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Donald A. Heald

Sable Island] [A series of five views on a single plate] `A View of the East End of the Isle Sable

Sable Island] [A series of five views on a single plate] `A View of the East End of the Isle Sable, bearing S:2o W: distant 4 Miles, Naked Sand Hills appearing over the Land, Rams Head S:57o W: distant 17 miles’; `The Eastern End of the Isle Sable, taken from the Southward.’; A View taken from the South Side of the N:E: Barr, in 13 Fathoms of Water, the Body of the Isle Sable bearing W: distant 5 1/3 Miles.’; `A View taken from the Ridge of the N:E: Barr, the Isle Sable bearing W:12oS: distant 16 1/2 Miles.’; `A View of the North Shore of the Isle Sable, Rams Head appearing over the Land, and bearing W:S:W: 2 1/2 Miles distant’

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824) Etching with aquatint, printed in sepia.Printed on laid paper with `J Bates’ watermark and `JB’ countermark. A fine series of profile views of the extraordinary Sable Island, from the remarkable marine atlas ‘The Atlantic Neptune’. These views were intended as an aid to navigating the treacherous waters around the island. Sable Island is a 20 mile long crescent of sand, south east of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The island is the last offshore remnant of a time when the sea levels were much lower. It is theorized that the vast mound of sand that forms the island was deposited there by glaciers at the end of the last ice age. The shifting nature of the shoals off the island, allied with treacherous sea currents have meant that, until the invention of modern navigational techniques, it was extremely hazardous to ships. Over 350 wrecks have been recorded since 1583, the most recent in July 1999. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres’s synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain’s empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres’s monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres’s charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; National Maritime Museum (Greenwich) Henry Newton Stevens Collection 74e; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15.
A Chart of the Harbour of Louisbourg in the Island of Cape Breton

A Chart of the Harbour of Louisbourg in the Island of Cape Breton

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824) Engraved chart, the town and border hand-coloured as issued. Minor repaired edge tears. Sheet Size: 22 5/8 x 32 1/2 inches. An important 18th century chart of Louisbourg harbour. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres’s synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain’s empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres’s monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres’s charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Stevens 140.
YORKTOWN] [A Plan of the Post of York and Gloucester in the Province of Virginia. Established by his Majesty's Army under the Command of Lieut. General Earl Cornwallis

YORKTOWN] [A Plan of the Post of York and Gloucester in the Province of Virginia. Established by his Majesty’s Army under the Command of Lieut. General Earl Cornwallis, together with the Attacks under Operations of the American & French Forces Commanded by General Washington and the Count of Rochambeau, which Terminated in the Surrender of the said Posts and Army on the 18th of October 1781. Surveyed by Captn. Fage of the Royal Artillery]

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824) One sheet only (of two). Engraved with aquatint, outline color, with an inset of the lower Chesapeake and lower courses of the York and James Rivers. Expert restoration. Very rare Des Barres chart of Yorktown. The [Atlantic Neptune] is the "most splendid collection of charts, plans and views ever published" (Rich). It was published at the charge of the British government for the use of the British Navy, and no expense appears to have been spared in the execution in order to render it a monument worthy of the nation. Due to the great cost of publication, this multi-volume atlas would probably have never seen the light of day if not for the worsening conditions in the American Colonies. It was imperative for the Admiralty to have a worthy sea atlas for the use of its fleet in American waters. Even then the work progressed slowly. The earliest charts were separately published and distributed to the Navy in 1775. New charts appeared regularly over the next seven years, with the emphasis shifting according to the course of events during the Revolution. Approximately 160 charts were produced before publication ceased in 1782, and no two examples of the atlas have the same collation. The [Plan of the Posts of York and Gloucester], dated 4th June 1782, was the last of the charts to be published. Very few copies were printed before the atlas was discontinued, and it is an extraordinary rarity. The map was included in only one of the thirteen sets of the Atlantic Neptune at the Library of Congress examined by Coolie Verner. It is the "first British prototype to detail the situation around Yorktown at the time of the surrender" (Verner, [Yorktown], p. 251). The second, by William Faden, did not appear until 1785. Present here is the right half only of the two sheet map. Degrees of Latitude , 66; Verner, "Maps of the Yorktown Campaign 1780 – 1781" The Mapping of America p. 252; Rich, Bibliotheca Americana, I , p. 249; Phillips, Atlases 1198-1204.
View of St Anthony's Nose

View of St Anthony’s Nose, on the North River, Province of New York, 1795

FISHER, George Bulteel after, J.W. EDY, engraver and publisher Hand-colored aquatint. "This beautiful, early aquatint of Hudson River scenery features Anthony’s Nose, a bold promontory of 900 feet on the Hudson near Peekskill" (Deak). This beautiful print is from a rare series of six views aquatinted by John William Edy from studies by Lieut. George Bulteel Fisher. Only two are of the United States, the remainder being of Canada. Lieut. George Bulteel Fisher was Aide-de-Camp. to Prince Edward (later Duke of Kent and Commander-in-Chief in Canada). Fisher made most of the drawings for these aquatints while in the Duke’s service; and he dedicated the series to the Duke (hence the archaic reference to "the Province of New York"). Spendlove remarks, that the quality of these views are second to none, and that Fisher and Edy achieve an extremely fine effect by combining a broad sweeping technique, with an eye for minute detail. The present aquatint, features the distinctive outline of the headland known as ‘St. Anthony’s Nose’, a 900-foot high promontory on the Hudson (or North River as it was also known at the time), close to Peekskill. The river flows around it; two men paddle a canoe across the foreground, while a sailboat is visible in the distance. The general treatment is broad and sweeping, but the richness of the foliage effects, combined with the close attention paid to the details of the tiny figures, all unite to a make an image of great beauty. Masses of exposed rock are painted in pale browns, framed by the luxuriant summer foliage in several shades of olive-green. Due to quarrying, Anthony’s Nose has lost its distinctive shape, and this image is one of the few records of how Nature originally shaped it. Deak 188; Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada p.24; Stokes C1790-95-B-116.
A View from the Camp at the East End of the Naked Sand Hills

A View from the Camp at the East End of the Naked Sand Hills, on the South East Shore of the Isle of Sable [Nova Scotia]

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824) Etching with aquatint. Printed on laid paper with `J. Bates’ watermark and `JB’ countermark. Skillful marginal restoration in several places. One of the most desirable, large-scale views from the ‘The Atlantic Neptune’, the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies In this fine scene Des Barres depicts his own men camping beneath the hills that form the spine of Sable Island, the 20 mile-long shifting sandbar that lies 111 miles off the coast of Halifax. From 1766 to 1768, Des Barres and his party spent two seasons surveying the waters around Sable Island. The island is known for both for its wild horses, depicted here, and, more ominously. as the "Graveyard of the Atlantic." The island is the last offshore remnant from the time when the sea levels were much lower. It is theorized that the vast mound of sand that forms the island was deposited there by glaciers at the end of the last ice age. The shifting nature of the shoals off the island, allied with treacherous sea currents have meant that, until the invention of modern navigational techniques, it was extremely hazardous to ships. Over 350 wrecks have been recorded since 1583, the most recent in July 1999. The horses on the island, now numbering about 200, are probably descended from stock belonging to the Acadians of Nova Scotia. In 1760, the Boston merchant Thomas Hancock shipped 60 Acadian horses to Sable island, where they have bred and flourished ever since. The isolated nature of the herd means that they provide insights into the type of animal that was favoured by the eighteenth-century settlers. This view is the fourth and final state produced, and is identical to the Henry Stevens Collection , variant 77D, in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Des Barres studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. On the outbreak of the Seven Years war in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to be his aide-de-camp. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St.Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on the Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune was the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies, and one of the most important achievements of eighteenth century cartography. With an official commission from the Royal Navy, Des Barres published the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by further volumes. Des Barres’ monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and aquatint views, many being found in several states. All of the charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information. Des Barres’ plates were used to print further editions up into the first decade of the nineteenth-century. The Neptune met with the highest acclaim from the beginning, and is today widely regarded as superior to all other atlases produced during its time. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15; National Maritime Museum: Henry Stevens Collection: K0252 HNS 77D & Catalogue, no.62-66, p.383; Phillips, p.634.
A group of six views printed on a single plate] `A View of Cape Egmont and Winter Rock from the Eastward.'; `Entrance of Egmont Harbor.'; `The Entrance of Keppel Harbor

A group of six views printed on a single plate] `A View of Cape Egmont and Winter Rock from the Eastward.’; `Entrance of Egmont Harbor.’; `The Entrance of Keppel Harbor, 10 Leagues to the Eastward of Halifax.’; `Falls of Hinchinbroke River, the North East Branch of Sandwich Bay.’; `The Entrance into Chisetcook Inlet 4 Leagues Eastward of Halifax.’; `Dartmouth Shore in the Harbor of Halifax’

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721?-1824) Hand-colored etching on Bates paper. No imprint. Sheet size: 32 1/4 x 23 3/4 inches with center fold, as with all early issues. Expert restoration to center fold and marginal tears. A set of six navigational views of Halifax Harbour and nearby coastal area, from one of the most important North American marine atlases This group includes four profile views intended as aids to navigation. The profiles were intended for use by captains of vessels to identify exactly where they were in relation to distant shorelines; added to these is a charming roundel giving a picturesque view of a waterfall on the Hinchinbroke River and finally a tranquil view in Halifax harbour which is enlivened by the small scene in the lower right of the image where, amid clouds of steam, men work frantically to re-tar the hull of a man-of-war. This finely coloured example of the print corresponds to Stevens 51, first state without stamped plate number. ‘The Atlantic Neptune ‘ was the first great marine atlas, and one of the greatest achievements of eighteenth century cartography. Published in England in 1774, it contained over 250 charts and views of the North American and Canadian coasts. The charts were intensely detailed and contained both hydrographical and topographical details. The Neptune was compiled and published for the Royal Navy by Joseph F. W. Des Barres, a Swiss cartographer who joined the Royal American Regiment as a surveyor. Des Barres fought in the French and Indian wars and was enlisted to survey the Canadian coastline. While his fellow surveyor, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast, Des Barres mapped the shoreline of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and the St. Lawrence River regions. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he compiled and published his monumental atlas; his dedication to the project was so strong that he published an updated version of the work every year until 1784. Des Barres’ work was so superior to any other contemporary atlas, that the maps were used as the standard charts of the East coast for over 50 years. The Neptune remains one of the most important atlases ever printed, its views and maps chart the history of North America and allow us to glimpse forgotten shores long changed with the passage of time. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada , Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15; Stevens 51A.
8 Navigational Profiles near Nova Scotia}: Appearance of the Land from the White Islands to St. Marys River taken two Leagues off Shore; The Entrance of Milford Haven at the Head of Chedabucto Bay; The Entrance of Port Bickerton bearing N. W.; A View taken off the Entrance of Beaver Harbor Bald Isle bearing E

8 Navigational Profiles near Nova Scotia}: Appearance of the Land from the White Islands to St. Marys River taken two Leagues off Shore; The Entrance of Milford Haven at the Head of Chedabucto Bay; The Entrance of Port Bickerton bearing N. W.; A View taken off the Entrance of Beaver Harbor Bald Isle bearing E, 150 N; A View taken in the Offing of Beaver Harbour Bald Isle bearing W. by S. 3/4 S. distant 3/4 of a Mile; Appearance of the Shore to the Westward of Canso Cranberry Isle bearing N. by E. 1/2 E. distant 4 Miles; C. Bald Isle bearing N. 1/2 E. The Beaver Isles; Appearance of the S. E. Point of Nove Scotia taken from Canso Island Shewing the distant Land of Richmond Isles the Gut of Canso &c

DES BARRES, J. F. W. (1721-1824) Hand-colored line engraving and aquatint. Two plates printed on two sheets, joined with 8 views arranged in 5 rows. Sheet size: 32 x 43 3/4 inches. 8 navigational profile views from the greatest of all 18th century sea atlases These eight views of sites in and around Nova Scotia were designed to give navigators additional information to the soundings on the charts of these same places. Several of the placenames have changed, but Beaver Island, Port Bickerton, Chedabucto Bay and Canso remain. This is the 5th of 5 states with many ships and aquatinted features to the landscapes added to the original plates. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The American Revolution in drawings and prints; a checklist of 1765-1790 graphics in the Library of Congress / Compiled by Donald H. Cresswell, with a foreword by Sinclair H. Hitchings. Washington : 1975, no. 397-404; #61e Henry Stevens Collection.
A group of six views near Halifax printed on a single plate] `A View of Cape Egmont and Winter Rock from the Eastward.'; `Entrance of Egmont Harbor.'; `The Entrance of Keppel Harbor

A group of six views near Halifax printed on a single plate] `A View of Cape Egmont and Winter Rock from the Eastward.’; `Entrance of Egmont Harbor.’; `The Entrance of Keppel Harbor, 10 Leagues to the Eastward of Halifax.’; `Falls of Hinchinbroke River, the North East Branch of Sandwich Bay.’; `The Entrance into Chisetcook Inlet 4 Leagues Eastward of Halifax.’; `Dartmouth Shore in the Harbor of Halifax’

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721?-1824) Etching with aquatint. Sheet size: 33 x 24 1/4 inches. A portion of the upper left platemark expertly reinforced. 3rd state of 5 (Corresponding to Stevens 51 (c)). A set of six navigational views of Halifax Harbour and nearby coastal area, from one of the most important North American marine atlases This group includes four views intended as aids to navigation. The profiles were intended for use by captains of vessels to identify exactly where they were in relation to distant shorelines; added to these is a charming roundel giving a picturesque view of a waterfall on the Hinchinbroke River and finally a tranquil view in Halifax harbour which is enlivened by the small scene in the lower right of the image where, amid clouds of steam, men work frantically to re-tar the hull of a man-of-war. This later state of the print incorporates all the improvements in detail and the addition of sailing ships of all kinds. ‘The Atlantic Neptune’ was the first great marine atlas, and one of the greatest achievements of eighteenth century cartography. Published in England in 1774, it contained over 250 charts and views of the North American and Canadian coasts. The charts were intensely detailed and contained both hydrographical and topographical details. The Neptune was compiled and published for the Royal Navy by Joseph F. W. Des Barres, a Swiss cartographer who joined the Royal American Regiment as a surveyor. Des Barres fought in the French and Indian wars and was enlisted to survey the Canadian coastline. While his fellow surveyor, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast, Des Barres mapped the shoreline of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and the St. Lawrence River regions. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he compiled and published his monumental atlas; his dedication to the project was so strong that he published an updated version of the work every year until 1784. Des Barres’ work was so superior to any other contemporary atlas, that the maps were used as the standard charts of the East coast for over 50 years. The Neptune remains one of the most important atlases ever printed, its views and maps chart the history of North America and allow us to glimpse forgotten shores long changed with the passage of time. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada , Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15; Catalogue of the Henry Newton Stevens Collection.51c.
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Travels through North & South Carolina, Georgia, East & West Florida, the Cherokee country, the extensive territories of the Muscogulges, or Creek Confederacy, and the country of the Chactaws [sic.]; containing an account of the soil and natural productions of those regions; together with observations on the manners of the Indians

BARTRAM, William (1739-1823) (7 1/4 x 4 5/8 inches). [2], xxxiv, [2, blank], 522pp. Engraved portrait frontispiece of "Mico Chulcco the Long Warrior" by J. Trenchard after Bartram, 1 folding engraved folding map, 7 engraved plates of natural history specimens (one folding). Usual browning. Contemporary sheep, expertly rebacked to style. Housed in a leather backed cloth box. Scarce first edition of "the classic of southern natural history and exploration, with much on the southern Indian tribes. Bartram’s account of the remote frontier, of the plantations, trading posts, and Indian villages at the end of the eighteenth century is unrivaled" (Streeter Sale). For the period, Bartram’s work is unrivalled. In this first-hand account of his travels in the southern states in the years 1773-1778, Bartram writes "with all the enthusiasm and interest with which the fervent old Spanish friars and missionaries narrated the wonders of the new found world . he neglected nothing which would add to the common stock of human knowledge" (Field). Sabin considered this work to be "unequalled for the vivid picturesqueness of its descriptions of nature, scenery, and productions." The famous frontispiece portrait of Mico Chlucco is after Bartram and is engraved by James Trenchard, the work also includes a chapter concerning the customs and language of the Muscogulges and Cherokees. Clark I: 197; Coats The Plant Hunters pp.273-76; Evans 23159; Field 94; Howes B223; Pilling Proof Sheets 301; Sabin 3870; Servies 669; Siebert Sale 594; Stafleu & Cowan 329; Streeter Sale 1088; Vail 849.
Chart of Port Shediack [&] Cocagne (New Brunswick)

Chart of Port Shediack [&] Cocagne (New Brunswick)

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824) Etched with aquatint and stippling. Some outline color. Platemark: 29 1/4 x 21 3/8"; sheet: 32 3/4 x 24 3/4". Laid paper watermarked "J. Bates" with counter mark "J.B." A meticulous survey of a portion of the eastern coast of New Brunswick on the Northumberland Straits with soundings and topographical detailing This chart, which appeared in Volume II of The Atlantic Neptune, was part of the surveying work conducted by Des Barres himself in the late 1760’s and early 1770’s. The first state was issued in 1776; this enhanced second state appeared in 1779. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres’s synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain’s empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres’s monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres’s charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Stevens 72h.
North East Coast of Nova Scotia / Northumberland Streights [sic] (One sheet)

North East Coast of Nova Scotia / Northumberland Streights [sic] (One sheet)

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824) Etching with roulette work, original outline color on laid paper watermarked "JBates" and countermarked "JB" This excellent example of Des Barres’ craftsmanship details a portion of the strait between New Brunswick and what is now Prince Edward Island (then St. John’s Island). It includes on the New Brunswick side: Shediac, Cocagne and Boutouche. The chart includes soundings throughout the Straits and Baie Verte. This is one of the many regions Des Barres himself surveyed during the 1760’s Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres’s synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain’s empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres’s monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres’s charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Streeter copy: Vol. II, # 58; Stevens 68e.
Miramichi Bay]

Miramichi Bay]

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824) Engraved with aquatint, on single double-page sheet watermarked "J. Bates." Excellent condition with minor repairs along centerfold. Detailed depiction of the mouth of the Miramachi River in New Brunswick and Miramachi Bay in the Gulf of St. Larwence. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres’s synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain’s empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres’s monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres’s charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. The survey of the St. Lawrence River and Gulf was conducted by Samuel Holland, who provided many charts to the immense hydrographic enterprise realized in the Atlantic Neptune . This is the fourth state of the map, with the imprint date changed to 1781. HNS 131D; Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet Des Barres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15.
Brevis Narratio eorum quae in florida Americae provi[n]cia Gallis acciderunt . quae est seconda pars Americae

Brevis Narratio eorum quae in florida Americae provi[n]cia Gallis acciderunt . quae est seconda pars Americae

LE MOYNE, Jacques (c.1533-1588). - Theodor DE BRY (13 3/8 x 9 3/8 inches). Engraved title (verso blank), 2-page dedication with engraved vignette, 2-page preface with engraved headpiece, privlege (verso blank), engraved folding map "Florida Americae Provinciae . descriptio, 30pp text, Index (verso blank), engraved sectional title (verso blank), 42 plates after Le Moyne with letterpress titling above and text beneath, [26]pp (including index, Paregon and errata). Expertly bound to style in full mottled calf, covers with central gilt device, spine with raised bands in six compartments, red morocco lettering piece in the second, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers The first Latin edition of a seminal illustrated work for early North America, with Jacques Le Moyne’s spectacular images of the region’s Native Americans and a very important map of Florida. With the publication of this work, together with Hariot’s Virginia, De Bry launched what would later become known as his Grand Voyages . These first two works are without question the most important of the series both in terms of their contemporary influence and their historical and ethnographic value to modern scholars and collectors. The text of the Brevis narratio. . describes the earliest French settlements of what are now portions of the United States and are here united by De Bry with engravings based on watercolours by a member of the expedition to the New World. To most of the Old World, this work presented the first accurate eyewitness depiction and account of Native Americans. In the mid-1560s two French expeditions led by Jean Ribault and René Goulaine de Laudonnière sought to establish a Hugenot settlement in Florida. Among those accompanying Laudonnière was Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues: born in Dieppe, France in about 1533, he was appointed artist to the expedition which sailed in April 1564. Arguably the first western artist to visit the New World, Le Moyne recorded the scenery of Florida and the lives of the Timucua Indians in great detail, as well as charting the coastline of Florida and much of present-day South Carolina. Unfortunately, the nascent French colony was seen as a threat by the Spanish, the dominant European power in the region, and in September 1565 a force led by Pedro Menendez massacred the French colonists at Fort Caroline. Le Moyne and several others, however, made a miraculous escape. The story of their struggles was not published until 1588, when, at the instigation of Richard Hakluyt, Laudonnière’s journal was published in Paris. Later that year, master engraver and publisher Theodor De Bry traveled to London, and met with Le Moyne in an unsuccessful attempt to obtain illustrations of the region to accompany a new edition of Laudonnière’s journal. Following Le Moyne’s death the following year, De Bry returned to London and purchased the watercolours from his widow. It was on this trip to London that De Bry met Hakluyt, who informed him of the British expeditions to Virginia, shared with him both Hariot’s journal and White’s watercolours from the expedition and suggested the publication of a series of illustrated voyages to America, beginning with Hariot/White and Laudonnière/Le Moyne. De Bry returned to Frankfurt and in 1590 published the former in Latin, German, French and English; the following year he published the latter in Latin and German, presumably having found that there was only a small market for the other languages. Le Moyne’s extraordinary illustrations of the Florida Indians, which appear on forty-two leaves of this work in their first published form, rank with those of John White as the best visual record of American Indians before the 19th century. They show all aspects of Indian life, including settlements, ceremonies, wars, agriculture, hunting, and preparation of food. They also show scenes of the French settlement and their involvement with the Indians. These images were widely copied for centuries, and many later supposedly original illustrations of American Indians are actually copies of Le Moyne’s illustrations. A full list of the plates appears in Church. The map, which appeared for the first time with this text, is one of the most elaborate of the Florida peninsula to appear in the 16th century, giving the names assigned by the French and Spanish. Cumming provides an elaborate description, and John Matthew Baxter describes it as ".the most remarkable and important map, which has been preserved from the sixteenth century maps, of that part of the East Coast which lies between Cape Hatteras and Cape Florida . [It is] the first French map to show Florida . [and is] considered the most important map of Florida." Arents 39; Brunet I, 1320; Burden Mapping of North America 79; Church 145; Cumming & De Vorsey 14; Clark I:16; European Americana 591/39; JCB (3) I:387-88; cf. Sabin 8784; cf. Schwartz & Ehrenberg pp.64-7; Streeter II, 1172.
Sinai and Palestine . [With:] Lower Egypt

Sinai and Palestine . [With:] Lower Egypt, Thebes, and the Pyramids . [And with:] Upper Egypt and Ethiopia

FRITH, Francis (1822-1898) (16 7/8 x 12 inches). 111 mounted gold-toned albumen photographs (additional title with mounted vignette and 36 photographs, in each volume). Scattered minor foxing at sheet edges. Expertly bound to style in half black morocco and publisher’s period cloth covered boards, spines with raised bands in six compartments, ruled in gilt on either side of each band, lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges The best edition of Frith’s photographs of Upper and Lower Egypt and the Holy Land. By the mid 1850s, Frith had sold his grocery and printing businesses to devote himself full time to photography. Between 1856 and 1860, he made three expeditions to Egypt, Sinai, Ethiopia, and Jerusalem, photographically documenting Middle Eastern architecture and culture. "On the first, he sailed up the Nile to the Second Cataract, recording the main historic monuments between Cairo and Abu Simbel. On the second, he struck eastwards to Palestine, visiting Jerusalem, Damascus and other sites associated with the life of Christ. The final expedition was the most ambitious, combining a second visit to the Holy Land with a deeper southward penetration of the Nile. His photographs of the temple at Soleb, 800 miles south of Cairo, represent a genuinely pioneering achievement. Unlike many travel photographers of this period, Frith used the wet collodion process in preference to the more convenient paper-based calotype. Because it involved chemically sensitizing the glass plates on site, this process posed particular problems in a climate dominated by heat, dust and insects. Commenting sardonically on how his chemicals often boiled on contact with the glass, he nevertheless produced negatives that are remarkable for their consistently high technical standard . Frith photographed most of the key monuments several times, combining general views with close studies of their significant details and broader views of their landscape environment. The clarity of his images proved to be of immense value to archaeologists. The photographs are also often powerfully composed, revealing an understanding of the poetic qualities of light that gives them lasting aesthetic value" (McKenzie, Grove Art). Upon his return to London, Frith first published his photographs under the title Egypt and Palestine Photographed and Described , in two volumes with 76 photographs. Various other works followed, including his elephant folio Egypt, Sinai and Jerusalem in 1860 with 20 albumen images, as well as a deluxe edition of the Queen’s Bible illustrated with 57 photographs of the Holy Land in 1862. The present set was published by Mackenzie in 1863 comprised of four volumes: Sinai and Palestine ; Lower Egypt, Thebes and the Pyramids ; Upper Egypt and Ethiopia ; and a supplementary volume titled Egypt, Sinai and Palestine . Each volume contained an illustrated title and 36 mounted photographs, for a total of 148 images. The final volume, evidently issued subsequent to the previous three, was a supplementary volume and is not present here, as is often the case. Comparing these volumes to Frith’s 1858-59 Egypt and Palestine Photographed and Described , Gernsheim refers to the present set as the "second, enlarged edition." While there are certainly similarities between the two works, including images printed from the same negatives and with some identical textual descriptions, in many ways the present set is an entirely different work. Whereas the earlier work was issued in parts with a random ordering of the images, the present set is organized based on Frith’s expeditions, yielding a better visual narrative of his experience. Furthermore, many of the images appear here for the first time, having not been included in any form in the original edition, and many images are variants of views from entirely different negatives than those appearing in the earlier work. Of this latter category, some are slight variants from the same location and angle (e.g. The Sphynx and Great Pyramid, Gezah; Temple of Koum Ombo; etc.), but others are entirely different compositions of the same location (e.g. Entrance to the Great Temple, Luxor). Finally, a number of images from the previous edition are not used here at all (e.g. Protestant Episcopal Church, Jerusalem; Sculptures from the Outer Wall, Dendear; etc.). Perhaps most significantly, however, are the size of the images (being slightly larger in the present work) and the quality of images. Gernsheim writes: "The prints in this edition are of a much stronger quality than those in the first edition having been gold-toned." The process of toning the albumen prints with gold chloride and other solvents both intensified the blacks and helped prevent fading and yellowing, yielding an overall better quality of images. Gernsheim 195.
A collection of 66 photographs from Égypte

A collection of 66 photographs from Égypte, Nubie, Palestine et Syrie: dessins photographiques recueillis pendant les années 1849, 1850 et 1851]

DU CAMP, Maxime (1822-1894) (17 1/2 x 12 3/8 inches). 66 (of 125) salted paper prints from calotype negatives, each on captioned mount as issued. Photographs printed at Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Evrard’s Imprimerie Photographique, in Lille. With 13 original front and 12 rear parts wrappers (with Gambart’s imprint) and with 52 original tissue interleaves with printed captions. Housed in a black morocco backed box. The birth of travel photography. Maxime Du Camp (1822-1894), French writer and journalist, travelled, under the auspices of the Ministry of Education, to the Near East in 1849. Accompanied by his friend the novelist Gustave Flaubert, he spent a year and a half photographing the sites. After an initial stay in Cairo, the two friends hired a boat to take them up the Nile as far as the second cataract, after which they descended the river at leisure, exploring the archaeological sites along its banks. In July 1850 they left Egypt for Palestine, Turkey, and Greece before they parted in Italy the following April. On his return a selection of 125 photographs, from a total of 220 taken, were published by Gide and Baudry of Paris, priced at 500 francs a copy. The photographs were printed at Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Evrard’s Imprimerie Photographique, in Lille. A journalist with no experience in photography, Du Camp learned the calotype process from Le Gray shortly before his departure for Egypt. "Faced with a scene before his camera, Du Camp — neither trained artist nor experienced photographer — seems to have disregarded any preconceived Romantic accretions attached to his subject, and by intuition discovered a gritty, elevational reality. His imagery demonstrates a conspicuously rigorous point of view for a neophyte photographer, unfettered and remarkably consistent . Du Camp’s images are determinedly unlovely but astonishing nevertheless. Yet this brutal directness has a grace and integrity of its own. His monuments seem less the forlorn, picturesque remains of an ancient civilization, than the grim evidence of centuries of pillage. Far from being a poetic homage, these pictures appear to be an indictment. Du Camp’s single foray into photography resulted in a superbly conceived and` well-made volume, and an exemplary demonstration of the photographic art, fully meriting its reputation as the first completely realized photobook" (Parr & Badger) The present images are from the rare English edition, as evidenced by the surviving wrappers, which was marketed by Ernest Gambart. Includes the following plates: 5 – Le Kaire – Mosquée De Sultan-Haçan 6 – Le Kaire – Mosquée Et Tombeau Des Ayoubites 7 – Le Kaire – Mosquée De Sultan Kansou-El-Gouri 8 – Le Kaire – Tombeau De Sultans Mamelouks 10 – Égypte Moyenne – Pyramide De Chephren 11 – Égypte Moyenne – Le Sphinx 12 – Haute Égypte – Necropole De Lycopolis 14 – Haute Égypte – Girgeh – Vue Generale 15 – Haute Égypte – Mosquée D’ Ali Bey 18 – Haute Égypte – Grand Templatée De Denderah Facade Postérieure 19 – Haute Égypte – Grand Templatée De Denderah Sculptures De La Facade Postérieure 20 – Haute Égypte – Grand Templatée De Denderah (Teutyres) Sculptures De La Facade Postérieure 21 – Haute Égypte – Village De Hamameh 24 – Thèbes – Louqsor Vue Générale Des Ruinés 25 – Thèbes – Louqsor Grande Colonnade Du Palais 36 – Thèbes – Palais De Karnak Grand Pyloné Du S-O 41 – Thèbes – Palais De Karnak Sculptures Extérieures Du Sanctuaire De Granit 43 – Thèbes – Palais De Sanctuaire De Granit Et Salle Hypostyle 44 – Thèbes – Palais De Karnak Les Obelisques 45 – Thèbes – Palais De Karnak Proménoir De Tothmés Iii 46 – Thèbes – Médinét Habou Vue Générale Des Ruinés 48 – Thèbes – Médinét Habou Facade Orientale Du Gynéceé De Ramses Méiamoun 49 – Thèbes – Médinét Habou Facade Septentrionale Du Gynéceé De Ramses Méiamoun 50 – Thèbes – Médinét Habou Peristyle Du Palais De Ramses Méiamoun 54 – Thèbes – Gournah Les Colosses 55 – Thèbes – Gournah Statue De Mémnon 57 – Thèbes – Gournah Sculptures Du Troné Des Collosses 60 – Thèbes – Gournah Nécropole De Thébes 61 – Thèbes – Gournah Palais De Ménéphta 1er 63 – Haute Égypte – Templatée D’ Hermontis 64 – Haute Égypte – Vue Générale D’ Esnéh 66 – Haute Égypte – Entrée De La Premiére Cataracte (Plate66) 67 – Haute Égypte – Sortie De La Premiére Cataracte 68 – Nubie – Philoe Vue Générale Prise A L’ouest 69 – Nubie – Philoe Vue Générale Prise A L’angle S.O. 72 – Nubie – Grand Templatée D’isis A Philoe – Dromos Et Pylonés 74 – Nubie – Grand Templatée D’isis A Philoe – Second Pyloné 75 – Nubie – Grand Templatée D’isis A Philoe – Proscynéma 80 – Nubie – Grand Templatée D’isis A Philoe – Vue Générale 81 – Nubie – Village Et Templatée De L’ile De Beghe 82 – Nubie – Rive Orientale Du Nil 83 – Nubie – Mosque De Bellal 84 – Nubie – Rive Septentrionale Du Nil 86 – Nubie – Templatée De Debod 88 – Nubie – Templatée De Tafah 91 – Nubie – Kalabscheh – Ptoleme-Caesarion 93 – Nubie – Templatée De Dandour 95 – Nubie – Templatée De Dakkeh 96 – Nubie – Templatée De Maharakkah 97 – Nubie – Hemi-Speos De Seboua – Dromos 98 – Nubie – Hemi-Speos De Seboua – Pylonés 99 – Nubie – Templatée D’amada 102 – Nubie – Ibsamboul – Vue Genérale Du Speos De Phre 103 – Nubie – Ibsamboul – Colosse Oriental Du Speos De Phre 104 – Nubie – Ibsamboul – Colosse Oriental Du Speos De Phre 105 – Nubie – Ibsamboul – Sculptures De L’entreé Du Speos De Phre 109 – Nubie – Ibsamboul – Entrée Du Speos D’hathor 110 – Nubie – Ibsamboul – Partie Méridionale Du Speos D’hathor 112 – Nubie – Seconde Cataracte Dgebel – Aboucir 114 – Palestiné – Jerusalem – Quartier Occidental 115 – Palestiné – Jerusalem – Arcades Inférieures De L’église Du Saint-Sepulcre 118 – Palestiné – Jerusalem – Porte Doreé 119 – Syrie – Baalbeck – Interieur De L’enciente Des Templateés Du Soleil Et De Jupiter 121 – Syrie – Baalbeck – Colonnade Du Templateé Du Soleil 122 – Syrie – Templatée De Jupiter, A Baalbeck 123 – Syrie – Templatée De Jupiter A Baalbeck Parr & Badger, The Photobook I:p.23; Gernsheim 14; The Truthful Lens 47.
Poissons Ecrevisses et Crabes

Poissons Ecrevisses et Crabes, de diverses couleurs et figures extraordinaires, que l’on trouve autour des Isles Moluques et sur les cotes des Terres Australes

RENARD, Louis (1678/9-1746) (15 3/4 x 10 1/8 inches). Half-title. Title printed in red and black, engraved arms of George II of England on dedication. 100 hand-coloured engraved plates after Fallours (one folding, each showing two or more subjects). Contemporary calf, spine with raised bands in seven compartment, red morocco lettering piece in the second, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, gilt edges. Modern cloth box with leather label One of the rarest and most desirable work of natural history, containing brilliantly hand colored plates of marine life from the East Indies, at the time virtually unknown to Europe. This extraordinary work purports to show marine life from the East Indies at a time when the natural wildlife of that area was virtually unknown in Europe. Noted as one of very few pre-Linnaean works on fishes to be published in color, the work was first published in 1719 in an edition of only 100 copies. Following Renard’s death, the Ottens publishing firm purchased approximately thirty unbound copies of the first edition, as well as the original copperplates, from Renard’s estate. They had the remaining plates hand coloured and printed approximately 70 additional sets, replaced the title-page with a new one, and added a preface by Aernout Vosmaer and a "Declaration" by Renard. This second edition, also limited to 100 copies, is noted for its superb hand colouring. Louis Renard (1678-1746) was a French Huguenot refugee who became a successful book seller and publisher based in Amsterdam, as well as a spy for the British Crown. The plates were engraved after drawings by Samuel Fallours, brought back to Amsterdam from Amboina in the East Indies by Frederik Julius Coyett, son of the Governor Baltazar Coyett. Fallours began his career as a soldier in the service of the Dutch East India Company, and later between 1707 and 1712, held the title of Associate Curate to the clergy. As early as 1703 his artistic abilities were discovered by several important officials, also in the employ of the Company. "When he (Fallours) showed his portfolio of watercolours to the Directors of the East India Company at Amsterdam, they could or would not believe that such fish really existed. So, to convince these gentlemen, Fallours had written a letter to the Reverend Francois Valentijn (1666-1727), who had also spent many years in the East Indies. In his letter, Fallours asked Valentijn to confirm to the Governors that the fishes which he had painted actually existed. Valentijn complied by writing on August 28th 1715, . `I can assure you in all honesty that in the waters around Ambon and the other islands belonging to the Moluccan Archipelago I have observed a wide variety of fish whose colours are as variegated and brilliant as Fallours has painted. I have seen his watercolours and can vouch that these fishes have been drawn and coloured from life.’. Writing over one hundred years later, Bleeker remarked, ‘Although these figures are partly exaggerated and partly unrecognizable, it later proved that practically every one of them is based on a natural object.’ It was Louis Renard, one of the charges d’affaires of H.M. King George II of England in Amsterdam, who decided to publish this material" (Landwehr, pp. 44-45). The plates depict 416 fishes, 40 crustaceans, 2 insects, a dugong, and a mermaid. Despite their fanciful appearance, modern scientists have identified the species depicted in most of the illustrations (the mermaid excepted). The work contains no text apart from the engraved descriptions on the plates themselves, in which almost every fish is named and some assessed in terms of its edibility (with some descriptions including brief recipes for preparation). A beautiful example of the most fantastic book on East Indian ocean life and "one of the most remarkable Dutch books with coloured plates" (Landwehr). Landwehr 159; Nissen ZBI 3361; Nissen Schone Fischbucher 103; cf. Pietsch, Fishes, Crayfishes, and Crabs. Baltimore: 1995, pp. 22-26.
Travels] Itinerarius

Travels] Itinerarius

MANDEVILLE, Sir John (d.1372) (7 3/8 x 5 1/8 inches). Type: 5:82G; 33 lines, initial spaces, with 51 initials supplied in red in a contemporary manuscript hand. Collation: A-F8 G6 H8, lacking A1 (an initial blank). Colophon H8r: ‘ Explicit jtinerarius [i.e. itinerarius] a terra anglie i[n] p[ar]tes ierosolimitanas et in vlteriores transmarinas editus p[ri]mo in lingua gallicana a domino Iohanne de Mandeuille milite suo auctore. Anno incarnacionis D[omi]ni Mcclv. in ciuitate leodiensi [et] paulo post in eade[m] ciuitate tra[n]slatus in dicta[m] forma[m] latina[m] Quod opus vbi inceptu[m] simul et co[m]pletu[m] sit ip[s]a elementa seu singularu[m] seorsu[m] caracteres i[tine]rarum quibus impressu[m] vides venetica monstrant manifeste’. (Lacking front blank, neat expert restoration to upper blank margin of first page). Red 20th-century morocco by Zaehnsdorf of London, covers with single gilt fillet border, spine gilt in six compartments with raised bands, lettered in the second, date in the third, the others plain but for a single fillet gilt border, gilt turn-ins, gilt edges At the very beginning of printed travel literature stands the tales of the English knight Sir John Mandeville, whose narrative describes extensive and often rather incredible adventures outside of Europe to the East in the first half of the 14th century. The authenticity of Sir John Mandeville and his travels have been matters for debate for centuries – what is undeniable is the popularity of the travel narrative, which was the most widely read of its time. Mandeville’s stories are the bridge between the fabulous tales of the Middle Ages and the real, but remarkable, encounters of Europeans venturing into the wider world. Apocryphal or not, the Mandeville adventures set the stage for all of published travel literature. Notably, they were published at the same time and place as the first edition of Marco Polo’s narrative of his travels to China. The Mandeville narrative has long been ascribed to one John of Burgundy, who died at Liege in 1372; the earliest known manuscript version, in the Bibliotheque Nationale, is dated to 1371. This is the first of some three hundred manuscript versions created over the next century, making the Mandeville narrative one of the most popular secular texts prior to the invention of printing. It tells the story of a young English knight from St. Albans who left Britain in 1322 and spent the next thirty-four years travelling in the East, visiting the Middle East and Palestine before continuing to India, Tibet, China, Java, and Sumatra, then returning westward to Egypt and North Africa. Records of the Mandeville family show that a John Mandeville sold his land and property in 1321, then disappears from records until 1358, when a further record of him occurs. While some parts of the Mandeville narrative are lifted from other sources, and others may be fabulous, it certainly seems that the text is built around a core of truth. Donald Lach, while arguing that the Mandeville narrative is a literary invention of either a Burgundian or possibly written by Mandeville himself, points out that the book was accepted at face value at the time, and was translated from the original Latin into every major European language by 1500. He points out the many existing sources drawn upon, from Pliny and Solinus to Odoric of Pordenone’s account of the Middle East and numerous other contemporary sources. "Mandeville’s book certainly owes much of its popularity to the sheer artistry displayed by the author in weaving the available sources into a rich backdrop for his personal, fictional, narrative." Lach acknowledges that many of the accounts of the East given by Mandeville are accurate, citing his description of the use of the Southern Cross in navigation from India to Sumatra, and the kinds of spices grown in Java. "Mandeville utilized the travel and mission accounts to their fullest and sought to integrate this newer knowledge with more traditional materials. Since his veracity was generally unquestioned until the seventeenth century, his work helped to mold significantly the learned and popular view of Asia." This is the fine Robinson copy of the second edition of this famous work. This edition is evidently preceded only by the Zwolle edition of Pieter van Os, completed on Sept. 17, 1483, also in Gouda (Goff M-159). There is a gap in the printed output from Leeu’s workshop from the late summer of 1482 to some point in 1483 when he begins again with a new font – the same font as used here. The colophon in the present work alludes to the Venetian origin of the matrix, and it may be that the hiatus in Leeu’s output was because he took time to visit Venice personally to collect the type. A fine copy of the printed book at the very foundation of travel literature. The first edition, the year prior to this one, is so rare as to be impossible; no copy has appeared on the market in modern times. Only two copies of this edition have appeared at auction in the last thirty-five years. BMC IX, 27 (IA. 47355); NCBEL I, 471-473; CA 1998; Cinquième Centenaire 129c, pp.280-8; Goff M-160; HC 10644*; IDL 3063; Klebs 652.3; Polain 2584; C.W.R.D. Mosley, "The Use of Sources" in the Travels of Sir John Mandeville (1983); Lach, Asia in the Making of Europe, I, pp. 77-80; Howgego M39.
Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle

Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty’s Ships Adventure and Beagle, between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America and the Beagle’s Circumnavigation of the Globe . [with:] Journal of Researches into the Geology and Natural History of the Various Countries Visited by H.M.S. Beagle

DARWIN, Charles (1809-1882); Philip Parker KING (1791-1856); and Robert FITZROY (1805-1865) [Narrative:] 54 maps and plates (including 6 loose folding charts housed in pockets at the front of each volume, as issued). Mostly unopened. First edition, first issue (with author’s names on the spines and Colburn/London reading). [Journal:] 2 folding maps (bound in at pages 1 and 539 and without front cover pocket, as issued). Publisher’s 16pp. (dated August 1839) and 8pp.ads in the rear. First separate issue. Publisher’s blindstamped blue cloth, spines ruled in blind and lettered in gilt, yellow endpapers First edition of the Narrative of the Beagle, with the first separate edition of Darwin’s Journal. "The English Catalogue makes it clear that the set was available, with or without Darwin’s volume, at £3.18s. or £2.18s., and that his volume alone cost 18s. What was being advertised as three volumes was really two volumes and the appendix . It has usually been stated that Darwin’s volume was reissued in its own covers later in the same year, because the demand for it was greater than that for the other two volumes of technical narrative. That the demand for it was greater than the rest was probably true, and that it must be considered technically the later issue is certainly correct . Nevertheless, it is also certain that both were advertised in the same set of advertisements in August 1839" (Freeman). The first volume of the Narrative contains Captain King’s account of the expedition in the Adventure and Beagle between 1826 and 1830, which surveyed the coasts of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. The second volume and appendix volume describe the second voyage of the Beagle under Captain Fitzroy between 1831 and 1836, which visited Brazil, Argentina, Tierra de Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Galapagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia and other islands and countries. The final volume is Darwin’s Journal, his own account of the Beagle’s voyage, and his first published book – it is an outstanding account of natural history exploration which described the fieldwork which ultimately led to On the Origin of Species. "The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life, and has determined my whole career . I have always felt that I owe to the voyage the first real training or education of my mind; I was led to attend closely to several branches of natural history, and thus my powers of observation were improved" (Life and Letters, 1:61). One of the most important records of natural history exploration ever written, and the foundation for the study of modern biology. Freeman, Darwin 10 and 11; Borba de Moraes p.247; Hill (2004) 607; Norman 584; Sabin 37826.
Illustrations of the Natural Orders of Plants. Arranged in groups; With Descriptions

Illustrations of the Natural Orders of Plants. Arranged in groups; With Descriptions

TWINING, Elizabeth (1805-1889) (19 x 13 inches). 160 hand-coloured lithographic plates, heightened with gum arabic, by and after Twining, printed by Day & Son. Expertly bound to style in half green morocco and period green cloth covered boards Provenance: Rugby School (presentation inscription from the author) First edition of a lovely and rare folio flower book, with hand coloured plates. The fine plates depict plants arranged by botanical families using de Candolle’s classification. Where a family is known to include a British member this is included, and each plate includes between two and seven members of each family. This method produces fascinating groupings of plants seldom seen together: British with Amazonian, Italian with Himalayan, etc. The plants are generally arranged with a fine artistic sensibility on the plate, but clearly retain a careful scientific accuracy. Elizabeth Twining, philanthropist, educator and botanist, was a member of the famous tea-merchant family. She began drawing plants and flowers at a young age. The present work, her masterpiece, is largely after images drawn by her from specimens at the Royal Botanical Gardens and Lexden Park. An octavo second edition, with the plates reduced and printed in colours, was published in 1868. Great Flower Books (1990), p. 78; Nissen BBI 2018; Pritzel 9591; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 15.410.
Six works bound in one

Six works bound in one, mostly concerning the English colonies in America]

ENGLISH COLONIES IN AMERICA (12 1/2 x 8 inches). Manuscript index, Contemporary English mottled calf, expertly rebacked to style, spine gilt with raised bands, red morocco lettering piece Provenance: Samuel Sandys, 1st Baron Sandys (1695-1770) An extraordinary sammelband of early 18th century Parliamentary reports and colonial laws relating principally to the English colonies in America, including the first collected printing of colonial charters and an important early work on Georgia. 1) Report from the Commissioners for Trade and Plantations . a Scheme for the Registring the Wool of Great Britain and Ireland . [London]: 1741 [but 1742]. 11, [1]pp. This Parliamentary report, dated Feb. 12, 1741-2 and issued under Walpole’s administration, details a fifty-point process for the licensing of wool from the moment of shearing, in an attempt to reduce the smuggling of wool and the avoidance of export tariffs. ESTC T150068. 2) An Abridgement of Several Acts and Clauses of Acts of Parliament, Relating to the Trade and Navigation of Great Britain, to, and from, and in the British Plantations in America . London: John Baskett. 1739. Text in two columns. 44pp. Includes text from the Molasses Act of 1733, as well as other British Acts of Parliament relating to colonial trade, the fisheries, piracy, and more, from as early as 1660 to 1735. Sabin 80; ESTC T111534 (recording only four copies in North America). 3) [MARTYN, Benjamin (1699-1763)]. An Account shewing the Progress of the Colony of Georgia in America from its First Establishment . London: 1741. [2], 71, [1]pp. Ordered to be published by the Trustees for Establishing the Colony of Georgia, this work — the first history of the Colony of Georgia — was issued as a Parliamentary paper, ordered to be printed 26 February 1741. "While Martyn’s two earlier pieces of 1732, his Some Account and New and Accurate Account , were in the nature of prospectuses for the proposed colony of Georgia, the Account shewing the Progress is a year by year record of happenings there, preceded by a discussion of the charter, and especially its reasons for the prohibition against Negroes. There is also much on the relations between Georgia and South Carolina. This is the first year by year account, of the colony of Georgia." (Streeter). A very few examples are extant with a map of Georgia inserted, not present here and not present in either the Streeter or Siebert copies. Rare. Vail 411; Howes M353; De Renne I pp. 90–91; Streeter sale 2:1145; Siebert sale 573; Clark I:121; European Americana 174/147; Sabin 45000; ESTC T103222. 4) A List of Copies of Charters from the Commissioners for Trade and Plantations . Viz. Maryland . Connecticut . Rhode-Island . Pensylvania [sic] . Massachusets Bay . Georgia . London: 1741. [2]; 12; 10; 14; 12; 21, [1]; 18pp. Text of the Maryland Charter in Latin. The first collected edition of American colonial charters, issued as a Parliamentary paper and ordered to be printed 11 February 1741. ESTC notes two issues: the present with "John Clarke" on the last line of the first page of the Connecticut charter. Rare, with only a single example in the auction records for the past half century. Sabin 41430; Tower 8; Rich I:15; ESTC T80993. 5) Acts of Assembly, Made and Enacted in the Bermuda or Summer-Islands, From 1690, to 1713-14 . London: John Baskett, 1719. [2], v, [1], 79, [1]pp. With separate title pages to each of the various sessions, i.e. at pages 28, 41 and 55. The first collected laws of Bermuda. Very rare, with no examples in the auction records for the past half century. Sabin 4906; Tower 4; ESTC T145163. 6) Acts of Assembly, Passed in the Island of Barbadoes; From 1717-18, to 1738, inclusive. Part II. London: John Baskett, 1739. x, [2, blank], 315-484pp. Preceded by pp. 315-318 [i.e. a supplement to Part I]. The first part was separately published in 1721 and reissued in 1732, comprising the laws from 1648 to 1718. This second part, recording the laws from 1717 to 138, also includes an abridgment of the previous Acts of Assembly in the rear. Sabin 3260; ESTC T19070.
The British Poets

The British Poets

BRITISH POETS (5 7/8 x 3 5/8 inches). Vol. 44 without the general title, as issued. Contemporary red morocco, flat spines gilt with green morocco labels, marbled endpapers, gilt edges Provenance: Augustus Phipps (armorial bookplate); Maria Thellusson Phipps (contemporary note inserted in front of vol. 1); Robert Tyndall Hamilton Bruce (gilt stamp on each cover) Creech & Balfour’s celebrated British Poets: a lovely set in a decorative 18th century binding. Among the earliest uniform editions of various authors’ works and an important contribution to the creation of the canon of English literature. "From the outset, Creech and Balfour saw The British Poets as a vital national enterprise . The publishers solicited advice from Hugh Blair, Professor of Rhetoric and Belle Lettres at the University of Edinburgh" (Bonnell). Blair would write to Creech following publication that "he does believe [the set to be] the most Elegant Edition of any, and shall not fail to recommend it, and avow his having had a hand in the Selection." The first volume contains Milton’s Paradise Lost and the final volume the verses of James Beattie of Aberdeen. For a detailed look at the tortuous publication history of this work, see chapter three of Bonnell. The set is scarce complete in all forty-four volumes in such a lovely contemporary binding. NCBEL II, 435; cf. Thomas F. Bonnell, The Most Disreputable Trade: Publishing the Classics of English Poetry 1765-1810 (Oxford University Press, 2008).
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Forest Scene on the Lehigh (Pennsylvania)

BODMER, Karl (1809-1893) Aquatint engraving by Salathé after Bodmer. From the scarce Leipzig edition printed from the original copper-plates. Limited in number, the prints from the Leipzig edition are more scarce than, and compare favorably to, the first edition. (David C. Hunt, "Karl Bodmer and the American Frontier," Imprint/Spring 85, p.18) This peaceful view is from a drawing made on 27 July 1832 on the Lehigh River close to the town of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Bodmer and Prince Maximilian had met Lewis Saynisch, a German doctor, who accompanied them on several of their explorations of the area, on the evening of their arrival in the town. On the afternoon of the 27th they visited his house to inspect his collection of scientific books. Later the three took a stroll along the Lehigh River past Moncasa Creek where Bodmer made a number of sketches, ably capturing the lyrical magic of the area. Karl Bodmer’s paintings show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian’s servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures. David C. Hunt, "Karl Bodmer and the American Frontier," Imprint /Spring 1985, p.18. Cf.Graff 4648; cf. Howes M443a; cf. Pilling 2521; cf. Sabin 47014; cf. Wagner-Camp 76:1.
Fort Pierre on the Missouri

Fort Pierre on the Missouri

BODMER, Karl (1809-1893) Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Salathé after Bodmer. Two repaired tears to upper blank margin, one repaired tear to lower blank margin, one small tear to right blank margin. From the scarce Leipzig edition printed from the original copper-plates. Limited in number, the prints from the Leipzig edition are more scarce than, and compare favorably to, the first edition. (David C. Hunt, "Karl Bodmer and the American Frontier," Imprint/Spring 85, p.18) A highly evocative landscape which, with an echo of the vast Biblical epics of John Martin, captures the vastness of the frontier prairies: the Fort, one of the largest settlements of the American Fur Company, is dwarfed amid the huge expanse that surrounds it. Bodmer recorded this image on 29 April 1834 during the journey back down the Missouri River, on whose banks the Fort stands. The Fort, named for Pierre Chouteau of the American Fur Company, is shown with a neighboring encampment of Sioux Indians. The modern Pierre, South Dakota now stands on the far bank of the river. Karl Bodmer’s images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian’s servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures. David C. Hunt, "Karl Bodmer and the American Frontier," Imprint /Spring 1985, p.18. Cf.Graff 4648; cf. Howes M443a; cf. Pilling 2521; cf. Sabin 47014; cf. Wagner-Camp 76:1.
Histoire naturelle des Colibris

Histoire naturelle des Colibris, suivie d’un supplément à l’histoire naturelle des Oiseaux-Mouches

LESSON, René Primevère (1794-1849) (9 1/16 x 5 3/4 inches). Half-title, title, section title, dedication to Baron Cuvier, and the rest of the text all printed on pink paper. 66 plates (60 printed on pink paper; 61 after J.-G. Prêtre, 5 after A.G. Bévalet; 51 by Coutant, 9 by Teillard), all printed by Rémond, finely hand-coloured and heightened with gum arabic. Contemporary French blue morocco-backed grained blue paper-covered boards, spine gilt in five compartments with raised bands, lettered in gilt in the second compartment, the others panelled in gilt, marbled endpapers First edition of this important early monograph on Hummingbirds. Here in its rarest state – printed on coloured paper Wood notes that this work was offered ‘in four printings varying as to quality of paper, character of type and colouring of the plates’. The present example is on the highest quality coloured paper, with beautifully printed text and plates showing a combination of coloured paper and very fine printing and finishing which allows the images to be seen in their finest form. The tone of the paper gives a depth to the colouring that is not present on the few plates printed on uncoloured paper, and extra care appears to have been taken over application of both the hand colouring and the varnish. The result is a truly spectacular series of plates in which the artist has achieved his aim of capturing the shimmering opalescent, almost metallic sheen of the living birds. The number of examples of the work printed in this way is not recorded in any of the standard bibliographies, but from information known about other issues of this work it is probably less than 25 and possibly no more than 5. This is Lesson’s second work on humming-birds, a companion to his Histoire naturelle des oiseaux-mouches (Paris: 1829-1830). His two monographs formed the most comprehensive treatment of the family until John Gould published his work (between 1849 and 1887). However, his observations have the great advantage of in many cases being first hand: unlike Gould who never saw a humming-bird in the wild, Lesson was able to study these birds in their natural habitat during his voyage round the world aboard La Coquille . Anker 293; Balis 66; BM(NH) III,p.1096; Fine Bird Books (1990) p.117; Nissen IVB 548; Ronsil 1774; Wood p.433.
A Plan of the River and Sound of D'Awfoskee

A Plan of the River and Sound of D’Awfoskee, in South Carolina, Survey’d by Captain John Gascoigne

GASCOIGNE, John and William FADEN (1750-1836) Copper-engraved sea chart, on a full, untrimmed sheet, in excellent condition. A very rare and highly important sea chart of South Carolina’s Hilton Head area, made towards the beginning of the Revolutionary War, in the first state. This finely engraved map was the finest sea chart of the area available in the early days of the Revolutionary War, and most certainly would have played an important role in the development of strategies by various commanders. It embraces the coastal region of South Carolina, from Port Royal Sound in the north, down past the mouth of the Savannah River and Tybee Island, Georgia, in the south. Prominently featured is Hilton Head Island (called "Trench’s Island") and "D’Awfoskee Sound," which is today known as Calibogue Sound. The old name survives on "D’Awfoskee Island," but now spelled Daufauskie, located at the center of the map. The region has one of the most varied and fascinating histories of any in the American South. Originally inhabited by the Yamassee native tribe, the area first came to the attention of Europeans during the expedition of Francisco Cordillo in 1521. Parris Island, located in Port Royal Sound, in the upper part of the map, was home to two early settlements. In 1562, Jean Ribaut founded a Huguenot settlement, Charlesfort, but the Spaniards did not tolerate its presence and destroyed it in short order. The Spaniards then founded their own fort and Jesuit mission, Santa Elena, nearby in 1566. In 1661, the English formally staked claim to the region, naming it Carolina after Charles II. In 1663, Captain William Hilton sailed from Barbados aboard the Adventure, on a reconnaissance mission to explore his country’s new claims. It was then that he encountered a beautiful island, featuring a prominent sandy cape, which he named "Hilton Head." Once ashore, he remarked that the island was blessed with "sweet water" and "clear sweet air." English settlers arrived in the region in the 1670s, but it was not until 1717 that the first Englishman, Col. John Barnwell settled on Hilton Head, having been given a grant of 100 acres in the northwest corner of the island. In the eighteenth-century, the region enjoyed a very successful economy based on plantations and maritime trade, although it was under threat from attacks by both the Spanish and pirates, most notoriously "Blackbeard." This sea chart was one of the most detailed and accurate of any of the American coastline. The immense detail of the hydrography was the result of surveys conducted by Captain John Gascoigne, assisted by his brother James. In 1728, aboard the HMS Alborough he employed the most sophisticated and modern techniques with exacting attention to detail to produce a manuscript chart. The next year, this chart was altered by Francis Swaine, and it would appear that Swaine’s manuscript, or a close copy of it, found its way to the London workshop of William Faden. Faden, the successor to the great Thomas Jefferys, adapted this map from a section of Swaine’s manuscript, and the present first state was printed in 1776. During the American Revolution, this area was an active military theatre. At the outbreak of the war, Hilton Head and most other areas sided with the Americans, however Daufauskie Island fell under British control. Britain’s superior naval power allowed its ships to conduct frequent raids along the coast for the duration of the war, however the real threat to the American cause came in December, 1778, when British General Augustin Prevost seized Savannah, determined to use it as a base for further operations. The following February, he dispatched a team of marines to take control of Port Royal Sound. They initially engaged the Americans at Hilton Head before proceeding further up Port Royal Sound. However, the invasion was ultimately repelled by Gen. William Moultrie at Beaufort. On September 24th of the same year, in what was to become known as the Battle of Hilton Head, three British ships were set upon by a trio of French ships allied to the American cause. After a dramatic chase and an intense exchange of cannon fire, the principal British ship, the HMS Experiment, was forced to surrender. Sellers & Van Ee, Maps & Charts of North America & the West Indies , 1525; Stevens & Tree, "Comparative Cartography," in Tooley, The Mapping of America , 16 (a); Cf. Cumming, British Maps of Colonial America , pp.47-49 and The Southeast in Early Maps , 204.
Prix de la Nature (100 kil)/ E Dubonnet le gagnant sur monoplan Tellier moteur Panhard

Prix de la Nature (100 kil)/ E Dubonnet le gagnant sur monoplan Tellier moteur Panhard

GAMY-MONTAUT after Georges BRIC Hand-coloured pochoir print. Very good condition. The little known Tellier monoplane. As the man who was at the helm of the tow-boat for Voisin’s Box-kite glider trials on the Seine, Tellier had long been associated with Voisin & Panhard. The Gamy-Montaut prints document various historical events in the early history of motorized transportation, including Power Boat Racing, Motorcycle and Motor Car Racing, Motor Car Touring, Zeppelins and Airplanes. Having observed the rapidly growing interest in cars and racing during the early years of motor cars, Ernest Montaut produced his first motoring prints in the mid-1890s, and by 1897, his drawings were pictorial records of the many races in France. Montaut’s work was extremely well received in the Paris of his day and was shown in the fashionable shops of the Rue de l’Opera and Rue de la Paix, as well as in the better galleries. Marguerite Montaut, Ernest’s wife, joined him in his work producing not only racing prints but also developing a fine series of aviation prints commemorating such events as the first flights on the early European mail routes. While Marguerite Montaut’s works were occasionally signed "M. Montaut", she also used the name "Gamy", an anagram for Magy. The Gamy-Montaut prints were all produced by the pochoir process in which the outlines for each image were drawn onto lithographic stones and printed. Using these uncoloured prints as a template, elaborate stencils were cut for each colour. Water-colour was then brushed onto the image through the stencil. The colouring process was quite complex, with each print taking several days to produce. It was also quite labour intensive, and the studio of Gamy-Montaut therefore employed a group of trained artists, including Nevil and Campion, to assist in the colouring.
Assiniboin Indians

Assiniboin Indians

BODMER, Karl (1809-1893) Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Geoffroy after Bodmer, blindstamp. A fine full-length double-portrait composed by Bodmer from individual portraits executed at Fort Union in June of 1833. The figure in the foreground is Pitätapiú, a young warrior and member of the Stone band with his hair ornamented with two small shells. On his left arm is a rawhide shield, painted and with an amulet attached to assure success on horse raids. A riding whip with a wooden handle hangs from a fur loop around his wrist. In his right hand he holds a combination bow/lance that was probably only for ceremonial purposes. The name of the figure in the background is not known, but it is recorded that he was initially very solemn until Bodmer’s music box made him laugh. His quilted and beaded shirt is fringed with leather rather than the more usual hair. He cradles a much-prized trade flintlock in the crook of his left arm. Karl Bodmer’s images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian’s servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin , they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures. Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.
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A History of the Birds of Europe, including all the species inhabiting the Western Palaearctic Region

DRESSER, Henry Eeles (1838-1915) (12 5/8 x 9 3/4 inches). 5pp. list of subscribers, additional wood-engraved title to each volume. 723 lithographed plates (721 hand-coloured, 2 uncoloured plates, as issued), after John Gerrard Keulemans (678 plates), Joseph Wolf, Archibald Thorburn and Edward Neale, printed by M. & N. Hanhart, Walter or the Mintern Brothers, the colouring by Smith or William Mathew Hart. Contemporary red morocco gilt A definitive work of ornithology, wonderfully illustrated with hand coloured plates by Keulemans and other noted bird artists. First edition of a work which forms a comprehensive record of the birds of the entire Western Palaearctic Region. This region is defined by Dresser in the introduction as comprising "the whole of continental Europe to the Ural range, Scandinavia, Spitzbergen, the British Isles, Iceland, the Faeroes, the Azores, Madeira, and the Canary Isles, a comparatively narrow strip of North Africa, reaching to the border of the desert, Asia Minor (excluding the Jordan valley, which is essentially Ethiopia), and the Caucasus." It had been fifty years since the publication of Gould’s The Birds of Europe, and the significant ornithological research conducted in the interim required a systematic and accurate new work. Dresser based this monumental work on his collection of 12,000 specimens, collected not only by himself but by a large network of colleagues across the continent. The plates include work from three of the greatest bird artists of their age: Wolf, Keulemans and Thorburn, but the majority are by John Gerrard Keulemans (1842-1912). The over 650 images he produced for this work rank as one of his greatest ornithological achievements. The work was originally issued in 84 parts, without consecutive numbering to text or numbering to plates. The lengthy publication period and the issuance in parts without regard to subject matter and without numbering, has led to many incomplete sets: the present set, however, is complete. Anker 120; Balis 111; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 92; Mullens & Swann 179; Nissen IVB 267; Zimmer p.177. Large 4to, nine volumes, including index (Volume I) and supplement (Volume IX)
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Travels through the interior parts of North America, in the years 1766, 1767, and 1768

CARVER, Jonathan (1710-1780) (8 1/4 x 5 inches). [20],xvi,543,[1]pp. 2 folding engraved maps, 4 engraved plates. Uncut. Later half morocco and marbled paper covered boards, spine gilt with raised bands First edition of this landmark work on the exploration of the American West. Jonathan Carver, who was born in Massachusetts, served in the colonial militia during the French and Indian War rising to the rank of Captain and mastering the techniques of surveying and map making. He left the army in 1763 with the intention of exploring the new territories acquired by the British as a result of the war. In 1766 Robert Rogers appointed Carver to lead a semi-official expedition to find a route via lakes and rivers to the Pacific Ocean and the East Indies. Carver left Fort Michilimackinac at Mackinack Island in the spring of 1766, travelling along the northern coast of Lake Michigan, before cutting across to what is now the Door County peninsula in Wisconsin and continuing along the western edge of the bay until reaching what is now Green Bay, Wisconsin. From here he traveled up the Fox River to the Winnebago Indian village at the north end of Lake Winnebago. He continued up the Fox River until he arrived at the "Grand Portage" (a well used portage between the Fox River and the Wisconsin River). Carver then crossed to the Wisconsin River and traveled down to the Mississippi emerging at the great trade encampment at Prairie du Chien. He then turned north into what is now Minnesota. By the late summer he had reached the Saint Anthony Falls (Minneapolis). He spent some time near the falls but turned south, down the Mississippi to find a more suitable place to spend the winter, setting camp in a tribal village in what is now eastern Iowa. The next spring he continued exploring and mapping the Mississippi River through what is now Minnesota and Wisconsin before eventually returning in 1768 to the British fort at Mackinack. In pursuit of a claim for compensation from the British Government for the work he had put into the expedition, Carver travelled to London and it was here that the present work was published. Carver’s book was an immediate success when first published in 1778, and a second London edition followed the next year; with over thirty editions published since in several languages. A very important book in the history of the exploration of the American West as Carver was the first English-speaking explorer to venture west of the upper Mississippi River, he anticipated the idea of a continental divide and was the first to mention a large mountain range to the west (presumably the Rocky Mountains). Furthermore, the name ‘Oregon’ appears in print here for the first time, both in the text, and on one of the maps. Carver penetrated farther into the West than any other English explorer before the Revolution and stimulated curiosity concerning routes to the Pacific, later satisfied by Mackenzie and Lewis and Clark. Arents 890; Bell C84; Cox II,151; Field 251; Gagnon II 325; Graff 622; Howes C215; JCB II 2538; Jones 563; Lande 108; Pilling Algonquian p. 68, & Siouan p. 12. Sabin 11184; Streeter III,1772; cf.Jones 563.
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Acts Passed at the First Congress of the United States of America . [With:] Acts Passed at the Second Congress of the United States of America . [And:] Acts Passed at the Third Congress of the United States of America

UNITED STATES 434, [2, blank], 47, [1]; 406, [2], [22]; 144, iii, [1], [2], [145]-260, iv pp. Contemporary sheep, covers bordered in blind, flat spines ruled in blind, red morocco lettering pieces An early octavo edition of the laws of the First, Second and Third Congresses, in a lovely uniform contemporary binding. In 1795, Philadelphia printer Francis Childs, the official "Printer of the Laws of the United States", reprinted the laws of the first two Congresses (1789-1791; 1791-1793) to accompany his octavo edition of the laws of the Third Congress, then in session. The first volume includes an attestation leaf following the title by Secretary of State Edmund Randolph, which affirms that the text of the laws in this edition have been compared and collated with the official rolls. Included are the fundamental laws of the new nation, including a printing of the Constitution, the establishment of the mint, the post office, the courts, the census, etc., as well as laws relating to Native Americans, the Northwest Territory, lighthouses and much more. This example, which includes Child’s 1794-1795 printing of the laws of the first two sessions of the Third Congress (the latter with separate title), is in a lovely contemporary American binding. A rare edition, particularly in such fine original condition. Evans 29674 (vol. 1), 29675 (vol. 2), and cf. 29676 (for Vol. 3 with a 1795 imprint and index, this imprint and collation not in Evans).
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Plans, Elevations, Sections, and Details of the Alhambra: from drawings taken on the spot by the late M. Jules Goury and in 1834 and 1837 by Owen Jones . With a complete translation of the Arabic inscriptions, and an historical notice of the Kings of Granada, from the conquest of that city by the arabs to the expulsion of the moors, by Mr. Pasqual de Gayangos

JONES, Owen, (1809-74) and Jules GOURY (d. 1834) (26 x 19 1/2 inches). 1p. list of subscribers. 2 chromolithographic additional titles, 2 hand-coloured plans, 100 plates, measured drawings and plans, engravings or lithographs (38 on India paper mounted [4 of these folding], 67 chromolithographs) after Owen Jones or Jules Goury, by Jones, T.T. Bury, W.S. Wilkinson and others. Contemporary half green morocco and marbled paper covered boards, spine gilt with raised bands, expert repairs to joints and head and tail of spine Large paper copy of the first edition of this highly-detailed and beautifully-produced work. According to Abbey this work was first published in two forms: small paper for £18.16s (as the Abbey copy) or £31.10s for the large paper issue (as here). Abbey does not mention if there were any other differences in the make-up of the two issues, but the plates on India paper found here (which are not in the Abbey copy) are only found in the large paper issue. The lithographs, printed in colours, are highly important in their own right as early experimental examples of the chromolithographic process that was to come to dominate colour lithography for most of the second half of the nineteenth century. These images, combined with the excellent text, form an important historical record of the Alhambra is it stood early in the 19th century: at least twenty years before the first detailed photographic records were made. Owen Jones was the son of a prosperous Welsh furrier. In 1833, Jones, who had been articled to Lewis Vuillamy from 1825-1831, made a tour of the Middle East (including Constantinople and Cairo) painting watercolour landscapes: this sparked his fascination with Islamic buildings. In the following year he made a tour of Spain accompanied by the young French architect Jules Goury, visiting Granada, and the Alhambra in particular. Both were fascinated by the Moorish Palace and they planned to study it in detail. At that time, it was possible for suitable visitors to rent a suite of rooms within the palace itself: Washington Irving had been inspired to write his Tales of the Alhambra whilst staying there in 1829 and following in his footsteps, Jones and Goury stayed at the palace whilst making detailed drawings of the architectural and coloured decorations of the building. Tragically, Goury contracted cholera during his stay, and died on the 28th August, 1834. Owen Jones returned to England with both his and Goury’s sketches. He also brought back an enormous number of casts that he and Goury had made of the ornaments and mouldings. A note at the beginning of the present work explains that "to insure perfect accuracy, an impression of every ornament throughout the palace was taken, either with plaster or with unsized paper." Jones returned to the Alhambra again in 1837 to complete the recording and measuring of a number of aspects of the palace that had remained unfinished at the time of Goury’s sudden death. "On his return with his drawings . Jones apparently had difficulty in finding any printer to undertake the unfamiliar and difficult work of color printing [especially the need for the flat, opaque and accurate colour schemes to reproduce the decorative motifs] . With the promise of some help from Day & Haghe, Jones therefore set up an establishment . [in London] . training his own workmen and providing his own presses . Jones’s approach to colour-printing was that of the precise architect with an eye for abstract design and the harmony of colours . Here Jones is a forerunner of Morris, the Pre-Raphaelites, and Art Nouveau [including Christopher Dresser]" (Abbey). His subsequent career was not limited to the theoretical. He designed the internal decoration of the Vulliamy and Roumieu church, All Saints, Ennismore Gardens (c.1850), which is now the Russian Orthodox Cathedral in London. In 1851, Jones was appointed Superintendent of the works for the Great Exhibition, and in 1854 he designed the Egyptian, Greek, Roman and Alhambra Courts when the Crystal Palace was moved to Sydenham. In 1856 he published, with Sir Matthew Digby Wyatt, the celebrated and monumental Grammar of Ornament , creating a nucleus of ornamental ideas that still has resonance today. Cf. Abbey Travel I. 156 (small format); Burch pp.183-185; Courtney-Lewis pp.139-140; Martin Hardie pp. 243, 250, 252-253.
Do Tali [Do Tal

Do Tali [Do Tal, Ellora]

DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) after James WALES Aquatint by Thomas Daniell after James Wales, coloured by hand, on ‘Whatman’ wove paper. Do Tali’ the remarkable two storied cave complex from Plans of Hindoo Excavations in the Mountain of Ellora, This plate was engraved by Thomas Daniell after a drawing by James Wales in 1803 and is from the part of Oriental Scenery known as "Hindoo Excavations in the Mountain of Ellora near Aurangabad". The huge complex of cave temples was actually begun by Buddhists in the 6th century, eventually including Hindo and Jain temples as well. The Daniells’ Oriental Scenery is considered one of the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. The sixth part of Oriental Scenery is twenty-four plates based on drawings by James Wales, primarily of the excavations at Ellora. The title of this section was Hindoo Excavations in the Mountain of Ellora , near Aurungabad in Decan. The mountain contains 34 "caves" that were created to serve as monasteries and temples for Buddhists, Hindus and Jains, each religion having several spaces. Do Tal, here called Dotali, was one of the Buddhist "caves". It is three stories high and was built in the 8th century. Abbey Travel II.420 no. 122; Martinelli and Michell, India: Yesterday and Today , p. 210, no. 143; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.
Ryacotta

Ryacotta, in the Barramah’l

DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837) Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand, on ‘Whatman’ wove paper. Image size: 16 1/2 x 23 1/2 inches; 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. A very fine view of the Barramah’l region that had just recently been wrested from Tippoo Sultan’s grasp when the Daniells visited. "Rayakottai formed part of a chain of military outposts used by Tipu Sultan’s forces on their campaigns in the Tamil country. A British flag flying proudly from a lookout halfway up the hill proclaims the recent British victory. Rings of walls encircling the central granite rock at successive levels were clearly visible to the Daniells, but can hardly be traced now" (Martinelli/Michell p.144). The Daniells’ Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ”92 Rayakottai, fort’; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.
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American Ornithology; or the Natural History of the Birds of the United States. Illustrated with plates engraved and coloured from original drawings taken from nature

WILSON, Alexander (1766-1813) (text: 3 vols., quarto [10 x 7 1/2 inches], plates: 1 vol. folio (14 5/16 x 12 inches]). Text: cxcix,[1],231,[1]; vi, 456 [without a leaf number vii-viii, as usual]; vi,396pp. 4pp. subscribers’ list at rear of vol.III. Atlas: 76 hand-coloured engraved plates, heightened with gum arabic, by A. Lawson (52), J.G. Warnicke (21), G. Murray (2), and B. Tanner (1), all after Wilson. Expertly bound to style in half red morocco period purple cloth covered boards, flat spines gilt, marbled endpapers The second full edition of Wilson’s work, with plates in their most desirable form, and with the very rare large paper issue of the text. "Science would lose little if every scrap of pre-Wilsonian writing about United States birds could be annihilated" (Coues). None of the bibliographies that we have consulted mention a "large paper" edition of the 1828-29 American Ornithology , the text of this set is on demonstrably larger paper than the usual ‘octavo’ copies that we have examined. The present copy is 10 inches, the uncut size of the octavo issue is 9 7/8 inches. Both issues are printed on the same ‘Ames / Phila.’ wove paper (with a dove of peace countermark): the present quarto issue can be recognised by the presence of the watermark in the middle of the sheet, with the octavo issue the watermark is invariably cut into by the upper or lower margin. The text is identical, but the settings of type must have been placed differently on the form in order to achieve the wider inner margins that are a feature of the quarto issue (2 inches as compared with 7/8 inch). The first edition of Wilson’s life-work was published in nine volumes between 1808 and 1814. The present edition was prepared by Wilson’s friend and colleague, George Ord, who improved the work textually by re-arranging the work in a systematic order by species and by contributing an important "Sketch of the Author’s Life" (pp.vii-cxcix in the first text volume) as well as numerous additional textual notes. He also notes in his preface to the first text volume that he arranged for the plates to be "carefully examined and retouched" by Alexander Lawson (the original engraver of most of the plates). Reading between the lines of Ord’s preface, it is clear that he believed the plates in the present edition to be better than the first, and this is the current general view: it is noted in Fine Bird Books that "the plates [are] coloured better," and Wood writes: "The hand-colored drawings in the atlas are from the original copper plates, colored anew by pigments which seem to have been better quality than those used by Wilson." In addition to the coloring, better quality paper was used in this edition, thus avoiding the foxing which almost inevitably mars the first. Thus, this edition is more desirable than the first. BM (NH), p.2332; Fine Bird Books (1990) p. 155; Nissen IVB 992; cf. Sabin 104598; Wood p.630.
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Chaucers Canterbury Pilgrims. Painted in Fresco by William Blake & by him Engraved & Published October 8, 1810

BLAKE, William (1757-1827) Engraving, printed on Rives wove paper watermarked "France". A rich impression in excellent condition. Fifth state (of five). Image size: 11 3/4 x 37 inches. Final state of the largest Blake engraving. "Every age is a Canterbury Pilgrimage," wrote William Blake (1757-1827), poet, and probably the most imaginative and original artist in the history of British art. "We all pass on, each sustaining one or other of these characters, nor can a child be born who is not one or other of these characters of Chaucer." Working in an archaic style intended to evoke the engravings of Chaucer’s time, Blake presents us with the cast of Chaucer’s Tales as they begin their pilgrimage. Since Blake understood his subject so well, and wrote with such elegance, we can do no better than to use as a guide his own description of the engraving: "The time chosen is the early morning, before sunrise, when the jolly company are leaving the Tabarde Inn. The Knight and Squire with the Squire’s Yeoman lead the Procession; next follow the youthful Abbess, her nun, and three priests; her greyhounds attend her. Next follow the Friar and Monk, and then the Tapiser, the Pardoner, and the Sompnour and Manciple. After this ‘Our Host,’ who occupies the centre of the cavalcade, and directs them to the Knight, as the person who would be likely to commence their task of each telling a tale in their order. After the Host follows the Shipman, the Haberdasher, the Dyer, the Franklin, the Physician, the Ploughman, the Lawyer, the Poor Parson, the Merchant, the Wife of Bath, the Miller, the Cook, the Oxford Scholar, Chaucer himself; and the Reev comes as Chaucer has described:- And ever he rode hindermost of the rout." The view is eastward from the Tabard in Southwark, across the Bridge from London, as Blake conceived it to have been in Chaucer’s day. He based his costumes on ancient monuments and other records. "As a literary piece," it has been noted, Blake’s engraving "has hardly an equal in the whole field of art." The engraving was begun late in 1809 and issued by the artist in October the following year. In his Prospectus for the issue, Blake declared that the English nation would ‘flourish or decay’ according to the recognition they gave him for his year’s labor. The printing plate survived, and passed after Blake’s death through the estate of Blake’s wife, finding its way to the collection of John Giles. Sold at auction with Giles collection in 1881, the printing plate was purchased by Colnaghi who issued restrikes on laid, India paper. By 1940, the plate was in the possession of a New York art dealer, who sold it to the wife of noted collector A. Edward Newton for her to present to her husband as a fiftieth anniversary present. After Newton’s death, the plate was sold with his famed library at auction, on 16 April 1941, for the princely sum of $2300 to Charles J. Rosenbloom via his agent at the Parke Bernet sale, Philadelphia bookseller Charles Sessler. Before delivering the printing plate to Rosenbloom, Sessler had a small number of prints pulled on French hand-made paper. Although Rosenbloom only authorized 35 prints, Essick and Young identified at least ninety-one impressions. "Whereas most of the identifiable Colnaghi restrikes were flatly printed, the Sessler prints were heavily inked and printed. The plate shows minimal wear and the Sessler prints are generally preferable to Colnaghi’s earlier printings — probably because of better cleaning of the copper and superior presswork" (Essick and Young). Rosenbloom donated the plate to Yale University in 1973. Robert Essick and Michael Young, "Blake’s Canterbury Print: The Posthumous Pilgrimage of the Copperplate" in Blake: An Illustrated Quarterly , Vol. 15, No. 2, Fall 1981, pp. 78-82; Essick, Separate Plates of William Blake , XVI.
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A Flora of North America. Illustrated by coloured figures, drawn from nature

BARTON, William Paul Crillon (1786-1856) (10 9/16 x 8 5/16 inches). Half-titles in each volume. To the Subscriber’s leaf in vol. 2 present (often lacking). 106 hand-coloured engraved plates (two folding), including some partially printed in colours and finished by hand, from drawings by the author, by Cornelius Tiebout (29), G.B. Ellis (32), F. Kearney (23), J. Boyd (7), J. Drayton (6), C. Goodman (6), Jacob J. Plocher (2) and J.L. Frederick (1). Expertly bound to style in half green calf and period marbled paper covered boards Provenance: Charles H. Olmsted (early signature) An important American flora, "magnificently illustrated" (DAB) with "Plates [that] are clear, soft and lovely" (Bennett). The work includes the first successful use of stipple-engraving in the United States. In addition to its significance as a botanical work, Barton’s Flora is also one of the most important early colour-plate books entirely produced in the United States. "The plates were made by [amongst others] Cornelius Tiebout, the first skilled engraver born in the United States, although he trained in London for two years in the 1790’s to perfect his technique." (Reese, Stamped with a National Character p. 40). Barton states in the advertisement to the first volume that some of the "plates are printed in colour, and are afterwards coloured by hand. It is confidently believed by the author, that they will be found the most successful attempts at imitation by sound engraving, of the French style, yet made in this country." He goes on to note that the method of colour printing was the result of "repeated experiments" owing "to the impossibility of obtaining information as to the manner of colouring abroad." The text gives details of each species, its Latin binomial, common name, and class and order according to the Linnaean system, followed by interesting information about the history of the discovery of the species and details about its geographical range. BM(NH) I, p.105; Bennett p. 9 (incorrect plate count); Dunthorne 26; Nissen BBI 84; MacPhail Benjamin Smith Barton and William Crillon Barton 19; Meisel III, p.385; Pritzel 446; Reese Stamped with a National Character 11; Sabin 3858; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 236.
Magnalia Christi Americana: or

Magnalia Christi Americana: or, the Ecclesiastical History of New-England, from its first planting in the year 1620. unto the year of our lord, 1698. In seven books.

MATHER, Cotton (1663-1728) (12 1/4 x 7 7/8 inches). Divided into seven parts, each with sectional title. Text in two columns. [30], 38; [2], 75, [1]; [2], 238; [2], 125-222; 100; [2], 88, [2. blank]; 118, [4, publisher’s ads]. Double-page engraved map of New England and New York. Without the separately-issued errata leaves, as usual. With both publisher’s advertisement leaves (one misbound at the front). Modern panelled calf, spine with raised bands in seven compartments, red morocco lettering pieces. A first edition of the greatest history of New England: a landmark in colonial New England history, The first edition of what Howes calls the "most famous 18th century American book" and one which Streeter describes as "the most famous American book of colonial times." Mather’s opus is rightly considered an indispensable source for the history of New England in the 17th century, both for its biographies and its history of civil, religious, and military affairs. The seven books include 1) the history and settlement of New England; 2) the lives of its governors and magistrates; 3) biographies of "Sixty Famous Divines"; 4) a history and roll of Harvard College; 5) a history of the Congregational Church in New England; 6) a record of the remarkable providences revealing God’s direct influence in particular events in the colonies; and 7) the "War of the Lord" dealing with the devil, the Separatists, Familists, Antinomians, Quakers, clerical imposters and the Indians. Much of the book’s value rests in its incomparable wealth of detail regarding daily life in early colonial New England. David Hall has referred to it as "a mirror of the 1690s," the decade in which most of it was written. Far from being a dull chronicle of events, the Magnalia is full of lively biographical pieces, vivid descriptions of the times, and many surprising sidelights. It has been mined by all modern scholars of social history for its unsurpassed view of New England at the end of the 17th century. The map, known as the "Mather map" is actually titled "An Exact Mapp of New England and New York." The first eighteenth-century general map of New England, it depicts an area from Casco Bay, west to the Hudson then south to Manhattan and north west past Long Island to Martha’s Vineyard and Cape Cod, before heading north again past Boston to Casco Bay. The information concerning the early roads is particularly valuable, and the early versions of the spelling of the towns and rivers cast a fascinating light on the early topographic nomenclature of colonial America. Church 806; Grolier American 6; Howes M-391; Sabin 46392; Streeter sale I:658; Alden & Landis 702/127.
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Merika Shinshi [New Account of America]

TSURUMINE SHIGENOBU (1788-1859) Woodcut maps and illustrations by Utagawa Sadahide, comprising three hand colored double-page maps and 22 double-page and two single-page woodcut illustrations. Publisher’s stitched paper wrappers, with circular medallic onlays The first Japanese book exclusively about America. This Japanese account of the history of America was written by scholar Tsurumine Shigenobu based on information from John Munch, as well as translations of western books and interviews with visiting Americans. The first volume is largely devoted to Columbus’s discovery and the Spanish conflicts with natives; the second volume begins with a brief account of California before turning to a history of the American Revolution; the third volume treats South America and its independence movement, as well as Native Americans; the fourth and fifth volumes are on American commerce and customs. The illustrations are attributed to Utagawa Sadahide, the famous artist best known for his Yokohama-e pictures of foreigners. Among the illustrations are portraits of George Washington, Columbus, Vespucci and Queen Isabella; battles scenes, including Yorktown and other American Revolution conflicts; gold mining, whaling and more. Very rare complete with all five volumes. OCLC records only 4 copies in North America (University of British Columbia, Yale, University of California, Berkeley and Brigham Young University).
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Political, Miscellaneous, and Philosophical Pieces

FRANKLIN, Benjamin (1706-1790) (8 5/8 x 5 1/4 inches). xi,[1],567,[7]pp. Engraved portrait frontispiece, three engraved plates (one folding), and folding table. Contemporary calf, rebacked preserving original morocco lettering piece Provenance: Earl of Fife (armorial bookplate) First edition of a noted lifetime collection of Franklin’s essays published during the American Revolution. Edited by his close friend Benjamin Vaughan and published in London during the American Revolution while Franklin served as the Ambassador to France, this is the "only edition of Franklin’s writings (other than his scientific), which was printed during his life time; [and] was done with Franklin’s knowledge and consent and contains an ‘errata’ made by him for it" (Ford). Many of the pieces published here relate to the Revolution, including the transcript of Franklin’s famous appearance before Parliament in 1766 in which he argued successfully for the repeal of the Stamp Act. Also present here is the culmination of his sagacious Poor Richard advice, his The Way to Wealth. And although the compilation is predominantly political or social essays, the collected work also includes his paper on the effectiveness of lightening rods. The work closes with Franklin’s famous mock epitaph: "The body of / B. Franklin, Printer / (Like the Cover of an Old Book / Its Contents torn Out / And Stript of its Lettering and Gilding) / Lies Here, Food for Worms. / But the Work shall not be Lost; / For it will (as he Believ’d) Appear once More / In a New and More Elegant Edition / Revised and Corrected / By the Author." Howes F330; Sabin 25565; Ford 342; Adams, American Controversy 79- 38b.
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A Candid and Impartial Narrative of the Transactions of the Fleet, under the command of Lord Howe, from the arrival of the Toulon squadron, on the coast of America, to the time of his lordship’s departure for England. With observations. By an officer then serving in the fleet. The second edition, revised and corrected, with a plan of the situation of the fleet, within Sandy-Hook

O'BEIRNE, Rev. Thomas Lewis (1748-1823)] (8 1/4 x 5 inches). 58pp. Folding engraved chart titled "Plan of the Situation of the Fleet within Sandy Hook." Expert restoration at head of folding map. Expertly bound to style in half russia and period marbled paper The preferred and expanded second edition, published in the same year as the first and including for the first time an engraved map of the entrance to New York’s harbour. The author served as chaplain of the British fleet under Howe, and in this work fiercely defends his commander from criticism of the ministry for failures against Count D’Estaing, arguing that Howe was supplied with inadequate ships. The first edition of the work contained only 44 pages and no map; this preferred edition, published in the same year, contains additional material and the chart of Sandy Hook. The chart shows the locations of each of the ships in Howe’s fleet in July 1778 following the British evacuation of Philadelphia, and includes the locations of various inlets, the light house on Sandy Hook, and many soundings. Howes O4; Sabin 10658; Rich I, p. 275; Adams 78-78b.
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History of the Expedition Under the Command of Captains Lewis and Clark, to the Sources of the Missouri, Thence Across the Rocky Mountains and Down the River Columbia to the Pacific Ocean. Performed During the Years 1804-5-6

LEWIS, Meriwether (1774-1809) and William CLARK (1770-1838) Five maps and charts. Large folding map in expert facsimile. Text toned as usual. Bound to style in contemporary tree calf, covers bordered with a gilt roll tool, flat spine divided into six compartments by Greek key roll tool, red morocco lettering piece in the second compartment, red morocco lettering piece with volume number in the fourth compartment, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt The first edition of the "definitive account of the most important exploration of the North American continent" (Wagner-Camp). A cornerstone of Western Americana. The book describes the Government-backed expedition to explore the newly acquired Louisiana Purchase undertaken from 1804 to 1806 by ascending the Missouri to its source, crossing the Rocky Mountains, and reaching the Pacific Ocean. In total, the expedition covered some eight thousand miles in slightly more than twenty-eight months. Lewis and Clark brought back the first reliable information about much of the area they traversed, made contact with the Indian inhabitants as a prelude to the expansion of the fur trade, and advanced by a quantum leap the geographical knowledge of the continent. This official account of the expedition is as much a landmark in Americana as the trip itself. The narrative has been reprinted many times and remains a perennial American bestseller. The observations in the text make it an essential work of American natural history, ethnography and science. It is the first great U.S. government expedition, the first book on the Rocky Mountain West, and a host of other firsts. It is among the most famous American books. Church 1309; Field 928; Graff 2477; Grolier American 100, 30; Howes L317; Printing & the Mind of Man 272; Tweney 89, 44; Sabin 40828; Shaw & Shoemaker 31924; Streeter Sale 1777; Streeter, Americana Beginnings, 52; Wagner-Camp 13:1.
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The London Atlas of Universal Geography, exhibiting the physical & political divisions of the various countries of the world, constructed from original materials

ARROWSMITH, John (1790-1873, publisher) (21 x 14 inches). Engraved throughout: title, preface/contents leaf, 67 double-page engraved maps (several with extending flaps), hand-coloured or hand-coloured in outline, each notched at the fore-edge margin as issued with a letterpress tab. Contemporary half red morocco and purple cloth covered boards, original red morocco lettering piece on the upper cover, rebacked preserving the original spine, worn at joints and edges, marbled endpapers One of the finest 19th-century English atlases, including Arrowsmith’s highly important map of Texas. Arrowsmith first published his famous map of the Republic of Texas on 16 November 1841, shortly after the Republic was officially recognized by Great Britain. The present example is in the second state, dated 8 June 1843. Arrowsmith’s map of Texas "was probably the first to show the full extent of Texas’s claim to the region of the upper Rio Grande, an area included within Texas’s boundaries until the Compromise of 1850 . the map certainly was the best information on Texas geography available in Europe" (Martin & Martin Maps of Texas and the Southwest , 32; see also Streeter Bibliography of Texas , 1373). This work as a whole is one of the finest examples of English 19th century atlases by one of its greatest geographers, John Arrowsmith, the nephew of Aaron Arrowsmith (1750-1833). The younger Arrowsmith introduced The London Atlas in 1834 and subsequent editions appeared with title pages dated 1840, 1842 and 1858, but as Arrowsmith was continually adding new maps, there is no firm collation for any edition. The contents sheet for this copy, for example, calls for fifty maps, but it has been supplemented with an additional seventeen maps bound in at the end. The maps were also continuously updated and corrected, so that most appear in several states. This example contains no maps in states copyrighted earlier than 1841 and includes maps dated up to 1849. The maps are based upon documents supplied by `The Colonial Office, the Hydrographical Office of the Admiralty, the East India Company, the Royal Asiatic Society, the Royal Geographical Society’, and numerous other `Offices, Companies, and Societies’. The later editions of the atlas are the most valuable, as they include a larger number of maps, and many new ones of great importance, such as those in the present example of Texas and also Australia. The Library of Congress, for example, has an 1834 edition, which contains just two maps relating to Australia. The present example has a total of seven maps devoted to Australia and New Zealand and includes some of the most important for the region published during the 19th century. Phillips Atlases 790 (a comparable edition with title dated 1842, containing the additional 17 map sheets dated to 1853).