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LAZARUS & ROSENFELD. VICTORIA CHINA WORKS. ALTROHLAU, CARLSBAD, AUSTRIA./ GLASS FACTORIES – STEINSCHOENAU AND KITTLITZ, BOHEMIA./ LONDON HOUSE: BEVIS MARKS/ LAZARUS, ROSENFELD & LEHMANN, 60-62 MURRAY STREET, NEW YORK. / CHICAGO BRANCH, 66 EAST LAKE STREET. E.H. LYONS, MANAGER. [Caption title on first page: VASES "LIBERTY" AND "PROGRESS" BY THE VICTORIA CHINA WORKS, CARLSBAD, AUSTRIA.]

Lazarus, Rosenfeld & Lehmann [12] pages, photographic illustrations. Printed original wrappers with full page illustration of the factory on the rear wrap [minimal dustsoiling, short closed tear and small chip to bottom edge of front wrap], two staples. Very Good. This catalog features the following vases, some with full page photographic illustrations: The Declaration of Independence, Discovery of Steam Power, The Abolition of Slavery , The Landing of Christopher Columbus 1492, Discovery of the Use of Electricity, Magna Charta, Invention of Gunpowder, The Taking of Bastile, The Battle of Sempach 1386, and Invention of Printing. A Jewish owned business, Lazarus & Rosenfeld [a/k/a Lazarus, Rosenfeld & Lehmann] was a European ceramics group that founded the Victoria Porcelain Factory at Altrouhlau, Bohemia. The company consisted of Isaac Lazarus and Bertie Rosenfeld, and later Isaac, Sidney, Alfred and Julius Rosenfeld according to Trow’s Corporation Directory of 1914. The company was a member of, and contributor to, the United Hebrew Charities of New York City. In 1918, Mr. Rosenfeld chaired a campaign for the relief of Jewish war sufferers in Europe among the local trades, using his past experience as chairman of the Trades Committee in the United War Work campaign. ["Fund for Jewish War Sufferers," THE POTTERY, GLASS & BRASS SALESMAN, VOL. XVIII, NO. 20, December 12, 1918, p.83.] OCLC attributes publication date to 1893. OCLC 356291461 [3], as of April 2019.
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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF MEXICO, MEXICO, FEBRUARY 4, 1848. ORDERS NO. 45./ PROCEEDINGS OF A COURT OF INQUIRY CONVENED AT TACUBAYA, MEXICO. TO EXAMINE INTO THE FACTS AND CIRCUMSTANCES CONNECTED WITH THE LOSS OF CERTAIN PACK MULES ON THE 4TH INST., WHILE UNDER THE ESCORT OF A COLUMN OF TROOPS COMMANDED BY LIEUT. COLONEL MILES. BY COMMAND OF MAJOR-GENERAL SCOTT.

Mexican War 5-1/2" x 8". [3], [1 blank] pp. Disbound. Unsigned. Very Good. Brevet Lieut. Col. Miles had been ordered by Brig. Gen. Twiggs, commanding at Vera Cruz, to take command of the wagon train and troops to march into the interior. A number of merchants availed themselves of the escort of the U.S. troops for safe conduct of their merchandise to the capital. The train consisted of 316 government wagons which extended three miles in length, and pack mules upwards of 1700 in number adding another nine miles in length. Lieut. Col. Miles had 1300 troops, but only 150 were cavalry. The mule train was attacked by a party of guerillas between Santa Fe and the Rio San Juan, and upwards of 300 pack mules were driven off, with most of the goods lost belonging to Mexican merchants. The court of inquiry opined "that in consideration of the excessive length of the train, and the small number of troops under the orders of Lieut. Col. Miles, it was utterly impossible to afford such protection to the whole train as to ensure a safe transit for it through an enemy’s country – that Lieut. Col. Miles exercised unusual prudence and foresight in his precautionary measures, and that his entire arrangements upon the march were most judicious and officer-like, and that instead of meriting censure or even animadversion, the conduct of Lieut. Col. Miles entitles him to high commendations." Dixon Stansbury Miles [1804-1862] served in the Indian Wars and the Mexican War. He was promoted to Captain in 1836 and fought in the Seminole Wars in Florida from 1839-1852. He was promoted to to Major at the start of the Mexican War for" gallant and distinguished conduct" in the defense of Fort Brown, Texas. He fought at the Battle of Monterrey and the Siege of Veracruz, after which he was appointed Brevet Lieut. Col. for "gallant and meritorious conduct in the several conflicts at Monterrey, Mexico." He was a commander during the Civil War and in 1862 was given command of the U.S. arsenal at Harpers Ferry, where his garrison held Conf. Gen. Lee’s supply line through the Shenandoah Valley. He was later mortally wounded.
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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, MEXICO, DECEMBER 29 1847. GENERAL ORDERS– NO. 393. BEFORE A GENERAL COURT MARTIAL CONVENED IN THIS CITY, BY VIRTUE OF GENERAL ORDERS NO. 364, AND OF WHICH LIEUT. COL. PLYMPTON, 7TH INFANTRY, IS PRESIDENT, WERE TRIED: 2D LIEUT. EDW. MCD. REYNOLDS, MARINE CORPS. VIOLENCE TO HIS SUPERIOR OFFICER. DISOBEDIENCE OF ORDERS. 2D LIEUT. J.N.G. WHISTLER, 3D INFANTRY. NEGLECT OF DUTY. PRIVATE RICHARD LAKENAN OF COMPANY F., 4TH ARTILLERY. NEGLECT OF DUTY. ABSENCE WITHOUT LEAVE. INSUBORDINATE CONDUCT. [&c]

Mexican War 5-1/2" x 8". 5, [3 blank] pp. [page 5 misnumbered as 4.] Disbound, lightly toned, partly loosened. Tiny tear to edge of first leaf. Signed in ink by H.L. Scott, A.A.A.G., "By command of Major-General Scott." Very Good. Lieut. Reynolds was found not guilty; Court opined that the charges were unfounded and vexatious. Lieut. Whistler was found not guilty and acquitted. Pvt. Lakenan was found guilty of all charges and sentenced to forfeit five dollars per month for four months. Other charges heard include: Pvt. Steward Finney, Co. B, and Pvt. Mathew Sweful, Co. K, 3d Infantry, both found guilty of desertion, sentenced to fifty lashes on their bare backs; Pvt. Henry Saguier, Co. K, 3d Infantry, found not guilty of absence without leave; Pvt. Felix Dobson and Pvt. Edw’d Hoover, both of Co. F, 4th Artillery, found guilty of highly unsoldierlike conduct; Pvt. James Smith, Co. I, Voltigeurs, guilty of sleeping on post; Pvt. Joseph Beatty, Co. B, 3d Infantry, found guilty of absence without leave; Pvt. Peter Flynn, Co. A, 3d Infantry, guilty of highly unsoldierlike conduct; Pvt. Augustus Iddler, Co. F, Voltigeurs, guilty of leaving his post and absence without leave; Corp. William Ramsey, Co. F, 6th Infantry, guilty of gross neglect of duty; Pvt. Charles Donivan, Co. F, 6th Infantry, guilty of sleeping on post; Pvt. Samuel Waite, Co. F, and Pvt. John Flynn, Co. G, both of Voltigeurs, both guilty of sleeping on post. The lesser charges include sentences such as forfeiture of pay, hard labor, and marching with 30 pounds carried on the back. Most of the punishments for the lesser charges were forfeiture of pay.
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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, MEXICO, NOVEMBER 12, 1847. GENERAL ORDERS– NO. 345. BEFORE A GENERAL COURT MARTIAL, OF WHICH COL. N.S. CLARKE, 6TH INFANTRY, IS PRESIDENT, CONVENED BY GENERAL ORDERS NO. 302, WAS TRIED 1ST LIEUT. JOHN S. DEVLIN, OF THE U.S. MARINE CORPS, ON THE FOLLOWING CHARGES AND SPECIFICATIONS, VIZ: DRUNKENNESS ON DUTY. CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN. VIOLATION OF THE 25TH ARTICLE OF THE RULES AND ARTICLES AND WAR. BREACH OF ARREST.

Mexican War 5-1/2" x 8". 4, [1], [3 blank] pp. Disbound, lightly toned, minimal light foxing. "By command of Major-General Scott." Unsigned. Very Good. A detailed report with many specifications and charges listed. Lieut. Devlin was found guilty of drunkenness, conduct unbecoming an officer, and guilty of the charges of Violating the 25th Article of War and breach of arrest. Originall sentenced to be cashiered, he found mercy from the Court, which commuted the sentence to "twelve months suspension from rank, command and emoluments." A series of court martials took place during this time after the capture of Mexico City in 1847. Devlin, described as "a hot headed, hard drinking native of Ireland" had accused Capt. John G. Reynolds of cowardice, thus provoking a fight between the two men. It led to Devlin’s request for a duel. Although the commission ultimately mitigated his sentence, Devlin continued to have troubles and faced court martial in August, 1852. He was again found guilty and sentenced to be cashiered out, but this time nobody in authority stepped in to help. The sentence was approved on September 18, 1852. [Smith, Charles R.: MARINES IN THE MEXICAN WAR, 1991, p.45.].
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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, MEXICO, DECEMBER 1, 1847. GENERAL ORDERS– NO. 359. BEFORE A GENERAL COURT MARTIAL, OF WHICH BT. COLONEL B. RILEY, 2D INFANTRY IS PRESIDENT, CONVENED BY GENERAL ORDER NO. 333, WERE TRIED: CAPTAIN S.D. DOBBINS, 3D INFANTRY, ON. CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN. SPECIFICATION 1ST . DID GO INTO THE QUARTERS OF HIS COMMANDING OFFICER, CAPTAIN E.B. ALEXANDER. 25TH OF OCTOBER, 1847, IN A STATE OF INTOXICATION, AND DID THERE ENTER INTO A VIOLENT AND UNBECOMING ABUSE OF 1ST LIEUTENANT A.B. BOWMAN, MAKING USE OF HIGHLY OUTRAGEOUS LANGUAGE. SPECIFICATION 2D. AT THE HOUR OF MIDNIGHT, ON THE 25TH OF OCTOBER, 1847, WHILE IN A STATE OF INTOXICATION, VIOLENTLY ENTERED THE QUARTERS OF LIEUT. A.W. BOWMAN, 3D INFANTRY. WHILE LIEUT. BOWMAN WAS UNARMED, PARTIALLY UNDRESSED. THE SAID CAPTAIN DOBBINS,. DID DRAW HIS SWORD AND ASSAULT THE SAID LIEUT. BOWMAN, WOUNDING HIM IN TOW PLACES, ON THE HEAD AND BACK, ENDANGERING [HIS] LIFE. BEFORE THE SAME COURT WAS TRIED MAJOR WI

Mexican War 5-1/2" x 8". 2, [2 blank] pp. Disbound, lightly toned. Signed in ink by H.L. Scott, A.A.A.G., "By command of Major-General Scott." Very Good. Captain Dobbins had abused Lieutenant, saying: "’Lt. Bowman is a damned coward, he is not fit to wipe my a—–e with, God damn him, etc.’" He was sentenced to be dismissed from the service of the United States. Major Dulany was acquitted. Stephen D. Dobbins was involved in early scouting actions along the Rio Grande before the outbreak of hostilities, and performed heroically at the battle of Resaca de la Palma. [Moseley & Clark: THE A TO Z OF THE UNITED STATES – MEXICAN WAR, Scarecrow Press: 2009, p.99].
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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, MEXICO, MARCH 9, 1848. ORDERS NO. 22. AT A GENERAL COURT MARTIAL, BY VIRTUE OF GENERAL ORDERS NO. 50, DATED FEBRUARY 10, 1848, AND OF WHICH MAJOR GENERAL R. PATTERSON U.S. ARMY, IS PRESIDENT, WERE TRIED: 1ST LIEUTENANT CHARLES TAPLIN, OF THE 12TH U.S. INFANTRY. UNOFFICERLIKE CONDUCT. 1ST LIEUTENANT N. MCCLANAHAN, 14TH U.S. INFANTRY. NEGLECT OF DUTY. 1ST LIEUTENANT D.M. SHORT, OF THE 12TH INFANTRY. NEGLECT OF DUTY. DISOBEDIENCE OF ORDERS. DISRESPECT TOWARDS HIS COMMANDING OFFICER. CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN. BREVET MAJOR WILLIAM DULANY, U.S. MARINE CORPS. DRUNKENNESS ON DUTY. CONDUCT TO THE PREJUDICE OF GOOD ORDER AND MILITARY DISCIPLINE. NEGLECT OF DUTY. CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN.

Mexican War 5-1/2" x 8". 7, [1 blank] pp. Disbound, lightly toned, light foxing. One early ink correction in text. Signed in ink by L. Thomas, AAG, "By order of Major General Butler." Very Good. Lieut. Taplin chased Pvt. Joseph Admonston of the 4th Regiment and then "cut him down with his sword", "cutting him severely in several places" until his cries of murder brought people to his rescue. Lieut. Taplin was found guilty but "returned to duty by the leniency of the Court." Lieut. McClanahan was found guilty of neglect of duty and sentenced to a one month suspension and forfeiture of pay. Lieut. Short was found guilty of all charges except conduct unbecoming an officer. He was sentenced to a two month suspension and forfeiture of pay. Bvt. Major Dulany was found guilty of conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline and a modification of the fourth charge to guilty of unofficerlike conduct. This last charge resulted from his stealing from plundered articles taken from the Guard at the National Palace and stealing from the Convent of San Domingo while the Marines were quartered there. The Commanding General gave Dulany credit for correct motives and he was allowed to "resume (his) sword." Charles Van Linneus Taplin [1819-1855] served during the Texas War for Independence. He had accompanied John C. Fremont on at least three of his expeditions, including the fourth during which, according to the accounts of Taplin and others, some of the men resulted to cannabilism. Some sources list him as being brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious service during the Mexican War. Ultimately, he submitted his resignation of commission on April 12, 1848, not long after this court martial. William Dulany [1817-1868] served in the U.S Marine Corps. He was appointed from Virginia as 2d Lieutenant on June 10, 1817; promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 19, 1819; to Captain July 1, 1834; and to Brevet Major Ship on March 3, 1843, for meritorious conduct during the Florida War. He fought in the Mexican War and during his service was promoted to Brevet Lieutenant Colonel on September 14, 1847 for "gallantry at Chapultepec, the capture of Belch Gate and the City of Mexico"; and to full Major on November 17, 1847. ["William Dulany", Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Virtualology: 2001, accessed online 11/26/2018.].
A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON RAIL-ROADS AND CARRIAGES

A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON RAIL-ROADS AND CARRIAGES, SHOWING THE PRINCIPLES OF ESTIMATING THEIR STRENGTH, PROPORTIONS, EXPENSE, AND ANNUAL PRODUCE, AND THE CONDITIONS WHICH RENDER THEM EFFECTIVE, ECONOMICAL, AND DURABLE; WITH THE THEORY, EFFECT, AND EXPENSE OF STEAM CARRIAGES, STATIONARY ENGINES, AND GAS MACHINES. ILLUSTRATED BY FOUR ENGRAVINGS AND NUMEROUS USEFUL TABLES. BY THOMAS TREDGOLD, CIVIL ENGINEER, MEMBER OF THE INSTITUTION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS, &C

Tredgold, Thomas Original quarter sheep and marbled boards [hinges firm, but spine and corners rubbed]. Spine lettered and decorated in gilt. xi, [1 blank] 184 pp. Four plates [one of them folding], as issued. Light to moderate spotting, Good+. This American edition was issued in the same year as the first [London]. "This study, and that of Nicholas Wood (Practical treatise on railroads, London, 1825) constitute the first comprehensive works in railway engineering, having been written and published at the same time as the opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway, the first to carry pay load. In Tredgold’s book, the structural features of roadbed, rails, engines, and rolling stock are analyzed, and the evolution of railroads from man-powered and animal-powered to steam-powered is given. Clear and detailed engravings illustrate Stephenson’s pre-Rocket engines and others with primitive transmission of power from engine to rail" [Dibner, Heralds of Science 182]. Rink 5836. Thomson 96.
A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON RAIL-ROADS

A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON RAIL-ROADS, AND INTERIOR COMMUNICATION IN GENERAL. CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF THE PERFORMANCES OF THE DIFFERENT LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES AT AND SUBSEQUENT TO THE LIVERPOOL CONTEST; UPWARDS OF TWO HUNDRED AND SIXTY EXPERIMENTS; WITH TABLES OF THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF CANALS AND RAIL-ROADS, AND THE POWER OF THE PRESENT LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES. ILLUSTRATED BY NUMEROUS ENGRAVINGS. FIRST AMERICAN, FROM THE SECOND ENGLISH EDITION, WITH CORRECTIONS, NOTES, AND ADDITIONS; ALSO, AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING A DETAILED ACCOUNT OF A NUMBER OF RAIL-ROADS IN EUROPE, AND IN THE UNITED STATES

Wood, Nicholas xxvi, 592pp, one folding table, plus ten plate illustrations/diagrams [9 of which are folding plates]. Bound in attractive, modern half calf and marbled boards, with gilt spine rules and gilt-stamped spine title, marbled endpapers. All text present but, after page 552, a number of leaves are bound out of order: ([1]-552, 561-568, 553-560, 577-584, 569-576, 593-598, [1-errata], [1-binder’s instructions], [585]-592 pp). Light scattered toning and foxing. Except as noted, Very Good. The first American edition of the first comprehensive book [with Thomas Tredgold’s ‘Treatise’ published the same year] on railway engineering. As Wikipedia notes, Wood "analysed the various types of ‘motive power’ then in use: self-acting planes, fixed steam-engine planes, horses and steam locomotives." He also presented evidence on the superiority of railroads to canal transportation. FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. Dibner, Heralds of Science 182. Thomson 691. OCLC notes 9 copies under 7 accession numbers as of December 2018.
MILLER'S PLANTERS' AND MERCHANTS' ALMANAC FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1834. CALCULATED BY JOSHUA SHARP
DISTURNELL'S RAILROAD

DISTURNELL’S RAILROAD, STEAMBOAT, AND TELEGRAPH BOOK; BEING A GUIDE THROUGH THE MIDDLE, NORTHERN, AND EASTERN STATES, AND CANADA: ALSO, GIVING THE GREAT LINES OF TRAVEL SOUTH AND WEST AND THE OCEAN STEAM PACKET ARRANGEMENTS. CONTAINING TABLES OF DISTANCES, &C. TELEGRAPH LINES, AND CHARGES; LIST OF HOTELS, EXPRESS OFFICES, &C. &C

Disturnell, J[ohn] 12mo, original bright red wrappers, printed in brilliant gilt lettering. Stitched. Map affixed to title page verso: ‘Map of the Hudson River as far as Navigable, with the distances from New-York.’ Two Folding Maps: ‘City of New York. with part of Brooklyn and Williamsburgh’ [Disturnell: 1847]; large color ‘Travellers’ Map of the Middle, Northern, Eastern States and Canada Showing all the Railroad, Steamboat, Canal, and Principal Stage Routes’ [Disturnell: 1849] [a couple of small splits at fold junctions]. 98, [10 advertisements] pp, with all edges gilt. Very Good Disturnell packs an enormous amount of information into this little Guide: the information promised in the title, with all the rail and steam lines, principal hotels and boarding houses, mail and telegraph lines, information for Southern travelers, canal packet lines, and many advertisements– frequently illustrated– for goods and services helpful to the traveler. In addition to his work publishing similar guide books, Disturnell was a bookseller and librarian of the Cooper Union. Modelski 12. OCLC 6370811 [4- NYHS, Brown, L.A. Public Lib., U AL] as of December 2018. See 43 Decker 127 for the January 1849 edition.
THE AUTHENTIC LIFE OF MRS. MARY ANN BICKFORD

THE AUTHENTIC LIFE OF MRS. MARY ANN BICKFORD, WHO WAS MURDERED IN THE CITY OF BOSTON, ON THE 27TH OF OCTOBER, 1845. COMPRISING A LARGE NUMBER OF HER ORIGINAL LETTERS AND CORRESPONDENCE NEVER BEFORE PUBLISHED. SECOND EDITION

Bickford, James] 48pp. Disbound, original printed wrappers, the front wrapper illustrated with a portrait of Mrs. Bickford, engraved by Brown & Worcester. Verso of title page is a printed certificate from James Bickford, attesting to the accuracy of the correspondence and text. Spine worn, old bookplate on blank verso of front wrapper. Except as noted, Very Good This and the first edition were both printed in 1846. "The color of the cover appears to be the only difference between this and the 1st ed." [OCLC]. The wife of James Bickford of Maine, Mary Ann was 17 when she gave birth to their first child; the baby died the following year. Thereafter, Mary Ann was "bordering on insanity." She left her husband and began an affair with Albert Tirrell of Boston. Was Tirrell a womanizer who took advantage of Mary Ann and caused her to live in a brothel? Or was Mary Ann a beautiful harlot who used sex for material gain? Authorities claimed that, when Tirrell learned that Mary Ann contemplated reconciling with her husband, he killed her in a fit of rage and then set the brothel on fire. He was tried separately for murder and for arson. His attorney argued that Mary Ann committed suicide or, at the very most, Tirrell committed the murder while sleepwalking. Tirrell was acquitted on all charges. "The Tirrell case is one of the triumphs of Rufus Choate, who convinced the jury." McDade. The widower, James Bickford, published Mary Ann’s private correspondence in hopes that they would prove to the public that she was no harlot, but rather a distraught woman who had been abused by a scoundrel. McDade 986. Cohen 13108. Neither source records this second edition. OCLC 58657467 [1- NYHS] as of December 2018.
SUPREME COURT OF APPEALS OF WEST VIRGINIA

SUPREME COURT OF APPEALS OF WEST VIRGINIA, WHEELING. DANIEL A. STOFER AGAINST WEST VIRGINIA. FROM CIRCUIT COURT OF POCAHONTAS COUNTY

Stofer, Daniel A.] 17, [1 blank]. Original printed salmon wrappers [light edge dusting and wear], stitched. Old vertical fold. Very Good. An 1866 West Virginia statute required Daniel Stofer to swear, as a condition of admission to the Bar in that State, that he had not borne arms against the United States or the State of West Virginia. He took the "lawyers’ test oath" in June 1867. The State of West Virginia indicted him for perjury after witnesses swore that he "had voluntarily given aid and comfort to persons engaged in armed hostility, by countenancing, counseling and encouraging them in the same; had sought, accepted and attempted to exercise the functions of office under authority in hostility to the United States, and to the State of West Virginia; and had yielded a voluntary support to a pretended government, authority, power and constitution within the United States, hostile or inimical thereto." Found guilty after trial, he was sentenced to pay a fine of $25 and serve one year in jail. Stofer appealed. He argued that the test oath was unconstitutional, and sought a new trial on various other grounds. This is the record submitted to the Supreme Court of West Virginia. The Test Oath "did not endure very long, but it was in force long enough to be declared constitutional and to cause the arrest, indictment and conviction of Captain Daniel A. Stofer, of Pocahontas County. This lawyer had served as captain of a hard fighting Confederate company which distinguished itself at Gettysburg and on other stricken fields, and in June, 1867, this captain took the oath cheerfully and was tried and convicted, and escaped by the skin of his teeth by reason of a negligently drawn indictment, which was quashed in the Supreme Court of Appeals in West Virginia." [West Virginia Bar Association: PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL MEETING OF THE WEST VIRGINIA BAR ASSOCIATION. 1915. Pages 108-111.] Not located on OCLC as of January 2018.
THE CRIMINAL; THE CRIME; THE PENALTY
A HISTORY AND DESCRIPTION OF THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAIL ROAD; WITH AN APPENDIX

A HISTORY AND DESCRIPTION OF THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAIL ROAD; WITH AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING A FULL ACCOUNT OF THE CEREMONIES AND PROCESSION ATTENDING THE LAYING OF THE CORNER-STONE, BY CHARLES CARROLL, OF CARROLLTON, ON THE FOURTH OF JULY, 1828, AND AN ORIGINAL AND COMPLETE REPORT OF THE GREAT OPENING CELEBRATION AT WHEELING, JANUARY, 1853. TO WHICH IS ADDED A SUPPLEMENT. ILLUSTRATED BY A MAP AND SIX ORIGINAL PORTRAITS. BY A CITIZEN OF BALTIMORE

Smith, William Prescott] 200pp, in original publisher’s cloth [stamped in blind, gilt-lettered title stamped on front board]. Six portrait plates of the key men in the Road’s founding and development. Folding ‘Map, Exhibiting the Railway Route between Baltimore & St. Louis Together with the Other Principal Lines in the Eastern, Middle & Western States. Prepared under direction of B.H. Latrobe Ch. Engr. B. & O.R.R. [Lith. by A. Hoen & Co. Balto.]’ The map has a clean tear along one fold, one small tear at a fold intersection, and one blank margin tear from careless opening. Clean text, one small ink spot on front board, Good+. The author presents his "historical sketch and compendium of facts relating to the diversified career of the Baltimore and Ohio Rail Road Company,- from the period of its first organization in 1827, to its completion in 1853." He praises Maryland for "having been the first State in the Union to incorporate a Company for the construction of a Rail Road." Howes S716. Sabin 84847. Not in Modelski.
THE FLORIDIAN. "LAISSEZ NOUS FAIRE." VOL. VII-- NO. 40

THE FLORIDIAN. "LAISSEZ NOUS FAIRE." VOL. VII– NO. 40

Florida] Folio, 13-1/4" x 19-1/2". [4] pp, each page printed in five columns, separated by rules. Repairs to second leaf, without taking any text. Else Very Good. Wilson established the second Tallahassee territorial press. "On October 7, 1828, William Wilson established the Floridian, most influential Florida paper of the succeeding half-century. Wilson managed to secure the contract for printing the documents of the seventh legislative council, which met in the fall of 1828, and published the Acts of that session with the imprint ‘Printed by William Wilson. Tallahassee, 1829.’ Wilson remained publisher of the Floridian until 1837 and retained the public printing contract until that time, with the exception of 1831." [McMurtrie, Beginnings of Printing in Florida, 23 FL Historical Quarterly 83 (1944)]. This is a significant issue from Wilson’s press. It prints at length material on the Texas Army’s 1836 victory at San Jacinto, the decisive battle of the Texas War of Independence (1836); news and ads from Tallahassee at the time of the Second Seminole Indian War (1835-1842); Andrew Jackson’s 1836 Proclamation on the boundary between the United States and Mexico; the murder of "a white boy about fifteen years of age by a party of savages"; Governor Call’s Address on the frontier "crisis" caused by "marauding bands" of Indians. One article reproduces excerpts from the official account of the storming of the Alamo, stating in part that the fort "had been attacked by a force consisting of 1400 men, divided into four columns and a reserve, at five o’clock in the morning – that the resistance of the Texians was of the most determined character, and continued for more than an hour and a half, when the garrison were, as far as can be learned slaughtered."
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FREEDOM IS EVERYBODY’S JOB! THE CRIME OF THE GOVERNMENT AGAINST THE NEGRO PEOPLE. SUMMATION OF THE TRIAL OF THE 11 COMMUNIST LEADERS

Crockett, George W., Jr. 16pp. Original printed title wrappers with photographic illustration of author on front wrap [minimal dustsoiling], held with two staples. Number written in ink at head of front wrap, institutional discard rubberstamp on rear wrap. Short split at each end of spine fold. Very Good. "The pamphlet contains a portion of Mr. Crockett’s summation to the jury in the recently concluded trial of the eleven leaders of the Communist Party. The defendants – all members of the National Committee of the Communist Party of the United States, were indicted on July 28, 1948 under the so-called "Smith Act" and charged with conspiring to organize as the Communist Party a society or group of persons who teach ‘the Marxist-Leninist principles of the overthrow and destruction of the Government of the United States by force and violence.’. Mr. Crockett was one of five trial attorneys who undertook the defense." George W. Crockett, Jr., [1909-1997] was an African-American attorney, judge, and member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Michigan’s 13th district. from 1980-1991. He helped to found the National Lawyer’s Guild in 1937, the nation’s first integrated bar association. Among his many accomplishments, he was the first African-American lawyer in the U.S. Department of Labor, was an active civil rights lawyer in private practice, and a judge in Detroit in the 1960s and 1970s.