoculars, or Who Doesn’t Want to Believe Can Leave]

Hoffmeister, Adolf Expanded edition of this illustrated survey of the countries of the world by Czech artist Adolf Hoffmeister (1902-1973), first published in 1956. His brilliantly colored modernist collages of New York, Paris, Egypt, Spain, China, Japan, and Brazil reflect Hoffmeister’s defiantly cosmopolitan world view, in both subject and technique. Born into a wealthy Prague family, Hoffmeister was one of the founders of the avant-garde Devetsil group of Czech artists and writers. In the 1930s, he launched the anti-fascist magazine Simplicus, worked with Jewish refugees, and wrote the libretto for Hans Krása’s 1938 opera Brundibar, performed by children in the Terezín concentration camp. Imprisoned during the war, Hoffmeister managed to escape and flee to New York, where his anti-fascist drawings were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art. He served as the Czechoslovak ambassador to France from 1948 to 1951, when he was recalled, suspected of being too Western in his sympathies. His diplomatic career over, Hoffmeister taught art in Prague, became president of International PEN, and served as Czechoslovakia’s representative to UNESCO. His son Martin recalled: "He was often chosen to represent the country at cultural events because of his broad knowledge, his connections and his knowledge of languages. He went to China, Egypt, Japan, North and South America. . . . His students would wait excitedly for him to return and tell them what was happening in the West and what was new in modern art" (Haaretz). After the Soviet invasion of Prague in 1968, Hoffmeister fled to France, but returned in 1970, and died under house arrest. Text in Czech. A very good copy of a wide-ranging, graphically exuberant book, all the more striking for the isolation in which it was produced. Single volume, measuring 9.25 x 6.5 inches: 167, [5]. Original white cloth stamped in tan, black and blue endpapers, top edge stained blue, glossy unclipped color pictorial dust jacket. Title page printed in blue and black; nineteen full-page color collages. Light spotting to boards and edges, edgewear and tape reinforcement to jacket, small chip to head of jacket spine.
Toys

Toys

MANUSCRIPT]; Henry, Avril Striking illustrated manuscript on the role of toys across cultures, produced by English scholar Avril Henry (1935-2016). As a young woman, Henry studied painting and sculpture at Wimbledon School of Art, obtaining an Art Teacher’s Diploma with Distinction at the University of London. After working as an art teacher and illustrator, she entered Oxford to study the culture of medieval England. Henry would go on to teach medieval studies at the University of Exeter for more than three decades, with a special interest in "the complex interface of text and image" (Exeter Cathedral Keystones and Carvings). That interest is on display in this research project, almost certainly an art school assignment. The text is written in Henry’s calligraphic hand, illustrated with fourteen examples of her original artwork, and presented in an unusual vernacular binding likely executed by Henry herself. The aim of the essay is to "consider toys insofar as they are works of art, for both those who make and those who play are artists." Drawing on anthropological and historical sources, Henry illustrates her argument with examples of toys from the Stone Age to the Age of Steam, including full-color images of Javanese shadow-puppets, an African mask, Hopi Indian dolls, a Victorian rocking-horse, and an American teddy bear. Many of the toys are drawn from life at the British Museum, the Horniman Museum, and the Victoria & Albert Museum. Literary quotations from the likes of Alexander Pope, G.K. Chesterton, and A.A. Milne are sprinkled throughout the text. The most recent bibliography entry is a December 1956 Punch article entitled "Toys Will Be Toys," which dates this manuscript to Henry’s early twenties. A compelling manuscript, historically informed and graphically striking, reflecting the author’s lifelong attention to material culture. Single volume, measuring 14.75 x 10.25 inches: [44]. Original full tan morocco, front board stamped with dozens of tiny gilt stars, spine stamped with stars and lettered in gilt, heavy purple endpapers hand-stamped with border of yellow squares. Unfinished manuscript title page stamped with border of yellow squares and hand-colored in yellow; eighteen unnumbered manuscript leaves in black ink on rectos only; three manuscript leaves ("Index to Illustrations") in red ink on rectos and versos. Illustrated with fourteen original drawings and gouache paintings mounted onto heavy grey paper. Light wear and spotting to boards.
Happiness as Found in Forethought Minus Fearthought

Happiness as Found in Forethought Minus Fearthought

Fletcher, Horace; [James, Henry] Early edition of this inspirational self-help treatise by American health faddist Horace Fletcher, known as "The Great Masticator" for his insistence on chewing every bite of solid food to liquid before swallowing. This copy is warmly inscribed by Fletcher to his recent convert, the novelist Henry James: "To the most subtle and elevating influence in contemporary literature / Henry James / all happiness always / is the devout wish of / Horace Fletcher / Palazzo Saibante / Canal Grande / Venice / August 1905." Henry James and his brother, the philosopher William James, were both enthusiastic "Fletcherizers" for a time, along with Thomas Edison, Mark Twain, John D. Rockefeller, and even Franz Kafka. Happiness as Found in Forethought Minus Fearthought, originally published in 1897, predates Fletcher’s celebrity as "the chew-chew man." The book advocates a relentless model of positive thinking that pulverizes all obstacles to happiness. "All time – all eternity – is made up of a succession of nows. If you are free in the present now, you may more easily be free from temptation in the succeeding nows until emancipation shall be complete and the very atmosphere of your freedom shall exorcise all evil before it can come near enough to attract your consciousness." Henry James would eventually abandon the dietary practice of Fletcherizing in 1910, blaming the liquid diet for his chronic digestive ailments and general low spirits. A notable association copy, and an intriguing artifact of mainstream American quackery, handsomely bound by Riviere & Son. Single volume, measuring 7.25 x 5 inches: [6], 261, [1]. Contemporary three-quarter brown morocco over brown cloth boards; raised bands; spine compartments lettered, ruled, and decorated in gilt; boards ruled in gilt; top edge gilt; marbled endpapers. London bookseller ticket (B.F. Stevens & Brown) to title page. Ink presentation inscription, dated August 1905, from Horace Fletcher to Henry James on half-title. Light shelfwear to binding.
Dess Epictetus Politische Sitten-Lehre in vier der Sprachen vornembsten Europens übersetzt

Dess Epictetus Politische Sitten-Lehre in vier der Sprachen vornembsten Europens übersetzt

Epictetus First polyglot edition in vernacular languages of the Stoic classic Enchiridion, in an unusual early Italian painted vellum binding. Born a slave, and crippled early in life, Epictetus gained his freedom in Rome and moved to the Adriatic coast, where he opened a school of philosophy. His sayings were collected by his student Arrian, and edited into the handbook of moral philosophy known as the Enchiridion. Epictetus understood philosophy as an active pursuit, more difficult than the abstract exercise of logic: "Do you think that you can act as you do, and be a philosopher? . . . You must watch, you must labor, you must get the better of certain appetites, must quit your acquaintance, be despised by your servant, be laughed at by those you meet" (Carter translation). Epictetus’s emphasis on self-knowledge and self-discipline greatly impressed the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, who quotes him at length in the Meditations, and his philosophy was read across Renaissance Europe, inspiring the Neostoicism movement and influencing the likes of Pascal and Descartes. While editions of the Enchiridion appeared in many languages, this is the first edition to contain multiple vernacular languages in a single publication: Spanish, German, Italian, and French. W.A. Oldfather, in Contributions toward a Bibliography of Epictetus, describes this polyglot edition as "extremely rare" (560). This copy is from the library of eighteenth-century Milanese collector Marquise Luigi Sylva, whose books are immediately identifiable by the exuberant hand-painting of their custom vellum bindings. While hand-painted vellum bindings were popular in eighteenth-century England and France, those from Sylva’s library provide some of the rare surviving Italian examples from the period. A wonderful example of an important vernacular edition in a vernacular binding. Octavo, measuring 6.5 x 4 inches: [16], 127, [1]. Eighteenth-century Italian binding, three strips of vellum per board hand-painted with ornaments in black and gold around a central window of red and gold marbled paper, manuscript shelf label in black ink on spine, matching yellow, green, and pink ornamented spotted endpapers. Additional ink shelf mark on verso of second fly leaf. Old paper strip, covering an ownership inscription, and engraved bookplate mounted to half-title. Eighteen pages for notes (blank) added by binder at rear. Some bowing to boards, faint soiling, and light toning to spine.
Qiu yu qiu feng ["Autumn rain

Qiu yu qiu feng ["Autumn rain, autumn wind": memorial for the executed revolutionary Qiu Jin]

Qiu, Jin]; Huang, Min (editor) Extraordinary memorial pamphlet for the Chinese revolutionary and feminist Qiu Jin (c.1875-1907), printed less than two months after her public beheading in 1907. Qiu Jin was born into wealth and privilege. Her parents bound her feet and arranged her marriage, but also provided her with a comparatively thorough education. She was deeply drawn to revolutionary ideas, however, chafing under the restrictions of life as a Chinese wife and mother; in one poem, she writes: "My body will not allow me to join the ranks of men, but my heart is far braver than that of a man." In 1904, Qiu Jin sold her dowry to finance an escape to Japan, joining the expatriate Chinese revolutionaries gathering there. She unbound her feet and undertook the study of traditionally male martial skills, like her hero Mulan: sword fighting, archery, and horseback riding astride. She adopted masculine dress, especially Japanese and Western styles: the famous photograph reproduced in this pamphlet shows Qui Jin in Japanese dress, wielding a warrior’s sword. The portrait is a provocation, intended to spark discussion about women’s roles in the coming revolution, as well as to burnish her own legend. Qiu Jin began writing and speaking publicly in defense of women’s emancipation, arguing that China as a whole would benefit from reforms that gave women more opportunities. She directed her criticism at the arranged marriages, inadequate schooling, and foot binding that limited the potential of Chinese women. Foot binding, in particular, literally disabled women, making it impossible for them to participate in the public sphere. (While the practice had been outlawed in 1902, it was still an unquestioned expectation of an upper-class woman.) Qui Jin was a brilliant orator, a talent all the more unusual because she "lived at a time when women in China were not permitted to venture out of their homes, let alone participate in public affairs" (New York Times Overlookedobituary, 2018). Her famous poem "Reply to a Japanese Friend," included here, is characteristic: "Don’t tell me women are not the stuff of heroes." In 1906, Qiu Jin moved back to China, and founded theChinese Women’s Journalto advocate for women’s rights. She became principal of a school of physical education that served as a front for her underground revolutionary organization. In 1907, the organization’s leader was captured after assassinating a local government authority, and officials soon came in pursuit of Qiu Jin, the second in command. After a fight, she was captured, tortured, and executed. The title of this pamphlet references her death poem, her last words, which play on her surname ("qiu," meaning ‘autumn’): "Autumn rain, autumn wind: they make one die of sorrow." Qiu Jin’s body would eventually be buried and reburied nine different times, as various factions competed to claim her as one of their own. This 1907 pamphlet is one of the earliest examples of an attempt to shape her legacy, including excerpts from her writings and tributes by others; the printer ran an exceptional risk in producing this memorial before the revolution. Sun Yat-Sen’s revolutionary party, of which Qiu Jin was the first female member, would finally overthrow the Qing Dynasty in 1911: Sun Yat-Sen’s wife described Qiu Jin as "one of the noblest martyrs of the revolution." Today, she remains a national hero, central to modern China’s vision of itself. The legend of Qiu Jin, revolutionary general and martyr, is memorialized in print, inscribed on stele, and dramatized on stage and screen. Rare: no holdings in OCLC, and no auction records in the West. A remarkable survival of a poorly printed underground publication. Single volume, measuring 7.25 x 5 inches: [4], 75, [1]. Original printed wrappers, stitched as issued, ornamental border stamped in purple on upper wrapper. Half-title printed on green paper. Portrait of Qiu Jin in Japanese dress, wielding a sword, following the table of contents. Single character written in ink on verso of upper wrapper, name written in ink and 1922 "paid" stamp of a San Francisco Chinese grocer on lower wrapper. Foxing to covers, some edgewear, spine largely perished, text block uniformly embrowned.
Women Authors of Our Day in Their Homes

Women Authors of Our Day in Their Homes

Halsey, Francis Whiting (editor); Burnett, Frances Hodgson; Wiggin, Kate Douglas; Howe, Julia Ward; Atherton, Gertrude; Davis, Rebecca Harding; Wharton, Edith; et al. First edition of this journalistic survey of popular women writers at the turn of the twentieth century, based on interviews conducted for the New York Times. Editor Francis Whiting Halsey had already published two collections of similar sketches depicting authors, all men, at home: "Meanwhile, authorship has become a source of income to women, a considerable number of whom have found it the means to a comfortable livelihood." Subjects include Frances Hodgson Burnett, Kate Douglas Wiggin (whose portrait at her writing desk is reproduced on the binding), Julia Ward Howe, Gertrude Atherton, and Rebecca Harding Davis. Edith Wharton, profiled in New York City before the appearance of The House of Mirth, offers the paradox of the working woman who does not need to work: "In one sense born to the place she has made her own in creative art, in another she has won it from the inaccessible seclusion of wealth and social position." A near-fine copy, revealing the conventions and limitations of female authorship in the American imagination. Single volume, measuring 7 x 4.5 inches: xvi, 300, [2]. Original dark blue ribbed cloth stamped in gilt, photograph mounted to upper board, top edge gilt. Title page printed in red and black, one page of publisher’s advertisements at rear, text block partially unopened. Seventeen full-page photographic plates throughout text. 1904 owner signature on front free endpaper, publisher’s prospectus for "Eminent Actors in Their Homes" laid in. Light rubbing to spine ends and corners.
Továrna Na Absolutno [The Absolute at Large]

Továrna Na Absolutno [The Absolute at Large]

Capek, Karel; Capek, Josef (illustrator) First edition of this biting science-fiction satire by a major Czech modernist, inscribed by Capek in the year of publication to an actress at the national theatre. Capek’s plot is set in motion by an invention. A new carburetor uses nuclear fission to create clean, cheap energy, but also releases a byproduct of "Absolute," a "God particle" that produces an intense spiritual experience: "It must be some kind of poisoning." Mixing the philosophy of Leibniz and Spinoza with commentary on modern technology and capitalism, Capek explores the unexpected pairing of limitless energy and unrestrained inspiration with black humor: "There have been some serious cases of enlightenment." The climax of the book reflects the cynicism produced by World War I, as an absurd Great War breaks out between competing religious groups: "you should not listen to those people when they proudly say that they lived through was the greatest war of all time. We all know, of course, that in a few decades’ time we will manage to create a war which is even greater." The novel is illustrated by Karel Capek’s brother Josef, an important modernist illustrator and book designer. The two brothers were central members of the Czech avant-garde between the wars: their intellectual circle promoted the modern renaissance of written Czech, publishing works like Továrna Na Absolutno in the vernacular rather than German. Josef Capek would die in a concentration camp in 1945, victim of an "even greater" war. Capek inscribed this copy in Czech to the actress Tana Cuprova, later art manager of the national theatre in Prague where R.U.R., Capek’s most famous play, introduced the word "robot" to the world. Text in Czech. A wonderful inscribed copy of an important early science-fiction novel. Octavo, measuring 7.75 x 5.5 inches: 219, [5]. Original tan pictorial wrappers with blue and orange design by the author’s brother Josef, spine and lower wrapper lettered in blue, text block uncut, many individual signatures unsewn and laid in (as issued). Title page printed in blue and black, twenty full-page black-and-white illustrations (included in collation). Manuscript prices in blue and grey pencil to verso of upper wrapper. Ink inscription by Capek in year of publication to front fly leaf. Small chip to head of spine, closed tear at top joint of front wrapper.