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Gezicht op de Schapen Markt naer den Reguliers Toren

Gezicht op de Schapen Markt naer den Reguliers Toren, de Munt, en een ge deelte van de Doele Sluis nevens het Rondeel en den binnen Amstel over de Halve Maensbrugh langs de Erweten Markt en de Huizen van de Zwanenburg Straet.

DE LETH, Andries; DE LETH, Hendrik A view of the Muntplien with the Munttoren and the Englese Huizen Etching with engraving, on two sheets joined. A view of the Schapenplien (Muntplien) with the Munttoren (The Mint Tower), the Englese Huizen (English Houses), and the Doelensluis. The Muntplein is named after the Munttoren (or simply Munt) tower which stands on this square. This tower was once part of the three main medieval city gates. In the seventeenth century, it temporarily served as a mint, hence the name. The square was originally named Schapenplein and in the seventeenth century was enclosed by the Englese Huizen, shown in the centre. The buildings were constructed in 1624, and would be demolished in the late nineteenth century for the widening of the bridge over the Singel, as a result of which the enclosed Schapenplein disappeared. The new square was given the name Sophiaplein, after the deceased first wife of King William III, but was soon called the Muntplein or in short, the Munt. Andries de Leth (1662-1731) and Hendrik de Leth (1692-1759) were engravers, publishers, and mapmakers working in Amsterdam during the first half of the eighteenth century. R.W.P. de Vries, auction, 1925: 277.
Gezicht van's lands of Admiralityts magazyn

Gezicht van’s lands of Admiralityts magazyn, en werf, nevens de oorloghschepen leggende in het dok, te zien van het Westindisch Huys naar de Oosterkerk. Vue du magasin et chantier de l’etat: et aussi des vaissaux de guerre dans le bassin vojant du coté de la maison des indies occidentales, vers l’eglise orientale.

WINDTER, Johann Wilhelm [after] LAAN, Adolph van der View of the Zeemagazijn or Naval Arsenal Amsterdam Engraving with etching, on two sheets joined. A view along the what is now Prins Hendrikkade (Prince Hendrik quay) with the Zeemagazijn (now the Scheepvaartmuseum) and the naval shipyard to the left and the Oosterkerk to the right. The views shows off the might of the Dutch Navy with numerous ships of the line in the dockyard. To the right of the dockyard stands the "Admiralityts Magazyn" or Zeemagazijn the Dutch navy’s arsenal. . On 12 August 1655, the Admiralty was given the entire western strip of Kattenburg island for the construction of a warehouse and timber-wharf. The designs for which where drawn up by Daniel Stalpaert, in the Dutch Baroque manner. In 1791, a great fire broke out and charred the entire building. Instead of breaking it down and constructing a new arsenal in its place, the decision was made to plaster the building to imitate sandstone, giving its distinctive white look it has today. After the French invasion in 1795, the Dutch Admiralty was disbanded and a national navy was formed, the function of the arsenal changed as well. It no longer stored cannons, ropes and gunpowder but clothing and food. After the French left, the building was given to the newly formed Dutch navy and would stay that way until 1973. The building now houses the Nederlands Scheepvaartmuseum: the Dutch Maritime Museum. To the right of the Zeemagazijn is the Oosterkerk a Dutch Reform church built between 1669-71 by architect Daniel Stalpaert, the same man responsible for the Zeemagazijn. Johann Wilhelm Windter (1696-1765) German painter and engraver. Adolph van der Laan (1684-1755) Dutch engraver and draughtsman, worked for a long time in Paris, and had as his pupil Jan Punt. He specialised in engraving works after J. Glauber and Van der Meulen, and is remembered especially for ‘The Assassination of the Prince of Orange, William I’. R.W.P. de Vries, auction, 1925: 289.
The latest edition of the map of Hong Kong in full detail; with a map of Kowloon; for the use of all purposes].

The latest edition of the map of Hong Kong in full detail; with a map of Kowloon; for the use of all purposes].

SANXING PRESS] Large plan of 1930s Hong Kong showing the cyclone scale Chromolithograph plan, inset maps of Kowloon, Guangzhou, Hong Kong and the New Territories, some strengthening to folds, a few old repairs. Fine and detailed plan of Victoria, Hong Kong. The plan stretches west to east from Belcher’s Bay to North Point. All prominent public and private buildings are named and marked, as are tramways, streets, rivers, public telephone boxes, tracks, and the Mount Parker cable car. The Mount Parker Cable Car connected Quarry Gap (between Mount Parker and Mount Butler) and Quarry Bay near present day Yau Man Street. It was built to provide a means of transport for employees of the Swire Group between the staff quarters uphill, and Taikoo Dockyard and Taikoo Sugar Refinery downhill. It operated between 1892 and 1932. To the lower right is a plan of Guangzhou. To the left is an inset plan of the New Territories marking lighthouses, towns, villages, railways, mountains, and borders. Next to this is a table of the Hong Kong cyclone scale, from 1 to 10, including both daytime symbols, and night-time warning lights. A system of cyclone warnings had been initiated by the Hong Kong Observatory in 1884. By 1917, the system consisted of seven levels, denoting severity, wind direction and proximity to Hong Kong. In 1931, the system was amended to a scale of 1 to 10 – as here – with three new signals added – signals 2 and 3 signifying strong winds from southwest and southeast respectively, and signal 4, a non-local signal meaning that a dangerous typhoon exists but poses no imminent danger to Hong Kong. The four gale signals, renumbered 5 to 8, also had their directions changed to the four quadrants, while the original signals 6 and 7 were renumbered 9 and 10. Signals 2, 3 and 4 were discontinued in the late 1930s. To the upper left is an inset plan of Kowloon, and to the sea are depicted 20 national flags: France, America, China, England, Portugal, Italy, Belgium, Holland, Austria, Siam, Brazil, Switzerland, Spain, Japan, Norway, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, Sweden, and Germany; denoting the numerous countries that traded through Hong Kong. The plan would appear to have been somewhat of a success with later editions appearing throughout the 1930s. A slightly smaller example of around 1939, shows a new cyclone scale, and the number of flags has been reduced from 20 to 17.
A Topographical Map of the County of Sussex

A Topographical Map of the County of Sussex, Divided into Rapes, Deaneries and Hundreds, Planned from an Actual Survey.

GARDNER, W., YEAKELL, T., and GREAM, Thomas Yeakell and Gardner’s landmark map of Sussex Engraved map, mounted on linen, hand coloured. Thomas Yeakell and William Gardner first published their map in four sheets between 1778 and 1783, on a scale of two inches to the mile. The map drew on the massive advance in surveying techniques being made at this time which would be utilised in the first Ordnance Survey maps of the early nineteenth century. It proved a landmark map of the county and of large scale mapping in this country in general. Yeakell and Gardner were originally employed by Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond, on his Goodwood estate. In 1782 the Duke was appointed Master General of the Ordnance and brought Gardner with him, who became Chief Surveying Draughtsman. In 1791 Gardner produced a revised version of the map of Sussex at one inch to the mile, using data collected from the triangulated surveys of the OS, with the help of Thomas Gream, Yeakell having died in 1787. Appearing six years before the first official Ordnance Survey map, of Kent, this edition was the first ever map to be published based on their surveys. The present example is the second state, although the first was probably never offered for sale. Kingsley observes that the first state was a proof with no title, dedication or scale.
Map of Chelsea].

Map of Chelsea].

STANFORD, Edward The Royal Borough Lithographed map with original hand colour. An unusual map of the parish and historical borough of Chelsea. A thick black line denotes the outline of the "Union, Parly. & Met. Boro. Bdy.": Chelsea was made a borough in the London Government Act of 1899, which divided the city into 28 metropolitan boroughs and the city of Westminster. Previously, local government had been overseen by the parish of St Luke’s Chelsea, which is also labelled on the map. There is a key to the different boundaries and a scale bar at the lower edge of the map. The map has been hand coloured to show different types of buildings and roads. Educational establishments are coloured in dark blue; parks and open ground in green; religious establishments in dark grey; docks and wharves in light grey; places of entertainment (including theatres, cinemas and libraries) in burgundy; and public houses in orange. Main roads are coloured pink, with more minor roads in light blue. A number of buildings are coloured red; these appear to be buildings that have now been demolished (or in the case of those ruled out by waving red lines, were slated for demolition or redevelopment), in order to make the streets wider. Edward Stanford (1827-1904) was a highly successful publisher, known for his accurate maps of London. He began his career working for Trelawny Saunders, an enterprising mapmaker who supplied a daily weather chart for the Great Exhibition. Stanford started his own business in 1853, was elected a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society the following year and set about expanding the cartographical aspect of the firm.
Gezicht van de Bosjes Sluis af langs de Kolveniers Burgwal naer de Zuider Kerk toren het Oost-Indisch Huis Dol Huis

Gezicht van de Bosjes Sluis af langs de Kolveniers Burgwal naer de Zuider Kerk toren het Oost-Indisch Huis Dol Huis, Brouwery van t’ Amsterdamsche wapen den yoren van de Kolveniers doelen en den binnen Amstel. Vüe du bosjes sluys le long du canal des croceurs vers la tour de l’eglize du sud la maison des indies, la maison des enrages, la brasserie les armes d’amsterdam, la tour de l’hotel des croceurs et l’amstel interieure.

STOOPENDAAL, Bastiaen] A fine eighteenth century view of the Kolveniersburgwal Engraving with etching on two sheets joined. View of the Kolveniersburgwal, taken from the Bushuissluis looking towards the Amstel river. A key in Dutch and French lists seven places of interest these include among others the ‘Bosjes Sluis’, the bridge spanning the canal; the impressive Zuiderkerk tower; the Oost-Indisch Huis, or East India Company House; and the tower of the Koveniersdoelen, from whence the canal gained its name. The Kloveniersdoelen ("musketeers’ shooting range") was a complex of buildings in Amsterdam which served as headquarters and shooting range for the local schutterij (civic guard). The companies of kloveniers were armed with an early type of musket known as an arquebus, known in Dutch klover, hence the name kloveniers. The print depicts a bustling city with gentlemen and women rubbbing shoulders with street vendors and beggars. To the right of the view a large barge is shown off-loading its wears next to East India House. To the left women are shown unloading crockery for sale in the local market. Further down the canal more boats ply their trade and in the distance the one can just pick out the Amstel river. A later state of the print with a new impressive building constructed on the left hand side of the print, partially blocking out the Zuiderkerk. Bastiaen Stoopendaal (1636-1707) etcher, engraver, painter, and draftsman lived and worked in Amsterdam, he was father of the artist Daniel Stoopendaal, and his most famous pupil was Jan Kip. R.W.P. de Vries, auction, 1925: 281
Topographisch-geognostische Karte vonTexas mit Zugrundelegung der geographischen Karte v. Wilson nach eigenen Beobachtungen bearbeitet von Dr.Ferd.Roemer.

Topographisch-geognostische Karte vonTexas mit Zugrundelegung der geographischen Karte v. Wilson nach eigenen Beobachtungen bearbeitet von Dr.Ferd.Roemer.

ROEMER, Ferdinand "one of the first scientific investigations of Texas made by someone qualified to do so" (Jenkins) Large folding lithographed map, with contemporary hand-colour in outline and in part This map is of particular importance: it is the first geological map of Texas, and one of the most accurate from the Republic period. The map shows only the settled portion of the state, east of approximately the 101st meridian. Roemer identifies various geological strata by color, such as granite, alluvial, tertiary, and palaeozoic. This geological data is superimposed on an excellent topographical map that includes a wealth of human detail. He gives an excellent account of the road system, with many towns, settlements, forts, and ferries. Originally from Roemer’s book ‘Texas: Mit besonderer Rucksicht auf deutsche Auswanderung und die physichen Verhaeltnisse des Landes nach eigener Beobachtung geschildert’. Ferdinand Roemer (1818-1891), known as "the father of Texas geology", came to Texas at the instigation of Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels to investigate the mineral resources of Texas and to produce a competent map of the country. Solms-Braunfels was particularly interested, as a large number of German immigrants were currently settling in Texas under his sponsorship. With the financial assistance of Alexander von Humboldt and the Royal Academy of Sciences in Berlin, Roemer arrived in Texas in 1845. During the ensuing year and a half, he explored most of the settled areas of the state. When he returned to Germany in late 1847, Roemer wrote this account, under the patronage of the Berlin Academy. He confessed that it was impossible to present his scientific findings without including observations on Texas and Texans. Rupert Richardson claimed it was "the best account available of the Texas frontier at that time." J. Frank Dobie states that Roemer "saw more and told about it in a livelier and more diverting way than any other brace of travelers between Cabeza de Vaca and Frederick Law Olmstead." Samuel W. Geiser said that the work "is an invaluable source for the social history of that day in Texas." Among Roemer’s adventures was his participation in Meurbach and Neighbor’s expedition to make their famous treaty with the Comanche Indians, one of the most interesting events in the history of Texas Indian relations. The most important contribution of Roemer’s work was in the field of science. Donald C. Barton states that "much of his geological observation and reasoning is just as good now and always will be as good as when he made them". Dobie, p.52; Howes R407; Jenkins, ‘Basic Texas Books’ 179; Graff 3549; Dictionary of Scientific Biography 11, p. 500; Raines, p. 177; Sabin 72593.
Novissima Amstelodami Tabula.

Novissima Amstelodami Tabula.

COVENS, Johannes & MORTIER, Cornelis Amsterdam during the Golden Age Large engraved map on four sheets joined, flanked by two keys and with a panorama of Amsterdam below. Large scale plan of early eighteenth century Amsterdam. The present work is an unrecorded state of Covens and Mortier’s four sheet plan of Amsterdam. The map is a later state than the example housed in the Stadsarchief, with the addition of three small islands and a windmill to the north of the Xoutkeetsgracht, west of the Blauwhoofd. The three islands would later become part of the Van Diemenstraat, Barentszstraat, Houtmankade, thus forming the eastern part of the Zeeheldenbuurt. The panorama below, which depicts the IJ teeming with merchnat ships, is based on Johannes Kip’s view, first issued by Jochem Bormeester in 1685. The plan shows Amsterdam at the height of her powers, with the great Three Canals Project nearing completion. The Project, which was begun in 1610, was brought about by the rapid growth in the city’s population. The population had doubled between 1567 and 1610 to 50,000, and would by 1660 have quadrupled to 200,000. In order to cope with the ballooning population, the city council implemented the construction of three great semicircular canals, the erection of buildings on pilings, sanitary arrangements for each house, a network of drains and sewers, and the construction of merchants’ houses with storage facilities on the upper floors and warehouses near the mouth of the Amstel. The council expropriated the land, dug the canals, and laid out lots for sale to private individuals for housing, thus allowing some of the cost of construction to be recouped. At the end of the project Amsterdam had expanded from 450 to 1,800 acres. Rare we are only able to trace one other example appearing on the market in the last 50 years. Not in Hameleers. Stadsarchief Amsterdam, cf. KOG-AA-3-03-08 and Atlas Splitgerber 1.1.17, state 4.
Plan of the Town and Environs of Porto 1832.

Plan of the Town and Environs of Porto 1832.

WYLD, James Separately issued plan illustrating the siege of Porto during the Portuguese Civil War Lithograph map with fine original hand colour. Rare separately issued plan Porto published during the Liberal Wars or the Portuguese Civil War. This detailed plan of Porto and its environs was published by Wyld to coincide with Britain’s continued involvement in Portuguese affairs. The British had sided throughout the 1820s with the Liberal constitutionalists led by Dom Pedro (Pedro IV) against the Absolutists led by his younger brother Miguel. The British, although not overly concerned with the internal politics of the country, were weary of the outside influence on Portugal by the likes of Austria, Spain, and to a lesser extent France. The tensions between the two Portuguese factions led to the Portuguese Civil War (1828-1832), also known as the Liberal Wars. By 1832 the forces led by Miguel controlled all of the Portuguese mainland, with the Liberal forces controlling the Azores. On 8 July 1832 a fleet of 60 ships from the Azores led by the British Admiral George Roses Sartorius landed some 7,500 men on the Arnosa de Pampelido beach near Mindelo. The action took the Absolutist forces completely by surprise and they were not able to oppose the landing, nor the occupation of Porto the next day. On 23 July the Liberal Army were able to repulse the Absolutists in the Battle of Ponte Ferreira, but had to fall back on Porto. The Absolutist forces would lay siege to the city for the next 12 months. The plan itself, on a scale of 3 inches to the statute mile, is superbly detailed with roads, and buildings named and marked, and elevation shown by hachure. A reference key to the right lists 21 prominent buildings and landmarks. Two red lines depict the city’s defensive lines or walls, one surrounding the outer limits and the other the inner core. James Wyld sr. was apprenticed to William Faden in the Clothworkers’ Company in 1804, and made free in 1811. After his freedom, Wyld seems to have worked as a surveyor and for the Quartermaster General’s Office, the department of the army responsible for publishing maps, being involved in producing maps for use by the British Army in the Peninsula War. This particular war saw the first use of mass lithographic printing for map publishing. At the end of the Napoleonic War, Wyld moved into commercial mapmaking and publishing, as an engraver, printer and publisher. In 1823 he took over the Faden mapmaking and publishing business, which he operated until his death in 1836. He was joined in partnership by his son James jr. (1812-1887), who then succeeded him; he was succeeded in turn by his son James John Cooper Wyld (1844-1907). For much of the century the family were the leading English mapmakers and publishers, succeeding Faden as geographer to the King and to the Duke of York, and then by appointment to King William IV and then Queen Victoria. Wyld sr. was one of the founding members of the Royal Geographical Society in August 1830. In the second half of the century they were challenged by Edward Stanford. Under the third James Wyld the firm went into decline, and in 1893 the business acquired by Edward Stanford Ltd. We are only able to trace one institutional example in the BNF, with the defensive walls marked in red differ somewhat in their placement compared to the present plan. Scale: 3 inches to one statute mile. BNF département Cartes et plans GE D-13223.
A Mapp of ye Great Levell of ye Fenns extending into ye Countyes of Northampton

A Mapp of ye Great Levell of ye Fenns extending into ye Countyes of Northampton, Norfolk, Suffolke, Lyncolne, Cambridg & Huntington & the Isle of Ely as it is now drained.

MOORE, Jonas Cambridgeshire – The draining of the Fenns Engraved map on 16 sheets, dissected and mounted on linen, in four sections, water mark of "S&A" dated 1824, orange marbled paper endpapers, with labels, housed in orange marbled paper slipcase, with label. Below the map to the left is the coat-of-arms of the Bedford Level Company. The company was set up in 1630, when the 4th Earl of Bedford contracted with a number of landowners to drain the area of the southern Fen afterwards known as the Bedford Level. The Bedford Level Company was incorporated in 1634 and contracted with Vermuyden to perform the necessary works. These works were deemed to be "complete" at a meeting held in St. Ives in 1636, but in fact much remained to be done, and the St. Ives decision was set aside in 1638. There was a revival of interest after the Civil War, promoted this time by the 5th Earl (later Duke) of Bedford, and Vermuyden was again appointed Director of the Works. The levels to the north west of the Bedford Level were adjudicated drained in 1651 and those in the South Level likewise in 1652. In 1654, the company gave leave to Jonas Moore to print and publish a map of the area. Only one copy of the first edition printed in 1658 remains, that in the National Archives (MPC 1/88). In 1677, Moore was asked to reprint the map, correcting various faults; there is also a note regarding the buying "of his old plates". This edition, by Moses Pitt, appeared in 1684, and likewise there is only one known copy, in the Bodleian Library (Gough Maps Cambridgeshire 2). A third version was printed by Christopher Browne and dated 1706, and two final issues: one in 1824, bearing the watermark ‘S&A 1824’, and the present copy, also dated by its watermark, to 1836. Carroll states that "the very first large scale map of England was not of a county but the Fens – mapped by Jonas Moore and published on sixteen sheets." The map is very rare and, being on a scale of 2 inches to one mile, astonishingly detailed – it not only shows each plot of land, but in some cases the owner’s name as well.
This is Map of Berkeley Town its streets go winding up and down

This is Map of Berkeley Town its streets go winding up and down, an oak covered campus it wears for a crown with people & places of renown.

TOOKER, Virginia Pictorial Map of the University of Berkeley Cromolithograph plan of Berkeley, a few tears skilfully repaired. Rare pictorial map of the University of Berkeley, California. This humorous plan shows the architectural transformation of Berkley under John Glen Howard (1864-1931) from the turn of the century to the mid 1920s. In the late 1890s an international competition was set up to find a suitable architect in order to transform the undistinguished campus into a "City of Learning". Howard did not win the competition; in fact he finished fourth. The winner was Émile Bénard of Paris. However when Bénard travelled to Berkeley, he managed to insult virtually everyone he met, and persuaded the Californians that he was not to be entrusted with the execution of any of his work. Howard due to his local proximity (he was based in Los Angeles) was appointed to the advisory council to oversee the implementation of Bénard’s designs; and in 1901 was appointed as the supervising architect of the University. Howard developed a style of architecture that was inspired by stately classical lines. Among the campus landmarks built during his tenure were the Hearst Memorial Mining Building (1902-7), the Hearst Greek Theatre (1903), California Hall (1905), Doe Library (1911-17), the Campanile (1914), Wheeler Hall (1917), Gilman Hall (1917), and Hilgard Hall (1918). Other notable buildings on the plan include the California Memorial Stadium (1923); and the Stephens Hall (1924). This ensemble of buildings helped transform what had been a somewhat pedestrian institution into a true "City of Learning". Although the plan is not dated it does mark the site of the Bowles Hall, "Site of the Bowles Dormitory for men", which was opened in 1928. We are unable to trace any biographical information regarding the illustrator Virginia Tooker, however, the publishers the Thomas Brothers were known to have published several maps and plans of California between the late 1920s to the mid 1950s. We are only able to trace five institutional examples: Pennsylvania; Ceveland Public Library; California Historical Society; University of Berkeley; and University of California. UCB G4364.B5:2U5A6 1927.T6
Angling in Troubled Waters Der Fischfang im Trüben - La Pêche en l'eau trouble - La Pesca nelle acque turbes. A Serio-Comic Map of Europe By Fred W. Rose. Author of the "Octopus" map of Europe Copyright - Tous Droits Réservés 1899. 15th Thousand.

Angling in Troubled Waters Der Fischfang im Trüben – La Pêche en l’eau trouble – La Pesca nelle acque turbes. A Serio-Comic Map of Europe By Fred W. Rose. Author of the "Octopus" map of Europe Copyright – Tous Droits Réservés 1899. 15th Thousand.

ROSE, Fred W Fred Rose’s most famous caricature map Chromlithograph map, inset map of Europe upper right, key to map lower right and left, folding into original paper covers, one cover detached, with publisher’s label. A caricature map of Europe with each country depicted as an angler having various levels of success in hooking colonies: John Bull has a huge catch-bag (Ireland), with Egypt as a crocodile on the end of his line; France is a scuffle for control of the Third Republic between the military and civilian, their rod with an empty hook, with Napoleon’s shade looking on from Corsica; Spain is watching sadly as their former catch (fish marked Cuba, Porto Rico and Phillippines) is being dragged away on the lines of an unseen U.S.A.; Belgium has the Congo; the Austro-Hungarians are mourning the assassination of Empress Elisabeth by an anarchist; Turkey has a hook in ‘the Cretan spike fish’, and a stain on his trousers is a skull marked ‘Armenia’; Greece has pricked a finger trying to catch the spike fish by hand; larger than all others is Russia, shown as Nicholas II with an olive branch in one hand and a line stretching to the Far East in the other. Hill, Cartographical Curiosities, 57; MCC 1, Geographical Oddities, no 82.
Londinium Feracissmi Angliae Regni Metropolis.

Londinium Feracissmi Angliae Regni Metropolis.

BRAUN, Georg and Franz HOGENBERG The earliest extant plan of London Double-page engraved plan, fine original hand-colour. This magnificent plan was first published in Braun and Hogenberg’s seminal town book ‘Civitates Orbis Terrarum’, 1572. London is depicted in birds-eye view from the south looking north. Above the plan is the title in Latin flanked by the royal and the City of London’s arms. In the foreground are four figures in traditional Tudor dress, together with two cartouches with text. The text on the left hand side is a paean to London, which is said to be "famed amongst many peoples for its commerce, adorned with houses and churches, distinguished by fortifications, famed for men of all arts and sciences, and lastly for its wealth in all things"; the text to the right deals with the Hanseatic League, which is praised for its global trade and its "tranquility and peace in public affairs", and names their trading hall in London, known as the Stillard. Although published in 1572, the plan is clearly based upon information gathered some years earlier. St Paul’s is shown with its spire, which was destroyed in 1561; the cross in St Botolph’s Churchyard is shown, although it was destroyed in 1559; and York Place, so named in 1557, is given its old name ‘Suffolke Place’. Upon the Thames, the royal barge can be seen, together with numerous ferrymen and sailing vessels. On the south bank of the river is the new district of Southwark, with its theatres, and bull and bear baiting pits. To the left is Westminster – connected to the City by a single road – with Westminster Abbey clearly visible. To the north of Westminster, cows are depicted grazing in open fields. The view was most definitely derived from a 15-sheet city plan, of which only three plates have survived. The original plan was probably commissioned by the Hanseatic League, at sometime around 1550, hence the praise heaped upon the League in the text on the plan. Scale: 6 1/2 inches to 1 statute mile. Howgego 2 (2); Koeman 2433 state 4; in this state "Westmester" has been changed to "Westmunster" and the Royal Exchange has been inserted, along with ‘cum privilegio’.
Nouveau Plan Routier de la Ville et Faubourgs de Paris.

Nouveau Plan Routier de la Ville et Faubourgs de Paris.

DAVIDS, Rupert Eighteenth century map of Paris printed on calico Engraved plan printed in rose madder on calico. Rupert Davids (1724-1790) was a calico printer and engraver based in Crayford, Kent. Crayford was an ideal site for a calico printing business: abundant water for fabric bleaching, space, and proximity both to central London – the main market – and the Thames ports of North Kent. The first significant printers in Crayford were Rupert Davids and Sons, established in 1757, whose success gave rise to a number of other printing businesses. The London Gazette of March 28th 1783 notes that "the partnership between Rupert Davids and Sons (William and Charles) of Crayford in the County of Kent, Callico-printers, was this day dissolved by mutual consent"; the following year Rupert is recorded as working in Cheapside. He died on 8th January 1790: The Gentlemen’s Magazine (Vol 67), in their ‘Obituary of Considerable persons’, describes him as "an eminent calico-printer" and notes he "Dropped down dead, near the third mile-stone on the Deptford-road". Cartographic works bearing the Davids imprint are extremely rare: we have only been able to trace a handkerchief titled ‘A Scale of Distances of the Principal Cities & Towns in England’, dated by 1763; and a reference to the present item in the magazine ‘Le Gaulois’ of 25 June 1896: "One of the most interesting gifts was made to the musée Carnevalet by M. Le Vayer, conservator of the museum: an example of "Nouveau plan routier de la ville et des faubourgs de Paris", printed by R. Davids Crayford, in 1768". This example is printed on canvas and appears to be unique in this state." Copac and Worldcat record no institutional examples. The BNF contains a photographic reproduction of the piece.
Manuscript sketch map of fort Bharatpur and environs].

Manuscript sketch map of fort Bharatpur and environs].

Military sketch map of the Siege of Bharatpur Manuscript sketch map, pencil, pen and ink, on J. Whatman paper watermark dated 1820, mounted on cloth, a few tears to far right portion of map, Military sketch map of the fort of Bharatpur and the surrounding country. Siege of Bharatpur Bharatpur was at the time the capital of the Jat Kingdom, who held an uneasy truce with the British East India Company. In February 1825, the then ruler Baldeo Sigh died with his six year old son Bulwant Singh being named his successor. The succession had the explicit support of the British. So when the new Raja’s cousin Durgan uspurped the throne, the British Resident in Delhi, Sir David Ocherlony, warned the local people and chieftains not to support Durgan, but his advice was ignored. Durgan and his followers had two reasons for confidence: the British were already committed to a war in Burma, and the Jats calculated that that meant there would not be sufficient troops left over to fight them; moreover, there was a belief that the fortress in Bhurtpore was impregnable, famed for an episode twenty years previously when it had withstood a siege and several assaults by a British army under General Lake. The British had suffered very few military setbacks in India, so Bhurtpore assumed a symbolic significance for the independent princes of North India. General Sir David Ochterlony who, acting on his own initiative as Civil Commissioner, advanced on Bharatpore with an army from the British garrison at Delhi. When Lord Amherst, the Governor General of India, heard of the move, he sent peremptory orders to recall the troops, whereupon Ochterlony resigned. The British appointed Lord Combermere as commander-in-chief. Combermere arrived in Calcutta from London on 2nd October, reaching Agra 1st December. And the outskirts of Bharatpur by 10th December. The siege itself was relatively swift with the fort being completely surround by the British by mid December and breaches in fort’s considerable walls being made on 18th January, 1826. Following the capture of the fort, the numerous forts surround the Bharatpur, including Wier, Deeg, Biana, and Fatehpur Sikri quickly surrendered to the British. The Map The map, on a scale of half an inch to the statute mile, stretches from Weir (Weer) in the west to Agra in the east, and Deeg in the north to Bayana (Biana) in the south. Little topographical detail is shown with only major rivers and mountain ranges to the south sketched in, with dense foliage surrounding Bharatpur. Towns and villages are marked with a red circle and a pinhole, with the names secretary hand. The names of cities and major conurbations are in upper case. The majority of the towns are linked by thin red lines, either denoting roads or the routes taken by the British Army, commanded by the General Combermere. The greatest detail is left for the county immediately surrounding Bharatpur: numerous villages are marked, with the fort itself depicted with all its ramparts and parts of the moat. To the upper right the camp is marked with text: "Camp said to be 8000 horse, 4000 foot, and 12 guns". The text probably refers to the Jat forces under the command of Durgan Sal. The force was protecting the Jheel Bund, the earth wall surrounding the city’s lake, which if breached would have flooded the fort’s outer defensive ditches and the surrounding countryside, thus making an assault on Bhaartpur considerably harder. One of Combermere’s first actions was to capture the strategic point, which the British did on the 10th December. To the right of the fort three squares with trees are marked: "Mirdee Baug", "Buldeo Sing Ka Baug", and "Luchman Sing Ka Baug". These three squares denote three formal gardens; the garden of Buldeo Sing was key to the British success as it allowed protective cover for their artillery during the siege.
Map of the Countries round the North Pole by J. Arrowsmith.

Map of the Countries round the North Pole by J. Arrowsmith.

ARROWSMITH, John Arrowsmith’s Polar Map Circular engraved map, hand-coloured, dissected and mounted on linen, folding into original brown cloth slipcase with publisher’s label. First published by Aaron Arrowsmith in 1818, the current map, by his grandson John, is updated to include the most recent explorations. On a polar projection, the map includes the north pole and its surrounding continents and countries. Therefore, it visualises the whole arctic region up to 80 degrees north. The region ranging from 80 to 90 degrees north was considered undiscovered at the time of the map’s publication, Arrowsmith simply noting the northernmost latitude achieved to date, of 82 degrees, north of Spitzbergen, Norway. The region north of Canada is highlighted in purple, to show the extent of the coastal exploration to 1850. Several important expeditions are marked including Parry’s, and Franklin’s voyages. Frabklin’s last expedition of 1845, to find the Northwest passage, ended in disaster with the disappearance of Franklin and his entire crew. Several expeditions were sent out to find Franklin, such as the Rae-Ricahrdson (1849), McClure’s (1850), and the American Grinnell (1850). The Rae-Richardson voyage is marked by a dotted line denoting the extent of the pack ice in 1849. A note above Smith Sound states "Coasts examined by the Expedtions of 1850", this is most like the Inglefield expedition, of 1852, who had been sponsored by Franklin’s widow to search for the missing explorer.
Gesicht Van De Groen-Markt

Gesicht Van De Groen-Markt, Van De Ree Sluys Te Sien naar de Wester Kerk tot Amsterdam. Conspectus Fori oleris a cervae cataracta vesus Templum Occidentale, Amstelodami.

SCHENK, Leonard; [after] RADEMAKER, Abraham View along the Prinsengracht from the Reestraat to the Westerkerk Engraving with etching, on two sheets joined. Prinsengracht (Prince’s Canal) is the fourth and the longest of the main canals in Amsterdam. It is named after the Prince of Orange. The majority of the houses along it were built in the seventeenth century during the Dutch Golden Age. Notable buildings along Prinsengracht include the Noorderkerk (Northern Church), the Noordermarkt (Northern Market), Anne Frank House, and the Westerkerk (West Church). The present view looks along the canal from the Reestraat to the Westerkerk. The Westerkerk was built between 1620 and 1631 in Renaissance style according to designs by architect Hendrick de Keyser (1565-1621).The building of the Westerkerk was finished and completed by his son Pieter de Keyser (1595-1676) and inaugurated on June 8, 1631. The church remains to this day the largest purpose built Protestant churches in The Netherlands. Leonard Schenk (fl.1720-1746) an Jan Schenk (1698-1752) were brothers working as engravers and publisher’s in Amsterdam. Abraham Rademaker (1677 – 21 January 1735) was an 18th-century painter and printmaker from the Northern Netherlands. Rademaker was born in Lisse. According to the RKD he was a versatile artist who painted Italianate landscapes, but is known mostly for his many cityscapes and drawings of buildings that were made into print. R.W.P. de Vries, auction, 1925: 278
Map of the County of Lincolnshire from Actual Survey By A. Bryant

Map of the County of Lincolnshire from Actual Survey By A. Bryant, In the Years 1825-26 & 1827. Respectfully Dedicated to the Nobility, Clergy & Gentry, of the County.

BRYANT, A[ndrew] Lincolnshire – Bryant’s large scale map of Lincolnshire Large-scale engraved map, fine original hand-colour, dissected and mounted on linen, in two sections, key to map lower left, view of Lincoln Cathedral lower right, edged in green silk, with some loss of silk, housed in calf pull-off slipcase, lettered in gilt. Bryant’s large scale map of Lincolnshire. Between 1822 and 1835 Andrew Bryant surveyed thirteen English counties, much in the manner of the Greenwood brothers though without the latters’ extreme detail. With their swash lettering, vignette views and meticulous engraving there was a great similarity about their respective output. Of the six counties covered by both cartographers, in five instances they were both working in the field at the same time; even with the much talked about animosity between the Greenwoods and Bryant, it is most likely that they shared information. The map, like that of the Greenwoods, is very detailed, and shows boundaries of the counties, hundreds and parishes, churches and chapels, castles and quarries, farmhouses and gentlemen’s seats, heaths and common land, woods, parliamentary representatives and distances between towns. The map is on a scale of 1 inch to the statute mile. The maps by Bryant are appreciably scarcer than Greenwoods. Rodger 277.
A New and Correct Map of the World with the latest Discoveries of Captn. Cook and other Circumnavigators; Also Geographical and Astronomical Observations of the

A New and Correct Map of the World with the latest Discoveries of Captn. Cook and other Circumnavigators; Also Geographical and Astronomical Observations of the, Earth, Moon, Stars, &c.

WEST, William Unrecorded state of William West’s two sheet world map Large engraved map of the world, on two sheets joined with fine original outline hand colour, a few minor tears to margins, skilfully repaired. Unrecorded state of William West’s two sheet world map. The present map is the last in the line of two sheet world maps, published in England between 1680 and the beginning of the nineteenth century. The first two sheet world map was published by William Berry in 1680, copying the design of the French cartographer Alexis-Hubert Jaillot. The map was aimed at the mass middle market: larger than the folio sheet maps that appeared in the atlases of the eighteenth century, the map was intended as wall or screen decoration, and was considerably cheaper than the multi-sheet world maps published at the time. In their comprehensive carto-bibliography of two sheet English world maps, Armitage and Bayton-Williams, divide the maps into four different proto-types after the mapmakers: Berry, Moll, Senex, and Price. The present map is codified as "Senex Subtype G"; the category is distinguished by "’Tab’ labels, containing titles, attached to each hemisphere". This form of the map was first introduced by John Evans in 1794. William West received training from John’s brother James Evans in the 1780, and he would late, with the help of Thomas’s son James, take over the business when Thomas retired. West for the rest of his career was know as a publisher of children’s educational material, and only known to have published two maps, the present world map, and a map of England and Wales. Both of which are exceedingly rare. The map bears a great similarity with Evans’ work. The geographical features are relatively up-to-date apart from the depiction of Tasmania as contiguous with the Australian mainland, and does not show the discoveries made when Matthew Flinders and George Bass sailed through the Bass Strait in 1798-1799. To the east of Papua New Guinea is a landmass named "Terra de Arsacides", which also appears on d’Anville’s 1761 map, possibly named after Arsacides, the successors of the first King of the Parthians, Arsaces. Curiously although the death of Cook is recorded on Hawaii, only his Second voyage is marked. Two lines of text to the upper Pacific, erroneously dates the track of Cook’s Third voayage: "Cook’s return in 1772", and "Cook’s track to America 1773"; possibly realising his error neither track has been engraved. Surrounding the map is a model of the solar system, the light of the sun on the moon, and the earth; the faces of the Moon, Mars, Venus, Mercury, Saturn, and Jupiter; the Sun through a telescope; and text retailing to the fixed stars, comets, the earth, and Saturn’s rings. The only other recorded example of the map, housed in the British Library, is dated 1803. The date of 1816 on the present example is somewhat problematic, as it is believed that West emigrated to Ireland sometime in the early nineteenth century, and did not return to London until the 1830s. BL, Wall in the Map Reading Room; Armitage and Baynton-Williams: Map 24. (map) 563 by 1160mm (22.25 by 45.75 inches). (sheet) 728 by 1160mm (28.5 by 44 inches).
De Zee-Atlas Ofte Water-Waereld Vertoonende all de Zee-Kusten Van het bekende Deel des Aerd-Bodems

De Zee-Atlas Ofte Water-Waereld Vertoonende all de Zee-Kusten Van het bekende Deel des Aerd-Bodems, Met een generale beschrijvinge van dien. Seer dienstigh vooralle Schippers en Stuurlieden; mitsgaders Koop-lieden om op’t Kantoor gebruykt te werden Nieuwelijks aldus uytgegeven.

DONCKER, Hendrik The most up-to-date sea atlas of the second half of the seventeenth century Folio atlas (500 by 320mm), title, preliminaries pages 14-22 text (complete), 34 double-page engraved charts, on laminated paper, fine original outline hand-colour, a list of previous owners of the atlas in manuscript to the upper paste-down, title-page margins skilfully repaired, some minor damp staining to margins, contemporary full calf, gilt fillet border, spine separated by raised bands, gilt. Although not the first to publish a sea atlas in Amsterdam – that honour went to Janssonius – the first edition of Doncker’s ‘Zee-Atlas’, published in 1659, was superior both in coverage and utility to the rival publications of Johannes Janssonius and Arnold Colom, neither of which were reprinted after 1659. Koeman notes: "Doncker’s charts were the most up-to-date in the second half of the seventeenth century. Although there is some similarity to those charts published by Van Loon, Goos, Lootsman, and Doncker, the latter’s charts are original. More frequently than . [his] contemporaries, Hendrik Doncker corrected and improved his charts. He often replaced obsolete charts by new ones . This consciousness of the high demands of correctness is reflected by the development of Doncker’s sea atlas". The charts of the Americas include the "Pas caert van Nieu Nederland, Virginia en Nieu Engelant" – the third printed chart of the New Netherlands, and the ‘Pascaart vertoonen de Zeecusten van Chili, Peru, Hispania Nova, Nova Grenada en California – orientated with east at the top and depicting California as an island on a larger scale than any earlier sea chart. The the preliminaries and charts conform to Koeman Don 9B, but contain the additional charts of ‘De cust van Zeelandt.’, and ‘De Cust Vlaenderen.’, which Koeman records as first appearing in the Spanish edition of 1669. Provenance: A list of five members of the Lundgren family originally from Onsala, in Sweden, in manuscript to the upper pastedown. From Captain A. Lundgren in the early eighteenth century to Hans Lundgren, an accountant, of Karlskrona, born in 1908; and hence by decent. c.f. Koeman, Don 9B; and Don 13.
t Gesigt Van de Portugeese

t Gesigt Van de Portugeese, en Hoogduyse Ioden Kerken, tot Amsterdam. Veue ou perspective des eglises des juiss portuguese et allemands a amsterdam. A Prospect of the Portugese and High German Jews Churches at Amsterdam.

VAN GUNST, Pieter [after RADEMAKER, Abraham] View of Amsterdam’s Jewish Quarter Engraving with etching, on two sheets joined. View of the Plantage Muidergracht and the Jonas Daniël Meijerplein. The view shown from the present day Mr. Visserplien, the busy intersecti.on in central Amsterdam, depicts the Portuguese Synagogue on the left and the High German or Great Synagogue. These momumental buildings now house the Jewish Historical Museum. The first Jews to settle in Amsterdam were the Sephardim, who had been expelled from Portugal and Spain in 1493. They were joined in the following decades by the Ashkenazi from Central and Eastern Europe, the first of whom had come from Germany in 1600. In those years, the only available land for them was at the outskirts of the eastern side of the Centrum — the island of Vlooienburg, surrounded by the Amstel River and the canals — so they settled along the island’s main street, Breestraat, which quickly became known as Jodenbreestraat. The Great Synagogue (now the Jewish Historical Museum ), and the Portuguese-Israelite Synagogue, were opened in 1671 and 1675, respectively. The Portuguese Synagogue was the place where Spinoza was placed under the ban by the Sephardic Jewish community in 1656. Pieter Stevensz. van Gunst (1659-1732), also known as Pieter Stevens van Gunst or Petrus Stephani, was a Dutch draughtsman, copperplate engraver and printmaker active in Amsterdam, London (1704), and the Dutch town of Nederhorst (1730-1731). Abraham Rademaker (1677 – 21 January 1735) was an 18th-century painter and printmaker from the Northern Netherlands. Rademaker was born in Lisse. According to the RKD he was a versatile artist who painted Italianate landscapes, but is known mostly for his many cityscapes and drawings of buildings that were made into print. R.W.P. de Vries, auction, 1925: 295.
Wallis' Tour of Europe. A new Geographical Pastime.

Wallis’ Tour of Europe. A new Geographical Pastime.

WALLIS, John Wallis’ game map of Europe Engraved map with original hand colour, dissected and mounted on linen. This geographical game map from 1794 recreates the contemporary tradition of the ‘Grand Tour’, where wealthy young men were sent around Europe to acquire culture and experience of different countries. It is suitable for two to three players but up to six can play "if a double set of counters and pyramids are purchased". Each player takes a pyramid and four counters, which are meant to represent the tourist and their servants. They start at Harwich (No. 1), then spins a totem to see how many cities they can advance. Each subsequent roll is added to the total, so the last city (London) must be landed on with an exact roll to win the game. If for various reasons they miss a turn, they leave a counter (or servant) at the city, and have to retrieve them before they can advance. The game rules and a numbered list of places are in the margins, with a fact about each city named. John Wallis (1745?-1818) was a British map and book maker, seller and publisher. After his first business Wallis & Stonehouse went bankrupt in 1778, he became well-known for producing games and puzzles for children. His business was based at 16 Ludgate Street, where the game map was published, from 1778-1805. From 1813 he worked in collaboration with his son Edward Wallis (1787?-1868), who continued the business after his death in 1818.
A New and Correct Map of England & Wales with the Principal Roads and the distances from Place to Place in measur'd miles to which is added Six Persective Views of its Antiquity.

A New and Correct Map of England & Wales with the Principal Roads and the distances from Place to Place in measur’d miles to which is added Six Persective Views of its Antiquity.

WEST, William] William West’s rare map of England and Wales Wood engraved map, fine original outline hand-colour. The map marks cities (capital letters), county towns (capitals in italics), borough towns (title case), market towns and villages (italics), places that send two Members of Parliament (a line atop a circle), and places that send one MP (a dot); a note below states that London, Oxford, and Cambridge each send four MPs. Roads are drawn between prominent cities, towns and villages, together with their distances from each other in miles. Below the title is a table enumerating each county’s cities and market towns, the county’s circumference, and the number of MPs. William West received training from the engraver and publisher James Evans in the 1780s. He would later take over the running of John Evans’ (James’ brother) business in partnership with John’s son James. West for the rest of his career was know as a publisher of children’s educational material, and only known to have published two maps, the present map of England and Wales, and a two sheet map of the world. Both of which are exceedingly rare. We are unable to trace an other example of this state of the map. The British Library houses the only other extant example dated 1st March 1804 and with the name of William West. The present map bears on imprint. BL Cartographic Items Maps CC.6.a.31.
Veritable Representation Des Premieres Matieres Ou Elements avec leurs Directions &= accidents dans leurs Tout

Veritable Representation Des Premieres Matieres Ou Elements avec leurs Directions &= accidents dans leurs Tout, Decrits en Italien par Antoninus Saliba, recorige, mis en Latin par Corn: Iudae d’ Anvers Nouvellement mis en Hollandois Par A.D W. Nieuwe Ende Alderneerstighste Onderscheydinghe der Elementen, Van Antoninus Saliba, Maldeser in Veel Plaatsen verbetert, Ende in’t Latyn overgeset door Corn. de Iudae Antwerpaaren nu in Duyts Gebrachtdoor A.D W. – Tot Haalem By Ambr. Schevenhuyse Voor aan in Zylstraat Caart Konstverkooper.

SALIBA, Antonio] Fantasy and Geography Broadsheet engraved map, fine hand-colour, a few marginal tears skilfully repaired. A rare separately-published world map combining geography with the supernatural. This striking representation of the cosmos is composed of eight concentric rings. At the very core is the burning Inferno; next is the subterranean world with various examples of mining, underground rivers and lakes, and on the surface are windmills; the middle rings hosts the ocean and part of an earthly hemisphere; the following two rings shows celestial phenomena, including storms, rainbows and the twelve classical wind heads; the penultimate ring depicts the heavens with zodiac representations and notes on the historical appearance of comets; finally, the outer circle is a ring of fire populated by demons, phoenixes and salamanders. Outside the main composition are four corner squares with representations and notes on the Sun, the Moon, and their eclipses. Flanking the title are two small insets of the Northern and the Southern hemispheres. The map was originally compiled in 1582 by Antonio Saliba of Malta, a doctor of theology, philosophy and canon law, and engraved by Mario Cartaro of Naples. It included an explanatory text in Italian on either sides and contained nine rings. Saliba’s design was re-issued by Cornelis de Jode after 1593 in Latin and without one ring, showing a derivation of de Jode’s twin hemisphere world map as the cartographic portion of the engraving. The subsequent re-issues were all derived from de Jode: Paul de la Houve, Paris c1600; Jean Messager, Paris c1640; Pierre Mariette, Paris c1650; Gerard Jollain, Paris c1681. The present example is a slightly smaller version of the above editions. The work is based on the Aristotelian and Ptolemaic model for the universe, which placed the Earth in the centre surrounded by nine spheres for the heavens – the five planets, the sun, the moon, the stars, and the primium mobile. Saliba has departed from the classical representation of the Ptolemaic universe by concentrating the planets, the sun, the moon and the stars onto one circle, the penultimate, and by adding the ring of fire, in line with the Renaissance reverence for fire as a purifying tool. We are aware of only one recorded example of the 1582 chart, which is housed at the Herzog August Bibliothek in Niedersachsen, Germany. There are no known examples of de Jode’s c1593 edition; and there is only one recorded example of each of the four subsequent re-issues. We are only able to trace eight institutional examples of the present map: National Library of Denmark; Leiden University; Athenaeum Library, Deventer; Munich State Library; University Library, Dresden; Darmstadt State Library; the Rothchild Collection, Waddesdon Manor; and the Science Museum, London. Map Collectors Circle Vol. I, No. 26; Shirley, World 226; Peter Whitfield, The Image of the World, p.70.
Map of Hong Kong and the Territory leased to Great Britain under the Convention between Great Britain and China

Map of Hong Kong and the Territory leased to Great Britain under the Convention between Great Britain and China, signed at Peking on the 9th of June 1898.

War Office, Geographical Section, General Staff Hong Kong – the ailing Qing dynasty leased to Great Britain, 1898 Colour lithographed map, dissected and mounted on linen, folding map. An early, attractive, and detailed map of Hong Kong and the New Territories first published in 1905 and re-issued with additions in 1922. From another example of this chart we have handled, it appears that the coastline from Sai Kung to Mirs Point onwards was taken from Admiralty charts; that of Deep Bay, from the mouth of the Sham Chun River to South-West Point, from a survey by the P.W.D.; thence northward and westward from Admiralty charts; that of Lan Tao and adjacent islands from a 1-inch map compiled by Tate; and the New Territories from a map compiled by W. J. Newland in 1903-04, with additions and revisions by P.W.D. in 1913 and 1922. As listed in the Reference table, the map shows Important Villages & Market Places; Villages; Churches & Mission Stations; Pagodas & Temples; Pass; Heights in Feet above Sea Level; Bridges; Limit of Navigation for Large Junks; Cart Roads; Pack Roads & Paths; Telegraphs; Tramways; Boundary of British Territory; and Railways. "The local spelling of place-names has been followed". This map has been compiled from Existing Intelligence Division maps of Hong Kong; Admiralty Charts; Map of New Territory Kowloon, compiled by Mr. Tate for Colonial Government Survey 1899 – 1900; Survey of Kowloon and part of New Territory (8 In. – 1 Mile) carried out in 1902-1903. The boundary along the Shores of Mirs Bay and Deep Bay is the High Water Mark. It has not yet been surveyed and is only shown provisionally. Geographical Section General Staff No. 1393. Additions, Mar. 1922, War Office, Aug. 1905. Scale 1:84,480 or ¾ Inch to 1 Mile.
A Chart of the Eastermost part of the East Indies and China

A Chart of the Eastermost part of the East Indies and China, From Cape Comarine to Japan, with all the Adjacent Islands.

THORNTON, John The rare first state of the Southeast Asia map from the first atlas devoted to Oriental navigation Engraved chart on a laminated sheet, trimmed to upper neatline. The first state of Thornton’s chart of the East Indies, published in his ‘English Pilot: The Third Book. the Oriental Navigation’, the first printed sea atlas devoted to Southeast Asia and the East Indies. The great ‘English Pilot’ project had been started by John Seller in 1671, with a fragmentary edition of the ‘Oriental Navigation (Third Book)’ published in 1675. Seller’s financial troubles, however, precluded any further editions, and it was not until four years after his death, in 1701, that another fragmentary ‘Third Book’ was reissued by Thomas Mount and William Page, whom had probably acquired the plates and text from Seller’s one time business partner William Fisher. It would not be until 1703, when John Thornton published a rival edition, that a complete seaman’s guide and set of printed charts for navigation to and in Southeast Asia was bought to market. Thornton was part of the consortium that had overseen the publication of the first edition of 1675, and his position as hydrographer to the East India Company (E.I.C.) meant he had a ready supply of charts of the area. In fact we know that Thornton had access to some of the most up-to-date charts of the region, due to a collection of 17 manuscript charts signed by him, now housed in the BnF. The charts are most likely those taken from the East Indiaman, the Canterbury, by two French ships off Malacca on 20 December 1703. The charts enable us to reconstruct most of the source material for the works Southeast Asian section. Some of the charts such of those of the Hugli River, and the Bay of Amoy, draw on English voyages and surveying, however, the majority are based on manuscript surveys by Blaeu, hydrographer to the Dutch East India Comapny (VOC). It is unclear how the Thornton gained access to such highly secret maps, however, Mlle de la Roncière, suggests that "the reign of William III, King of England and Stadtholder of the United Provinces, might have facilitated exchange between the two rival companies [ie the V.O.C. and the E.I.C.]". However Thornton acquired the new cartographic information, the present chart show a marked improvement on the charts published by Seller, and is one of the most accurate and up-to-date maps published at the time. His son Samuel Thornton took over the publication after his father’s death in 1708, and produced a new edition in 1711. Few changes were made to the actual content of the maps, although John’s name was replaced with Samuel’s in the cartouche. After Samuel’s death in 1715, the plates were acquired by William Mount and Thomas Page. The work would continue to be published up until 1761, and James Cook is known to have taken a copy on his first voyage, even using it to navigate the coasts of Java. The present map is an example of the first state with the imprint of John Thornton. We are unable to trace any other example of this state appearing at auction. Worldcat and COPAC record no institutional examples of this state separate from the atlas. We are only able to trace four copies of the 1703 pilot in institutions: The British Library; The Admiralty Library; The National Maritime Museum; and the Maritime Museum Rotterdam. Skelton and Verner, ‘John Thornton. The English Pilot. The Third Book’, T.O.T., Amsterdam, 1970.
Gesigt van den Vermaakelyken Overtoom Gelegen buyten de Leydsche Poort der Stad Amsterdam te sien naar de groote en kleyne overhaal. Vüe agreable de l'overtoom
Gesicht Van De Cingelverby de Kerk Van die van de Ausburgische confessie naar Ian Roonpoorts toren tot Amsterdam. Fossa Cingens; Confessionis Augustanae Remplum transiens

Gesicht Van De Cingelverby de Kerk Van die van de Ausburgische confessie naar Ian Roonpoorts toren tot Amsterdam. Fossa Cingens; Confessionis Augustanae Remplum transiens, Johannis que de porta rubra turrim respiciens Amstelaedamum.

SCHENK, Jan [after] RADEMAKER, Abraham View of the Singel canal in Amsterdam as viewed from the Prins Hendrikkade Engraving with etching, on two sheets joined. The most prominent feature of the of this view is The Ronde Lutherse Kerk or Koepelkerk is a former Lutheran church. The church was built in neo-classical style and has a characteristic copper dome. It was built in 1671 by Dutch Golden Age architect Adriaan Dortsman, who also built Museum Van Loon, a magnificent private residence at the Keizersgracht. When the Lutherans left the building in 1935, it became a concert hall. In 1993 the interior and characteristic green-colored copper dome were destroyed by fire. After a renovation period of 16 months, the church was fully restored. Further down the canal the imposing Roonports tower can be seen. Leonard Schenk (fl.1720-1746) an Jan Schenk (1698-1752) were brothers working as engravers and publisher’s in Amsterdam. Abraham Rademaker (1677 – 21 January 1735) was an 18th-century painter and printmaker from the Northern Netherlands. Rademaker was born in Lisse. According to the RKD he was a versatile artist who painted Italianate landscapes, but is known mostly for his many cityscapes and drawings of buildings that were made into print. R.W.P. de Vries, auction, 1925: 284
t Gesigt Van de Portugeese

t Gesigt Van de Portugeese, en Hoogduy[t]se Joden Kerken, tot Amsterdam. Veue ou perspective des eglises des juiss portuguese et allemands a amsterdam. A Prospect of the Portugese and High German Jews Churches at Amsterdam.

GUNST, Pieter van [after RADEMAKER, Abraham] View of Amsterdam’s Jewish Quarter Engraving with etching, on two sheets joined. View of the Plantage Muidergracht and the Jonas Daniël Meijerplein. The view shown from the present day Mr. Visserplien, the busy intersecti.on in central Amsterdam, depicts the Portuguese Synagogue on the left and the High German or Great Synagogue. These momumental buildings now house the Jewish Historical Museum. The first Jews to settle in Amsterdam were the Sephardim, who had been expelled from Portugal and Spain in 1493. They were joined in the following decades by the Ashkenazi from Central and Eastern Europe, the first of whom had come from Germany in 1600. In those years, the only available land for them was at the outskirts of the eastern side of the Centrum — the island of Vlooienburg, surrounded by the Amstel River and the canals — so they settled along the island’s main street, Breestraat, which quickly became known as Jodenbreestraat. The Great Synagogue (now the Jewish Historical Museum ), and the Portuguese-Israelite Synagogue, were opened in 1671 and 1675, respectively. The Portuguese Synagogue was the place where Spinoza was placed under the ban by the Sephardic Jewish community in 1656. Pieter Stevensz. van Gunst (1659-1732), also known as Pieter Stevens van Gunst or Petrus Stephani, was a Dutch draughtsman, copperplate engraver and printmaker active in Amsterdam, London (1704), and the Dutch town of Nederhorst (1730-1731). Abraham Rademaker (1677 – 21 January 1735) was an 18th-century painter and printmaker from the Northern Netherlands. Rademaker was born in Lisse. According to the RKD he was a versatile artist who painted Italianate landscapes, but is known mostly for his many cityscapes and drawings of buildings that were made into print. R.W.P. de Vries, auction, 1925: 295.
Gezigt van de Haringpakkers toren

Gezigt van de Haringpakkers toren, nevens de Haarlemmers sluis, en Nieuwe Vismarkt tot Amsterdam. van ‘t y aan te zien. Turris in Salsamentaria quae regione est, nec non Hydrercii Harlemai Novique Fori Piscarii, qua res ad yam vergit, oculus objecta species. Veue de la tour des paquers du harang, ecluse de harlem, & nouvelle poissonerie; du côté de l’ye, golfe d’amsterdam.

SMIT, Jan] View from outside the Haringpakkerstoren towards the Koepelkirk Engraving with etching, on two sheets joined. The Haringpakkerstoren was a tower on the corner of the Singel canal and the current Prins Hendrikkade. The tower was originally part of the medieval defensive wall, and was at the time called the Tower of the Holy Cross. The tower would later become known as the Haringpakkerstoren, because the area was where the herring fishermen salted and packed their catch. In 1829, the city authorities took the decision to demolish the tower (the Jan Roodenspoortstoren was also demolished at the same time), as the city lacked the funds to maintain them. Before their demolition detailed drawings of the towers were taken, so that they could be reconstructed when funds became available. Although plans have recently been made to reconstruct the tower, there have been concerns that this would adversely affect Amsterdam’s position on the UNESCO world heritage list. Jan Smit was a draftsman and engraver working in the first half of the eighteenth century in The Netherlands. R.W.P. de Vries, auction, 1925: 287.
A Topographical Map of Hertford-shire from an Actual Survey; in which is Expressed all the roads

A Topographical Map of Hertford-shire from an Actual Survey; in which is Expressed all the roads, lanes, churches, noblemen, and gentlemen’s – seats, and every thing remarkable in the County: together with the divisions of the parishes. By Andw. Dury, Jno. Andrews.

ANDREWS, John [and] Andrew DURY Hertfordshire – Rare large-scale map of Hertfordshire Folio (550 by 400mm), index map, large-scale engraved map, on nine sheets, fine original full-wash colour, plan of Hertford, and plan of St Albans, half-calf over blue marbled paper boards. Andrews’s and Dury’s large scale map of Hertfordshire. John Andrews and Andrew Dury were responsible for three large scale eighteenth century county surveys: the present map – Hertfordshire 1766 , Kent 1769, and Wiltshire in 1773. All three surveys are on a scale of two inches to one mile. The majority of the large scale maps were on a scale of one inch to one mile. This larger scale allowed for much greater detail; and the map depicts hills, woods and barrows, commons heaths and parks, rivers, ponds and wells, bridges and windmills, churches and chapels, towns, villages and parishes, gentlemen’s seats, farms and houses, turnpikes, secondary roads and lanes, county and hundred boundaries. A note on the map reads "NB The Western Part of this County from Chipping Barnet along the North Road was Survey’d by John Andrews, the East Part by Andrew Dury etc". Dury was a London book-seller who probably put up most of the capital for the project. The map, which sold for £1.16s. in sheets, is functional rather than decorative, the title being contained in a simple rectangle. The only decoration is provided by the dedication – a large vignette engraving incorporating a hunting scene with the names of various nobility on a banner in the sky. Although the name of the map’s engraves is not given, it could be possibly have been John Cheevers who engraved the town plans that were published by Dury around the same time.
Analise Géographique des departements de la France.

Analise Géographique des departements de la France.

BOURRUT-LÉMERIE] Bourrut-Lemerie’s maps of the French Departments Set of 90 cards (132 by 820mm), title, advertisement, distribution, index, 86 cards for each department with map and text below, housed within original pull-off slipcase. The third edition of Bourrut-Le Merie’s rare set of cards of the French Departments. First published in around 1820, work consists of four numbered cards (I-IV): title, advertisement, the information contained on each card, and index; and 86 numbered cards of each department. Each card provdes information on the size of the department, number of inhabitants, major cities and towns, prefectures, and regional produce. The maps are derived from the work of Aristide M. Perrot, who’s maps where first published in 1821. For the second edition Bourrut-Le Merie printed new plates: "The numbering of the cards is slightly different, with just the figures 1-86 at top left. The revised maps are now of various shapes and sizes and are surrounded with pretty little illustrations which often include the names of famous sons. Although they have been moved around, these are instantly recognizable as derived from the decorative vignettes of Aristide M. Perrot. The map titles now consist of just the name of the department." (King) The present set are an example of the third edition, the maps are exactly the same as the second edition, but with the title card now without publisher or edition line. Bourrut-Lemerie was a author and publisher of both playing cards and educational cards, active in Paris in the early nineteenth century. Rare: Worldcat records only one institutional example in Stanford University.
London thou art the flower of cities.