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Tregear's Black Jokes

Tregear’s Black Jokes

SUMMERS, W., illustrator; HUNT, G., engraver The Incredibly Rare Tregear’s Black Jokes "A Series of Laughable Caricatures on the March of Manners Amongst the Blacks" SUMMERS, W., illustrator. Tregear’s Black Jokes, being a series of laughable caricatures on the march of manners amongst the blacks. Twenty plates. London: Published by G.S. Tregear, at his Humorous and Sporting Print Shop, Cheapside, 1834. Oblong quarto (10 1/4 x 14 1/2 inches; 260 x 368 mm.). Lithographed title-page and Twenty superb hand-colored lithographs by W. Summers, engraved by G. Hunt. All plates with original tissue-guards. Top margin of first plate with 3/8 inch slight water-stain, otherwise fine and clean. Contemporary quarter maroon roan over mottled green cloth boards, front cover with original printed paper label "Tregear’s/BLACK JOKES./[double rule]/Twenty Plates./[double rule]/Price £1.11s.6d." Spine with five double-ruled lines, covers a little worn at extremities and also slightly soiled. Original pale gray end-papers. Armorial bookplate of George Folliott on front paste-down. His collection of valuable printed books was sold after his death by Sotheby’s London in 1930. Tregear’s Black Jokes were series of prints issued by the London engraver and print-seller Gabriel Shire Tregear. In their style and subject matter, they are an adaptation of Edward W. Clay’s earlier lithographic series Life in Philadelphia (1828-30), which sought to lampoon and ridicule the social pretensions of black Philadelphians though a number of exaggerated situations and compositions. Edward Clay had been inspired by George & Robert Cruikshank’s Life in London, a copy of which he saw while on a trip to England. Tregear followed this format, producing vivid hand-colored aquatints from Hunt’s engravings of W. Summers’ original caricatures that far exceed Clay’s in their technical accomplishment. The series relies heavily on its humor being drawn from the incongruity of placing Africans in overtly European social contexts. The ‘joke’ is continued with the extensive use of patois, deepening the sense of social and racial disparity. According to OCLC there is just one complete copy in libraries and institutions worldwide: Harvard University, Houghton Library (MA, US). The only complete copy to have appeared at auction (at least since 1930) was at (Sotheby’s, London (July 26, 1984 – lot 427 £1,250 + auctioneers premium "worn & stained"). An incomplete copy(lacking the title-page and the last eight plates was sold at Swann Galleries in New York, April 16, 1998 – lot 183 $3,400 + auctioneers premium). Gabriel Shear Tregear (1802-1841) also known as Gabriel Shire Tregear, was an English publisher of caricatures and prints. He was married to Ann McLean, the sister of print-seller and publisher Thomas McLean. Active from the late 1820s until his death, he operated his "Humorous and Sporting Print Shop" from quarters near today’s 123 Cheapside, London. His shop was renowned, and later infamous, for the multitude of caricatures and prints filling its windows. He was forced to reduce the number of displayed items after a child was accidently struck by a passing wagon due to the size of the gathered crowd near the shop. Artists and caricaturists published by Tregear included a member of the Cruikshank family of caricaturists, Isaac Robert Cruikshank. Tregear published many series, of which Flights of Humour appears to be the longest, running to 95 prints or more. They are generally undated. The "Rum Jokes" series ran to at least 43 prints, and cover hunting, shooting, and fishing, plus racing events, skating, billiards and the building trade. His "Black Jokes" were described in an advertisement as "being a Series of Laughable Caricatures on the March of Manners Amongst the Blacks." The Plates: ? "No. 1: The Promenade" ? "No. 2: The Lady Patroness/of/Alblacks" ? "No. 3: Marriage ala Mode" ? "No. 4: The Christening" ? "No. 5: Venus and Adonis" ? "No. 6: The Route" ? "No. 7: The Card Party/They Are Certainly Black Legs" ? "No. 8: The Breaking Up" ? "No. 9: Othello/Desdemona Asleep" ? "No. 10: The Concert" ? "No. 11: Miss White’s birth-day, Party" ? "No. 12: The Lubbers Quarrel" ? "No. 13: Blackberrying" ? "No. 14: Don Juan and Zerline" ? "No. 15: Cinderella and the Black Prince" ? "No. 16: The Portrait" ? "No. 17: The First Lesson" ? "No. 18: The Advertisement" ? "No. 19: The Wedding Feast." ? "No. 20: The Elopement" Abbey, Life 322.
Vicar of Wakefield

Vicar of Wakefield, The

BAYNTUN, Binder; GOLDSMITH, Oliver; POIRSON, Victor-Armand, illustrator A Superb Early Example of a Bayntun ‘Inlaid’ Binding BAYNTUN, Binder. GOLDSMITH, Oliver. The Vicar of Wakefield. With prefatory memoir by George Saintsbury. And One Hundred and Fourteen Coloured Illustrations. London: John C. Nimmo, 1886. Large octavo (9 3/4 x 6 3/8 inches; 247 x 162 mm.). [iv], [xvi], [1], [1, blank], 291, [1, blank] pp. Illustrated throughout with over one hundred and forty delicately colored text illustrations by Victor-Armand Poirson. Handsomely bound ca. 1900 byBayntun (stamp-signed in gilt on front turn-in) "Bayntun, Binder, Bath, Eng." Full red crushed levant morocco, covers decoratively tooled in gilt, front cover with a superb figure of ‘The Vicar’ on horseback inlaid in several different colored morocco’s. Spine with five raised bands decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt-ruled board-edges and turn-ins, pink marbled paper liners and end-leaves, al edges gilt. A superb early example of a Bayntun ‘inlaid’ binding. Fine. "The Vicar of Wakefield is a novel by Irish writer Oliver Goldsmith. It was written in 1761 and 1762, and published in 1766, and was one of the most popular and widely read 18th-century novels among Victorians. The novel is mentioned in George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Jane Austen’s Emma, Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities and David Copperfield, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Sarah Grand’s The Heavenly Twins, Charlotte Brontë’s The Professor and Villette, Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women and in Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s The Sorrows of Young Werther, as well as his Dichtung und Wahrheit." (Wikipedia). Victor-Armand Poirson (1858-1893) was a French artist and illustrator of comic genre subjects. He illustrated The Vicar of Wakefield byOliver Goldsmith in 1886, Salammbo by Gustave Flaubert in 1887, The Donkey of Lucius (translation of Paul-Louis Courier ) in 1887, The War of Carlo Monge in 1886, The Tale of the Archer by Armand Silvestre in 1883 (engraved watercolors by Gillot). He worked for the illustrated newspapers Modern Life , The Black Cat or The Journal of Youth and he contributed to The Graphic, 1888-89.
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Cornelia and Alcestis; Two Operas;

FORE-EDGE PAINTING; The "DOVER PAINTER", artist; EURIPIDES; MASON, James Esq A Fine Early Twentieth Century Fore-Edge Painting of the Acropolis by the "Dover Painter" From the Celebrated Library of Estelle Doheny FORE-EDGE PAINTING. [The "DOVER PAINTER"]. EURIPIDES. Cornelia and Alcestis; Two Operas; Founded on the Medea and Alcestis of Euripides. With prefatory remarks on that ancient author. By James Mason, Esq. London: Printed for T. Payne, 1810. First edition. Presentation copy from the author, inscribed in black ink on verso of title-page "Elizth. Goulds Book/The Gift of/Jas. Mason Esqr./April 9th 1819" Octavo (194 x 124 mm. (7 5/16 x 4 3/4 inches; 186 x 121 mm.). [iv], lxxxvii, [i, blank], 188 pp. With a fine early twentieth century fore-edge painting by the "Dover Painter". The painting salutes the classical origins of the operas with a striking depiction of the Acropolis, rising majestically on its hill, surrounded by open countryside with blue mountains in the distance. The foreground is populated by two tourists, sitting on a rock admiring the view, and four brightly dressed Greek peasants. The view shows a remarkably sophisticated sense of design as well as a delicacy of painterly strokes, and the whole scene looks very convincing. The intricate gradations in the shading, seen especially in the fields and sky, are remarkable, and the highly skilled use of shadows establishes a strong sense of three-dimensionality. There is a great deal to see in terms of activity, landscape, and architecture, and all of it is painted in careful, convincing detail. It is easy to recognize the work of the so-called "Dover Painter," as it shows his distinctive style of applying small dabs of paint; this method is especially effective in producing convincing texture for skies, trees, shrubs, and grass. Contemporary purple straight-grain morocco, covers ruled in gilt, spine with five raised bands ruled and lettered in gilt. Gilt decorated board-edges and turn-ins, gray paper liners and end-leaves, all edges gilt. With the engraved bookplates of Edward Laurence Doheny and Carrie Estelle Doheny on the front paste-down and front end-paper respectively. On the verso of the rear end-paper is the booksellers ticket of J.W. Robinson Co. Housed in a full brown morocco pull-off case ca. 1930 by Sangorski & Sutcliffe for J.W. Robinson Company. The "Dover Painter" an unknown English artist – probably worked on commission exclusively ca. 1920-1930 for Marks & Co, the London booksellers. By 1928 Dawson’s Book Shop in Los Angeles, headed by Ernest Dawson, began a relationship with Marks & Co. ["a reciprocal agency agreement"] that included sending crates of books to America via the Panama Canal. Several hundred fore-edges came to Dawson’s. Sesslers’ in Philadelphia bought and sold examples of the "Dover" painter’s work, as fore-edges by this and other artists turned up in the B. George Ulizio collection at Kent State University. Other fore-edge paintings were imported via J.W. Robinson Company [department stores], Los Angeles. The Robinson Co. books came with added new Sangorski & Sutcliffe slipcases made especially for them and sometimes included a typed identifying slip mounted on the end-leaves. Mrs. Doheny was a customer of Dawson’s and when a new shipment of books arrived from London Ernest Dawson would would select a choice item to offer to Lucille Miller, Mrs. Doheny’s personal librarian. Thus more than 200 of the 694 fore-edge paintings at the Doheny collection were painted by the :Dover" artist. The Doheny accession records tell us that most of her "Dover" artist fore-edges were purchased from 1929 to 1940. All came from Dawson’s or J.W. Robinson Co. (Jeff Weber. An Annotated Dictionary of Fore-Edge Painting Artists & Binders. 2010). The two librettos are based on Euripides’ tragedies "Medea" and "Alcestis." "Cornelia" transports the story of Medea’s revenge on her faithless husband to Roman Britain, while Alcestis’ story of self-sacrifice and redemption retains its original setting and cast of characters. James Mason (1779-1827) was a British writer of political pamphlets advocating parliamentary reform and Catholic emancipation, as well as several plays, an epistolary novel, and translations from the classics. In 1810 he translated into English blank verse ‘The Georgicks of Publius Virgilius Maro"
A Christmas Carol. The Chimes. The Cricket on the Hearth. The Battle of Life. The Haunted Man

A Christmas Carol. The Chimes. The Cricket on the Hearth. The Battle of Life. The Haunted Man

DICKENS, Charles; ROOT & SON, Binders A Superb First Edition Set of The Charles Dickens Christmas Books Beautifully Bound by Root & Son ca. 1920. DICKENS, Charles. ROOT & SON, Binders. The Christmas Books. London: [Various], 1843-1848. [Comprising:] A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being A Ghost Story of Christmas. With illustrations by John Leech. London: Chapman & Hall, 1843. First edition, first issue, with "Stave I" reading. Sixteenmo (6 3/8 x 4 inches; 160 x 100 mm). [8], 166, [2, ads] pp. Complete with half-title and ads. Half-title printed in blue, title-page printed in red and blue, four hand-colored plates, and intertextual illustrations. Original endpapers bound in. [And:] The Chimes: A Goblin Story or some Bells that Rang an Old Year Out and A New Year In. London: Chapman and Hall, 1845. First edition, second state of the engraved title. Sixteenmo (6 3/8 x 4 inches; 160 x 100 mm). [8], 175, [1, colophon] pp. Complete with ad for A Christmas Carol on verso of the first leaf. Engraved frontispiece, engraved title, and intertextual illustrations. [And:] The Cricket on the Hearth. A Fairy Tale of Home. London: Printed and Published for the Author, by Bradbury and Evans, 1846. First edition. Sixteenmo (6 3/8 x 4 inches; 160 x 100 mm). [8], 174, [2, ads] pp. Complete with half-title and the Oliver Twist advertisement at end. Engraved frontispiece, engraved title, and intertextual illustrations. [And:] The Battle of Life. A Love Story. London: Bradbury & Evans, 1846. First edition, fourth issue, with Cupid added to the scroll but without publisher’s imprint on engraved title. Sixteenmo (6 3/8 x 4 inches; 160 x 100 mm). [8], [1-2, sectional title], 3-175, [1, colophon], [2, ads] pp. Complete with half-title and ads. Engraved frontispiece, engraved title, and intertextual illustrations. [And:] The Haunted Man and the Ghost’s Bargain. A Fancy for Christmas-Time. London: Bradbury & Evans, 1848. First edition. Sixteenmo (6 3/8 x 4 inches; 160 x 100 mm). [8], 188 pp. Complete with ads and half-title. Engraved frontispiece, engraved title, and intertextual illustrations. Uniformly bound by Root & Son ca. 1920 (stamp-signed in gilt on front turn-ins). Full blue crushed levant morocco, covers with three-line gilt border surrounding a large holly leaf inlaid in green morocco and detailed in gilt with six inlaid red morocco berries on stem. Four similar but smaller corner-pieces also inlaid in green and red morocco. Spines with five raised bands, similarly decorated with inlaid green and red morocco holly leaves and lettered in gilt in compartments. Decorative gilt board edges and turn-ins, pale blue liners and endleaves. all edges gilt. Each volume with the original tan and brick red cloth covers and spines bound in at end. Spines very slightly and uniformly darkened. Some scattered light foxing otherwise a very fine set of arguably the most influential and important nineteenth century tales of the Christmas season. Following the overwhelming success of A Christmas Carol in 1843, Dickens embarked upon the Christmas Books project, seeking to marshal "the Carol philosophy . [in order to] strike a sledgehammer blow" for England’s lower classes. He continued publishing the Christmas Books throughout the 40s, and the stories became mainstays of Dickens’s public reading tours of the 1850s and 1860s. A Christmas Carol was an instant success, reportedly selling all 6,000 copies of the first edition on the first day of publication, and Dickens went on to write four more small festive books for each successive Christmas. The London bindery of W. Root & Son consistently turned-out excellent work, both on fine bindings as here, and on trade bindings and sets. Packer lists the firm in business in Red Lion Square in 1899-1901, and the December 1942 issue of The Rotarian notes with regret that W. Root had been bombed out (uprooted?) of their premises on Paternaster Row during the 1941 Blitz. There is a record in the June 10 1905 issue of The Academy "Esteemed Editions of various Authors, some scarce, all in new extra leather bindings. W. Root & Son, 29-30 Eagle Street, Red Lion Street, Holborn, W.C." Root & Son are also recorded at the same address in The Literary Year-Book, 1909 (thirteenth annual volume). The British Library have five examples of bindings by Root & Son.
Fifty "Bab" Ballads

Fifty "Bab" Ballads

GILBERT, W.S. W.S. Gilbert’s ‘Fifty "Bab Ballads’ A Fine Inlaid Binding – Possibly by W.T. Morrell GILBERT, W.S. Fifty "Bab" Ballads. Much Sound and Little Sense by W.S. Gilbert. With illustrations by the author. London [&] New York: George Routledge and Sons, 1878. Third? edition (first published in 1876). Octavo (7 1/2 x 5 1/4 inches; 190 mm x 133 mm.). 255, [1, imprint] pp. Engraved frontispiece (included in pagination) with original tissue-guard and numerous illustrations in the text. Some marginal foxing, otherwise near fine. Bound ca. 1920 in full red crushed levant morocco, covers ruled in gilt enclosing an elaborate oval floral design with eight inlaid flowers in cream morocco and leaves of olive, medium and dark green and red morocco surrounded by a decorative border of medium and dark green. The flowers and leaves are decoratively tooled in blind and highly decorated with gilt pointille. Spine with five raised bands, with decorative inlaid dark green morocco borders, lettered and ruled in gilt in compartments, gilt-ruled board-edges and turn-ins, gray paper liners and end-leaves, all edges gilt. Although this fine little binding is unsigned it was most certainly done executed by one of the great English binderies, possibly by one of the finishers at the London bindery of W. T. Morrell. Prideaux in her "Modern Bookbindings" published in 1906, says that Morrell at that time had a very large business that supplied "all the booksellers with bindings designed by his men," bindings that were "remarkable for their variety and merit." The "Bab" Ballads. [together with:] More "Bab" Ballads. Much Sound and Little Sense, were first published in London: by John Camden Hotten and George Routledge and Sons, 1869 [and] 1872. In 1876 Gilbert collected fifty of his favourite poems in Fifty "Bab" Ballads- Much Sound and Little Sense, with one poem being collected for the first time ("Etiquette") and twenty-five poems that had appeared in the earlier volumes being left out. As Gilbert explained: The period during which they were written extended over some three or four years; many, however, were composed hastily, and under the discomforting necessity of having to turn out a quantity of lively verse by a certain day in every week. As it seemed to me (and to others) that the volumes were disfigured by the presence of these hastily written impostors, I thought it better to withdraw from both volumes such Ballads as seemed to show evidence of carelessness or undue haste, and to publish the remainder in the compact form under which they are now presented to the reader. (Gilbert 1876, p. vii). Gilbert’s readers were not happy with the loss, and in 1882 Gilbert published all of the poems that had appeared in either The "Bab" Ballads or More "Bab" Ballads, once again excluding "Etiquette." Some twentieth-century editions of More "Bab" Ballads include "Etiquette". In 1890 Gilbert produced Songs of a Savoyard, a volume of sixty-nine detached lyrics from the Savoy Operas, each with a new title, and some of them slightly reworded to fit the changed context. Many of them also received "Bab" illustrations in the familiar style. He also included two deleted lyrics from Iolanthe (footnoted as "omitted in representation"). The effect was that of a new volume of "Bab Ballads". Indeed, Gilbert considered calling the volume The Savoy Ballads (Ellis 1970, p.27, n. 53).
Fairy Tales by Hans Andersen

Fairy Tales by Hans Andersen

CLARKE, Harry, illustrator; ANDERSON, Hans Christian Scarce First American Trade Edition [CLARKE, Harry, illustrator]. ANDERSEN, Hans Christian. Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen. Illustrated by Harry Clarke. New York: Brentano’s, [n.d., 1916]. First American trade edition. Quarto (11 x 7 5/8 inches; 280 x 194 mm.). 319, [1] pp. Sixteen mounted color plates (all but frontispiece with captioned tissue guards), twenty-four black and white plates, and ten decorative tail-pieces, mostly repeated throughout the text. Additional line drawings for the frontispiece, title-page, list of illustrations, self-portrait tail-piece, and "The Tinder-Box" title-piece. Original gray cloth, covers and spine pictorially stamped in black. Top edge gilt, others uncut. Minimal darkening to spine, partially unopened and a few leaves poorly opened, but only affecting blank margins. Neat ink presentation dated Christmas 1916 on front paste-down. A very good copy of a scarce title. "Mr. Clarke brings to Hans Andersen an entirely fresh interpretation, and he appeals to the intellectual emotions of art-lovers, who will find in his work satisfaction of their craving for new and unconventional treatment of themes which may never be exhausted while the spirit of life exists in art. Mr. Clarke is a craftsman who devotes to each drawing an infinity of pains which is little less than marvelous, and it is difficult to know which to admire most-his fresh conceptions or his delicate and intricate detail. The latter feature, by the way, has necessitated a very considerable amount of hand-graving upon the colour blocks, and these give, therefore, much more than the usual mechanical reproductions of the artist’s drawings" (Prospectus, quoted in Bowe on p. 40). Bowe, p. 149, no. 2.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator; DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge; CARROLL, Lewis; DOBSON, Austin Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Illustrated by Arthur Rackham [RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. CARROLL, Lewis. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Illustrated by Arthur Rackham. With a Proem by Austin Dobson. London: William Heinemann, [n.d., 1907]. First English Edition DeLuxe. Limited to 1,130 numbered copies (this copy being # 853). Large quarto (11 1/16 x 9 inches; 281 x 229 mm.). xii, 161, [1], 1, blank] pp. Thirteen tipped-in full-page color plates mounted on heavy brown paper, with lettered tissue-guards. Fourteen black and white drawings. Publisher’s white buckram over boards, front cover and spine pictorially stamped and lettered in gilt, pictorial end papers, top edge gilt, others uncut. Minimal dust soiling to spine, gilt on word "Lewis" a little rubbed, some light offsetting from paste-downs to free end-papers as usual, small neat ink inscription dated Christmas 1907 on front flyleaf. An excellent copy of one of Arthur Rackham’s best loved titles. "Rackham’s next undertaking after Peter Pan was the most controversial of his whole career. This was nothing less than a fresh illustration of Alice in Wonderland, a work so completely identified with the drawings by John Tenniel that it seemed to many critics almost blasphemous for anyone to attempt to prepare alternatives. As soon as it became clear, however, that a spate of new illustrated editions was being planned to follow the expiry of the original copyright (in fact, at least seven appeared in England in the first possible year, 1907), it was surely not to be regretted that an artist of Rackham’s quality had taken up the challenge. Even The Times, in the course of an unfavourable review, recognized that Rackham ‘feels his privilege and his responsibilities’, but this critic, obsessed by Tenniel, found Rackham’s humour ‘forced and derivative’ and discovered ‘few signs of true imaginative instinct’ in his work. A stranger wrote at once to sympathize: ‘I felt I must express my indignation at the injustice of the "Times" criticism. However, I am certain that Time is on your side, and that nothing but prejudice prevents your superiority being recognised now. Your delightful Alice is alive and makes by contrast Tenniel’s Alice look a stiff wooden puppet. This went much further than Rackham would have done, for he had no wish to set himself up against Tenniel. He would have been well content with the verdict of the Daily Telegraph, that it would be fortunate for Lewis Carroll’s memory if his masterpiece encountered ‘no less inspired interpreters than Mr Arthur Rackham’." (Derek Hudson, Arthur Rackham. His Life and Work. pp 70 and 72.) "The Alice. is not the heroine of Sir John Tenniel’s imagination; she is older and more sophisticated; but at the same time she has a tender, flickering light of imagination in her eyes, which lifts her out of the domain of the merely pretty and childish. Mr. Rackham’s inexhaustible imagination, working over and embroidering the ground-work of Tenniel’s types, has added a really wonderful wealth of uncanny, dreamlike mystery to the story.[and] extraordinary feeling into the drawing of the hands" (Daily Telegraph). Latimore & Haskell, p. 29. Riall, p.77.
Cendrillon

Cendrillon

RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator; PERRAULT, Charles The First of Arthur Rackham’s Two Great Silhouette Books The French Edition de Luxe [RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. PERRAULT, Charles. Cendrillon. D’Apres Ch. Perrault avec illustrations par Arthur Rackham. Paris: Librairie Hachette, [1919]. French Edition de Luxe. Limited to 500 copies signed by the illustrator, of which this is no. 96. Large quarto (11 1/4 x 8 7/8 inches; 286 x 226 mm.). 110, [2, blank] pp. Mounted color frontispiece with color pictorial border and tissue guard. Three double-page silhouette drawings with color, one single-page silhouette drawing with color (not included in the trade edition), thirteen single-page silhouette drawings without color, and thirty-six silhouette drawings in the text. Title with color pictorial border. Title-page slightly browned from frontispiece tissue-guard. Some very light occasional offsetting from illustrations to text. Original cream parchment over boards, pictorially stamped and lettered in gilt on front cover and spine. Top edge gilt, others uncut. Pictorial end-papers in green and white. Boards very slightly ‘mottled’ otherwise a fine copy. "Rackham gave his talk to on Silhouettes to the Art Workers’ Guild in November 1919, the month in which Cinderella, the first of his two great silhouette books, was published. Cinderella and The Sleeping Beauty differed from Rackhams’ preceding books in relying almost wholly for their effect on silhouette. It is immediately clear that Rackham is a master of the medium, being able to evoke character and humour by profile and gesture alone, and allowing the two-dimensional effect of his pen work to lead the reader through the book and keep the story going. Silhouette books, even with additional colours had lower production costs than their colour plate equivalents, and so were an attractive option both for publishers and customers in the uncertain post-war market." (James Hamilton. Arthur Rackham, A Biography, p. 188). Latimore and Haskell, pp. 49-50. Riall, pp. 134-135.Hamilton, p. 189.
Le Songe D'Une Nuit D'Ete

Le Songe D’Une Nuit D’Ete

RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]; SHAKESPEARE, William One of Only Thirty Signed Copies Printed on Papier Imperial Du Japon [RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. SHAKESPEARE, William. Le Songe D’Une Nuit D’Ete. Paris: Hachette et Cie, 1909. First edition in French of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream illustrated by Arthur Rackham. Limited to thirty numbered copies on Papier Imperial du Japon signed by Arthur Rackham, this being copy no. 19, of a total edition of 330. Quarto (11 1/2 x 9 inches; 292 x 228 mm). [6], 134 pp. Forty mounted color plates with captioned tissue guards, thirty drawings in black and white. Publisher’s full vellum, gilt decorated. Top edge gilt, others untrimmed. Silk ties missing. Small rectangular bookplate on front fly-leaf. A fine copy. The black & white illustrations have far more definition here printed on ‘Papier Imperial du Japon’ than those in the English Limited Edition. "The most splendid illustrated work of the century, so far" (William de Morgan). "The illustrations for a Midsummer-Night’s Dream. were much less controversial in theme than Alice, and their success was ungrudged. Rackham cast his spell over the play; his drawings superceded the work of all his predecessors from Gilbert to Abbey, and for fifty years have enriched the imagination; his conception of Puck and Bottom, Titiana and Oberon, Helena and Hermia, his gnarled trees and droves of fairies, have represented the visual reality of the Dream for thousands of readers. Here he excelled especially in landscape, and in reconciling dream and reality, giving himself to the luxury of rich detail with a rare generosity" (Hudson). "By March 1909, three months after publication, the entire de luxe edition.had been sold out, and of the 15,000 trade copies, 7,650 had been sold. The English edition remained in print and paid [Rackham] royalties until the end of his life" (Hamilton). Riall p. 87. Cf. Latimore and Haskell, p. 32.
Miseries of Human Life

Miseries of Human Life

ROWLANDSON, Thomas In the Original Boards Complete with the Rare ‘Pall Mall’ Plate ROWLANDSON, Thomas. Miseries of Human Life: Designed and Etched by T. Rowlandson. London: R. Ackermann, 1808. Oblong quarto (8 1/8 x 10 3/16 inches; 207 x 262 mm.). Hand colored engraved title-page and forty-nine hand colored engraved plates including the rare ‘Pall Mall’ plate which is missing from most copies. Two of the plates watermarked ‘J. Whatman 1811’ and seven watermarked ‘J. Whatman 1814’. Original quarter roan over drab boards. Front cover with original printed green paper label "Miseries of Human Life. / Designed and Etched by / T. Rowlandson. / 50 plates, coloured / [rule] / Price £1. 11. 6d." Spine ruled in gilt. Spine worn, corners rubbed. Housed in a full red morocco solander case with five raised bands, lettered in gilt in compartments. A wonderful untouched copy, the plates bright and fresh. "Plate 40 ‘Pall Mall’ is rare, most copies re-placing this with ‘The Chiropodist’ (Abbey). According to ABPC just one copy complete with all 51 plates has appeared at auction over the past 35 years (Christie’s New York, May 14th, 1985) "The Miseries of Human Life, [originally] written in 1806 by James Beresford (1764-1840) of Oxford University, was extraordinarily successful, becoming a minor classic in the satirical literature of the day. In a humorous dialogue between two old curmudgeons, the book details the "petty outrages, minor humiliations, and tiny discomforts that make up everyday human existence." The public loved it: dozens of editions were published, and printmakers rushed to illustrate their own versions of life’s miseries. Thomas Rowlandson (1756/57-1827) began drawing scenes based on Beresford’s book as soon as it was published, and after two years the luxury print dealer Rudolph Ackermann selected fifty of his hand-colored etchings for a new edition of Miseries. Many of the now-iconic characters and situations that the artist drew for this project – some based closely on Beresford’s text and others of his own invention-reappeared in later works, with variations on the Miseries turning up until the artist’s death. In the early twentieth century, Dickson Q. Brown, Class of 1895, donated two thousand Rowlandson prints and all of the artist’s illustrated books to Princeton University Library. Of particular importance was a small box of Rowlandson’s unpublished, undated drawings, including many specifically related to his Miseries series. Just as in Rowlandson’s book, those specific to Beresford’s text are shown alongside others that illustrate life’s miseries more generally, including some from the Princeton University Art Museum’s collection. The sections follow the chapters, or "groans," of Beresford’s book." (Julie Mellby, Graphic Arts Curator, Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University). William Morley Pegge (1952-1927) appears to have been a sportsman and a collector. He collected lace, books and drawings, and was a client of Messrs Dowdeswell and Dowdeswell. In 1910 he was a buyer at the sale of Sir William Neville Abdy’s collection at Christie’s, London. His own library was sold by Sotheby’s, London, on 29 March 1928. Grego, Rowlandson II, pp. 119-124; Abbey, Life in England, 317 (plates watermarked 1811 & 1814); Not in Tooley.
Les Étoiles

Les Étoiles

GRANDVILLE, J.J. (pseud. of Jean-Ignace-Isidore Gerard); MÉRY, Joseph; MEUNIER, Charles, binder Grandville’s "Last Fairy-Tale" In a Superb Inlaid Binding by Charles Meunier GRANDVILLE, J.J., illustrator] MÉRY, Joseph. MEUNIER, Charles, binder. Les Étoiles. Dernière féerie par J.-J. Grandville. Texte par Méry. Astronomie des dames par le C[om]te Foelix. Paris: G. De Gonet, Éditeur, [&] Leipzig: Chez Charles Twietmeyer, [1849]. First edition. Two parts in one quarto volume (11 x 7 3/8 inches; 280 x 187 mm.). [4], xvi, 252; [4], 186, [2] pp. With added hand-colored wood-engraved vignette title in each part, hand-colored engraved portrait of Grandville by Ch. Geoffroy, and twelve hand-colored engraved plates (eleven in the first part, one in the second part) by Ch. Geoffroy after Grandville, all with original tissue-guards. Handsomely bound by Charles Meunier, stamp-signed in black on front turn-in "Ch. Meunier. 1905". Full blue morocco, covers decoratively rued in gilt with gray morocco inlaid borders enclosing an elaborate design of inlaid gray, cream and green inlaid flowers with decorative gilt stems. Spine with four raised bands, decoratively inlaid in various colored morocco’s, decorated and lettered in gilt in compartments. Decorative gilt board-edges, gilt ruled turn-ins with inlaid gay morocco borders, gray-green marbled endpapers, top edge trimmed, others uncut. Original printed paper wrappers and spine bound in at end. Unidentified bookplate "Nec Tu Semper Eris" (You will not always be) on verso of front flyleaf. Housed in the original blue leather edged, patterned paper board slipcase. A wonderful copy of this lovely book, with exquisite plates after Grandville. "The compositions of this ‘last fairy-tale,’ brilliantly engraved on steel by Charles Geoffroy and delicately colored, form a fitting memorial to Grandville. They show that his powers remained unimpaired to the end of his short career. Grandville told his wife on the day he began these designs: ‘for too long I have kept my eyes lowered to the earth; now I want to lift them to the heavens’ (p. ix). The pattern which he follows is similar to that of Les fleurs animées. Nearly every plate has its beautiful lady, clad in white and adorned with stars, looming in the sky, with varied scenes of earthly life below her. These designs, Grandville’s tranquil refuge from the turmoil that beset his mind, are as charming as they are mysterious. Also included in the volume are an unsigned essay, which remains the most considerable source of biographical information about Grandville, and a fine portrait of him by Geoffroy (I, xvi) with a border of his creations, animals paying him tribute as well as his flower- and star-ladies" (Ray). This posthumously published work (Grandville died on March 17, 1847) was originally issued in fifty parts, the first part appearing in September 1849. Charles Meunier (1865-1940) began his apprenticeship as a bookbinder at age eleven. Five years later, at age sixteen, he joined master binder Marius-Michel’s workshop. He soon grew weary of producing traditional bindings and established his own bindery in 1885, at the tender age of twenty years old. CM was thought to be innovative and instinctive, with great reserves of energy and undeniable artistic talent. Drawing on traditional and modern techniques and forms of decoration, Meuniere mixed classical punches. with newly fashionable incised and modeled leather panels. His output was prodigious; by 1897 he had produced roughly six hundred bindings" (Art Nouveau and Art Deco Bookbinding, p. 194). Ray, The Art of the French Illustrated Book, 200. Vicaire V, col. 770. Grandville. Dessins Originaux, p. 398.
Petticoat Loose

Petticoat Loose

ROWLANDSON, Thomas, illustrator]; [WOLCOT, John, aka Peter Pindar] A Political Satire Deploring Ireland’s Union With England Four Hand Colored Etchings by Thomas Rowlandson Extra-Illustrated by the Insertion of Five Additional Plates Including a Very Scarce Double-Page Hand Colored Etching by Rowlandson "Comforts of an Irish Fishing Lodge" (Published May, 1812) ROWLANDSON, Thomas, illustrator. [WOLCOT, John, aka Peter Pindar]. Petticoat Loose. A Fragmentary "Tale of the Castle." Embellished with Plates. London: Printed for J.J. Stockdale, 1812. First edition. Quarto (10 5/8 x 8 1/4 inches; 270 x 210 mm.). 135, [1, blank] pp. Four hand-colored etchings (all with protective tissue-guards), designed and engraved by Rowlandson. Extra-illustrated by the insertion of five hand plates of which four are hand colored including one fine double-page hand colored etching by Thomas Rowlandson ‘Comforts of an Irish Fishing Lodge’ (published by Hannah Humphrey) which is not mentioned in Grego. This fine illustration depicts two men sitting in a badly flooded room surrounded by ducks, dogs, pigs and rats. We can locate just one copy of this etching at Yale University Library (CT, USA). Contemporary marbled boards, expertly rebacked to style in quarter calf. Spine with five raised bands ruled and lettered in gilt in compartments. An excellent example of this extremely scarce Rowlandson item, not mentioned in Tooley. The Plates: 1. Capture of the Petticoat. (frontispiece) 2. Breakfast Room at an Inn. (facing p. 11) 3. College Green, before the Union — A scene of state, bustle, and prosperity. (facing p. 59) 4. College Green, after the Union — Shabbiness, poverty, and beggary have sole possession of the scene. (facing p. 62) The Extra-Illustrations: 1. Engraved portrait of Peter Pindar Esq. (Opie/Mackenzie) pasted onto verso of title-page 2. T. Rowlandson. Comforts of an Irish Fishing Lodge Pub May 12th, 1812 by H. Humphrey No. 27 St. James’s St. (double-page, hand colored – between pp. 3 & 4) Small repair to lower 1 1/4 inch of fold. This fine etching is not mentioned in Grego 3. The Late Rt. Hon.ble Chas. Spencer Perceval Chancellor of the Exchequer & c. Pubd. May 16th, 1812 by A. Beugo 38 Maiden Lane Covt. Garden (hand colored – between pp. 22/23) 4. Mrs Clarke. Hapwood/Erskine Thomas Tegg 1809. (hand colored – between pp. 120/121 5. Napoleone Buonaparte First Consul of the French Republic. Pub. Aug 28th, 1800 by J. Harris (between pp. 124/125) When, in 1778, John Wolcot (1738-1819) a physician, came to London, he began "the writing of vigorous and witty satirical verses" (OCEL) under the pseudonym "Peter Pindar." He was blind by the year 1812. This work [Petticoat Loose] is a prose poem" (CBEL. Vol. 11, pp. 37-38). Loosely based upon a traditional tale of the same name, "Petticoat Loose" was the nickname of Mary Hannigan, a renowned dancer and drinker of ardent spirits who once, while seriously sloshed, caught her skirt on a floor nail which ripped and dropped the skirt to the ground, hence "Petticoat Loose." Once dared to test her drinking capacity, she fell dead after completing the challenge. Here, Wolcot has spun the story into a political satire deploring Ireland’s union with England. Grego, Rowlandson II, pp, 238-239; Grolier Club, Rowlandson, p. 121; Not in Tooley.
Return of Sherlock Holmes

Return of Sherlock Holmes, The

DOYLE, Arthur Conan; Paget, Sidney "’Holmes!’ I cried. ‘Is it really you? Can it indeed be that you are alive? Is it possible that you succeeded in climbing out of that awful abyss?’"- the Third Collection of Sherlock Holmes Stories DOYLE, A[rthur] Conan. The Return of Sherlock Holmes. Illustrated by Sidney Paget. London: George Newnes, Ltd., 1905. First English edition of the third collection of Sherlock Holmes stories (preceded by the first American edition by about one month). Small octavo (7 3/8 x 4 13/16 inches; 187 x 122 mm.). [8], 403, [1, printer’s imprint], [4, publisher’s advertisements] pp. Sixteen plates (including frontispiece). Publisher’s dark blue cloth lettered in gilt on front cover and spine. A fine copy with the gilt much brighter than is usually seen. Housed in a felt-lined quarter dark blue morocco clamshell case. "The author was persuaded to revive Sherlock Holmes by the generous offers made by the proprietors of the American magazine.Having decided to write a new series, the author took care to preserve the integrity of his fictional character. ‘I would not write a Holmes story without a worthy plot, without a problem which interested my own mind, for that is a requisite before you can interest any one else.’ The main problem was the plot.The plots did come and thirteen stories were written, among them some of the most interesting in the whole series" (Green and Gibson, pp. 140-141). The thirteen stories are: "The Adventure of the Empty House," "The Adventure of the Norwood Builder," "The Adventure of the Dancing Men," "The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist," "The Adventure of the Priory School," "The Adventure of Black Peter," "The Adventure of Charles August Milverton," "The Adventure of the Six Napoleons," "The Adventure of the Three Students," "The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez," "The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter," "The Adventure of the Abbey Grange," and "The Adventure of the Second Stain." Green and Gibson A29a.
Les Étudians de Paris

Les Étudians de Paris

GAVARNI; [pseudonym of Guillaume Sulpice Chevallier] The Parisian Students’ Distractions Sixty Superb Lithograph Plates by Gavarni GAVARNI. [pseudonym of Sulpice-Guillaume Chevallier]. Les Étudians de Paris. Paris. Bauger, [1839-42]. First issue. Folio (13 3/8 x 10 5/8 inches; 341 x 270 mm.). Sixty fine lithograph plates by Gavarni humorously depicting the lives of Parisian students of Medicine and Law. Some light foxing or staining (mainly marginal) affecting a few plates, otherwise fine. Mid nineteenth century black calf over black pebbled cloth boards. Smooth spine decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt. Near fine. The complete suite of sixty lithographs, eight of which were added only when it was put on sale in an album without text on the back. Of these eight lithographs, one, number 34, has never appeared in Le Charivari, and the other seven were, it is true, published in that newspaper, but under different collective rules, namely: Numbers 49, 50, 56, 57 and 58, under the title Paris in the Evening; Numbers 51 and 52, under the title Nuances du sentiment. Of the 52 other lithographs, number 4 appeared in Le Charivari with the title Etudians of Paris, numbers 54 & 55 under the title Sunday, and number 59 in Le Figaro, under the title Les Reves. Number 48 is a copy of a lithograph by Gavarni (signed "d’apres Gavarni"). All of these plates are surrounded by four-line margins, except number 9 which is surrounded by a single-line margin. The lithographs are all signed Chez Aubert gal. [and] Chez Bauger. "This is the first of Gavarni’s major series. It concerns students of law and medicine, the flower of French youth, for a few years liberated from the constraints of their bourgeois world. Gavarni knows them intimately, as he does their garret lodgings and chronic lack of money, and he is equally at home with their mistresses, untutored grisettes who are loyal and supportive despite their awareness that such liaisons must eventually end. His designs concern the students’ distractions rather than their work, which figures only marginally, when a grisette expresses wonder at a skeleton or an embryo in a bottle. Occasionally they must think of the proper society from which they came and to which they must return. In no. 40 one student says to another: "Oh! my dear fellow don’t complain! you will be a doctor, I’ll be public prosecutor; when you are obliged to have skill, I’ll be forced to behave properly, it’s that which will be difficult!" The success of the series owed much to those readers of Le Charivari who were enabled by it to relive their own youth." (Gordon N. Ray. The Art of the French Illustrated Book 1700 to 1914, #153). According to OCLC there are just four examples in libraries and institutions worldwide: The Morgan Library & Museum (NY, USA); Library of Congress (DC, USA), Musees de Strasbourg (France); and the Zentralinstitut fur Kungstgeschichte (Germany). "Ever since 1837, when their lithographs began to appear side by side in Le Charivari, Gavarni and Daumier have been compared and contrasted. Gavarni’s renown was greater in his own time, but over the last 100 years he has been far outstripped by Daumier. Gavarni (1804-1866) was born in Paris, where he was to spend most of his life. His education was mathematical and technical, but he turned to drawing for pocket money, and by the time he was twenty he had published his first lithograph album, Etrennes de 1825. Recréations diabolico-fantasmagoriques. In 1837 Gavarni began his connection with Le Charivari, which did not conclude until 1848. In all he drew 1054 lithographs for his journal (Armelhault and Bocher, p. 81). Most of these appeared in series, some twenty-five of which extend to ten or more plates, and were afterwards published by Aubert in albums. Perhaps the best of these collections are Fourberries de Femmes en Matière de sentiments, Les Étudians de Paris, Les Débardeurs, and Les Lorettes; but some of the rest are of hardly inferior interest. Still further series, contributed to periodicals other than Le Charivari, were also issued as albums." (Ray, pp. 216-217). Armelhault & Bocher, 614-661; Beraldi, VII, p.51; Ray, 153. List of Plates: 1. Non bis in idem! (Axiome de Droit) 2. Ma chère, comment peux tu supporter un homme qui pipe toute la journee dans des horreurs de machines comme ça? -Prends garde! çava te manger. Eh! B’en ma petite j’etais comme toi, avant: Rien qu’un cigarre. ça me mettait dans tous mes états; mais depuis que je connais Henri, ah! B’en. à prèsent je suis culottèe, vois-tu? 3. Quand on pense que voila ce que c’est qu’un homme. et que les femmes aiment ça! 4. – Qu’est-ce que t’as qui te chifonne? Les anglais veulent de l’argent. promets-leur en. Ton père n’en veut plus donner. tire lui une carotte. – Cen’est pas ça. c’est ma femme qui se marie, et ça m’embéte! 5. Donation entre vifs. 6. Ô Femme! Chef d’?uvre de la création! Reine de l’humamté! Mere du genre humam. tire mes bottes. 7. Adieu mon bon homme! Je te laisse ma pipe et ma femme, t’auras bien soin de ma pipe! 8. Vois-tu? Fifine nons lanterne tous les deux et ça devient chose! Faut en finir! J’te joue ça en trente-six net! Et j’tèn rends quatre. 9. Allons souper! Qu’est-ce qui en joue? 10. T’es bête, va! Pour une queue, une mèchante queue qu’on vous fait. la grande affaire! avec ça qu’on en manque de femme, à Paris, merci. 11. La première cure. Tiens Bichette! Une goutte de Rhum. rieu d’excellent comme ça pour la migraine. 12. Article 212 du code civil. "Les èpoux se doivent mutuellement fidèlite, secours, assistance". 13. Monsieur et M’ame Ernest. 14. – Combien? – Devine. – Trente francs? – Quatre francs! – Cré nom! 15. Mon cher ami je suis en affaire, avec mon oncle. 16. – Qu’est-ce que c’est que cette infamie de petite bête la? – C’est un cousin a moi, Nim, que je te présente. 17. M’ame Perpignan! M’ame Perpignan! deux donzames, une bouteille, deux pains, un filet-champignons, une pomme sautée et deux cigarres. des quatre sous! Rondement! 18. Voila huit mois Auguste que vous me pro
Invisible Man

Invisible Man, The

WELLS, H.G. Transparently, a Masterpiece An Exceptional First Edition of "The Invisible Man" WELLS, H.G. The Invisible Man. A Grotesque Romance. London: C. Arthur Pearson, 1897. First edition. Octavo (7 3/16 x 4 13/16 inches; 183 x 122 mm.). viii, 245, [1, printer’s imprint], [2, publisher’s advertisements] pp. Page [1] is incorrectly numbered 2. Title printed in red and black. Original red cloth with front cover lettered in gilt and decoratively stamped in black with the design of the Invisible Man in his dressing gown. Spine ruled and lettered in gilt. Inner hinges expertly and almost invisibly repaired. The paper stock is only mildly toned at the edges; most copies of this title, due to the poor quality of the paper used, exhibit browning throughout. This is a a very good copy copy of a book that tends not to survive in anywhere near fine condition. "The story begins comically in rural Surrey. ‘The stranger’, muffled, bespectacled and morbidly reclusive, installs himself at the Coach and Horses inn, provoking the curiosity of all in Iping village. He is in fact a young student, Griffin. The unveiling of the stranger’s secret over the next two months is initially hilarious. But when driven to flight things become gradually more ominous as he revenges himself on his tormentors. In the next phase of the story, he recruits a tramp (a type Wells always handled well) as his assistant. He breaks into the house of a former student friend, now Dr. Kemp, and tells him his story. It emerges that he is a figure to be pitied, rather than feared (particularly effective are the invisible man’s descriptions of his lonely alienation in London). Kemp betrays him, when the invisible man proposes setting up a reign of terror by selective murder. Alone and hunted and increasingly demented, he declares the ‘Epoch of the Invisible Man’. But it is he who is hunted and beaten to death by the decent country folk he intended to rule. As it lies in the street, his albino corpse finally materialises" (The Stanford Companion to Victorian Fiction). "This story was first printed serially in Pearson’s Weekly (June and July, 1897). The story, as given in the edition collated above, ends with the death of Griffin in Chapter XXVIII. The American first edition (Edward Arnold, New York. 1897), however, has a short Epilogue in which Thomas Marvell, who has retained the papers of the dead man, is pictured as proprietor of an inn, ‘The Invisible Man.’ This Epilogue is printed in a cheap edition with paper wrappers issued by Pearson (1900), where it occupies four pages (pp. 247-250)" (Wells). Bleiler (1978), p. 205. Currey, p. 520. Hammond B4. Reginald 15039. Wells 11. Wells Society 11.
Complete Set of the Pooh Books

Complete Set of the Pooh Books, A]. When We Were Very Young. Winnie the Pooh. Now We Are Six. The House at Pooh Corner

MILNE, A.A.; SHEPARD, Ernest H.; BAYNTUN-RIVIÈRE, binders A Fine First Edition Set of the Pooh Books Bound ca. 1960 by Bayntun of Bath MILNE, A.A. SHEPARD, Ernest H. illustrator. [A Complete Set of the Pooh Books]. Winnie the Pooh. Now We Are Six. When We Were Very Young. The House at Pooh Corner. With Decorations by Ernest H. Shepard. London: Methuen & Co., Ltd, 1924-28. First editions of all four ‘Pooh’ Books. Four small octavo volumes (7 1/8 x 4 5/8 inches; 181 x 117 mm.). x, [2], 99, [1]; [iii]-x, [6], 158, [1], [1, printer’s imprint]; x, [2], 103, [1, printer’s imprint]; xi, [1, blank], 178, [1], [1, printer’s imprint] pp. Each volume with numerous text illustrations by Ernest H. Shepard. Handsomely bound ca. 1990 by Bayntun-Rivière of Bath(stamp-signed in gilt on front turn-ins. Full blue, green, red and tan crushed levant morocco, each cover with an original Shepard design stamped in gilt on front board. Spines with five raised bands, decoratively stamped and lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt decorated board edges, gilt ruled turn-ins, marbled end-papers, all edges gilt. Original cloth covers and spines bound in at end of each volume. A fine set housed in a blue cloth slipcase. Alan Alexander Milne (1882-1956) was a British author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various poems. Milne was a noted writer, primarily as a playwright, before the huge success of the Pooh books overshadowed all his previous work. He is most famous for his two Pooh books about a boy named Christopher Robin after his son, Christopher Robin Milne, and various characters inspired by his son’s stuffed animals, most notably the bear named Winnie-the-Pooh. Christopher Robin Milne’s stuffed bear, originally named "Edward," was renamed "Winnie" after a Canadian black bear named Winnie (after Winnipeg), which was used as a military mascot in World War I, and left to London Zoo during the war. "The pooh" comes from a swan the young Milne named "Pooh." E. H. Shepard illustrated the original Pooh books, using his own son’s teddy, Growler ("a magnificent bear"), as the model. Ernest Howard Shepard OBE, MC (1879-1976) was an English artist and book illustrator. He is known especially for illustrations of the anthropomorphic soft toy and animal characters in The Wind in the Willows and Winnie-the-Pooh.
Lovers' Panorama

Lovers’ Panorama, The

CRUIKSHANK, George; CRUIKSHANK, Robert Exceptionally Scarce Valentine Caricature by George and Robert Cruikshank Obadiah "I do confess I long have loved thee, And hope thou hast conceived the like for me;" Rachael "Yea, if thou wishest to take me to wife, I’ll be thy partner thro’ this weary life;" CRUIKSHANK, George & Robert. The Lovers’ Panorama; or Cupid’s Vagaries on St. Valentine’s Day. London: Hodgson & Co., [1835]. Second Issue with changed title, otherwise identical. No date was assigned to either issue. Sixteenmo (5 3/4 x 3 3/8 inches; 146 x 86 mm.). 24 pp. Hand colored engraved vignette title-page and eleven hand colored vignettes in the text. Title-page and first two leaves slightly soiled at fore-margin, otherwise near fine. Nineteenth century burgundy paper wrappers, marbled endpapers over the original? plain wrappers. Housed in a fleece-lined, three-quarter red morocco clamshell case. According to Cohn the hand-colored engraving on the title-page is by George and Robert Cruikshank, the last two are by George Cruikshank, and the other nine are by Robert Cruikshank. OCLC locates only three copies of this issue in libraries and institutions worldwide: Yale University Library (CT., USA), McGill University Library (Montreal, Canada), and the British Library (London, UK). OCLC locates just two copies of the first issue: Trinity College Library (CT, USA), and Harvard University (MA, USA). The only copy of the first issue that we have been able to trace was the Salomons copy which appeared at auction in 1991. "This item is a second issue of "Cupid’s Vagaries" (No. 216) with identical plates. It should also be noted that the price has been raised from sixpence to a shilling." (Cohn, p.151). It was first published [1822] as "Cupid’s Vagaries, or the Lover’s Panorama on St. Valentine’s Day. (see also No. 510, "The Lovers’ Panorama," which is the same work, another edition.). (Cohn, p. 72). We have never seen this title before – in either first or second issue. and there was no example in the famous Cruikshank collection of Dr. Fluhmann. (Benoit Forgeot catalog 2009).
Thoughts of The Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

Thoughts of The Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, The

ZAEHNSDORF, binders; AURELIUS, Marcus The Thoughts of Emperor Marcus Aurelius Superbly Bound by Zaehnsdorf in 1900 ZAEHNSDORF, binders. AURELIUS, Marcus. The Thoughts of The Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. Reprinted from the Revised Translation of George Long. London: George Bell and Sons, 1897. Handmade Paper Edition (first published in 1862). Small octavo (6 1/4 x 3 3/4 inches; 159 x 95 mm.). [viii], 287, [1, imprint] pp. Text leaves partially uncut. Handsomely bound in 1900 by Zaehnsdorf of London for C. Scribner’s Sons, New York (Stamp-signed in gilt on front turn-in and black on verso of front endpaper). Full green morocco, covers with double-gilt rules surrounding an elaborate gilt design of twelve gilt flowers with intertwined foliage, spine with five raised bands, elaborately tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments, double-ruled gilt board edges and turn-ins, dark green silk liners and endleaves, top edge gilt, others uncut. Spine sunned to a shade of olive green. A fine example of the work of this exceptional London binder. Marcus Aurelius. Latin: Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus; [26 April 121 – 17 March 180 AD) was Roman Emperor from 161 to 180. He ruled with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from 161 until Verus’ death in 169. Marcus Aurelius was the last of the so-called Five Good Emperors. He was a practitioner of Stoicism, and his untitled writing, commonly known as the Meditations, is the most significant source of the modern understanding of ancient Stoic philosophy. During his reign, the Empire defeated a revitalized Parthian Empire in the East: Aurelius’ general Avidius Cassius sacked the capital Ctesiphon in 164. In central Europe, Aurelius fought the Marcomanni, Quadi, & Sarmatians with success during the Marcomannic Wars, although the threat of the Germanic tribes began to represent a troubling reality for the Empire. A revolt in the East led by Avidius Cassius failed to gain momentum and was suppressed immediately. Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations, written in Greek while on campaign between 170 and 180, are still revered as a literary monument to a philosophy of service and duty, describing how to find and preserve equanimity in the midst of conflict by following nature as a source of guidance and inspiration.
Intérior des Boutiques de Paris]

Intérior des Boutiques de Paris]

MONNIER, Henry Scarce Monnier Album MONNIER, Henri. Intérior des Boutiques de Paris. Paris: [François Séraphin] Delpech, [n.d., ca. 1827]. Rare suite of six hand-colored lithographed plates, mounted on stubs, complete as issued. Oblong quarto (9 1/4 x 12 3/16 inches; 235 x 313 mm). Bound ca. 1925 by René Kieffer (with his binders ticket on front blank) in half maroon straight-grain morocco over marbled boards. Spine decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt, marbled end-papers. A fine copy. An album of extreme rarity; OCLC/KVK locate no copies in institutional holdings worldwide. The Plates: 1. Marchandes de Modes. 2. Un Café. 3. Apothicare. 4. Marchand d’Estampes. 5. Bouquinisteur. 6. Restaurateur. "Between 1825 and 1827 Monnier passed much of his time in London.On his return to Paris he embarked on a series of albums in which he recorded the manners and humors of the city with unprecedented profusion. Between 1826 and 1830 he satisfied the insatiable demand for his designs with almost 500 lithographs, nearly all of which were drawn with a pen and colored by hand. For each design he himself colored a master print and carefully supervised its subsequent preparation" (Ray, p. 199). François Séraphin Delpech was a French lithographer, mainly of portraits and costumes after his contemporaries. His portrait lithographs are in the collection of Britain’s National Portrait Gallery and the Louvre. He also lithographed the work of others, as here. Marie 305-310.
Christmas Carol

Christmas Carol, A.

DICKENS, Charles; LEECH John, illustrator; LINTON, William James, engraver A Fine Association Copy of Charles Dickens’s Most Famous Christmas Book The Exceptionally Rare "Trial Issue" with the Title-Page Printed in Red and Green Inscribed "Christmas 1843" by the Brother of Dickens’s Illustrator for "A Christmas Carol" DICKENS, Charles. A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas. With Illustrations by John Leech. London: Chapman & Hall, 1844. First edition, first issue, the very rare so-called "trial issue," with title-page printed in red and green and half-title printed in green; "Stave I;" text entirely uncorrected; yellow coated end-papers. Small octavo (6 7/16 x 4 1/16 inches; 164 x 103 mm.). [8], 166, [2, ads] pp. Four hand-colored steel-engraved plates by and after Leech and four wood-engraved text illustrations by W.J. Linton after Leech. Contemporary ink gift inscription on verso of front end-paper "To Maria Linton/a Christmas present/from H.D.L./1843". (H.D. Linton was the co-founder of the illustrated periodicalPen and Pencil). He was the younger brother of wood-engraver William James Linton who contributed four wood-engraved illustrations to A Christmas Carol. Original cinnamon vertically-ribbed cloth. Covers decoratively stamped in blind, front cover and spine decoratively stamped and lettered in gilt, all edges gilt. Binding matches Todd’s first impression, first issue, with closest interval between blind-stamped border and gilt wreath equal to 14 mm. and with the "D" in "Dickens" in perfect condition. Inner hinges expertly and almost invisibly repaired, minimal wear to head of spine, imperceptible and very small closed splits to extremities of joints. Small rectangular colored bookplate of Mitchell S. Buck lightly tipped onto front paste-down. Bookplate of Bob Stilwell on inside of chemise. Loosely inserted is Mabel Zahn of Sessler’s, Philadelphia typed 1940s description showing the textual points of the first issue and written in ink "This Copy has all points." Overall, a wonderful copy of this great rarity, exceptionally clean and bright. Chemised in a quarter red morocco over red cloth slipcase, spine with five raised bands and two green morocco labels lettered in gilt. The current Dickens bibliographer Walter Smith has examined an identical example at the W.A. Clark Library and accepted it as an authentic example of this rare issue. The red and green title-pages and the green half-titles are agreed to have been printed earlier (thus the "trial issue" moniker). Charles Dicken’s Christmas classic, written in a mere six weeks at a low point in Dickens’s career, and published at his own expense, A Christmas Carol revived Dickens’s fortunes, establishing a robust market for Christmas gift books that survives to this day. The characters of Scrooge and Marley, Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim, are immediately recognizable even to those who’ve never read a word of Dickens: "’God bless us every one!’ said Tiny Tim, the last of all. He sat very close to his father’s side, upon his little stool. Bob held his withered little hand in his, as if he loved the child, and wished to keep him by his side, and dreaded that he might be taken from him." One of Dickens’ favorite artists, John Leech would produce the illustrations for all his Christmas books. H. D. Linton, was the younger brother of the wood engraver, landscape painter, political reformer, and Charles Dickens illustrator, William James Linton (1812-1897). In 1855 H.D. Linton together with his friend M.Edmond Morin, devised a new illustrated paper to be calledPen and Pencil. Morin furnished the money and contributed most of the drawings; H. D. Linton did the engraving (he had studied engraving with his brother and Orrin Smith); William James Linton edited the journal in conjunction with Mr. Macrae Moir.After about eight numbersPen and Pencilsuccumbed to scarcity of capital. Maria Linton, nee Hoover (1815-1858) H.D. was most likely H.D. Linton’s sister, first cousin, or niece. Smith, Dickens, II, 4. Calhoun & Heaney, especially pp. 35, 48-49.
Les Compensations

Les Compensations

PHILIPON, Charles, illustrator; WATTIER, Émile An Exceptionally Rare and Amusing Suite of Hand Colored Lithographs PHILIPON, Charles. WATTIER, Émile. Les Compensations Composées et Dessinées par Ch. Philipon, Lithographies par Wattier. Paris: Chez Ostervald ainé, Rittner, & Hautec?ur, [1828]. First edition. Quarto (10 7/8 x 8 1/2 inches; 276 x 216 mm.). Pictorial lithograph title and thirty-six (of forty-eight) hand colored lithograph plates. Some light foxing, mainly marginal. The coloring of the plates is quite exceptional. Recently bound by Roger Devauchelle in full violet cloth, printed paper label on front board. According to OCLC there are no copies in libraries and institutions worldwide. We have seen this title only once before – seventeen years ago in 2002. Not in Colas Hiler or Lipperheide. Charles Philipon (1800-1861) was a French lithographer, caricaturist and journalist. He was the editor of La Caricature and of Le Charivari, both of which were satirical political journals. Émile-Charles Wattier (1800-1868) was a French painter, illustrator, engraver and lithographer. The plates: 1. Amours d’Inclination. 1 bis. Amours de Convenance. 2. L’art remplace la nature. 2 bis. La nature se passe de l’art. 3. L’un monte. 3 bis. L’autre descend. 4. Actrice le soir. 4 bis. Marquis le matin. 5. Bonheur réel. 5 bis. Bonheur chimérique. 6. Sommes-nous de feu? Elles sont de glace! 6 bis. Nous refroidissons-nous? Elles s’enflamment. 7. Rodomont en public. 7 bis. Poltron en particulier. 8. Rampant avec un Supérieur. 8 bis. Impudent avec un Subordonné. 9. Nomination. 9 bis. Démission. 10. Brebis la veille. 10 bis. Tigre le lendemain. 11. Celui-ci voudrait remonter. 11 bis. Celui lá voudrait redescemdre 12. Vues de dos. 12 bis. Vues de face. 13. Le Créancier. 13 bis. Le Débiteur. 14. Jeunesse et beauté. 14 bis. Vieillesse et Laideur. 15. Petits voleurs. 15 bis. Grand voleur. 16. Bonjour. 16 bis. Bonsoir. 17. Lettre d’amour. 17 bis. Lettre de Change. 18. La Demoiselle sennuye. 18 bis. La Grisette s’amuse. Not in Colas Hiler or Lipperheide.
Queen Margot Wife of Henry of Navarre

Queen Margot Wife of Henry of Navarre

COSWAY-STYLE BINDING; BAYNTUN, binder; WILLIAMS, H. Noel A Superb Mid-Twenties Cosway-Style Binding by Bayntun of Bath with Two Fine Oval Miniatures Extra-Illustrated by the Insertion of Twenty-Five Engraved Plates of which Six are Hand-Colored COSWAY-STYLE BINDING. BAYNTUN, binder. WILLIAMS, H. Noel. Queen Margot Wife of Henry of Navarre. With sixteen illustrations in photogravure. London and New York: Harper & Brothers, 1907. Quarto (9 3/8 x 7 3/8 inches; 238 x 188 mm.). xviii, 409, [1, blank] pp. Colored frontispiece and nineteen photogravure plates with tissues printed in red & brown. Extra-illustrated by the insertion of twenty-five engraved plates of which six are hand-colored. Bound ca. 1925 by Bayntun, stamp-signed in gilt "Bayntun. Binder. Bath. Eng." on front turn-in. Full dark blue crushed levant morocco over beveled boards, covers with elaborate gilt frames, spine with five raised bands, elaborately decorated and lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt ruled board edges, wide elaborate gilt turn-ins, all edges gilt. Front doublure of red morocco surrounded by a frame of inlaid maroon morocco. Set into the front doublure are two very fine oval miniature paintings set under beveled glass within a double gilt frame. The upper miniature is of Margaret de Valois, Queen Margot of Navarre. The lower miniature is of her spouse Henry III of Navarre (later Henry IV of France). Both miniatures measure 3 3/16 x 2 1/2 inches; 81 x 63 mm. The rear doublure is of red morocco surrounded by a frame of inlaid maroon morocco. Blue watered silk end-leaves. A very fine example housed in its original felt-lined blue cloth clamshell case. Margaret of Valois (1553-1615) was a French Princess of the Valois dynasty who became Queen Consort of Navarre and later also of France. By her marriage to Henry III of Navarre (later Henry IV of France), she was Queen of Navarre and then France at her husband’s 1589 accession to the latter throne. Their marriage was annulled in 1599 by decision of the Pope. She was the daughter of King Henry II of France and Catherine de’ Medici and the sister of Kings Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III. Her marriage, which was to celebrate the reconciliation of Catholics and Huguenots, was tarnished by the St. Bartholomew’s Day massacre, and the resumption of the religious troubles which ensued. In the conflict between Henry III and the Malcontents, she took the side of Francis, Duke of Anjou, her younger brother, and this caused a deep aversion of the King against her. As Queen of Navarre, she also played a pacifying role in the stormy relations between her husband and the French Monarchy. Shuttled back and forth between the two courts, she endeavored to lead a happy conjugal life, but her sterility and the political tensions inherent in the French Wars of Religion caused the end of her marriage. Mistreated by a brother quick to take offence and rejected by a fickle and opportunistic husband, she chose the path of opposition in 1585. She took the side of the Catholic League and was forced to live in Auvergne in an exile which lasted twenty years.
Treasure Island

Treasure Island

WYETH, N.C., illustrator; STEVENSON, Robert Louis First N.C. Wyeth llustrated Edition of Treasure Island Finely Bound by MacDonald of New York WYETH, N.C., illustrator. STEVENSON, Robert Louis. Treasure Island. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1911. First Wyeth Illustrated Edition, first issue. [i-vi], vii-xiv, [1, blank], [1, map], 273, [1, blank] pp. Color pictorial title-page (included in pagination) and fourteen full-page color plates, all with captioned tissue-guards. Partially uncut, pp. 113/114 poorly opened affecting blank margins only. Otherwise a fine, clean copy. Bound ca. 1911 by MacDonald of New York (stamp-signed in gilt on rear turn-in). Full red crushed levant morocco, covers ruled in gilt with corner gilt fleurons , front cover with a central skull and crossbones design. Spine with five raised bands, decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt-ruled board-edges and turn-ins, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt, others uncut. Original front cover and spine bound in at end. Housed in the original felt-lined, red cloth slipcase. Newell Convers Wyeth was born on October 22, 1882, in Needham, Massachusetts. Growing up on a farm, he developed a deep love of nature. His mother, the daughter of Swiss immigrants, encouraged his early artistic inclinations in the face of opposition from his father, a descendant of the first Wyeth to arrive in the New World in the mid-17th century. On the advice of two friends, artists Clifford Ashley and Henry Peck, Wyeth decided to travel to Wilmington, Delaware, in October 1902, to join the Howard Pyle School of Art. Following Pyle’s maxim to paint only from experience, Wyeth made three trips between 1904 and 1906 to the American West. He spent much of these trips simply absorbing the Western experience which allowed him to paint images that would place him among the top illustrators of his day. By 1907, Wyeth was heralded in Outing Magazine as "one of our greatest, if not our greatest, painter of American outdoor life." His pictures had appeared in many of the most popular magazines of the period, such as Century, Harper’s Monthly, Ladies’ Home Journal, McClure’s, Outing, and Scribner’s. "In 1911, the publishing house of Charles Scribner’s Sons engaged Wyeth to illustrate Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, his first commission in Scribner’s popular series of classic stories. The success of Treasure Island insured Wyeth a long career with Scribner’s, illustrating in succeeding years many classic stories." "Treasure Island established itself as a classic, drawing plaudits from the widest range of literary sensibilities. In 1890 W.B. Yeats wrote to tell [Stevenson] that the book was the only one in which his seafaring grandfather had ever taken any pleasure and that he reread it on his deathbed with infinite satisfaction. Jack London, in so many ways RLS’s true spiritual heir, declared: ‘His Treasure Island will be a classic to go down with Robinson Crusoe, Through the Looking Glass and The Jungle Books”’ (Frank McLynn, Robert Louis Stevenson, p. 203). Allen & Allen, p. 218.
Jadis et aujourd'hui

Jadis et aujourd’hui

MONNIER, Henry "Then" and "Now"- Eighteen Scarce Hand-Colored Lithographed Plates By Le Maitre Monnier MONNIER, Henri. Jadis et aujourd’hui. Paris: Delpech, 1829. Title from front wrapper. Oblong folio (10 5/8 x 13 5/8 inches; 270 x 353 mm.). Pictorial lithograph wrapper and eighteen hand-colored lithographed plates, depicting bankruptcy, childhood, dressing, the boudoir, a physician, an attorney, the promenade, an evening gathering, etc. ,"then" and "now." The plain rear wrapper is also bound in at the end. Bound ca. 1925 [by René Kieffer] in quarter dark blue straight-grain morocco over marbled boards. Spine decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt, marbled end-papers. Lower tip of spine a little chipped, minimal rubbing to board extremities, otherwise fine. The plates are very clean, with only minimal edge browning. A wonderful copy of this extremely scarce series of plates. Loosely inserted is a duplicate of plate 15 "Jadis. Une Soirée." Very scarce, with just two copies in libraries and institutions worldwide: Kunstbibli Staatliche Museen Zu Berlin (Germany), and The Morgan Library & Museum (NY, USA). The Morgan Library copy appears to be uncolored. "Between 1825 and 1827 Monnier passed much of his time in London, where he collaborated with Lami in what was to become the Voyage en Angleterre. On his return to Paris he embarked on a series of albums in which he recorded the manners and humors of the city with unprecedented profusion. Between 1826 and 1830 he satisfied the insatiable demand for his designs with almost 500 lithographs, nearly all of which were drawn with a pen and colored by hand. For each design he himself colored a master print and carefully supervised its subsequent preparation.Some of the salient titles in his human comedy may be mentioned. There are potpourris like Recréations du coeur et de l’esprit, Paris vivant, and Rencontres Parisiennes. Macédoine pittoresque. There are more closely focussed surveys like Les grisettes, Moeurs administratives, Galerie théâtrale, Boutiques de Paris, and Six Quartiers de Paris. There are suites like Jadis et aujourd’hui and Les contrastes, which take their departure from comparisons in time or of manners.Monnier was a satirist with a difference. His attitude towards his subjects hardly varies. His aim was to set down what he saw with elegance and precision, but with no overt interpretation or judgment"(Ray, The Art of the French Illustrated Book, p. 199). The Plates: 1. Jadis. Une Promenade. 2. Aujourd’hui. Une Promenade. 3. Jadis. Le Complément des Etudes. 4. Aujourd’hui. Le Complément des Etudes. 5. Jadis. L’Enfance. 6. Aujourd’hui. L’Enfance. 7. Jadis. La Toilette. 8. Aujourd’hui. La Toilette. 9, Jadis. Les Banqueroutiers. 10. Aujourd’hui. Banqueroutiers. 11. Jadis. Un Médecin. 12. Aujourd’hui. Un Médecin. 13. Jadis. Un Procureur. 14. Aujourd’hui. Etude d’avoué. 15. Jadis. Une Soirée. 16. Aujourd’hui. Une Soirée. 17. Jadis. Un Boudoir. 18. Aujourd’hui. Un Boudoir. ** An additional duplicate of plate 15 Jadis. Une Soirée. loosely inserted. Rahir, p. 548. Marie 399-416.
Constructions Exposition Universelle 1889

Constructions Exposition Universelle 1889

PARIS EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE; WOODEN GAME A Very Rare Wooden Puzzle Made for The Expostion Universelle of 1889 [WOODEN GAME]. Constructions Exposition Universelle 1889. Square quarto 10 5/8 x 10 1/4 x 1 9/16 inches; 272 x 260 x 40 mm.). A rare and wonderful 1889 Paris Exposition Universelle game with fifty-three (of fifty-four) original wooden blocks, color chromo-lithographed on upper panels. All contained in the original red paper covered wooden box with the dark red cardboard box lid printed in gold and decoratively bordered in various colors. Near fine. A fine and lovely wooden game made for the 1889 Exposition Universelle in Paris, containing a construction game illustrating six important buildings of the exhibition: Pavilion des Beaux-Arts; Palais de Trocadero; Ministére de la Guerre; Maison Égyptienne; Panorama Transatlantique, and Fellah, une Rue au Caire (lacking one piece at top). A very rare original game of the famous 1889 World’s Exhibition in Paris in which the Eiffel Tower was built. The Exposition Universelle of 1889 was a world’s fair held in Paris, France, from 6 May to 31 October 1889. It was held to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the storming of the Bastille, an event considered symbolic of the beginning of the French Revolution. The fair included a reconstruction of the Bastille and its surrounding neighborhood, but with the interior courtyard covered with a blue ceiling decorated with fleur-de-lys and used as a ball room and gathering place. The main symbol of the Fair was the Eiffel Tower, which served as the entrance arch to the Fair. The 1889 fair was held on the Champ de Mars in Paris, which had been the site of the earlier Paris Universal Exhibition of 1867, and would also be the site of the 1900 exposition. Since the lifts had not been completed when the Exposition opened, the first visitors had to walk up to the second floor platform. Workers had worked through the night the day before the exhibition opened to complete the necessary construction needed to safely allow patrons to set foot upon the structure. When speaking of the dedicated workers, M. Salles, the son-in-law of Eiffel made the statement that "no soldier on the battle field deserved better mention than these humble toilers, who, will never go down in history." No one other than construction personnel were allowed higher than the second floor platform. The 1889 Exposition covered a total area of 0.96km2, including the Champ de Mars, the Trocadéro, the quai d’Orsay, a part of the Seine and the Invalides esplanade.
Our Mutual Friend

Our Mutual Friend

DICKENS, Charles; STONE, Marcus, illustrator "Mew says the cat, Quack says the duck, Bow-wow-wow says the dog!" (Mr. Boffin) DICKENS, Charles. Our Mutual Friend. With Illustrations by Marcus Stone. In Two Volumes. London: Chapman and Hall, 1865. First edition in book form, first issue with ‘pricipal’ for ‘principal’ (Vol II, p. 115, 14 lines up). Two octavo volumes (8 5/16 x 5 3/8 inches; 211 x 136 mm.). xi, [1, blank], 320.; vii, [viii, List of Illustrations], 309, [1, imprint] pp. Forty black and white engraved plates by Marcus Stone, including frontispieces. Charles Dickens. A Tribute to Genius 1812-1912 Testimonial stamp affixed to the blank verso of the lists of illustrations in volumes 1 & 2. The plates are in unusually nice condition with most quite clean and only a few exhibiting just the lightest of mottling and toning to margins. Contemporary full dark green hard-grain morocco, covers bordered in blind surround an elaborate gilt frame design. Spines with five raised bands decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments. Gilt ruled board edges and decorative gilt turn-ins, marbled end-papers, all edges gilt. With the blind stamp of A.R. Hicks, Bookseller & Stationer, Upper Head Row, Leeds, on the top corner of each free end-paper. A fine example in it’s original binding of 1865 having been bound from the original parts. Our Mutual Friend, originally appeared in twenty numbers, bound in nineteen monthly parts, the last part forming a double number, from May 1864 – November 1865. The first volume was published in book form on January 20, 1865; the second on October 21, 1865. 11s each." (Smith). It is the last novel completed by Charles Dickens and is one of his most sophisticated works, combining savage satire with social analysis. It centers on, in the words of critic J. Hillis Miller, quoting from the character Bella Wilfer in the book, "money, money, money, and what money can make of life." In the opening chapters a body is found in the River Thames and identified as that of John Harmon, a young man recently returned to London to receive his inheritance. Were he alive, his father’s will would require him to marry Bella Wilfer, a beautiful, mercenary girl whom he had never met. Instead, the money passes to the working-class Boffins, and the effects spread into various corners of London society. A.R. Hicks, Booksellers. The Leeds Intelligencer of May 6th, 1865 shows an advertisement for A.R. Hicks, Bookseller & Stationer, Upperhead Row, Leeds. Robert J. Hayhurst, inherited and improved a successful group of retail pharmacies, John Hayhurst & Son, based in Nelson, Lancashire, and became an avid collector of naval history and of eighteenth-century literature in contemporary bindings; "Mr. R. J. Hayhurst believes that most pharmacists neglect one of their most valuable assets – the tradition and dignity of the pharmacy. His historical sense, indeed, is no narrow one, for his feeling for the past reveals itself also in his hobbies. A collector of books, in a delightful room at his home, white-painted bookshelves stacked high on all the available wall space show to advantage the hand-tooled leather bindings of a collection that has been acquired slowly and with discrimination over the years" (The Chemist and Druggist, 7 September, 1957). Smith I, 15. Sadleir 687. Eckel pp. 94-95.
L'Amant Trompe Par L'Amour

L’Amant Trompe Par L’Amour

ALMANACH FRANCAISE A Beautiful Late Eighteenth Century French Almanach [ALMANACH FRANCAISE]. L’Amant Trompe Par L’Amour et autres Sujets agréables, Extraits des Trois Muses Réunies; mis en musique par les plus celèbres Compositeurs Modernes: Enrichies de Figures. Chaque Partie se vend séparément. Avec Tablettes Economiques Perte et Gain. Paris: Chez le St. Desnos, [1793]. [bound together with] Le Secrétaire des Dames et des Messieurs, ou Dépositaire fidèle & discret, et a double usage; Utile & nécessaire aux Gens d’Affaires, Négocians, Voyageurs, Militaires, & à tous les Etats. Sixteenmo (4 3/8 x 2 3/8 inches; 112 x 61 mm.). [ii, hand colored frontispiece, recto blank], [ii, hand colored title-page, verso blank], [1, blank], 17-24, (music), [viii, music], [5-6], 7-96, [2, blank], [3-4], 5-48, [12, calendar for 1789] pp. Ten hand-colored etched plates (including frontispiece and title-page). Full contemporary French red morocco, covers triple-ruled in gilt. Smooth spine elaborately decorated in gilt in compartments, green morocco label lettered in gilt. Gilt decorated board-edges and turn-ins, blue paper end-leaves. Miniscule wear to one side of spine tip, otherwise fine. This wonderful little volume was originally designed to hold a small pencil within three gilt-decorated morocco loop which in turn would keep the volume closed. Alas the pencil is long gone. The Hand Colored Plates with Music: 1. Frontispiece 2. Engraved title-page 3. L’Amant Trompé Par L’Amour. (The lover deceived by love) Chanson Anacréontique, Par Mr. Monsigny 4. Le Bouquet de Roses. (The bouquet of roses) Chanson Anacréontique, Par Mr. Philidor 5. Avis Aux Belles. (Reviews of beauty) Par Mr. Pamfossi 6. L’Opérateur des Ombres Chinoises. (The Chinese shadow operator) Par Mr. Cimarosa 7. L’Aveu Sincère. (The sincere plea) Chanson Anacréontique, Par Mr. Grétry 8. La Méfiance. (Distrust) Par Mr. Chapelle 9. L’Amant Impatient. (The impatient lover) Par Mr. Chardigny 10. L’Ecole Des Jaloux. (The school of jealousy) Par Mr. Cimarosa Additional Music: Les Petits Soupers de Venus. L’Hommage A L’Amour La Nouvelle Héloise Les Jeunes Amans Le Repentir Claudine A La Cour A Une Jolie Cremiere Les Jeunes Gens Du Siecle La Bergere Prudente Translation from the original French: THE LOVER DECEIVED BY LOVE, and other agreeable subjects, Excerpts from the Three Reunited Muses; set to music by the most famous Modern Composers: Enriched with figures. Each part is sold separately, with Economic Loss and Gain Tablets. In Paris, at S ‘Desnos, Engineer-Geographer and Libraire of His Danish Majesty, rue Saint-Jacques, at the Globe. (1793.) In-24. This almanac, with engraved and printed parts, is identical as figures to the first New Songwriter described above (see No. 855). Calendar engraved for 1793. [Cat. Techener. Ex. Mar. red, decorated back, fig. colored, 150 fr.] (Grand-Carteret No. 1106). THE SECRETARY OF THE LADIES AND THE GENTLEMEN, the most useful of the Almanacs, Little Necessary of every day, and Rendez-vous Business People, Negotiators, Travelers, Militaries and all states. New wallet in which everyone will find what they will need. With Economic Tablets. The Strangers will find Maps made with the Routes, the Paris Plan, that of Versailles, the distances itineraries of the Cities, the navigable Rivers and the Finance Card of the Kingdom, with a Discount Tables. In Paris, at the house of M. Desnos, bookseller, engineer-geographer of his Danish majesty, rue St-Jacques, in the Globe, where we find Almanacs of all sorts, very interesting. (Around 1778). In-24. Subsequently, Desnos will cut this publication into several parts. Thus we can see announced on its catalog of 1781: – Appointment of business gen. – Routes of France, Distances of Cities, Navigable Rivers etc. On the other hand, the title Secretary of the Ladies and Gentlemen will disappear and the publication will be called, in order to satisfy all the classes: Necessary of the Military. – Needed by the financier. Etc. (See Nos. 475, 476, 477, 484, 489.) (Grand-Carteret No. 604). OCLC locates just one copy of the first title in libraries and institutions worldwide: The Morgan Library & Museum (NY, USA). and just one copy of the second title in libraries and institutions worldwide: Bibliothèque Municipale de Lyon (France). Grand-Carteret, John. Les Almanachs Francaise, (Bibliographie-Iconographie) 1600-1895. Nos. 1106 & 604.
Choice of Books and other Literary Pieces

Choice of Books and other Literary Pieces, The

ROOT & SON, binders; HARRISON, Frederick "Any book is a good book if you get good out of it" ‘The Choice of Books’ Handsomely Bound by W. Root & Son ROOT & SON, binders. HARRISON, Frederick. The Choice of Books and other Literary Pieces. London: MacMillan & Co., Limited, 1925. Octavo (7 1/4 x 4 5/8 inches; 184 x 118 mm.). xii, 447, [1, blank], [4, advertisements] pp. Early neat ink inscription on front blank dated 1932, some neat marginal pencil annotations throughout, otherwise fine. Bound by Root & Son ca. 1932 in elaborate paneled full brown speckled calf. Covers with double gilt rules surrounding a wide panel of decoratively tooled orange calf, decoratively bordered in gilt, spine with five raised bands elaborately tooled in compartments, two green morocco gilt lettered labels, gilt board edges, decorative gilt turn-ins, marbled end-papers, all edges gilt. A fine example housed in the original red cloth slip-case. The London bindery of W. Root & Son consistently turned-out excellent work, both on fine bindings as here, and on trade bindings and sets. Packer lists the firm in business in Red Lion Square in 1899-1901, and the December 1942 issue of The Rotarian notes with regret that W. Root had been bombed out (uprooted?) of their premises on Paternaster Row during the 1941 Blitz. The Choice of Books, and other Literary Pieces, by Frederic Harrison (1831-1923) was first published in 1886. The title essay of this volume is a discourse on Reading, its benefits and its perils. In the first section, ‘How to Read,’ an eloquent plea is made for the right of rejection; for the avoidance of books that one "comes across," and even of the habit of one-sided reading. The essayist pleads that the choice of books "is really a choice of education, of a moral and intellectual ideal, of the whole duty of man." He warns readers that pleasure in the reading of great books is a faculty to be acquired, not a natural gift,-at least not to those who are spoiled by our current education and habits of life. And he offers as a touchstone of taste and energy of mind, the names of certain immortal books, which if one have no stomach for, he should fall on his knees and pray for a cleaner and quieter spirit. The second division is given to the ‘Poets of the Old World,’ the third to the ‘Poets of the Modern World,’ and the last to the ‘Misuse of Books.’ The essay is full of instruction and of warning, most agreeably offered; and the penitent reader concludes with the writer, that the art of printing has not been a gift wholly unmixed with evil, and may easily be made a clog on the progress of the human mind. An extract is given in the LIBRARY, under Mr. Harrison’s name; and the other side of the shield is shown in Mr. Arthur J. Balfour’s answer, also given under his name. Fourteen other essays, partly critical, partly historical, partly æsthetic, fill the volume; the ablest and one of the most delightful among them being perhaps the famous paper, ‘A Few Words about the Eighteenth Century.’.
Les Petites Félicités et les Petites Misères Humaines

Les Petites Félicités et les Petites Misères Humaines

MONNIER, Henry Henry Monnier’s Parody on Thomas Rowlandson’s Miseries of Human Life "From Childhood to Old Age" MONNIER, Henry. Les Petites Félicités et Les Petites Misères Humaines. Paris: Delpech, 1829. Oblong quarto (10 x 13 1/8 inches; 253 x 332 mm.). Ten fine and amusing hand colored lithograph plates (all mounted on stubs). Bound ca. 1925 by René Kieffer (with his binders label on verso of front end-paper) in half dark blue straight-grain morocco over marbled boards. Spine decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt, marbled end-papers. Fine. The amusing images cover life in France from L’Enfance to La Vieilesse (from Childhood to Old Age). The plates: Les Petites Félicités 1. L’Enfance. 2. La Jeunesse. 3. L’Age Mur. 4. La Vieillesse. 5. La Chaleur. Les Petites Misères Humaines 1. L’Enfance. 2. La Jeunesse. 3. L’Age Mur. 4. Vieillesses. 5. Le Froid. Exceptionally rare with only one copy in libraries and institutions worldwide: The Gordon N. Ray copy (dated as 1840) at the Morgan Library & Museum (NY, USA). "When Henry Monnier was barely old enough to trot off to school in his first pair of buttoned trousers and Charles Dickens was not yet born, Rowlandson was publishing the Comforts of Bath, and Miseries of Human Life. These humorous sketches of contemporary society suggest in their general plan and point of view Monnier’s Esquisses Parisiennes (1827), Vues de Paris (1829), and various other works containing groups of scenes connected by a central theme, particularly the Petites Misères Humaines, for which Monnier may have borrowed Rowlandson’s title and its companion work, Les Petites Félicités Humaines (1829). (Edith Melcher. The Life and Times of Henry Monnier, p.37). Marie, 427-431 & 432-436; Melcher, p.37. Not mentioned in Gordon Ray. The Art of the French Illustrated Book. Assumedly Gordon Ray must have acquired his copy after his book was published.
Prophéties Charivariques

Prophéties Charivariques

QUILLENBOIS, pseudonym of Charles Marie de Sarcus; Charles Marie de Sarcus "Facetious Prophesies" Twenty Hand-Colored Lithographed Plates Containing Sixty-Nine Vignettes [QUILLENBOIS, pseudonym of Charles Marie de Sarcus, illustrator]. Prophéties Charivariques. Par Quillenbois. Paris: Chez Aubert & Cie. Editeurs, [n.d., ca. 1846]. Large folio (13 1/4 x 9 7/8 inches; 338 x 250 mm.). Hand-colored lithographed title and twenty hand-colored lithographed plates, containing sixty-nine captioned vignettes depicting "Facetious Prophesies." Plates heightened with gum arabic. Lithographed leaf Maison de Commission. Des Modes Parisiennes [verso blank] and sixteen page Aubert et Cie. Livres et Albums etc., bound in at end. Minimal marginal foxing or browning to a few leaves. Publisher’s pictorial green lithographed boards. Spine and corners professionally repaired, board edges a little browned. Still an excellent example of this rather rare title. Small color-printed bookplate of Joaquin J. Giralt on front paste-down. OCLC locates just copies in libraries and institutions worldwide: The Morgan Library & Museum (NY, USA) and The Zentralbibliothek Zurich (Switzerland). Charles-Marie de Sarcus, a.k.a. Quillenbois, (1821-1867) was born in Dijon and died in Paris. He was a French painter and caricaturist during the middle of the nineteenth century, best known for his cartoons, which were published in many newspapers and albums between 1845 and 1853, and signed Quillenbois. He was a friend of Cham, a.k.a. Charles Amédée de Noé (1818-1879) and he contributed to the satirical newspaper La Revue Comique (1848-1849), providing drawings to Fashion, L Éclair as well as L’Illustration, and was the official draftsman of the Caricaturist (1849-1851).
Noticia de la California

Noticia de la California, y de su conquista temporal, y espiritual hasta el tiempo presente, sacada de la historia manuscrita, formada en Mexico año 1739. por el Padre Miguel Venegas.

VENEGAS, Miguel The Most Prized of All California Books VENEGAS, Miguèl. Noticia de la California, y de su conquista temporal, y espiritual hasta el tiempo presente, sacada de la historia manuscrita, formada en Mexico año 1739. por el Padre Miguèl Venegas. Madrid: Viuda de Manuel Fernandez, y del. Supremo Consejo de la Inquisicion, 1757. First edition, first issue (with p. 479 in Vol. II mis-numbered 476) of this "foundation of a library of Californiana" (Cowan). Three quarto volumes (8 x 5 3/4 inches; 203 x 146 mm.). [xxiv], 240; [viii], 564; [viii] 436 pp. Complete with all four engraved folding maps. Numerous engraved head- and tailpieces. Scattered light foxing, tiny paper-flaw to blank margin of pp. 449/450 in volume II; small piece (1 7/8 x 1 3/4 inches; 48 x 44 mm.) torn away (library stamp of the Museo de Tacoronte) from the second leaf (errata) in volume III, not affecting text on recto or verso. With the purple library stamp of Museo de Tacoronte on the second leaf of volumes I and II, Volume III with the stamp torn away on lower margin not affecting text on recto or verso. Each volume with the early ink signature of Th. Cambzeleno at foot of title-pages. Contemporary yapp-edged vellum, spines lettered in manuscript, remains of original string ties. Inner hinges of volumes I & III expertly repaired. An altogether beautiful copy of this seminal book; complete and in it’s original binding. Housed in a custom-made, quarter black morocco, felt-lined clamshell case with felt dividers. Provenance: By descent from Diego LeBrun, the owner of Museo de Tacoronte, to the family of Hamilton Wilkens. "This first, and thus cornerstone, history of the Californias was penned by Miguèl Venegas who was born in Puebla in 1680, entered the Society of Jesus at Tepotzotlan in 1700, was ordained in 1705, and served as a professor of moral theology in the Colegio Maximo of San Pedro y San Pablo in Mexico City from 1714 to 1724. For reasons of health, in the latter year he was sent as administrator to the Jesuit hacienda of Chicomocelo, where he compounded medications and dedicated himself to letters. In 1731 his classic Manual de Parrocos appeared in its first edition, and three years later he finished a biography of Juan Bautista Zappa, S.J., close friend of Juan Maria de Salvatierra, S.J., founder of the first permanent mission in the Californias, Nuestra Senora de Loreto. Highly inspired by the dynamic expansion of the Jesuits in the mission fields of Sinaloa, Sonora, Pimeria Alta, and California, Venegas had sought to serve in the California enterprise, but was rejected because of his delicate health. Thus, he was unable to go to his "beloved California" and he devoted his time to writing its history. In researching his history, Venegas employed the highest level of historical methodology, collecting original manuscripts, annual reports, and letters, viceregal documents, memoirs, and letters of Fathers Salvatierra, Eusebio Francisco Kino, Sigismundo Taraval, Juan de Ugarte, and numerous other missionaries in California and Sonora, and of Esteban Rodriguez Lorenzo, commander of the presidio of Loreto. In 1735, father Provincial Juan Antonio de Oviedo ordered that all archival material relative to California be provided to Father Venegas who also employed a novel form of acquiring information: detailed questionnaires covering the left half of the sheet, leaving the right half of the same sheet for answers, that were sent to persons who had participated in or were currently active in the California mission field. On August 5, 1739, Venegas finished his manuscript "Empressas Apostolicas de los PP. Misoneros de la Compania de Jesus, de la Provincia de Nueva Espana obradas en la conquista de Californias." of 709 pages in ten books, dedicated to the benefactor of the California missions, the Marques de Villapuente. Because the work revealed the weakness of Spanish defenses in California, it was filed until 1749 when it was sent to Procurator General Pedro Ignacio Altamirano in Madrid for revision and publication. This task was given to the Jesuit savant Andres Marcos Burriel at Toledo in 1750. Burriel accumulated documentation from the archives of the Society of Jesus and the Council of the Indies to augment Venega’s text with events transpiring since 1739, and received material from Mexico City, the Philippines, and geographical data from the Academie Royale des Sciences in Paris. By 1754, Burriel had finished his revisions and additions to the "Empressas Apostolicas" that had become known as the "Noticia de la California" and remitted his manuscript of 1,150 pages and four maps to Altamirano. The licensing of the work for publications was begun, and in December of 1755 the manuscript was sent to the Real Academia de la Historia for revision, censorship, and recommendations. Finally, in April 1757, the Noticia de la California came off the press of the widow of Manuel Fernandez in Madrid.The published work follows a very different format from the original Venegas manuscript, with the first part treating the geography and native inhabitants of California; the second, the attempts to occupy the region prior to the Jesuits; and the third, the work of the Jesuits up to the present. A fourth section, provided entirely by Burriel, comprises documentary appendices. Three of the maps were composed or collected by Burriel, but he opposed the inclusion of the Mapa de la America Septentrional because of its inaccuracy. This first history of the mysterious California was in high demand: it was translated in a substantial abridgement into English and published in London in 1759, and from this into Dutch (1761-1762), French (1766-1767), and German (1769-1770)" (Volkmann) The large folding map in Volume I (Mapa de la California su Golfo, y provincias fronteras en el continente de Nueva Espana) measures 14 3/4 x 12 3/8 inches (375 x 315 mm), with three sides bordered by ten pictorial vignettes of local scenes and animals. It is one of
Sketches of Portuguese Life

Sketches of Portuguese Life, Manners, Costume, and Character

ANONYMOUS]; G., A.P.D. Twenty Fine Hand Colored Aquatint Plates Depicting the Portuguese Way of Life in Lisbon and Rio de Janeiro [ANONYMOUS]. Sketches of Portuguese Life, Manners, Costume, and Character. Illustrated by twenty coloured plates. By A.P.D.G. London: Printed for Geo. B. Whitaker, 1826. First edition. Octavo (8 3/8 x 5 3/8 inches; 213 x 137 mm.). [iii]-xxv, [i, blank], [i, list of plates], [i, blank], 364 pp. Bound without the half-title. Twenty hand-colored aquatint plates and one engraved plate of music. Plates watermarked "J. Whatman / 1825". Contemporary full red straight-grain morocco, covers decoratively paneled in gilt and blind, smooth spine decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt, gilt board edges and turn-ins, brown liners and end-leaves. Later first and last blank leaves. Some very minor offsetting from the text but still a fine copy. The fine hand-colored plates depict the Portuguese way of life in Lisbon and Rio de Janeiro and were all drawn by the author himself "with the exception of the three which treat of military and civil executions. Those were given to the author by a gentleman who had received them as a present from a British officer, an eye witness to the facts of which they are descriptive" (Introduction, p. xi). The single leaf of music and words are for a "modinha," (traditional regional song) entitled "Cruel saudade," by Manuel José Vidigal. "The text that accompanies [the plates] gives a vivid and easily written account of the state of society in Portugal at that time; the author was in the Portuguese Civil Service for many years, and the subjects of the plates are, he says, nearly all scenes of which he was himself an eye-witness." (Prideaux, p. 320). Abbey, Travel I, 141; Colas, 2750; Martin Hardie, p. 145; Prideuax, p. 319; Tooley, 453.
L'Art d'Engraisser et de Maigrir a Volonté

L’Art d’Engraisser et de Maigrir a Volonté

CHAM (pseudonym of Amédée de Noé); Noé, Amédée de The Adventures of Gaining and Losing Weight Twenty Highly Amusing Multi-Image Hand Colored Lithograph Plates by Cham CHAM [Pseudonym of Charles Amédée de Noé]. L’Art d’Engraisser et de Maigrir a Volonté. [The art of gaining and losing weight with willpower]. Paris: Maison Martinet, [1857]. First edition. Folio (13 1/16 x 9 3/4 inches; 332 x 248 mm.). Pictorial hand colored lithograph title-page and twenty hand colored lithograph plates with a total of seventy-nine images. Plates lithographed by Fernique. Early twentieth century quarter brown cloth over marbled boards, spine lettered in gilt. A few marginal smudges, otherwise near fine. A highly amusing album depicting the adventures of the very thin Mr. Lesec who wants to gain weight and the rather plump Mr. Legras who wants to lose weight. Both Mr. Lesec and Mr. Legras are getting married and there is much going on in their households. They leave jointly for Algeria and go lion hunting. this adventure unfortunately causes Mr. Legras to gain weight and Mr. Lesec to lose several kilos. The same thing happens during a subsequent adventure with a camel. Unfortunately, the two friends leave Algeria for Italy, then for Turkey, Crimea, India, where they live multiple adventures that leave them in their respective physical states. They both decide to return to France, Mr Legras dies from being severely overweight – and the very depressed Mr Lesec just gets thinner and thinner and eventually also dies. Somewhat scarce with OCLC locating just four colored copies in libraries and institutions worldwide: The Morgan Library & Museum (NY); University of Chicago (IL); Boston Public Library (MA); Victoria & Albert Museum (London, UK). There are also two other ‘uncolored’ copies: Kunstbiblio Staatliche Museen Zu Berlin (Germany) & National Library of Poland Biblioteka Naro (Poland). CHAM, pseudonym of Charles Amédée de Noé (1818-1879). "It is to be regretted that space will not serve to represent the caricaturists and depictors of manners who followed in the wake of Daumier and Gavarni. Among the most attractive of the former is Amédée de Noé, known as Cham (that is, Ham, the son of Noah) of whom it was said that he had ‘an idea a day’ for Le charivari. A good proportion of his thousands of lithographs were gathered into albums. His contributions to the Album du siège , in which Daumier was his collaborator, are typical of his work" (Ray, The Art of the French Illustrated Book, pp. 155-156).
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Le Bon Ton, Journal de Modes

LE BON TON; LELOIR, Héloïse, illustrator 327 Superb Hand Colored Fashion Plates by Héloïse Leloir LE BON TON. Journal de Modes. Littérature, Beaux-Arts, Théatres. Paris: Au Bureau de la Société des Journaux de Modes Réunis, 1863-1867. A fine run of sixty numbers (January 1863 – December 1867; Volumes XXIX-XXXIII) bound in ten volumes. Ten large octavo volumes (10 3/3 x 7 3/8 inches; 264 x 187 mm.). 327 hand colored fashion plates(including 1 folding) mainly by Héloïse Leloir. In addition there are 8 plain folding plates. Late nineteenth century quarter red roan over diaper patterned red boards, spines with four double raised bands, ruled and lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers. A near fine run of this colorful and informative fashion journal. Le Bon Ton, Journal des Modes (Paris) was a highly accomplished weekly fashion magazine founded by a former hairdresser, Louis-Joseph Mariton, who went on to be the proprietor of eight others. It employed the best fashion-plate designers, and many of its plates were reissued in Blackwood’s Lady’s Magazine. The first number was issued in November 1834 and Le Bon Ton ran for forty years, the final number being in 1874. Héloïse Suzanne Colin (1819-1873) was one of the greatest fashion print artists of the 19th Century. The daughter of the painter Alexandre Colin, she married the painter Jean-Baptiste Auguste Leloir (1809-1992), and was the mother of Maurice Leloir, an artist who later became a film producer in Hollywood. She exhibited her first drawings in the 1835 edition of the Salon. She basically painted watercolors and became known for her portraits of small dimensions. Héloïse with her two sisters Adèle Anaïs Toudouze and Laure Noël were among the greatest illustrators of Parisian fashion of the mid-nineteenth. Colas, 384; Vyvyan Holland. Hand Coloured Fashion Plates 1770 to 1899, pp. 152-157. Volume 1: 35 color plates, including one folding. Volume 2: 31 color plates. Volume 3: 35 color plates, plus one black and white folding plate. Volume 4: 29 color plates, plus one black and white folding plate. Volume 5: 33 color plates, plus one black and white folding plate. Volume 6: 33 color plates, plus one black and white folding plate. Volume 7: 32 color plates, plus one black and white folding plate. Volume 8: 32 color plates, plus one black and white folding plate. Volume 9: 32 color plates, plus one black and white folding plate. Volume 10: 35 color plates, plus one black and white folding plate.
Galerie Théâtrale

Galerie Théâtrale

MONNIER, Henry Monnier’s "Theatrical Gallery" [MONNIER, Henry, illustrator]. Galerie Théâtrale. Paris: Chez Hy. Gaugain et Cie.et chez E. Ardit, [n.d., 1828]. Oblong folio. (9 3/4 x 13 1/4 inches; 471 x 336 mm.). Twenty-four numbered hand-colored plates lithographed by E. Ardit and H. Gaugain. Original brown paper pictorial front wrapper bound in. Plates Plates 13 through 24 with triangular embossed stamp of E. Ardit in the lower margin. Plate 11 inlaid to size, still with wide margins. Some scattered light foxing and browning, still an excellent copy of this very rare suite. Early twentieth century green cloth over boards with maroon morocco lettering labels on front cover and spine. From the celebrated collection of R. Descamps Scrive with his maroon morocco leather bookplate on front blank. OCLC locates just four copies in libraries and institutions worldwide: The Morgan Library & Museum (NY, USA); University of Chicago (IL, USA), University of Nortgh Carolina, Chapel Hill (NC, USA) and Toronto Public Library (ON, CA). "As a boy Monnier had been fond of fairs and popular entertainments, and in maturity he was fascinated by everything having to do with the stage. In this engaging album he offers an informal view of the theatrical life of his time, ranging from strolling acrobats and sideshows to the ballet and classical tragedy. Only an occasional performance is depicted; for the most part he is content to show actors at the side-scenes and backstage, together with a variety of other people associated with the theatre. Monnier’s command of this little world is authoritative, and he presents it with vivacity" (Ray, The Art of the French Illustrated Book). "The theme of the street entertainer was popular with lithographers, although with the notable exception of Daumier, their miserable state was not often depicted.Monnier, a playwright and actor as well as a draftsman, included this low theatrical form in his Galerie théâtrale, which is otherwise devoted to scenes of actors, rehearsals, and back-stage life of the indoor legitimate theatre" (Beatrice Farwell, The Charged Image, p. 112, describing Pl. 1. "Sauteurs"). The Plates: 1. "Sauteurs" 2. "Phénoménel" 3. "Une Débutante" 4. "Une Queue" 5. "Un Foyer" 6. "Le derrière de la toile" 7. "Une loge" 8. "Un Comité de Lecture" 9. "Un Paradis" 10. "Une indisposition" 11. "Une représentation" 12. "Mamans de comédie" 13. "Chef d’emploi" 14. "Cabaleurs" 15. "Une Répétition" 16. "Le Corps des ballets" 17. "Troupe ambulante" 18. "Tragédiens" 19. "un ancien camarade" 20. "Un Parterre" 21. "Comedie Bourgeoise. (le mariage de figaro)" 22. "Le Bienfaiteurs" 23. "Une grande Coquette" 24. "Leçon de déclamation" Ray, The Art of the French Illustrated Book, 135. Marie 275-295.
Three Tours of Doctor Syntax

Three Tours of Doctor Syntax, The]

ROWLANDSON, Thomas; Combe, William; Rivière & Son, binders The Three Tours of Doctor Syntax Finely Bound by Rivière & Son [ROWLANDSON, Thomas, illustrator]. [COMBE, William]. The Tour of Doctor Syntax, in Search of the Picturesque. A Poem. London: Pub.at R. Ackermann’s Repository of Arts, 1812. First edition, first issue, with p. 1 reading "Chapter I" and with the plate "Dr. Syntax, Bound to a tree by Highwaymen" (facing p. 14) in the first state, with the girl riding the donkey with her right arm straight. Octavo (9 1/16 x 5 3/4 inches; 230 x 146 mm.). iii, [1, printer’s imprint], [1, directions to the binder], [1, blank], 275, [1, blank] pp. Engraved title with hand-colored aquatint vignette and thirty hand-colored aquatint plates. Plates watermarked 1808. [Together with:] [ROWLANDSON, Thomas, illustrator]. [COMBE, William]. The Second Tour of Doctor Syntax, in Search of Consolation; A Poem. Volume Second. London: Published by R. Ackermann, At the Repository of Arts, 1820. First edition, second issue, with the plate facing p. 198 reading "Skimmington Riders." Octavo (9 1/8 x 5 13/16 inches; 232 x 147 mm.). [4], [1, directions to the binder], [1, blank], 277, [1, blank] pp. Twenty-four hand-colored aquatint plates. Wood-engraved vignette on p. 51. Plates watermarked 1820. [And:] [ROWLANDSON, Thomas, illustrator]. [COMBE, William]. The Third Tour of Doctor Syntax, in Search of a Wife, A Poem. London: Published at R. Ackermann’s Repository of Arts, [1821]. First edition. Octavo (9 1/8 x 5 13/16 inches; 232 x 147 mm.). [1, Preface], [1, blank], [1, directions to the binder], [1, blank], 279, [1, blank] pp. Engraved title with hand-colored aquatint vignette and twenty-four hand-colored aquatint plates. Hand-colored aquatint tail-piece vignette on p. 279. Uniformly bound ca. 1920 by Rivière & Son (stamp-signed on verso of free-endpapers) in full red crushed morocco. Covers double-ruled in gilt , spines with five raised bands, decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments, double gilt-ruled board edges, turn-ins decoratively tooled in gilt, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. Stab holes visible on some plates. Short tear in the outer margin of N1 (pp. 89/90) of The Tour of Doctor Syntax. A few minor marginal stains in the first volume, some light offsetting from plates to text only. A very fine set. Housed in the original red morocco-edged, fleece-lined cloth slipcase. William Combe (1741-1823), "prolific English writer of miscellaneous prose and satirical verse whose poem The Tour of Dr. Syntax in Search of the Picturesque (1812) was one of the most popular books of early 19th-century England.Dr. Syntax was introduced in 1809 in The Poetical Magazine. Combe’s first Dr. Syntax book and its successors, The Second Tour of Dr. Syntax in Search of Consolation (1820) and The Third Tour.in Search of a Wife (1821), satirize the many 18th- and early 19th-century writers whose ‘Tours,’ ‘Travels,’ and ‘Journeys’ were vehicles for sententious moralizing, uninspired raptures, and sentimental accounts of amorous adventures. The popularity of Combe’s work owed much to the illustrations of Thomas Rowlandson. Combe and Rowlandson also collaborated on The English Dance of Death (1815), which contains some of Combe’s best verse, and The Dance of Life (1816-17)" (Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of Literature). Abbey, Life, 266 and 267. Tooley 427, 428, and 429.
Opera

Opera

HORACE; Horatius Flaccus, Quintus A Superb Facsimile of one of the Earliest Extant Manuscripts of Horace. "A Picture is a Poem Without Words" HORACE [Horatius Flaccus, Quintus]. Opera [Latin MS.]. Rome: Regia Officina Polygraphia, 1933. Photographic facsimile on vellum-like paper, printed in red and black in double columns, of the original late 10th or early 11th century, once the property of Petrarch (in 1347) and now in the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Florence. Edition limited to 500 numbered copies (this being no. 246). Quarto (10 1/4 x 6 7/8 inches; 260 x 175 mm.). 144 leaves + colophon. Bound in medieval style full calf, covers decorated in blind, spine with four raised bands ruled in blind, decorative brass corner pieces and fore-edge clasps and catches. Fine. Together with: ROSTAGNO, Enrico. L’Orazio Laureziano gia de Francesco Petrarcca. [descriptive text] Rome: La Libreria Dello Stato, [1933]. Quarto (10 1/8 x 7 3/16 inches; 257 x 183 mm.). 64pp. Publishers printed wrappers. Fine. Together two volumes, housed in the original decorated paper over cardboard folding box. Very fine. A superb facsimile of one of the earliest extant late 10th or early 11th century manuscripts of Horace. Published eighty-five years ago, most of the surviving copies are in European and American libraries. "In November 1347 Francesco Petrarca visited Genoa on his way to Rome. AS usual in all his travels he rummaged the Convent libraries and on that occasion had the opportunity to purchase an old manuscript of Horace [Quintus Horatius Flaccus]. This specimen is today preserved in the Bibliotheca Medicae Laurenziana in Florence and offers us the opportunity to see a non-contestable memory of the poetry of ancient Rome" (translation of foreword). Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65 BC – 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus (also known as Octavian). The rhetorician Quintilian regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin lyrics worth reading: "He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words." Horace also crafted elegant hexameter verses (Satires and Epistles) and caustic iambic poetry (Epodes). The hexameters are amusing yet serious works, friendly in tone, leading the ancient satirist Persius to comment: "as his friend laughs, Horace slyly puts his finger on his every fault; once let in, he plays about the heartstrings". His career coincided with Rome’s momentous change from a republic to an empire. An officer in the republican army defeated at the Battle of Philippi in 42 BC, he was befriended by Octavian’s right-hand man in civil affairs, Maecenas, and became a spokesman for the new regime. For some commentators, his association with the regime was a delicate balance in which he maintained a strong measure of independence (he was "a master of the graceful sidestep") but for others he was, in John Dryden’s phrase, "a well-mannered court slave". Petrarch is a key figure in the imitation of Horace in accentual meters. His verse letters in Latin were modeled on the Epistles and he wrote a letter to Horace in the form of an ode. However he also borrowed from Horace when composing his Italian sonnets. Francesco Petrarca, (1304 – 1374), commonly anglicized as Petrarch, was a scholar and poet of Renaissance Italy who was one of the earliest humanists and is considered to be one of the fathers of the modern Italian language. His rediscovery of Cicero’s letters is often credited with initiating the 14th-century Renaissance. Petrarch is often considered the founder of Humanism. In the 16th century, Pietro Bembo created the model for the modern Italian language based on Petrarch’s works, as well as those of Giovanni Boccaccio, and, to a lesser extent, Dante Alighieri. Petrarch would be later endorsed as a model for Italian style by the Accademia della Crusca. Petrarch’s sonnets were admired and imitated throughout Europe during the Renaissance and became a model for lyrical poetry. He is also known for being the first to develop the concept of the "Dark Ages."
Aucassin & Nicolette

Aucassin & Nicolette

AUCASSIN & NICOLETTE; SANGORSKI & SUTCLIFFE, binders; MASON, Eugene, translator; ARMFIELD, Maxwell, illustrator Who will deign to hear the song Solace of a captive’s wrong, Telling how two children met, Aucassin and Nicolette AUCASSIN & NICOLETTE. SANGORSKI & SUTCLIFFE, binders. MASON, Eugene, translator. Aucassin & Nicolette. Translated from the Old French by Eugene Mason. With coloured illustrations by Maxwell Armfield. [Some Tales of Old Romances Series] London: J.M. Dent & Sons Ltd., 1910. Small quarto (6 15/16 x 4 3/4 inches; 176 x 121 mm.). viii, 72 pp. Six fine color plates and several line drawings in the text. Bound ca. 1910 by Sangorski & Sutcliffe (stamp-signed on verso of front endpaper). Full scored red calf, covers with double-gilt ruled borders surrounding a blind-stamped geometric design. Front cover lettered in gilt, spine with five raised bands decoratively tooled in gilt in compartments, olive green morocco lettering label, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. A fine copy. Aucassin & Nicolette is an Old French story written in a mixture of prose and poetry. The name of the author is unknown, but he probably lived in Picardy during the early 13th century. It recounts the tale of Aucassin, son of Count Garin of Beaucaire, who so loved Nicolette, a Saracen maiden, who had been sold to the Viscount of Beaucaire, baptized and adopted by him, that he had forsaken knighthood and chivalry and even refused to defend his father’s territories from enemies. Accordingly, his father ordered the Viscount to send Nicolette away, but instead the Viscount locked her in a tower of his palace. Aucassin is imprisoned by his father to prevent him from going after his beloved Nicolette. But Nicolette escapes, hears Aucassin lamenting in his cell, and comforts him with sweet words. She flees to the forest outside the gates, and there, in order to test Aucassin’s fidelity, builds a rustic home to await his arrival. Maxwell Ashby Armfield (1881-1972) was an English artist, illustrator and writer.
Canterbury Tales

Canterbury Tales, The

LIMITED EDITIONS CLUB]; CHAUCER, Geoffrey; SZYK, Arthur (illustrator) Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales Illustrated by Arthur Szyk One of 1,500 Signed Copies [LIMITED EDITIONS CLUB]. CHAUCER, Geoffrey. SZYK, Arthur (illustrator). The Canterbury Tales. Done into Modern English Verse by Frank Ernest Hill and Newly Revised for This Edition: With Miniatures by Arthur Szyk. New York: Limited Editions Club, 1946. Limited to 1500 copies signed by the artist, this being copy no. 182. Quarto (10 x 6 5/8 inches: 254 x 168 mm.). xx, 550, [1, limitation], [1, blank] pp. Double-page color frontispiece, 23 colored plates, colored tailpiece. Quarter white sheepskin over patterned boards. Smooth spine decoratively lettered in gilt, top edge stained blue. A fine copy, housed in the publisher’s slipcase. Arthur Szyk (1894-1951) was a graphic artist, book illustrator, stage designer, and caricaturist. Szyk was born into a prosperous middle-class Jewish family in Lodz, in the part of Poland which was under Russian rule in the nineteenth century. All of his life he worked both for his homeland and his faith. Before the second world war his work was renowned in Poland, France, and Great Britain. He moved to London in 1937 where he spent four years creating the magnificent paintings for the Haggadah. He moved to the USA in 1940 and his work became truly popular for his scathing caricatures of the Axis leaders Hitler, Mussolini, and Hirohito. His work was characterized by a rejection of modernism and its embrace of Medieval and Renaissance traditions, especially illuminated manuscripts. He illustrated such traditional works as Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tales, the Haggadah, and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Limited Editions Club, Quarto-Millenary, 175.
Beirdd Gregynog. Gregynog Poets

Beirdd Gregynog. Gregynog Poets

GREGYNOG PRESS; LOWE, Derek, binder The Gegynog Poets In a Fine Designer Binding by Derek Lowe [GREGYNOG PRESS]. [LOWE, Derek, binder]. Beirdd Gregynog. Gregynog Poets. [Nos. 1-12]. Gwasg Gregynog, Tregynog, Powys, 1987-1990. A selection of twelve poems selected by Meic Stephens. Complete set of twelve numbers. Number 182 of 400 sets handset either in 16- or 14-point Bembo, printed on Zerkall paper. Octavo (9 7/8 x 5 7/8 inches; 251 x 149 mm.). Twelve numbers, each [4] pp., Twelve wood-engraved frontispieces. Variously colored Ingres paper wrappers with the titles on the upper covers, lists of poems on the lower covers, printed all round with a geometric motif derived from the frontage of Gregynog. A fine set. Handsomely bound by Derek Lowe ca. 1990 in full gray crushed levant morocco, front cover blind-stamped title and colorful vertical design of various onlaid strips of morocco. Smooth spine lettered in blind. Housed in the original felt-lined, gray morocco clamshell case. Very fine. The Poems: 1. BOWEN, Euros. Yr Alarch (The Witch). Wood engraving by Colin Paynton. 2. JONES, Glyn. The Meaning of Fuchsias. Wood engraving by Sarah van Niekerk. 3. NORRIS, Leslie. Ransoms. Wood engraving by Anne Jope. 4. JONES, Bobi. Bwyta’n Te (Eat Tea). Wood engraving by Hilary Paynter. 5. WEBB, Harri. A Crown for Branwen. Wood engraving by Yvonne Skargon. 6. THOMAS, Gwyn. Ceffylau (Horses). Wood engraving by Leslie Benenson. 7. THOMAS, R.S. A Blackbird Singing. Wood engraving by Christopher Wormwell. 8. LLWELYN-THOMAS, Alun. Seren Bethlehem. Wood engraving by Harry Brockway. 9. MATHIAS, Roland. Craswall. Wood engraving by Peter Reddick. 10. LLWYD, Alun. Yr hebog uwch Felindre (The Senior Falcon of Velindre). Wood engraving by David Esslemont. 11. GARLICK, Raymond. Agincourt. Wood engraving by by George Tute. 12. CLARKE, Gillian. Harvest at Mynachlog (Monastery). Wood engraving by Miriam Macgregor. Founded in 1922 by the sisters and art patrons Margaret and Gwendoline Davies, the press was named after their mansion Gregynog Hall. It rose to prominence in the pre-war era as among the more important private presses, publishing limited edition books, primarily on a Victoria platen printing press. Much of the printing work from 1927 to 1936 was carried out by the skilled printer Herbert John Hodgson, who had previously worked on the 1926 edition of the T. E. Lawrence’s Seven Pillars of Wisdom. The American poet and printer Loyd Haberly was briefly the controller of the press.In 1954 after the death of Gwendoline Davies, Margaret donated most of the machinery used by Gregynog Press to the National Library of Wales. The press was reopened under the Welsh title Gwasg Gregynog by the University of Wales in 1978, and production resumed. While the National Library permanently loaned the Press its original Victoria platen press in 1980, since 1986 it has primarily printed with a Heidelberg Cylinder Press. Typesetting of the smallest pieces is done by hand, but otherwise manuscripts are typeset with the use of a Monotype machine. Among the publications of the press are a series of pamphlets entitled "Beirdd Gregynog / Gregynog Poets": the first of these was Euros Bowen’s Yr Alarch, 1987.
Works of Geoffrey Chaucer

Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, The

CHAUCER, Geoffrey; SHAKESPEARE HEAD PRESS The Shakespeare Head Chaucer, with Hand-Colored Drawings of the Canterbury Pilgrims, Taken from the Ellesmere Manuscript Handsomely Bound by Bayntun Rivière ca. 1940 [SHAKESPEARE HEAD PRESS]. CHAUCER, Geoffrey. The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer. Oxford: Printed at the Shakespeare Head Press, Stratford-upon-Avon, and Published for the Press by Basil Blackwell, 1928-1929. One of 375 sets (this being No. 224) on Batchelor’s Kelmscott handmade paper, out of a total edition of 386 copies. Eight folio volumes (10 1/2 x 7 1/4 inches; 267 x 184 mm.). Calligraphic half-titles, title-pages, and contents pages in red and black by Joscelyne V. Gaskin. Paragraph marks in red and blue, first initial in gold, other initials and sections headings printed in blue after designs by Gaskin, some shoulder notes printed in blue, occasional text printed in red and blue. Seventy hand-colored woodcut illustrations and twenty hand-colored woodcut diagrams. " The figures of the Canterbury Pilgrims in this and the following volumes have been freely drawn by Hugh Chesterman from those in the Ellesmere MS. of the Canterbury Tales" (printed slip in volume I). Edited by A.W. Pollard and others. Handsomely bound ca. 1940 in full blue crushed levant morocco by Bayntun (Rivière). Covers ruled in gilt, spines with five raised bands, decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments, decorative gilt board edges, gilt ruled turn-ins marbled liners and endpapers, all edges gilt. Spines uniformly faded. A very handsome and attractive set of this fine edition. The figures of the Canterbury Pilgrims were freely drawn from the Ellesmere manuscript (now in the Huntington Library) by Hugh Chesterman. The miniatures in The Romaunt of the Rose were redrawn by Lynton H. Lamb from a fourteenth-century French manuscript, MS. Egerton 881, at the British Museum. Other manuscripts from the Bodleian Library and Cambridge University were used for the illustrations to The Compleynte of Mars and A Treatise on the Astrolabe, as well as for two portraits of Chaucer. Woodcuts from Richard Pynson’s 1526 three-volume edition of Chaucer were redrawn by Lynton H. Lamb to illustrate A Parlement of Foules, Troilus and Criseyde, The House of Fame, and The Legende of Good Women, and woodcuts from Vincent’s early sixteenth-century Lyon edition of Boethius were adapted for De consolacione philosophie. Franklin, pp. 150, 235. Ransom, Selective Check Lists, p. 16, no. 60.
Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

RIVIÈRE & SON binder; POGANY, Willy, Illustrator; FITZGERALD, Edward, Translator; OMAR KHAYYAM An Exceptionally Fine Riviére Rubáiyát Illustrated by Willy Pogany [RIVIÉRE & Son, binders]. Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám. Presented by Willy Pogany. [The illustrations and decorations in this edition of Fitzgerald’s translation of the "Rubáiyát" are by Willy Pogany]. London: George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd., [ca. 1916]. Octavo (8 1/8 x 5 3/8 inches; 207 x 137 mm.). Text printed in blue and black. 112 unnumbered pp.With sixteen tipped-in color plates within decorative borders by Willy Pogany, and numerous text illustrations printed in blue. Bound ca. 1916 by Riviére & Son, stamp-signed in gilt on front turn-in. Full dark blue crushed levant morocco. Front cover with a central oval panel of green morocco with Eve, the serpent and the tree of life inlaid in various color moroccos. This central panel is surrounded by a gilt floral border of flowers and bunches of grapes, which in turn is surrounded by a border lettered "Oh, Thou, Who Man of Baser Earth Didst Make, / And Who With Eden Didst Devise The Snake, / For All The Sin Wherewith The Face Of Man / is Blacken’d. Man’s Forgiveness Give – And Take". Rear cover with an oval panel featuring the snake twined around a large chalice, also surroundedby a gilt floral border of flowers and bunches of grapes, which in turn is surrounded by a border lettered "Oh, Thou, Who Man of Baser Earth Didst Make, / And Who With Eden Didst Devise The Snake, / For All The Sin Wherewith The Face Of Man / is Blacken’d. Man’s Forgiveness Give – And Take". Spine with five raised bands decoratively paneled, tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt board edges, decorative gilt turn-ins, decorative floral endpapers, all edges gilt. An exceptionally fine example. Willy Pogany had previously illustrated the Rubaiyat in 1909, but these later illustrations are quite a different interpretation, more westernized and modernized than the earlier ones. "Had Omar Khayyam, the old tentmaker, visioned the beauty of his verses centuries later in Western dress, as embroidered by a Hungarian artist, he might have had a new conception of the meaning of immortality. For Pogany, the Hungarian, had made Omar, the Persian, live again." (Willy Pogany and his Work. eight-page leaflet). Willy Pogány, born in Szeged, Hungary, in 1882, studied at Budapest Technical University and in Munich and Paris. His reputation as a muralist, painter and illustrator was well established in Paris, London and Munich before arriving in the United States in 1915, at the age of thirty-three. Skilled in an unusually wide range of media, he had won gold medals at exhibitions in Budapest, Leipzig, and at the Panama Pacific International Exhibition. "Among Pogány’s many murals are those for the Heckscher Children’s Theatre in New York City and the Niagara Falls Power Station. As a painter he did portraits of famous people in all walks of life. An expert on scenery design and lighting effects, Pogány also designed sets for ballets and operas, including "Le Coq d’Or," and for many films, such as Modern Times for Charlie Chaplin as well as animated cartoons based on his children’s books. "Among his other artistic endeavors Pogány was an accomplished book illustrator. It was this phase of his career, especially as an illustrator of children’s books, which gives this collection special relevance for Special Collections & University Archives at the University of Oregon Libraries. Pogány designed and illustrated more than 150 books. His illustrations include those for the Rubaiyat and the Sonnets from the Portuguese, The Song Celestial, The Adventures of Odysseus, Gulliver’s Travels, and many others, both classic and original. "Working tirelessly right up until the end, Willy Pogány died in 1955" (University of Oregon, Guide to the Willy A. Pogány Papers 1910-1967).
Two Years Before the Mast;

Two Years Before the Mast;

DANA, Richard Henry Two Years Before the Mast Richard Henry Dana’s Account of his Sea Voyage from Boston to California DANA, Richard Henry. Two Years Before the Mast; A Personal Narrative of Life at Sea. New-York: V, 1840. First edition, second issue (without the dot over the i in the word in of the first line of the copyright notice, and with broken type on the running head on p. 9.) Binding B, state 2 (with the advertisement listings on the back cover showing: 1-121; 1-36; 1-27.) Publisher’s tan muslin stamped in black. Muslin front joint split but inner-hinge of end-papers intact. Some light foxing but far less than is usually seen. Front paste-down with three small sealing-wax? stains. A truly amazing copy of this ridiculously fragile book. Chemised in a quarter green morocco slip case, spine lettered in gilt. "It has been asserted and generally accepted, that there were two printings dated 1840; and, that the first of these may be identified by the presence of the dot over the i in the word in, first line of the copyright notice; and, by unbroken running head on p. 9. Reprints from the same plates dated as late as 1854 have the undotted i and the broken running head at p. 9. this gives support (not proof) to the theory." "Issued in two types of binding [black cloth & tan muslin]. There s no known sequence, if any:" (BAL 4434). Dana gives a vivid account of "the life of a common sailor at sea as it really is". He sails from Boston to South America and around Cape Horn to California. Dana’s ship was on a voyage to trade goods from the United States for the Mexican colonial Californian California missions’ and ranchos’ cow hides. They traded at the ports in San Diego Bay, San Pedro Bay, Santa Barbara Channel, Monterey Bay, and San Francisco Bay. "One of the first and freshest, because of its plain factual nature, of American accounts of the sea, the book has added factual importance because, while the brig was assembling hides for the return trip to Boston, Dana journeyed up into the California cattle country, of which he gives us our only trustworthy account before the 1849 gold rush" (Grolier American 100, 46). "If not the most widely read book on California, certainly this ranks extremely high on such a list. The author sailed up and down the California coast trading for hides from January, 1835 until May, 1836. He possessed not only extraordinarily keen powers of observation but a fine facility for expressing his ideas in writing, which makes this volume an excellent and very readable record of his experiences" (Zamorano 80, 26). BAL 4434.
Modes et Ridicules]

Modes et Ridicules]

MONNIER, Henry One of Henry Monnier’s Earliest Works Ten Superb Hand-Colored Lithograph Plates Depicting ‘Absurd Fads’ MONNIER, Henry, illustrator. [Modes et Ridicules]. Paris: Gihaut Frères, éditeurs, 1825. Quarto (10 7/8 x 8 1/2 inches; 276 x 216 mm.). Ten superb hand colored lithograph plates, mounted on stubs. Plate margins with some light foxing. Recently bound by Roger Devauchelle in full violet cloth, black leather label lettered in gilt on front board. An excellent copy of an extremely scarce album. The plates: 1. Avec beaucoup de plaisir, Monsieur! (With a lot of fun, sir!) 2. Voulez-vous me faire l’honneur, Mademoiselle? (Will you do me the honor, Miss?) 3. Satisfaction personnelle. (Personal satisfaction) 4. Embarras de Soi-meme. (Self embarrassment) 5. Mes jours de danse sont passés! (My dance days are over!.) 6. Mécontentement intérieur. (Domestic discontent) 7. Le Journal ne dit rien! (The journal does not say anything!.) 8. Distraction. 9. Je ne trouve plus de danseur! (I cannot find a dance partner anymore!) 10. Un Chanteur de Romanees. (A singer of Romanees.) According to OCLC there are only two copies in libraries and institutions worldwide: The Morgan Library & Museum (NY, USA) and Herzogin Anna Amalia Bibliothek Klassik (Germany). "Between 1825 and 1827 Monnier passed much of his time in London, where he collaborated with Lami in what was to become the Voyage en Angleterre. On his return to Paris he embarked on a series of albums in which he recorded the manners and humors of the city with unprecedented profusion. Between 1826 and 1830 he satisfied the insatiable demand for his designs with almost 500 lithographs, nearly all of which were drawn with a pen and colored by hand. For each design he himself colored a master print and carefully supervised its subsequent preparation. Some of the salient titles in his human comedy may be mentioned. There are potpourris like Recréations du coeur et de l’esprit, Paris vivant, and Rencontres Parisiennes. Macédoine pittoresque. There are more closely focussed surveys like Les grisettes, Moeurs administratives, Galerie théâtrale, Boutiques de Paris, and Six Quartiers de Paris. There are suites like Jadis et aujourd’hui and Les contrastes, which take their departure from comparisons in time or of manners.Monnier was a satirist with a difference. His attitude towards his subjects hardly varies. His aim was to set down what he saw with elegance and precision, but with no overt interpretation or judgment" (Ray, The Art of the French Illustrated Book, p. 199).
Reproductions of Eleven Designs Omitted from the First Edition of Le Morte Darthur

Reproductions of Eleven Designs Omitted from the First Edition of Le Morte Darthur

BEARDSLEY, Aubrey, illustrator; MALORY, Sir Thomas; VALLANCE, Aymer, foreword Beardsley’s Supplemental Drawings for Le Morte Darthur: The Morte Darthur Portfolio [BEARDSLEY, Aubrey, illustrator]. [MALORY, Sir Thomas]. Reproductions of Eleven Designs Omitted from the First Edition of Le Morte Darthur, illustrated by Aubrey Beardsley and published in MDCCCXCIII, also those made for the covers of the issue in parts and a facsimile print of the Merlin drawing. With a foreword by Aymer Vallance and a note on the omitted designs by Rainforth Armitage Walker. London: J.M. Dent & Sons Limited, 1927. First edition. Limited to 300 numbered copies on handmade paper (this being no. 82). Quarto (10 1/8 x 8 inches; 258 x203 mm.). 45, [1, blank], [1], [1, blank] pp. Fourteen black and white wood-engraved illustrations (including one mounted). Ornamental initials, borders, and head-pieces by Aubrey Beardsley. Original publisher’s quarter tan calf over vellum bevelled-edge boards, with Beardsley’s design stamped in gilt on front cover, spine lettered in gilt. Plain white endpapers, top edges gilt, others uncut. Covers minimally bowed, as usual. A fine copy. A lovely copy of this portfolio, which was published for owners of the deluxe three-volume edition of Beardsley’s Le Morte Darthur; the drawings included here were incorporated into the text of the third edition of Le Morte Darthur, also published in 1927.
Lady Windermere's Fan

Lady Windermere’s Fan

WILDE, Oscar; ZAEHNSDORF, binder "I can resist anything except temptation" "Life is far too important a thing ever to talk seriously about" WILDE, Oscar. Lady Windermere’s Fan. A Play About a Good Woman. London: Elkin Mathews and John Lane at the Sign of the Bodley Head, 1893. First edition. One of fifty large-paper copies on hand-made paper. Quarto (8 5/8 x 6 5/8 inches; 220 x 169 mm.). [i, blank], [i], limitation], [iii-xvi], 132 pp. Handsomely bound by Zaehnsdorf ca. 1897 (stamp-signed in gilt on front turn-in) and with their exhibition stamp in black on rear paste-down. Full dark green crushed levant morocco, covers bordered in gilt enclosing a six-line gilt border. Spine with five raised bands decoratively framed and lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt-ruled board edges, multi gilt-lined turn-ins, top edge gilt, others uncut. With the bookplates of the renowned collector C. S. Ascherson (dated 1897) and Paul Louis Weiller (also a famous book collector and a great friend of J. Paul Getty) on front paste-down. A couple of tiny and unobtrusive minor stains on blank borders otherwise an absolutely fine copy in a wonderful and early, if somewhat austere binding by the great firm of Zaehnsdorf. Lady Windermere’s Fan, A Play About a Good Woman is a four-act comedy by Oscar Wilde, first performed on Saturday, 20 February 1892, at the St. James’s Theatre in London. The story concerns Lady Windermere, who suspects that her husband is having an affair with another woman. She confronts him with it but although he denies it, he invites the other woman, Mrs Erlynne, to his wife’s birthday ball. Angered by her husband’s supposed unfaithfulness, Lady Windermere decides to leave her husband for another lover. After discovering what has transpired, Mrs Erlynne follows Lady Windermere and attempts to persuade her to return to her husband and in the course of this, Mrs Erlynne is discovered in a compromising position. It is then revealed Mrs Erlynne is Lady Windermere’s mother, who abandoned her family twenty years before the time the play is set. Mrs Erlynne sacrifices herself and her reputation to save her daughter’s marriage. Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) was an Irish poet and playwright. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London’s most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. He is best remembered for his epigrams and plays including Lady Windermere’s Fan, A Play About a Good Woman, his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, and the circumstances of his criminal conviction for homosexuality, imprisonment, and early death at age 46. Mason, 358.
Writings of Oscar Wilde

Writings of Oscar Wilde, The [Large Paper Edition]

WILDE, Oscar; STIKEMAN, binder The Writings of Oscar Wilde Handsomely Bound by Stikeman & Co. WILDE, Oscar. The Writings of Oscar Wilde [Large Paper Edition]. New York: Gabriel Wells, 1925. Limited to 575 numbered copies , this set being number 179. Twelve octavo volumes (8 11/16 x 5 5/8 inches; 221 x 143 mm.). Title pages printed in pale blue and black, each carrying a profile portrait of Wilde in pale blue. Handsomely bound by Stikeman & Co., N.Y. ca. 1925 (stamp-signed in black on front endpapers). Full dark green crushed morocco, covers decoratively bordered and tooled in gilt. Spines with five raised bands, decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments. Red and green liners elaborately bordered and lettered in gilt, red moire silk end-leaves, top edge gilt, others uncut. Spines uniformly faded to olive green, small circular stain on front board of volume one. A near fine set. The handsomely produced "Large Paper Edition", limited to 575 sets, which was put out by the celebrated New York bookseller Gabriel Wells who, during the 1920s, competed in the sale rooms with the great A.S.W. Rosenbach (1876-1952). This edition, with introductory material by several literary figures including W. B. Yeats (The Happy Prince), Padraic Colum (Criticisms and Reviews), John Drinkwater (The Importance of Being Ernest/An Ideal Husband), Arthur Symons (Salome), and Wilde’s one-time lover Richard Le Gallienne (Poems), was originally issued by Doubleday in 1923 as the "Patron’s Edition de Luxe". A few minor corrections were made for the present edition.