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Les differens batimens de la mer oceanne, With:(2) GUEROULT DU PAS, Pierre Jacques. Les differens batimens de la Mer Mediterranée, (3) GUEROULT DU PAS, Pierre Jacques. Petits batimens de l’ocean. Paris, Pierre Giffart, [titles of parts 2 & 3 dated 1709]. 3 parts in 1 volume. Oblong Imperial 16mo (12.5 x 16.5 cm). Part 1 with 30 engraved leaves including the title-page, part 2 with 30 engraved leaves including the title-page, and part 3 with 16 engraved leaves. All together 76 plates (plate size mostly ca. 7 x 11 cm, the title plates to parts 1 & 2 ca. 10 x 12 cm) depicting a wide variety of boats and ships, each with a caption identifying the type of ship. Contemporary French gold-tooled calf. Subtly rebacked with the original back-strip laid down.

GUEROULT DU PAS, Pierre Jacques. WorldCat (1 copy); cf. Cat. NHSM II, p. 745; Polak, supp. 10244 (cf. 4163); Thieme-Becker XV, p. 236 (all 1710 ed.); not in Chadenat. Rare first edition of three charming series of prints depicting boats and ships sailing on the Mediterranean, oceans around the world and canals in Venice for purposes of trade, fishing, transport, war, etc., engraved by Gueroult du Pas, who was active at Toulon at the beginning of the 18th century. The captions are unusually precise and informative, making the book a valuable reference work on the names of the various kinds of ships, their uses and the regions where they sailed. It includes ships sailing in European, American (including West Indies) and Levant waters. The last plate shows a ship under construction with cranes and other equipment. The engraved title-page to part 2 has the date 1709 in the cartouche and the first plate of part 3 has the same date below the title on the sail, so the three series were probably published in their present form, with each plate on a separate leaf, in that year.In good condition, with only some minor foxing or faint browned patches, and only slightly trimmed, giving generous margins. The binding has been expertly and unobtrusively rebacked and the surface of the leather shows some minor cracks and an occasional small flake, but the binding is still in good condition. First edition of three charming and informative series of boat and ship prints, in a charming contemporary French binding.
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Le maître a danser. Qui enseigne la maniere de faire tous les differens pas de danse dans toute la regularité de l’art, & de conduire les bras à chaque pas.Paris, Jean Villette, 1725. 8vo. With etched frontispiece and 59 etched plates (including 3 double-page and 1 larger folding) showing 2 couples dancing the minuet before King Louis XV and his court, individuals and couples demonstrating dance positions, dance steps, positions and movements of the hands and arms during the dance, drawn and mostly etched by the author. Further with numerous charming woodcut headpieces and tailpieces (2 signed "V.LS" or "V.LS in"), woodcut decorated initials, and decorations built up from cast fleurons. Green morocco (ca. 1900?), gold-tooled spine, gold-tooled turn-ins, fillets on board edges, curl-marbled endpapers, gilt edges (stamp on endleaf: "Gloss. Elldt Jnr"?).

RAMEAU, Pierre. Cohen, Guide, col. 852 (noting only 48 plates); Lipperheide 3070 (incomplete); Magriel, Bibl. of dancing, p. 131; O’Brian Malkin, Dancing by the book 103; Reynaud 443; Sander 1651. First edition of one of the best and most influential dancing manuals of all time, by the famous French dancing master Pierre Rameau (1674-1748). It was reissued with new title-pages in 1734 and 1748 and translated into English in 1728 by the dancing master John Essex (ca. 1680-1744) under the title The dancing master: or, The art of dancing explained. Rameau, a leading dancing master in his day, is now best known for his present manual, one of the most important primary sources for of French Baroque dance and for the study and reconstruction of eighteenth-century dance technique in general. "One of the most important books in the history of dance literature" with "the clearest and most detailed descriptions . of the structure and execution of the basic steps used in social and theatrical dance" (O’Brian Malkin quoting Fletcher and Hilton).Part one carefully describes and illustrates the appropriate manner of walking, foot positions, bows and a large vocabulary of dance steps, and for the first time clearly sets down the five basic positions of the feet. Part two covers the use of arms while dancing. The manual is also important for the study of the invention and introduction of a dance notation system in the early 18th century, one of the most fascinating aspects in the development of French Baroque dance. Rameau describes how to dance the Minuet: slow and pompous, a resplendently dressed assemblage would step and point with grace and style. It is to be performed with a staccato repetition of eight notes, for pointing of toes and for delicate movements. The dance was deemed the "queen of dances" by the French court, illustrated in this manual by a large folding plate showing it performed by two couples at an official reception at the Court.With a bookseller’s ticket of Günther Leisten in Cologne. The frontispiece is bound in facing p. 1. With small tears in 3 plates (2 repaired), the caption or number to an occasional plate slightly shaved and an occasional spot, marginal water stain or marginal restoration, but still generally in very good condition. The binding shows very minor cracks or wear at the head and foot of the hinges, but is otherwise fine. An essential and beautifully informative masterpiece for any study of the history of dance.
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Receuil de fontaines inventées par .With: Second livre de fontaines inventées par .Paris, Gabriel Huquier, [1736]. 2 parts in 1 volume. Royal 4to (32 x 24 cm). With 2 series of 7 finely etched and engraved plates of water fountains, including 2 title-prints, the first series with only the names of the artist François Boucher and publisher Gabriel Huquier, the second also with the name of its engraver Pierre(-Alexandre?) Aveline. 19th-century gold-tooled dark mottled sheepskin, gilt edges.

BOUCHER, François. Berlin Kat. 3581; J. Fürstenberg, La gravure originale dans l’ill. du livres Franç. = Die Original-Graphik in der französ. Buchillustr., 1975, no. 63 (this copy); KVK & WorldCat (5 copies part 1 ,1(?) copy of part 2); P. Jean-Richard, L’oeuvre gravé de F. Boucher, 1978, 1090-1097 & 216-222. Two rare print series (part 2 especially rare) showing beautiful, rich and decorative designs for fountains by François Boucher (1703-1770), famous French painter and decorative draughtsman, professor and later director of the Paris Academy, inspector of the Gobelin manufacture at Paris, and "premier peintre du Roi". The present two series show some of his best work, richly decorative forms in an early rococo style, incorporating (mostly wingless) putti, naked water nymphs (naiads), merfolk, a satyr, Neptune in his seahorse-drawn chariot, other water gods and godesses, shells, dolphins, sea monsters, a swan and other animals. Some were actually built: the Neptune print may have inspired Barthélemy Guibal’s 1750 Fontaine de Neptune at the Place Royale in Nancy. Extra inserted: 18th century engraved copy of plate 6 of the first series, showing a rich design with two Tritons blowing shell trumpets, unsigned.From the Library of Jean Fürstenberg (1890-1982), co-founder of the Association Internationale de Bibliophilie, with his book-label. The last print is slightly worn at a former fold and about half show small marginal holes or marginal restorations, none approaching the plate edge and otherwise in very good condition and with large margins.
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Ihan Teiko.Edo (Tokyo), 1805. 2 volumes: 3 parts in 1 text volume., and 1 atlas volume. Text volume (8vo), atlas vol. large 8vo (30 x 21 cm). With numerous anatomical illustrations on 16 engraved plates, mounted on thick paper, by the Japanese artist Aodo Denzen. Both volumes in contemporary Japanese book-bindings; rice-paper (text) and boards (atlas).

UDAGAWA, Genshin. Goodman, Dutch impact on Japan (1987), p. 133; Ranzaburo Otori, "The acceptance of Western Medicine in Japan", in: Monumenta Nipponica XIX, 3/4 (1964), pp. 254-74. Extremely rare original edition of a highly influential Japanese medical text book, the Ihan Teiko, (General outline of medical precepts). The work contains the 3 parts summary of the Ensei Ihan (Medical precepts of the West), compiled by the celebrated Japanese physician and successful Rangaku-sha (Scholar of Dutch learning) Udagawa Genshin (1769-1834, or 1824/5?), first published in 30 volumes in the same year and containing translations and excerpts of imported Dutch books on anatomy and physiology.Owing to the vast volume of this book, his pupil Fujii Hohtei summarized it to the present 3 volumes. With these procedures, the book became widely known and read among physicians who had an interest in Dutch style medicine, especially the function of the organs, and tissue. Although this book shows some classical immaturities, it had great influence on Japanese physicians in promoting the level of knowledge from pre-modern to modern medicine, even in the time of the closed-door policy. The work has been of great service in diffusing Western medical knowledge The atlas-volume contains a foreword in which the engraver Aodo Denzen is praised. It is the first engraved anatomical atlas published in Japan. The engravings were printed on rice paper, and mounted on thick paper, with explanatory text on the opposite page. In 1808 a second, revised edition of the Ihan Teiko was published.Serious wormholes in the margins of the last half of the atlas volume. Good set of the rare first edition.
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Humanae salutis monumenta. Antwerp, Christopher Plantin, "1571" [= 1582/83]. 4to (22 x 14.5 cm). With an engraved, illustrated title-page bearing the initials of the engraver Pieter Huys and the date 1571, an unsigned circular portrait of Jesus in profile and 70 full-page engravings (16.5 x 11.5 cm) by several artists. 17th-century gold-tooled black goatskin, the front board with a centrepiece comprising coat-of-arms (with a name below it) in an oval (the arms and name mutilated, but probably Robert de Ligne or an heir), gilt edges, later endpapers.

ARIAS MONTANO (MONTANUS), Benito (Benedictus). Morales 20; Netherlandish books 2479 & 2521?; Ruelens & De Backer, p. 108; USTC 401970 & 411594?; Voet 590. First quarto edition (with larger illustrations than the first two editions, which were in octavo format) of a collection of 70 beautiful full-page engraved illustrations from the Old and New Testaments, each accompanied by a Latin poem by Benito Arias Montanus (1527-1598), explaining the meaning and significance of the person or event represented. Arias Montanus, orientalist, Catholic exegete and editor of Plantin’s famous Antwerp Polyglot Bible, led the life of an ascetic, dividing his time between prayer and study. He was also celebrated as a poet, chiefly of religious verse.The present edition has the same main text, approbation, privilege and forewords by Plantin as the first two editions, and the plate for the engraved title-page, still dated "1571", was also used for the first edition (the second used a reduced copy). The illustrations, however, are much larger than in the octavo editions. Many of them also appeared in the folio Bible of 1583 and some in earlier liturgical works, and Plantin no doubt commissioned them for those publications. But he apparently recognized that this stock of beautiful copperplate engravings perfectly suited his friend Arias Montanus’s poems, leading him to use them to produce a new edition in the larger quarto format.The present copy was first owned by a member of one of the leading families of the Southern Low Countries, Robert de Ligne (1564-1614), Baron (from 1613 Prince) of Barbançon and Arenberg, and Captain of the bodyguard of the Archduke and Archduchess Albert and Isabelle. One text leaf with a cut (fortunately between the lines of type), a fold and a couple early marginal repairs, a small rust hole in another text leaf and an occasional minor marginal defect, but still in good condition. The arms on the binding are mutilated, and the binding further shows some wear and one headband is damaged, but it remains structurally sound. The most beautifully illustrated edition of Arias Montanus’s poems written to elucidate bible scenes.
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Suite de seize estampes représentant les conquêtes de l’Empereur de la Chine, avec leur explication].With:(2) [Supplement 1 with views 17-20].(3) [Supplement 2 with views 21-24].Paris, Isidore Stanislas Helman, Nicolas Ponce, 1783-1788. Oblong Imperial folio (35 x 48.5 cm). A series of 24 numbered engraved views (plate size 27 x 43 cm; image size 24 x 41 cm), with reproductions of the engraved explanation of the views, in both the earlier state covering views 1-16 and the later state covering views 1-24. Loose prints in folders in a modern archival box.

HELMAN, Isidore-Stanislas]. Cordier, cols. 641-642; M. Pirazzoli-t’Serstevens, Gravures des conquêtes de l’Empereur de Chine K’ien-Long, 1969, pp. 37-42 (views 1-20 only); Walraven, China illustrata 177 (cf. pp. 38-48). A fine complete series of 24 large and meticulously engraved views of the western conquests by the Qianlong Emperor (1711-1799), the favourite grandson of the Kangxi Emperor in the Manchu Qing dynasty, who ruled China officially from 1735 to 1796. The first series of 16 views illustrates events from 1754 to 1760, the first and most important of what the Chinese termed Qianlong’s ten great military campaigns. The views give very detailed images of the battles, with large numbers of foot soldiers and cavalry.The Qianlong Emperor had close relations with Europe. In 1765 he ordered the production of a series of 16 European copperplate prints commemorating the campaign against the Zunghars, drawn by the leading European artists in China: Giuseppe Castiglione (1688-1766), Jean Damascène, Jean Denis Attiret (1702-1768) and Jesuit Ignaz Sichelbart (1708- 1780). The first edition was engraved on enormous plates under the direction of Charles-Nicolas Cochin in Paris in the years 1769 to 1774, but few of his prints ever reached China and it was decided to have the present new edition of the same views produced at a more practical scale. This edition was a great success. Helman added two supplementary series to his edition, each with 4 views, giving a total of 24. In fine condition. A rare and remarkable series of views made for the Qianlong Emperor, mostly showing his conquests in western China.
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La Chine, moeurs, usages, costumes, arts et métiers, peines civiles et militaires, cérémonies religieuses, monuments et paysages, d’après les dessins originaux du père Castiglione, du peintre chinois Pu-Qua, du W. Alexandre, Chambers, Dadley, etc.Paris, De Malpiere, Goujon & Formentin, and Firmin Didot, 1825-1827. 2 volumes. Large 4to (34 x 25.5 cm). With 180 lithographed plates in publisher’s hand-colouring (including a frontispiece to each volume and 1 plan of Beijing), 4 engraved plates (the first with hand-coloured illustration and the other three with musical notation). Lacking 1 plate and its accompanying letterpress description ("Porte-enseigne du corps des archers"), facsimile included. Contemporary half tanned goatskin, gold-tooled spine.

MALPIERE, D. Bazin de. Brunet III, pp. 1346-1347; Colas 1957; Cordier, Sinica, col. 69; Lipperheide 1531; Löwendahl 845; Lust 60. First edition of "a huge collection of attractively lithographed copies of scenes from Chinese life of the mid-Ch’ing period" (Lust). The illustrations show scenes of everyday life, ships, views, interiors, (military) costumes and much more, each with one leaf of descriptive text. The plates were issued from 1825 to 1827 in 30 instalments, each consisting of 6 hand-coloured plates, and are seldom found complete. This copy lacks only one plate and description. All the illustrations are lithographed copies of earlier prints, including Alexander’s Picturesque representations of the dress and manners of the Chinese (1814), Chamber’s Designs of Chinese buildings. (1757), Mason’s The costume of China (1800) and The punishments of China (1804), the works of Castiglione, and others. A description of Beijing is included in the second volume illustrated with a plan. With the bookplate of Louis Becker, Paris. Binding rubbed along the extremities, but otherwise good. Lacking one plate and text leaf, as noted, foxing throughout, and some occasional browning; a good copy.
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De medica materia libri sex.Lyon, Thibaud Payen (Theobaldus Paganus), 1546 (colophon: 1547). 16mo. With a woodcut device on title-page and some woodcut initials. 18th-century calf, rebacked with original gold-tooled backstrip laid down.

DIOSCORIDES, Pedanius. USTC 149757 (1 copy); cf. T. Glick, Medieval science, technology and medicine: an encyclopedia, p. 152; not in Baudrier; Durling; SUDOC; WorldCat. Extremely rare pocket edition of Jean Ruel’s translation into Latin of Dioscorides’s standard work on pharmacology, the most important botanical book up on to the 16th century. This is the first issue with the date on the title-page saying 1546, colophon 1547. Dioscorides (ca. 40-90 AD), a Greek in the service of the Roman Empire, assembled all that was then known concerning the medicinal uses of plants, animals and minerals, adding information from his own experience accompanying the Roman army to Spain, the Middle East, North Africa and elsewhere, where he came to know many Persian, Indian and other exotic medicines. Though his work appeared in Latin from 1478 and in the original Greek from 1499, the present translation by Jean Ruel was first published at Paris in 1516. "Often considered a herbal, [it] deals with all three natural kingdoms: plant, mineral and animal. It describes all the substances known to Dioscorides that were used as primary ingredients for medicines, and constitutes an encyclopedia on the topic" (Glick).With owner’s inscription on title-page and paste-down. Some minor water stains in the gutter and in the margins of some of the first and last leaves, otherwise in good condition. Binding rebacked, as noted, and in very good condition.
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Kitab ‘Aja’ib al-maqdur fi aghbar Timur] | . Vitae & rerum gestarum Timuri, qui vulgo Tamerlanes dicitur, historia.Leiden, Bonaventura & Abraham Elsevier, 1636. 4to. With half-title printed in dark blue and red, title-page printed in red and black with a woodcut architectural border containing the letterpress title and (in a heart-shaped cartouche) imprint, and leaf *3 printed in red, dark blue and black. Later stiff paper wrappers.

IBN ARABSHAH, Ahmad ibn Muhammad. De Nave 90; Smitskamp 313; STCN (8 copies); Willems 434; not in Atabey; Blackmer. First Arabic edition of an important eyewitness account of the life of Tamerlane (Timur), the successful and barbaric 14th-century Turkish conqueror, printed entirely in Arabic except for the Arabic and Latin title-page. "An interesting feature of the book is the use of blue ink for the printing of the word ‘Tamerlanis’ (between two red lines) on the half-title, as well as for one typographical ornament on leaf 3 recto" (Smitskamp). The text is based on the original Arabic manuscript, completed in 1437-1438, by the Syrian author Ahmad ibn ‘Arabshah, secretary of Sultan Ahmad of Baghdad. In the 16th century Timur became famous in Europe through Christopher Marlowe’s play Tamburlaine (1590). The present work was edited and prefaced by Jacob Golius. The Arabic manuscript used by him is still preserved at Leiden University Library and contains many notes in his hand.With an unidentified library stamp on title-page. Some leaves heavily foxed and a few small spots, but otherwise a good copy.
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Flores Avicenne.(Colophon: Lyon, by Claude Davost for Barthélemy Trot, 1508). 8vo. With several botanical woodcut initials. Contemporary goatskin, blind-tooled in a panel design.

IBN SINA (AVICENNA). Adams A2319; Durling 411; USTC 143378; cf. N.G. Siraisi, Avicenna in Renaissance Italy (2014), p. 132. First edition of Michael de Capella’s abbreviation of the greatest work of the esteemed Islamic physician Ibn Sina (ca. 980-1037), known in Europe as Avicenna, his Canon medicinae (Canon of medicine, or in Arabic Kitab al-Qanun fi al-tibb), completed around 1024. It is a comprehensive medical encyclopaedia, mixing a thorough compilation of Greek and Islamic medical knowledge (including the work of Aristotle, Hippocrates, Galen and al-Majusi) with Avicenna’s own original contributions. It revolutionized European medicine long before it first appeared in print in 1472. "The preface refers to the importance in medicine of aphoristic works that can readily be committed to memory and to the example of Hippocratic writings. The task of abbreviation was undertaken with such enthusiasm that Avicenna’s chapter on the elements was compressed from about 550 words in the full Gerard of Cremona version into 53 in the Flores" (Siraisi).With the bookplate of Karl and Thilde Wagner. Binding somewhat worn, especially at the spine. Some spots throughout, ink stains on title-page and a couple minor stains in text; a good copy.
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Twelve Chinese gods].[Guangzhen (Canton)], Tingqua, [ca. 1870?]. Imperial 4to album (33 x 24.5 cm). 12 drawings in numerous brightly coloured gouaches plus gold and silver, on pith paper (30 x 21.5 cm), each drawing mounted by its corners in an album of mulberry-bark(?) paper and framed with 4 strips of blue silk, and with a loose tissue leaf inserted before each drawing and an extra blank album leaf before the first drawing. Contemporary rice-straw(?) pasteboards, with the contemporary "Tingqua" label.

TINGQUA. Cf. B. Salmen, Chinesische Bilder (2007); Tingqua: paintings from his studio (1976); I. Williams, "Views from the West", in: Arts of Asia XXXI (2001), pp. 140-149; I. Williams, "Painters on pith", in: Arts of Asia XXXIII (2003), pp. 56-66. Twelve spectacular and extremely detailed Chinese drawings of Chinese deities, executed in dozens of brightly coloured gouaches plus gold and silver by the Tingqua studio, established in Guangzhen (Canton province) in the 1830s. Tingqua, also known as Guam Lianchang (ca. 1809-1870 or soon after) was the leading artist in the export business that flourished after China’s defeat in the First Opium War (1839-1842) opened the country to foreign trade. He and his slightly older contemporary Sunqua (active 1830-1870) pioneered the genre of pith paintings for the export market. The drawings show considerable originality in the rendition of the deities and their attributes, which sometimes makes it difficult to identify the deity intended. As usual with pith-paper drawings made for export, they show a mix of Chinese and Western influences, the faces here clearly following Western art (Tingqua was a protégé of George Chinnery), but the present drawings may also show some Tibetan influences. Since pith-paper drawings were rarely signed, few can be attributed to an artist or studio on documentary evidence. The present set is a rare example of a group of drawings (clearly made as a set) preserved in its contemporary album with the Tingqua studio’s label. The figures are much more detailed than those in most pith-paper drawings.Several drawings show one or more broken corners or other small marginal defects, and sometimes an end of one of the blue ribbons has come loose, but the drawings themselves are in fine condition. The paper reinforcing the spine has torn at the hinges and the lower right corner of the front board is abraded, but the album binding is still in very good condition. A remarkable series of large, brightly coloured and unusually detailed pith-paper drawings of Chinese gods: rare documented drawings of the famous Tingqua studio, with their letterpress label.
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Sexology handbook].[Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India], 1811. 4to (23 x 15.5 cm). Manuscript in Persian, written in black ink with frequent words in red, with each page in a frame of blue, gold and red rules (the gold wider) with an outer frame of gold rules near the edges, the opening of the text elaborately decorated with flowers, vines and abstract forms in blue, lavender, green, orange, white, gold and bronze, and 29 original erotic illustrations (2 full-page, 27 half-page) in numerous colours of gouache and with extensive use of gold and some silver. With tissue guard leaves between most pairs of facing pages. Contemporary black calf, each board with embossed gilt paper inlays, gold-tooled spine, gold-tooled brown calf paste-downs.

EROTICA]. For background information: Preeti Awasthi, Awadh – congenial home for nurturing arts – in historical perspective of painting and music (1722-1856), PdD thesis, University of Lucknow, 2014. A rare example of an early 19th-century north-Indian sexology handbook, beautifully and extensively illustrated. It was commissioned by Saadat Ali Khan II (ca. 1752-1814), 5th Nawab of the princely state of Awadh (officially called Oudh by the British Raj) and written by his personal physician (hakim), possibly Ali Sharif, who had been hakim to the Nawabs before and after Saadat’s reign. The illustrations (7.5 x 9 and 14.5 x 9 cm) were made by the official royal painter, who has not been identified. The manuscript is divided into 14 chapters including those on development of male sexuality, development of female sexuality; things to do before, during and after copulation; descriptions of 14 sexual positions (assan); medical compounds for erectile dysfunction; and information about the female orgasm. It illustrates one male homosexual couple and one lesbian couple. Awadh under the Nawabs, straddling the present Indian-Nepalese border, was famous for its harmonious mixing of the Hindu religion and Islam (the Nawabs were Shi’ite). The Awadh school of miniatures "gradually acquired a prominent place in the cultural history of India which no other province gained" providing a "glorious heritage ., we should make efforts to preserve the rich cultural legacy of Awadh." (Awasthi, p. 102).One new endleaf has been inserted at the end and the decoration at the opening of the text (10.5 x 8.5 cm) was clearly taken from an earlier manuscript. The gutter folds of many leaves have been restored and the sewing is later than the binding. With some stains and worm holes, mostly in the gutter margin, and a few leaves with tattered edges, but generally in good condition and with the illustrations well preserved. The binding is loose, with 1 leaf detached, and slightly rubbed, with a few small parts of the gilt paper scuffed. A beautifully and extensively illustrated north-Indian sex manual, with a very topical mixture of ethnic backgrounds and sexual orientations.
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Le manuel des dames de charité, ou, formules de médicamens faciles a préparer, dressées en faveur des personnes charitables, qui distribuent des remèdes aux pauvres dans les villes & dans les campagnes: avec des remarques pour faciliter la juste application des remèdes qui y sont contenus, ensemble un traité abregé de la saignée, et un extrait de plusieurs remèdes choisis. Tirés des éphemérides d’Allemagne.Paris, Debure l’aîné, 1758. 12mo. Contemporary cat’s paw calf, gold-tooled spine.

ARNAULT DE NOBLEVILLE, Louis Daniel]. Ramsey, "The popularization of medicine in France, 1650-1900", in: Porter, The popularization of medicine, pp. 97-133; Wellcome II, p. 58; Weston, Medical consulting by letter in France, 1665-1789, p. 193; not in Krivatsy. True fifth edition (or fourth edition of the revised edition) of a highly popular outline of medicine for laymen administering charitable medical assistance. Although designed so that anyone could quickly acquire the necessary medical knowledge, the author emphasized that the reader should always consult physicians: "It would be tempting God, violating the [natural] order, not to consult them, because it is ordinarily through them that diseases are cured" (pp. xiii-xiv). Unfortunately, a physician would probably prescribe the remedies listed in the book, which include "fried sow’s genitals as a remedy against incontinence"; amulets or roots of certain dried plants "suspended between the shoulders and allowed to dry" against haemorrhoids; "the shirt of a menstruating woman worn as an emmenagogue; oil of earthworms for contusions; ivy gathered during a waning moon against atrophy; and pounded cockchafers against rabies". Against pleurisy, horse dung is recommended, or otherwise "a live pigeon split in half and applied to the patient for eighteen to twenty hours ‘until the bad smell makes it necessary to remove it’" (Ramsey). The latter method was apparently much in vogue by Montpellier physicians (Weston).Louis Daniel Arnault de Nobleville (1701-1778) was a French physician and naturalist who devoted most of his career to the medical caring of the poor. Among his works are a multivolume study of the natural history of animals relating to the materia medica and a treatise on the singing of nightingales.With a 1777 owner’s inscription on the fly-leaf. Binding worn at the extremities; spine damaged at the head and tail. With a few spots on the title page; otherwise internally in very good condition.
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Thesaurus et armamentarium medico-chymicum.Venice, Johann Gabriel Hertz, 1707. 4 parts in 1 volume. 8vo. With engraved title-page. Contemporary sheepskin parchment.

MYNSICHT, Adrian von. Blake, p. 318; Thorndike, pp. 84-86. Third Venice edition of a medical work by the German alchemist Adrian von Mynsicht (1603-1638). "One of the most frequently reprinted works of medical pharmacy was the Thesaurus of Adrian Mynsicht (1603-1638), an M.D. of Helmstedt who became physician to the duke of Mecklenburg and others . It purported to reveal to the "sons of doctrine and wisdom" a most secret way of compounding drugs based on his own experience and practice" (Thorndike). He was a follower of Paracelsus, opposing the Galenic theory in believing that illnesses were caused by chemical processes instead of fluctuation of the humours. Von Mynsincht was the first to describe emetic tartar. At the end of the text is a small treatise concerning the philosopher’s stone. The work is followed by three smaller works with continuous page numbers, by Carolus Musitanus, Andreas Battimelli and Hieronymus Piperus, who wrote additions to Mynsicht’s Thesaurus. The works were meant to be published together with this edition of the Thesaurus.With two owner’s inscription below the engraved title-page (one struck through) and a library stamp on the letterpress title-page. A very faint waterstain at the foot of the book, but otherwise in very good condition.
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Collection of 26 documents on the VOC and the Dutch East Indies].Middelburg, Batavia (Jakarta), Amsterdam, etc., ca. 1645-1833. 26 documents. Mostly folio (33 x 21 cm). Manuscript documents in Dutch (including 1 printed memorandum and 1 printed form filled out in manuscript).

VOC]. A collection of 26 documents concerning the VOC (Dutch East India Company) and the Dutch East Indies, mostly from the second half of the 18th century. They include commercial rules and regulations for the operation of a ship for the VOC in 1787; lists of ships lost or destroyed by the British in the Fourth Anglo-Dutch War and its aftermath (1780-1786); records of troops from the regiment of Karl Eugen, Duke of Württemberg, that are to be transported to the Cape of Good Hope for the Amsterdam and Zeeland chambers of the VOC in 1787 (and a credit/debit note for 1787/88); instructions for bookkeeping, with examples; an agreement drawn up in 1790 at the request of Huijg Jacobsz de Reus, Lieutenant Captain on the ship "De Pollux", for himself and his brother Jacob de Reus who both went into the service of the Zeeland chamber of the VOC in that year; a fragment of a notarial document drawn up by the VOC at Batavia ca. 1645; Eight numbered articles concerning the VOC, England, the Moluccas and the pretender Charles Stuart, described as King of Scotland; extracts from the registers of the Governor General of the Dutch East Indies, 1822; a filled-in form appointing the surgeon major F.W. van Zoust Zeldenrijk at the military hospital at Weltevreden to the post of directing officer of health for the Moluccas in 1822; what appears to be a sermon delivered at Batavia by J. Eikenkoken[?] in 1833; and more. There is also a 20th-century English translation of a 1795 Dutch inventory of coins in the VOC’s great chest at the Cape of Good Hope, together with two engravings: a portrait of . by Cornelis van Noorde with a 6-line verse by P. Langendijk; and an illustration of two bank notes (6 and 12 stuyver) issued at Batavia in 1782 and 1783. While some of the other documents have slightly tattered edges or an occasional minor stain, they are further in good or very good condition. A remarkable collection of 26 documents forming a unique and valuable primary source for the VOC and the Dutch East Indies, especially in the late 18th century.
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The Arab of the desert. A glimpse into Badawin life in Kuwait and Sau’di Arabia.London, George Allen & Unwin, 1951. 8vo. With a portrait of Sheikh Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah as frontispiece, numerous wood-engravings in text, including some maps, 46 pages with mostly reproductions of photographs, 9 colour plates (including 1 map), 12 maps (of which 8 folding and loosely inserted in the rear pocket), and 6 folding genealogical tables, also inserted in the rear pocket. Publisher’s cloth.

DICKSON, Harold Richard Patrick. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula 840 (1st ed.). Second edition of a classic account of Bedouin life in Arabia, before World War II. In this almost encyclopaedic account, the author describes virtually every aspect of life in Arabia before the changes due to the oil-wealth. The writing is very personal and the author expresses his deep admiration for Sheikh Salim Al-Mubarak Al-Sabah of Kuwait ("pre-eminent among Arabia’s rulers") and the Saudi King Abdulaziz ibn Saud ("one of the most remarkable personalities living today"). Most of Dickson’s descriptions are based on his own observations: "I would watch their doings for days at a time, and supplement my observations by perpetually asking questions. I used to find that a good opportunity for questioning was round our camp fire at night. On these occasions while coffee went the round, men, women and children of the camp would foregather in our tent, and answer questions on a hundred subjects". Several of these subjects can be found in the 33 appendices, including tribal names, elite camels, sailing boats and Himyarite inscriptions.Lacking the dustjacket. Spine discoloured at the head and foot and back paste-down lightly foxed. Otherwise in very good condition and complete with all maps and tables.
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Relation des voyages faits par les Arabes et les Persans dans l’Inde et à la Chine dans le IXe siècle de l’ère chrétienne; texte Arabe imprimé en 1811 par les soins de feu Langlès Paris, Imprimerie royale, 1845. 2 volumes. 18mo (15 x 10 cm). With Arabic title-page printed in red and black. Later half calf, gold-tooled spine, with the original blue printed wrappers bound in.

REINAUD, Joseph Toussaint (translator). Cordier, Sinica, cols. 1924-1925; Hage Chahine 3965; T. Mackintosh-Smith and J. Montgomery, eds., Two Arabic travel books (2014), pp. 4-17. First edition in French of an account of two Arabic voyages to China and India. The text was translated from the Arabic by the French orientalist and professor Joseph Toussaint Reinaud (1795-1867). The Arabic text was first printed in 1811, under supervision of the French linguist and orientalist Louis-Mathieu Langlès. The first volume starts with an introduction to the text, followed by the translation. The main text can be divided into two sections. The first account is based on a statement from a merchant called Suleyman, who is said to have travelled to India and China in the years 851-852 (237), however, the actual author of the text is unknown. The following account was written down by Abu Zayd al-Hasan al-Sirafi. Al-Mas’udi, "the Herodotus of the Arabs", mentions al-Sirafi in one of his works, stating that he met him in the year 915-916 (303) in Basra, Iraq. Al-Sirafi tells us he was commanded to verify and extend the earlier account. The date of the second account is unclear, but it was probably written in the first half of the 10th century. The text gives a lively account of the life in China and India, with " the first foreign descriptions of tea and porcelain, and a whole panorama of Chinese society, from the Son of Heaven and Confucian ethics down to toilet paper and bamboo urinals" (Mackintosh-Smith). The second volume gives notes to the translation, followed by the Arabic text. Added to the Arabic text are two extracts from works by Al-Mas’udi, including his Muruj al-dhahab.Restored tear though the wrapper and first two leaves, otherwise in very good condition, with only some minor browning. Wholly untrimmed.
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Mémoires de littérature, tirés des registres de l’Academie royale des inscriptions et belles-lettres. tome quarante-huitième.Including: SILVESTRE DE SACY, Antoine Isaac. Mémoire sur divers événemens de l’histoire des Arabes avant Mahomet.Paris, Imprimerie Impériale, 1808. 4to. Set in Roman, Italic, Greek and Arabic. With a folding engraved plate of a Greek inscription and 5 letterpress tables. Contemporary half calf.

SILVESTRE DE SACY, Antoine-Isaac, and others. Daunou, "Notice historique sur la vie et les ouvrages de M. le baron Silvestre de Sacy", in: Mémoires de l’Institut de France XII (1839), pp. 510-511; not in Lambrecht. Early work of the famous French orientalist Silvestre de Sacy (1758-1838), printed in a collection of articles by members of the French Académie royale des inscriptions et belles-lettres. In his article, read before an audience in 1785, Sacy describes the early history of the Arab People and the birth of Islam, based on ancient Arab sources which are added to his text both in French translation and in the original Arabic. Also added are a genealogical table of the ancestors of the Prophet Muhammad and chronological tables of the kings of Yemen, the rulers of the Banu Khuza’ah over Mecca, the kings of al-Hirah and of the kings of the Ghassanids.The articles in this collection were printed by the Imprimerie impériale, which owned one of the world’s best collections of Arabic types, including several that Napoleon had confiscated from the Propaganda Fide in Rome. The printing process was overseen by Jean-Joseph Marcel (1776-1854), who in 1798 oversaw the printing of the first books ever printed in Egypt (Hebrew presses excepted).Silvestre De Sacy was the first professor of Arabic at the École spéciale des langues orientales vivantes in Paris on its establishment in 1795. He produced an 1810 Arabic grammar that finally replaced Erpenius’s as the scholarly standard and several carefully edited editions of Arabic and other oriental manuscripts from the collections of the Bibliothèque Royale/Impériale. Binding somewhat worn, at the hinges; a very good copy.
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Les plaines. Paris, Henri Piazza (colophon: printed by G. Kadar, Paris, 15 February 1934). 4to (23 x 16 cm). With an original watercolour drawing (10 x 10 cm), 35 colour collotype facsimiles of watercolour drawings (1 as frontispiece, the others in the text), some finished by hand, and 70 plates repeating the 35 illustrations: once in black and white and once in colour, all by Henri Cassiers. Contemporary (1934) gold-blocked brown morocco by George Canape and Georges Corriez in Paris, each board with an unidentified (prince’s or duke’s?) coat of arms in the centre in a frame of rose branches (the roses in red), spine with author and title in gold and rose branches in red and gold, gold fillets on board edges, turn-ins in gold with red roses, decorated cloth doublures and free endleaves (yellow background with multi-coloured flowers all woven), gilt edges.

VERHAEREN, Émile. Copy no. 1 (one of the 25 copies of the deluxe issue) of a bibliophile edition of poems by the Belgian writer, poet and art critic Émile Verhaeren (1855-1916), illustrated with 35 colour-printed collotype facsimiles of watercolours by the Flemish artist Henri Cassiers (1858-1944), plus one original watercolour drawing, also by him. As the colophon notes, copies 1-25 are printed on Japanese paper, each including an original watercolour drawing and containing additional plates repeating the illustrations, once in black and white and once in colour. So each illustration appears three times (the hand finishing of the colour illustrations shows differences between the two examples). The edition further included 100 copies on Japanese paper, including the 35 black and white plates (copies 26-125); and 825 copies on Rives paper, without additional plates (copies 126-950). Henri Piazza published it as part of a series devoted to Flanders, Toute la Flandre, containing several works by Verhaeren, all illustrated by Cassiers. Canape et Corriez specialized in bibliophile bindings. They worked together from 1927 to 1937 (Fléty, pp. 37-38).In fine condition.
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Histoire des deux conquestes d’Espagne par les Mores, la premiere faite par Tarif & Mussa, sur les Crestiens; la seconde, par Abdalasis, sur les Mores revoltez, et des revolutions arrive es dans l’empire des califes pendant pre s de cinquante ans. .Paris, widow of François Muguet, 1708. 12mo. Contemporary mottled calf, red edges.

LUNA, Miguel de. Brunet I, cols. 16-17; García-Arenal & Mediano, The orient in Spain, pp. 155-164; not in Blackmer. First edition of the second French translation of a history of the conquest of Spain by the Moors, detailing events from 712 to 761 CE, a description of Spain during the same period, and a biography of Almanzor (ca. 938-1002), the Islamic ruler of the Iberian Peninsula at that time. "This was a false chronicle, halfway between a history and a novel of chivalry, supposedly translated from an Arabic manuscript by a (fictitious) historian called Tarif Abentarique that Luna had found in El Escorial" (García-Arenal & Mediano). In the account, first published in 1592, the Iberian Peninsula is saved by the Arab newcomers from a state of evil and corruption under the Visigoth rulers. Luna’s account is a defence of Arab culture in Spain, independently of the religion of Islam and particularly defending the Arabic language. "His writings attempt to reimagine the origins and history of Christianity in the Peninsula such that its inhabitants of Arab origin may be seen as "natural" or "native" .; therefore they cannot be expelled as alien invaders ., but rather, and above all, may aspire to honors and privileges" (García-Arenal & Mediano).Miguel de Luna (ca. 1550-1615) was a Spanish physician of Arabic descent, who also published a treatise on bathing. Known for his knowledge of Arabic, he worked as a translator for King Philip II of Spain and the Spanish Inquisition.With owner’s inscriptions on the back of the first fly-leaf and the title-page. Binding lightly worn at the extremities; with a few spots; a good copy.
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Nouveau dictionnaire genéral des drogues simples et composées, de Lemery; revu, corrigé, et considérablement augmenté.Paris, Rémont (back of half-title: Imprimerie de Valade), 1807. 2 volumes. 8vo. With 20 engraved plates (numbered 1-20) with 120 figures, by F. Kaiser. Contemporary gold-tooled red morocco, richly gold-tooled spine, gold-tooled board edges, gold-tooled turn-ins, gilt edges.

MORELOT, Simon and Nicolas LÉMERY. DSB VIII, pp. 172-175; Wellcome III, p. 488. Attractively bound first edition of a medical dictionary listing numerous simple and compound medicines, first compiled by the French chemist Nicolas Lémery (1645-1715) and here corrected and considerably enlarged by Simon Morelot (1751-1809). The present work combines Lemery’s pharmacopoeia and his Traité universel des drogues simples (1698): "Lemery’s chief contributions to pharmacy were his two complementary works, the Pharmacopée universelle and the Traité des drogues simples. These are alphabetically arranged lists of composites and simples respectively, giving the source, virtues, doses, and therapeutic action of the various medicaments. They represent a comprehensive dictionary of pharmaceuticals" (DSB). For the plants Morelot added taxonomical details according to Linnaeus. Besides medicines themselves, the dictionary includes some relevant terms concerning medicine and pharmacy. Each plate depicts six plants.Signed by the publisher on the back of half-title. Some minor foxing. Spines slightly discoloured. Overall in very good condition.
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Histoire des naturels des Iles Tonga ou des Amis, situées dans l’Océan Pacifique depuis leur découverte par le Capitaine Cook; rédigée par John Martin, sur les détails fournis par William Mariner, qui y a passé plusieurs années; .Paris, Gide and Nicolle (back of half-title: Imprimerie de J. Smith), 1817. 2 volumes. 8vo. Contemporary red half morocco, gold-tooled spine, paper sides with the crowned monogram of Empress Marie-Louise in gold on both sides of each volume.

MARINER, William and John MARTIN (editor). Forbes 468; cf. Howgego, 1800-1850, M14. First edition of the French translation of an important account of the Tonga islands by the English William Charles Mariner (1791-1853), who lived in Tonga for four years. When he was young, Mariner sailed in the privateer Porte au Prince to the New World with the objective of attacking Spanish ships and searching for whales. They seized several Spanish vessels and added several Hawaiians to the crew in 1806. Their visit to the Tonga Islands proved fatal: almost the entire the crew was massacred by the natives (ironically, James Cook had dubbed Tonga the "Friendly Islands"). The author, however, survived and lived there from circa 1806 to 1810, observing and recording Tonga culture with a keen eye for detail. Volume two includes some interesting notes on James Cook, who with his crew had met a friendly reception there. "Mariner’s meticulous observations on Tonga make this a key historical text on the history and culture of this island group" (Forbes).From the library of Marie-Louise (1791-1847), Empress as the second wife of Napoleon Bonaparte until his defeat in 1814 and then Duchess of Parma. Her library contained many books on natural history, but also many travel books. It was dispersed in the 1930’s. Binding slightly rubbed along the extremities. A few small spots in text. Overall in very good condition.
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Libro di novelle, et di bel parlar gentile. . Cento novelle . Di nuovo ricorrette.Florence, Filippo & Jacopo Giunta, 1572. 4to (21.5 x 16 cm). With the Giunta’s woodcut device on the title-page and a different one on the last page and about 120 woodcut decorated initials (about 7 series) including some repeats. With the main text set in roman type but the extensive preliminaries in italic. Contemporary limp sheepskin parchment.

GUALTERUZZI, Carlo (compiler) and [Vincenzo BORGHINI ("corrector")]. Adams G1358; Joseph Consoli, ed., The Novellino or One hundred ancient tales: an edition and translation, 1997; EDIT 16, 47120; ESTC 805025. Third edition (usually called the second), in the original Italian, of the first collection of native Italian stories, best known under the titles Il novellino and Le cento novelle antiche, written up as a collection between 1281 and 1300. Boccaccio borrowed and adapted eight of them when he wrote his Decameron between 1348 and 1353. The stories are among the first to present ordinary people as protagonists in stories of everyday life. They are as bawdy as Boccaccio’s but more conservative in their presentation of relations between the sexes. But while some stories from the Decameron were printed already in 1470 and it remained a celebrated literary standard work to our day, the present stories appear not to have been printed until 1525. An undated edition appeared soon after. Both were soon largely forgotten and survive in only a handful of copies. The present 1572 edition is a much fancier production than the earlier editions. It quickly became the standard text and all editions followed it until 1825.But in the heat of the Counter-Reformation, with the Catholic Church fiercely guarding its reputation against accusations of corruption and immorality, these stories could not be printed as they stood. Borghini’s censorship centred on religious elements. With a 17th-century(?) armorial library stamp on the title-page. After an attempt to remove an inscription from the foot of the title-page (leaving a stain on the facing flyleaf) an owner cut off 1 cm of its foot margin, not approaching the text. With a tear in the blank leaf 3*6 and in the blank foot of the final leaf V8, and minor foxing, but still in good condition. The cover has pulled loose from the bookblock at the inside front hinge.
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Carmina]. Catullus, et in eum commentarius M. Antonii Mureti.Venice, Paulus Manutius, 1554. 8vo. With Aldus’s woodcut device on the title-page, repeated on the verso of the otherwise blank final leaf, and spaces with guide letters left for 2 5-line and about 60 3-line manuscript initials (not filled in). Set in an Aldine italic (with upright capitals) with occasional words (mostly names) in roman and frequent passages in Greek. Gold-tooled mottled calf (ca. 1700).

CATULLUS, Gaius Valerius and Marc-Antoine MURET. Adams C1145; EDIT 16, 10364; Gay & Lemonnyer I, col. 498; Renouard 162; Marilyn Skinner, Companion to Catullus, passim; USTC 821188. First edition to include Muret’s important and influential commentaries, of the poems of the passionate (if self-centred) Roman poet Catullus (84-ca. 54 BCE), often given the collective title Carmina. Both the poems and the commentaries appear here in the original Latin. Poems 18 and 19 are addressed to the fertility god Pirapus, best known for his enormous perpetual erection, and poem 20 is also a Priapeia. Many are addressed to "Lesbia", whom Catullus passionately loved. He gave her this pseudonym in allusion to the Greek love poems of Sappho from the Island of Lesbos, which influenced him strongly. She is generally identified as Clodia, the wife of a Roman nobleman. Catullus was one of her several lovers and he names and rails against some of the others. While Catullus’s greatest passions were heterosexual, poems 48, 50 and 99 express romantic and sexual interests in men. In his poems he is quick to attack others, both politically and personally, and after he fell out with two male friends he wrote poem 16, threatening to sexually abuse them.The French humanist Marc-Antoine Muret (1526-1585), recognised as a brilliant scholar in his teens, taught at Paris from 1551, when he published his first book there. Accused of being a Huguenot and a homosexual, he had to flee Paris in late 1553 but Adus Manutius’s son Paulus, who had taken charge of the family’s Venice printing office, offered him shelter. The present book was Muret’s first publication in Venice.With minor damage to the lower outside corner of the first few leaves, not approaching the text, but still in very good condition. The hinges are slightly worn and the spine label has a small chip, but the binding is otherwise also very good.
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L’Islam sous la cendre.Paris, (colophon: Frazier-Soye), (19 February) 1918. Square 4to (25 x 26 cm). With the frontispiece in three states: a lithographed plate, a hand-coloured miniature painting on vellum, highlighted with gold, and an engraved plate; and with the half-title printed in blue and several words in the text printed in green and blue. Original green cloth.

HEINE, Maurice. C. Tailliart, L’Algérie dans la littérature française 123; WorldCat (3 copies). One of six copies (numbered 4) of a sumptuous publication of poems on Islam by the French poet, writer and publisher Maurice Heine (1884-1940). The entire edition consists of 77 copies, of which only the first six (numbered 1-6) were printed on dyed Japanese paper and included the frontispiece in three states, of which one painted and highlighted with gold on parchment. The frontispiece, an Arabic text surrounded by flowers, was designed and drawn by the Algerian miniature painter Mohammed Racim (1896-1975), founder of the Algerian school of miniature painting that still exists. The included poems are: La demeure harmonieuse; Dans la maison moresque; Palais d’Islam; Le voyage en faience; Le cyprès; Alger-aux-barbares; and La mort d’Alger.The work opens with a half-title printed in blue, followed by a blank leaf, a leaf with the privilege, another half-title, three frontispieces, the title-page, and a dedication, followed by the prologue and the seven poems. It closes with a colophon, mentioning the different copies of the book. Below the colophon is the print number: "Exemplaire no. 4. Imprimé pour le docteur Pierre Astruc". With a presentation inscription to Pierre Astruc: "à Pierre Astruc, avec toute l’affection de ton ami dévoué, Maurice Heine". In very good condition.
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In primam totam Fen primi libri canonis Avicenn[a]e dilucidissima & expectatissima expositio. Nunc primum in lucem edita, illustrata, & completa aßiduo labore, & longo studio Marci Oddi Medici eiusdem filij.Venice, Paolo and Antonio Meietti, 1575. 4to. With woodcut device on title-page, a woodcut headpiece, 3 nice large decorated woodcut initials (plus 17 smaller), and a small woodcut decoration (repeated once). Contemporary limp vellum, with manuscript title on spine.

IBN SINA (AVICENNA)]. ODDIS, Oddus de [Oddi, Oddo degli]. Arcadian library 15358; Durling 3388; EDIT 16, 30889; USTC 845237 (4 copies outside Italy); cf. N.G. Siraisi, Avicenna in Renaissance Italy: The Canon and medical teaching in Italian universities after 1500 (1987), p. 193. Rare first and only edition of a commentary on book I, fen I of Avicenna’s Canon, including the Latin version of the text by Andrea Alpago and Jacob Mantino. Like most of Oddi’s work it was published posthumously by his son Marco degli Oddi. "Although in the body of his work much of the time he treated Avicenna with nominal respect, this was apt to be achieved through a procedure of deducing Avicenna’s ‘real’ opinion by consulting Galen. In addition, Oddo Oddi had a long-standing interest in the problem of securing a better Latin text of the Canon (he was on the academic committee that approved Alpago’s work and he encouraged Graziolo many years later); he based his exposition on Alpago’s text, which he claimed to be in general use, and rather frequently compared the latter’s renderings with those of Gerard of Cremona and Jakob Mantino." (Siraisi).Before practicing Medicine in Venice, Oddo degli Oddi (1478-1558) taught classics (Greek and Latin) at the University of Padua. Eventually he went back to Padua, where he taught Medicine. He was a committed supporter of Galen’s doctrines. With owner’s inscription on fly-leaf dated 1586, two owner’s names on title-page (one struck trough) and some manuscript notes in the margins. Binding slightly wrinkled, but internally in very good condition.
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Zeemans-gids, naar, in en uit Oost-Indië, China, Japan, Australië, de Kaap de Goede Hoop, Brazilië en tusschenliggende havens, volgens de laatste Engelsche uitgave van Horsburgh’s Directory, .Amsterdam, C.F. Stemler (back of half-title: printed by H.F. Bakels), 1853. Folio. Contemporary half calf, gold-tooled spine.

HORSBURGH, James, Gerrit KUIJPER and D. BOES LUTJENS. Cat. NHSM, pp. 76-77; NCC (4 copies); WorldCat (3 additional copies); cf. Cook, "Horsburgh, James (1762-1836)", in: ODNB (online ed.). Rare second edition of the Dutch translation, based on the English edition of 1852, of a massive navigational directory, with exhaustive information on the Arabian Sea, the Red Sea, and the Arabian (Persian) Gulf, including detailed entries on Sharjah, Dubai ("Debay"), Abu Dhabi ("Abozhubbie") and Bahrain, not only covering navigational details, but also the inhabitants, pearl fishery, geography, commerce etc. The work was compiled chiefly from recent journals of ships employed by the British East India Company, by James Horsburgh (1762-1836), hydrographer and chart maker to the Company. The present work was translated and expanded by the engineer Gerrit Kuijper and merchant D. Boes Lutjens. It opens with a preface, a table of contents, and an introduction on navigation, covering the winds, storms, weather at sea, sea currents, using a compass, and more. The rest of the text contains sailing routes to different parts of the world, mostly the East Indies (India, Southeast Asia and Indonesia), but also covering the African coasts, China, Japan, Australia, and Brazil.Binding worn along the extremities, hinges cracked, front hinge restored with black tape, spine loose. Internally in very good condition, only slightly browned.
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Rime di M. Francesco Coppetta de’ Beccuti Perugino. Venice, Domenico & Giovanni Battista Guerra, 1580. 8vo. With Guerra’s woodcut device on title-page and a slightly larger version on the otherwise blank last printed leaf. Contemporary limp sheepskin parchment.

BECCUTI, Francesco, known as Il COPPETTA. Aldrich & Wotherspoon, Who’s who in gay and lesbian history, pp. 44-45; EDIT 16, 4773; Gamba, Serie . Italiana letteratura 372; USTC 813042. First edition (the only edition before 1720) of the collected poems of the Renaissance poet Francesco Beccuti (1509-1553) in Perugia, in the original Italian. It contains 129 sonnets, 4 canzoni, 4 madrigals and 19 additional poems. While some of his poems had appeared earlier in anthologies of work by various authors, sometimes mis-attributed to Tasso or others, many appear for the first time in the present posthumously published collection. Although Beccuti’s poems express love for several women and he married in 1544 and had children, he is now best known for the extensive homosexual content in his poems, revealing the activities and social interactions of Beccuti himself and those in his circles in great detail and showing the social and cultural position of homosexuality in mid-sixteenth century Italy. A decade after his death the Council of Trent, concerned about the effect of Protestant accusations of corruption and immorality on the Church’s image, began efforts to suppress or hide many homosexual activities, but "Beccuti profited from the enormous tolerance of homosexuality, which existed just before the start of the Counter Reformation, to discuss his own homosexual loves with a frankness which would become unthinkable only a few decades later" as well as those of "an entire generation of the upper classes in Perugia" . "Practically unique in its genre" (Aldrich & Wotherspoon). With occasional small and mostly marginal stains or ink spots, but otherwise internally in very good condition. The parchment is wrinkled with a few small holes and tears and the cover has separated from the bookblock at the inside front hinge. A long neglected work, now of great interest as a socio-cultural document of homosexual relations in Italy ca 1550.
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Il Decameron . di nuovo ristampato, e riscontrato in Firenze con testi antichi, & alla sua vera lettione ridotto. dal cavalier Lionardo Salviati . Et . adornato di bellissime figure .Venice, Alessandro Vecchi, 1602. 4to. With Vecchi’s on the title-page, a woodcut oval portrait of Boccaccio and 110 woodcut illustrations (mostly about 6.5 x 10 cm). Contemporary limp sheepskin parchment.

BOCCACCIO, Giovanni. BMC STC Italian (17th century), p. 117; ICCU RMLE 024120; USTC 4033572; for Salviati’s redaction: D.T. Tonozzi, Reading the Decameron from Boccaccio to Salviati (PhD thesis, Cornell University, 2010), pp. 115-166. One of the most important and influential redactions of Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron, the greatest and most popular work of Italian literature. Boccaccio (1313-1375) began writing the Decameron soon after the plague that decimated Florence in 1348 and finished it in 1353. It was immediately recognized as a great work, and has remained a classic ever since. It is a classic example of stories within a frame story, the frame story revolving around the plague in Florence. Ten young noble Florentines (seven women and three men) decide to leave the city to avoid the plague, settling in a villa in the countryside nearby. They entertain each other for ten days by each telling a story each day, making a hundred stories in all. Although Boccaccio has the young man Dioneo tell more naughty stories than the other characters, he also has the women tell some, especially on day seven, when Dioneo sets the theme as stories of women playing tricks on their husbands. Modern scholars often accuse Salviati of butchering Boccaccio’s text but in fact he showed the greatest respect for it. The Church was more concerned with its own reputation than with eroticism per se, so in many cases Salviati could preserve the erotic escapades of priests, nuns, etc., by simply turning them into teachers, housewives or other people not seen as representatives of the Catholic Church. Salviati’s redaction was a great success when it appeared in 1582, satisfying the Church and clearly also finding eager readers. With an early owner’s monogram before the imprint. The title-page is worn and shows a faint water stain, one or two of the printed shoulder notes are very slightly shaved, and one or two leaves show a tiny marginal worm trail, but the book is generally in good condition. The binding is slightly rubbed, with some worm holes in the spine.
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Calila et Dimna, ou fables de Bidpai, en arabe; précédées d’un mémoire sur l’origine de ce livre, et sur les diverses traductions qui en ont été faites dans l’Orient, et suivies de la Moallaka de Lébid, en arabe et en français; .Paris, Imprimerie royale, 1816. 4to. Contemporary half calf.

KALILA WA DIMNA]. Silvèstre de Sacy (editor). Blois, "Kalila wa-Dimna", in: Meisami & Starkey, Enyclopedia of Arabic literature, pp. 423-425; Keith-Falconer, Kalilah and Dimnah, pp. xvi-xvii. First publication of a complete Arabic text of the Kalîla wa Dimna or Bidpai fables, written by Ibn al-Muqaffa (ca. 721-ca.757) and edited by the famous French orientalist Silvestre de Sacy (1758-1838). At its core a translation from the Sanskrit Panchatantra, Ibn al-Muqaffa added an introduction and several moralising sub stories, turning a collection of fables into "an indispensable store-house of political wisdom But in the end it is unlikely that anyone ever learnt either politics or morals from this book; the supposed pedagogical content is little more than an ostensible justification for what to a Muslim reader would otherwise have seemed a trivial work of entertainment" (Blois).Following the fables, is the complete text of the Mu?allaqa by Labid (ca. 516-ca. 661), one of the greatest pre-Islamic Arabic poems, also published for the first time. It contains notes in Arabic by Sacy and a French translation.Silvestre De Sacy was the first professor of Arabic at the École spéciale des langues orientales vivantes in Paris on its establishment in 1795. He produced an 1810 Arabic grammar that finally replaced Erpenius’s as the scholarly standard and several carefully edited editions of Arabic and other oriental manuscripts from the collections of the Bibliothèque Royale/Impériale.With minimal (contemporary?) underlining. Binding restored; a good copy.
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Il Filocopo Di nuovo riveduto, corretto, & alla sua vera lettione ridotto da M. Francesco Sansovino. .Venice, [device of Domenico Giglio] (colophon: Francesco Rampazetto, 1554). Small 8vo (15 x 11 cm). With Giglio’s woodcut device on the title-page, 6 woodcut decorated initials (3 series) plus 2 repeats. Set in Aldine-style italic types (with upright capitals) with incidental roman. Contemporary limp vellum.

BOCCACCIO, Giovanni. EDIT 16, 6334; Gay & Lemonnyer, col. 726; USTC 814845; cf. Gamba, Italiana letteratura 198 cr. (other eds.); for the text: Kirkham et al., eds., Boccaccio: a critical guide, pp. 87-93; Marrone, Encyclopedia of Italian literary studies, pp. 252-253. Second Sansovino edition of Boccaccio’s first important work, Il Filocolo (here Filocopo), a prose romance written ca. 1334-1336, about twenty years before the Decameron. Boccaccio reworked the 12th-century French love story of Floire (Florio), muslim Prince of Andalusia, and Blancheflor (Biancifiore), the orphaned daughter of his mother’s Roman Christian lady-in-waiting. They grow up together in the royal household, but when they fall in love his parents try to break up the romance by selling her to merchants who will take her to Alexandria to join a harem. Florio, under the pseudonym Filocopo, rescues and marries her. He converts to Christianity and they return home where he ascends the throne and his people embrace Christianity. Boccaccio introduced many new elements into the story and told it with his usual flare for (often risqué) humour. It served as inspiration for writers around the world from Chaucer to Keats, and Boccaccio himself further developed several episodes for stories in his Decameron.Francesco Sansovino (1521-1583) had produced the first variorum edition of the Decameron in 1546 and then turned his editorial scholarship to Il Filocolo, beginning with Gaetano’s text (editions in 1527 and 1538). With 2 early owners’ inscriptions on the title-page, both struck through and part of one abraded. With a small hole in the title-page and the corners of a few leaves dog-eared, but otherwise internally in very good condition. The binding is worn, but the lovely manuscript title on the spine remains clear. Second edition of the best Renaissance redaction of Boccaccio’s important, influential and entertaining first major work.
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Voyages de Gulliver.Paris, Pierre Didot aîné (verso of vol. 1 half-title: sold by [Pierre-François] Bleuet jeune), 1797. 4 parts in 2 volumes, bound as 4. 18mo (13.5 x 8.5 cm). With an engraved frontispiece and 9 engraved illustration plates, all drawn by Louis-Joseph Lefèvre (1756-1830) and engraved by Louis-Joseph Masquelier, with a tissue guard leaf bound in before each plate. Set in roman and italic types cut by Firmin Didot, brother of the printer, and printed in an edition of 100 copies. Near contemporary (ca. 1820) gold-tooled, long-grained red morocco by René Simier, Relieur du Roi, signed at the foot of the spine of vol. 1, gilt edges.

SWIFT, Jonathan]. Cohen & De Ricci, cols. 965-966; WorldCat (2 copies of Bleuet issue & 1 copy of Didot issue?); cf. H. Teerink, Bibl. Jonathan Swift 397 (Didot issue); for Gulliver’s travels generally: Howgego, Invented, S40; for the binder: Devauchelle, Reliure en France II, p. 250; Fléty, p. 162; Ramsden, French bookbinders, p. 190. A charming and finely produced little bibliophile edition of Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s travels, in Abbé Pierre François Guyot Desfontaines’s French translation, with an illustrated engraved frontispiece and 9 engraved illustration plates all made for this edition. It was printed by Pierre Didot, then the most esteemed printer in the world. It includes all four voyages, here each bound in a separate small volume. The best and most famous satire of modern Western politics, religion and culture in almost all its aspects (and a brief satire of Japan). The book has three illustrations for the first voyage and two for each of the others. One illustration shows Gulliver extinguishing the fire that threatened to engulf the Lilliputian royal palace by urinating on it.René Simier (1772-1843) is recorded as bookbinder to the Empress Marie Louise from 1809 to 1812, and King Louis XVIII appointed him royal bookbinder soon after the restoration, apparently in 1816 or 1817. "His variety and technique were superb; he had no superior and few rivals during his career" (Ramsden). He bound at least four copies of the present edition, for the present copy is not one of the three noted by Cohen & De Ricci.With an occasional minor spot, in one case with a small hole in the margin, but otherwise in fine condition. Each volume with a small scuff mark at the foot of the spine, very minor wear to the hinges and corners, and the outer edges of the paste-downs slightly discoloured by the morocco underneath, but otherwise also fine. A jewel of book production (1797) and binding (ca. 1820).