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An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill and Prime Minister Harold Macmillan at 10 Downing Street on 9 December 1958

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill and Prime Minister Harold Macmillan at 10 Downing Street on 9 December 1958

This is an original press photo of Winston S. Churchill leaving 10 Downing Street on 9 December 1958 following a lunch with Prime Minister Harold Macmillan. This image measures 11.125 x 9.5 in (28.6 x 24.6 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is good plus. The slightly irregularly trimmed paper is clean and crisp with some minor wear along the right edge, original crop markings, creasing to the lower right corner, and a series of parallel scratches in the upper right corner visible only under raking light. The verso bears two copyright stamps of "P.A.-Reuter Photos Ltd.", a published stamp of The Daily Telegraph from 10 December 1958, remnants of a typed caption, and a clipping of the caption as it appeared in print. The clipping reads: "A FRIENDLY HAND FOR SIR WINSTON. Mr. Macmillan taking Sir Winston Churchill’s arm as he left 10, Downing Street yesterday after he and Lady Churchill lunched with the Prime Minister and Lady Dorothy Macmillan." This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. Prime Minister from 1957-1963, Harold Macmillan (1894-1986) was first elected a Conservative member of parliament in 1924.He spent much of the 1930s with his political career impeded by his advocacy of social reform and his anti-appeasement stance.As it did for Churchill, the outbreak of the Second World War proved his qualities and brought him into thegovernment as the Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Supply.In 1942, he both became under-Secretary at the Colonial Office and was sworn of the privy council – "an unusual honour for a junior minister." (ODNB)By the end of 1942, Churchill appointed Macmillan Minister Resident at allied forces HQ in Algiers, where Macmillan was to act as political advisor to Eisenhower and represent the British government in developing allied policy in North Africa and the Mediterranean.Significantly, Macmillan reported directly to Churchill.This role made Macmillan an important go-between.It also nearly cost him his life, when he was badly burnt in a plane crash in North Africa.In his crucial role as a wartime liaison, "On several occasions his diplomacy saved the day" and he was dubbed 'Viceroy of the Mediterranean’. (ODNB)Macmillan’s diplomacy and accommodations often both vexed and ably served Churchill.By war’s end, Macmillan had returned to Britain to join the Cabinet as secretary of state for air – just before for Labour won the General Election in July 1945.When the Conservatives returned to power in 1951, Macmillan served as minister of housing and then, in quick succession, minister of defence, foreign secretary, and chancellor of the exchequer under the premierships of Churchill and Eden.When the Suez crisis forced Eden’s resignation, Macmillan became premier, remaining in office until Cabinet scandals and ill health forced his resignation in October 1963.When his old boss, Churchill, broke his hip in Monte Carlo in June 1962 and conveyed the message to 10 Downing Street ‘I want to die in England’, it was Prime Minister Macmillan who ordered an RAF Comet to ferry Churchill home.Macmillan’s grandfather had founded Macmillan publishers, who published Churchill’s 1906 biography of his father,Lord Randolph Churchill, and reprinted several Churchill titles during the war.After resigning the premiership, Macmillan chaired his family’s firm. This original press photograph was taken in the twilight of Churchill’s remarkable life and career.Winston S. Churchill was 80 years old when he resigned his second and final premiership on 5 April 1955. For the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served.
An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill on 3 July 1945

An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill on 3 July 1945, delivering his final campaign speech of the General Election that ended his wartime premiership on 26 July 1945

This original press photograph captures Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill on 3 July 1945 delivering his final campaign speech of the 1945 General Election. Churchill is depicted here with a borrowed hat befitting his borrowed time; his wartime premiership ended weeks later on 26 July 1945. The image, measuring 8 x 6 in (20.3 x 15.2 cm), is a gelatin silver print on glossy photo paper. Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp with some edge wear, creasing to the corners, and light scuffing and spotting visible only under raking light. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Keystone Press Agency Ltd.", a stamp reading BILDSERVICE, handwritten notations, and an original typed caption. The caption is titled "CHURCHILL AT WALTHAMSTOW STADIUM", is dated "3.7.45." and reads: "MR. CHURCHILL KEEPS THE SUN OUT OF HIS EYES WITH A BORROWED HAT WHILE MAKING HIS SPEECH." The General Election of July 1945 was Britain’s first since 1935. Churchill began campaigning on 26 May, just eighteen days after Britain celebrated VE Day. His first speech characterized the moment, opening with words of celebration and pivoting to a hard turn to the reality at hand: "The great victory in Europe has been won. Enormous problems lie before us." This photograph was taken on 3 July at the end of a two day election tour of the London area during which Churchill was met with both adoring crowds and detractors. In his speech before, some among the crowd "were rowdy and there was some stone-throwing". (Gilbert & Arnn, Documents Vol XXI, p 1810) Though Churchill had led the nation to victory, the Conservative party’s ability to achieve postwar reconstruction was viewed with growing skepticism. On 3 July Churchill delivered his final campaign speech before a crowd of over 20,000 at a stadium in Walthamstow at which a vehemently hostile faction was present. His 28-minute speech was interrupted throughout by catcalls and booing, as well as by cheers and applause. The environment was stormy enough that Churchill remarked upon the crowd’s participation many times throughout his speech. At the end of his speech he directly called out the opposition, "Where I think the booing party are making such a mistake is dragging all this stuff across the practical tasks we have to fulfil [sic] They are going to be defeated at this election in a most decisive manner. Their exhibition here shows very clearly the sort of ideas they have of free speech." (Complete Speeches, Vol VII, p 7203) The opposite of the outcome predicted by Churchill would shortly come to pass. Churchill had warred with his own Conservative Party throughout the 1930s. Now, despite his personal popularity, his Conservative Party would cost him the premiership. On 26 July 1945, despite having done so much to win the war, Churchill faced frustration of his postwar plans when his wartime government fell to Labour’s landslide General Election victory over the Conservatives. He would be relegated to Leader of the Opposition for more than six years until the October 1951 General Election, when Churchill’s Conservatives outpaced Labour, returning Churchill to 10 Downing Street for his second and final premiership. This press photo once belonged to a working newspaper archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.
Great Contemporaries

Great Contemporaries

Winston S. Churchill This is the British first revised and expanded edition, first printing. This edition, published in 1938 soon after the first edition of 1937, added four new essays (Fisher, Parnell, Baden-Powell, and - of great interest - Roosevelt). As is the case with the first edition, first printing, the binding proved quite prone to sunning and dulling. This British first revised edition, first printing, is a very good copy. The blue cloth binding is clean, square, and tight with minimal wear substantially confined to extremities. While there is a faint strip of toning at the upper rear cover, the spine shows only a hint of dulling, with no discernible color shift between the covers and spine. The contents are crisp and bright with no previous ownership marks and no spotting. Differential toning to the endpapers corresponding to dust jacket flaps confirms that this copy was long jacketed, which explains the unusually good condition of the binding. Great Contemporaries is Churchill's much-praised collection of insightful essays about leading personalities of the day - including the likes of Lawrence, Shaw, and, most famously, Hitler. Churchill's piece about Hitler can be a shock to the modern ear, as it underscores his ability to write a balanced appraisal of his subject while expressing his earnest desire to avoid the war that he would fight with such ferocious resolve only a few years later. Neville Chamberlain, perhaps Churchill’s most vexing political opponent at the time, wrote to Churchill on 4 October 1937 to say: "How you can go on throwing off these sparkling sketches with such apparent ease & such sustained brilliance is a constant source of wonder to me. But the result is to give great pleasure and entertainment " There is a reason this book is still in print today. It was written with what has been called "penetrating evaluation, humor, and understanding." Churchill's balanced and nuanced perspectives favorably contrast with many of today's more polemic writers. In the course of sketching the character of his contemporaries Churchill necessarily reveals much of his own character and perspective. Churchill's portrait of T.E. Lawrence, published here just a few years before the Second World War, might well have been written about the author rather than by him: "The impression of the personality of Lawrence remains living and vivid upon the minds of his friends, and the sense of his loss is in no way dimmed among his countrymen. All feel the poorer that he has gone from us. In these days dangers and difficulties gather upon Britain and her Empire, and we are also conscious of a lack of outstanding figures with which to overcome them. Here was a man in whom there existed not only an immense capacity for service, but that touch of genius which everyone recognizes and no one can define." (Great Contemporaries, p.164) While some of the subjects of Churchill's sketches have receded into history, many remain well-known and all remain compellingly drawn. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A105.3.a, Woods/ICS A43(b.1), Langworth p.182. First revised and expanded edition, first printing.
While England Slept

While England Slept

Winston S. Churchill This is the precursor to Churchill's great war speeches, the U.S. first edition, first printing in the first printing dust jacket. The U.S. first edition is a handsome book, a substantial 9.5 x 6.375 inches (25.13 x 16.19 cm) bound in blue cloth with red banners on the front cover and spine lettered in silver and red topstain. This is a sound copy in good plus condition in a poor, albeit first printing, dust jacket. The blue cloth binding remains square and firmly attached to the text block, though with moderate overall scuffing and shelf wear to extremities. The contents are clean with no previous ownership marks and no spotting, though moderately age-toned and with the red stained top edge dulled. Differential toning of the endpapers corresponding to the dust jacket flaps attests that this copy has spent life jacketed. Of the first printing dust jacket, the best thing we can say is that it remains present and relatively bright. The jacket is price clipped and quite considerably worn, torn, and scuffed, with significant losses to the spine ends and upper front face. The dust jacket is now protected beneath a removable, archival quality clear cover. While England Slept contains text from 41 Churchill speeches criticizing British foreign policy, spanning 25 October 1928 to 24 March 1938. This collection has been called " the permanent record of one man’s unceasing struggle in the face of resentment, apathy, and complacency". The speeches were compiled by Churchill's son, Randolph, who contributed a preface and is credited with compilation. Randolph would do the same for his father's first volume of war speeches, Into Battle, published in an almost unrecognizable world less than three years later. At the time, on the eve of the Second World War, the British edition was given the politically palatable title Arms and the Covenant (and more esoterically referencing the Covenant of the League of Nations). The U.S. title – While England Slept - is a bit more blunt. The world remembers the resolute war leader to whom the British entrusted their fate, but it is easy to forget the years leading up to the war, which Churchill spent persistent, eloquent, and largely unheeded. Churchill bibliographer Frederick Woods called this edition "probably the most crucial volume of speeches that he ever published". As testimony to the book's importance, a copy of While England Slept lay on "President Roosevelt's bedside table, with key passages, including an analysis of the president's peace initiative, underscored." (William Manchester, The Last Lion, Volume II, p.305) Bibliographic reference: Cohen A107.2.a, Woods/ICS A44(b.1). Langworth p.193.
The Story of the Malakand Field Force: An Episode of Frontier War

The Story of the Malakand Field Force: An Episode of Frontier War

Winston S. Churchill This is the first edition, only printing, first state of Churchill's first book, based on his exploits with Sir Bindon Blood's expedition on the Northwest Frontier of India in 1897. First state is confirmed by the lack of an errata slip and a publisher’s catalogue dated "12/97". Condition approaches very good and would merit near-fine if not for a comparatively minor flaw. Of particular note are both an unusually bright binding and unusually clean contents. The publisher’s green cloth binding remains square, firm, clean, and vividly hued. Shelf presentation is superior, with no discernible color shift between the spine and covers, and bright gilt. We note only small bumps to the lower corners and light shelf wear to extremities. The binding is protected with a removable, clear mylar cover. The contents are equally and notably clean for the edition, with no spotting. Even the page edges are surprisingly clean, showing only mild age-toning. The original black endpapers are present and all maps are intact, including the folding maps at pages 1 and 146, as is the frontispiece and tissue guard. What prevents our grading this copy as better than very good is that the front free endpaper and half-title leaves are nearly loose, hanging on by a proverbial thread. This does not reflect or correspond to any loss of binding integrity. Owing to this minor flaw, we significantly reduce the price that this copy’s clean binding and contents would otherwise command. The sole previous ownership mark is the illustrated bookplate of a "C. Mossman McLean" affixed to the front pastedown. When this book was written and published, Churchill was a young cavalry officer still serving in India. While he had successfully applied his pen as a war correspondent - indeed the book is based on his dispatches to the Daily Telegraph and the Pioneer Mail - this was his first book-length work. The young Churchill was motivated by a combination of pique and ambition. He was vexed that his Daily Telegraph columns were to be published unsigned. On 25 October 1897 Churchill wrote to his mother: ".I had written them with the design. of bringing my personality before the electorate." Two weeks later, his resolve to write a book firming, Churchill again wrote to his mother: ".It is a great undertaking but if carried out will yield substantial results in every way, financially, politically, and even, though do I care a damn, militarily." Having invested his ambition in this first book, he clearly labored over it: "I have discovered a great power of application which I did not think I possessed. For two months I have worked not less than five hours a day." The finished manuscript was sent to his mother on the last day of 1897 and published on 14 March of 1898. Publication was arranged by Churchill's uncle while the author was still in India, resulting in numerous spelling and detail errors. Churchill was incensed by the errors and acted with haste to address them. Hence later states of the first edition bear errata slips. Home Issue copies also bear a 32-page Longmans, Green catalogue bound in at the back, which is dated either "12/97" or "3/98" at the foot of page 32. With only a little more than 1,900 copies bound, this first edition of Churchill's first book is both desirable and elusive in collectible condition. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A1.1.a, Woods/ICS A1(aa), Langworth p.12
An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill giving a campaign speech using an improvised microphone stand during an election tour on 2 July 1945

An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill giving a campaign speech using an improvised microphone stand during an election tour on 2 July 1945, 24 days before his Conservatives lost the General Election to Labour and Churchill relinquished his wartime premiership

This original press photograph captures Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill standing before an improvised microphone stand on 2 July 1945 while campaigning for the General Election, which his Conservatives would lose to Labour, ousting Churchill from his wartime premiership on 26 July 1945. The image, measuring 8 x 6 in (20.3 x 15.2 cm), is a gelatin silver print on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scratches with some light edge wear, cockling along the right edge, and some intermittent spotting, including at Churchill’s lips, that appears to be original to the photo’s developing out. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Keystone Press Agency Ltd.", a received stamp dated 3 JUL 1945, and a typed caption dated "2.7.45." and reading "CHURCHILL IN A HAPPY MOOD, ON HIS LEFT IS CAPTN. SIR W.W. WAKEFIELD CONSERVATIVE CANDIDATE FOR MARYLEBONE, FORMER RUGBY PLAYER." The typed caption terminates with a Keystone number of "492560". The General Election of July 1945 was Britain’s first since 1935. Churchill began campaigning on 26 May, just eighteen days after Britain celebrated VE Day. This photograph was taken on 2 July, as Churchill embarked on a tour of London. Despite the verso caption’s reference to the "enthusiastic crowds" there were apparently a number of vocal opponents during this tour where "the crowds were rowdy and there was some stone-throwing". (Gilbert & Arnn, Documents Vol XXI, p 1810) Though Churchill had led the nation to victory, the Conservative Party’s ability to lead a postwar recovery was viewed with growing skepticism. The following day Churchill delivered his final campaign address before a crowd of over 20,000 at a stadium in Walthamstow at which a vehemently hostile faction was present. His 28-minute speech was interrupted throughout by catcalls and booing, as well as by cheers and applause. The environment was stormy enough that Churchill remarked upon the crowd’s participation many times throughout his speech. At the end of his speech he directly called out the opposition, "Where I think the booing party are making such a mistake is dragging all this stuff across the practical tasks we have to fulfil [sic] They are going to be defeated at this election in a most decisive manner. Their exhibition here shows very clearly the sort of ideas they have of free speech." (Collected Speeches, Vol VII, p 7203) The opposite outcome would shortly come to pass. Churchill had warred with his own Conservative Party throughout the 1930s. Now, despite his personal popularity, his Conservative Party would cost him the premiership. On 26 July 1945, despite having done so much to win the war, Churchill faced frustration of his postwar plans when his wartime government fell to Labour’s landslide General Election victory over the Conservatives. He would be relegated to Leader of the Opposition for more than six years until the October 1951 General Election, when Churchill’s Conservatives outpaced Labour, returning Churchill to 10 Downing Street for his second and final premiership. This press photo once belonged to a working newspaper archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives of physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.
An original wartime press photograph of First Lord of the Admiralty Winston S. Churchill touring the RAF Headquarters in France on 7 January 1940

An original wartime press photograph of First Lord of the Admiralty Winston S. Churchill touring the RAF Headquarters in France on 7 January 1940, less than half a year before Churchill’s ascension to the premiership, the Dunkirk evacuation, and the fall of France

This original press photo captures First Lord of the Admiralty Winston S. Churchill touring the Royal Air Force Headquarters in France on 7 January 1940, less than half a year before his ascension to wartime premier, the evacuation of Dunkirk, and the fall of France. The image, measuring 9.5 x 7.5 in (24.1 x 17 cm), is a gelatin silver print on heavy matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scuffing and scratches, its chief flawing being a .75 in closed tear perpendicular to the right edge. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Fox Photos", a stamp of the Evening Standard dated 11 JAN 1940, and a typed caption indicating that this is an official RAF photograph with copyright held by the Crown. The caption is titled "The Royal Air Force in France" and reads "Photo taken during the visit to France of the Rt. Hon. Mr. Winston Churchill, the First Lord of the Admiralty." It is worth noting that the original caption’s date of "Jan. 10th. 1940" for Churchill’s "tour of Headquarters" is incorrect. On 4 January 1940 First Lord of the Admiralty Winston S. Churchill embarked on a four-day visit of France, a nation on the brink of invasion. Just twelve months prior Churchill had been in political exile, an elder statesman of 64 whose warnings against the growing Nazi threat had gone substantially unheeded. But in September 1939, at the outbreak of the Second World War, Churchill was called back to the Admiralty, filling the same position he held in the previous war. On this trip Churchill visited the Maginot Line, the headquarters of General Gort (head of the British Expeditionary Force), and a number of RAF squadrons stationed in France, where this photograph captures him on 7 January. Following Churchill’s return to England on 8 January, a press statement was released. Churchill encouraged the public that he "visited a British Brigade which is in direct contact with the enemy and found them in splendid spirits Anyone at home who feels a bit gloomy or fretful about the war would benefit very much by spending a few days with the French and British Armies. They would find it at once a tonic and a sedative." (Gilbert, Documents Vol XIV, 617) Five months later Churchill became wartime Prime Minister, and shortly after swift Nazi subjugation of France required the dramatic rescue of Allied forces trapped in northern France. An incredible mobilization of British civilians helped effect a near-miraculous evacuation of 224,000 British and 111,000 French soldiers. In recognition of this effort Churchill gave one of his most defining – and defiant – wartime speeches. In his 4 June 1940 speech he set the tone that would carry his nation through long years of war still ahead: "We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender " This press photo once belonged to the working archive of the Evening Standard. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.
An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill

An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill, accompanied by his wife, Clementine, in his Woodford constituency on 26 May 1945 giving his first speech of the 1945 General Election that would end his wartime premiership two months later on 26 July 1945

This original press photograph captures Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill accompanied by his wife, Clementine, in his Woodford constituency on 26 May 1945 giving his first speech of the 1945 General Election that would end his wartime premiership two months later on 26 July 1945. This is a gelatin silver print on glossy photo paper and is notably large, measuring 9.5 x 12 in (24.1 x 30.5 cm). Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp and clean with some wear along the edges, bruising to the corners, and light scuffing visible only under raking light. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Pictorial Press Ltd.", a stamp of the "International Magazine Service", and some handwritten notations. The General Election of July 1945 was Britain’s first since 1935. Churchill started campaigning with a 26 May visit to his Woodford constituency, where this photograph was taken. Britain had celebrated VE day just eighteen days earlier. Despite the rain, great crowds showed up to express their admiration and get a glimpse of the man who led them to victory. The experience was an emotional one for Churchill; newspapers reported that the Premier shed a tear as he was greeted by the crowds. "It was not ‘the Prime Minister, the Right Hon Winston Churchill’ visiting his division, but ‘Our member, Mr. Churchill.’ Sometimes it was even ‘Dear old Winnie.’" (Chelmsford Chronicle, 1 June 1945) Churchill gave a stirring speech from the back of an open car, in which he and Clementine are here pictured. Churchill’s opening words of celebration turned sharply to the reality at hand, "The great victory in Europe has been won. Enormous problems lie before us." Churchill had warred with his own Conservative Party throughout the 1930s. Now, despite his personal popularity and a resounding personal victory in his Woodford constituency, his Conservative Party would cost him the premiership. On 26 July 1945, despite having done so much to win the war, Churchill faced frustration of his postwar plans when his wartime government fell to Labour’s landslide General Election victory over the Conservatives. He would be relegated to Leader of the Opposition for more than six years until the October 1951 General Election, when Churchill’s Conservatives outpaced Labour, returning Churchill to 10 Downing Street for his second and final premiership. This press photo once belonged to a working newspaper archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives of physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.
The Battle of Britain The Actual Story of the R.A.F. in the First Great Air Battle in History

The Battle of Britain The Actual Story of the R.A.F. in the First Great Air Battle in History

The British Air Ministry This is the first American edition of a wartime publication of the official British Air Ministry’s record of the Battle of Britain. As printed on the rear cover: "This is an official report of the British Air Ministry to the British people - now released to the world through the British Ministry of Information. This is the only authorized American edition. no royalty is being paid and the entire net profits of the publishers are being donated to the R.A.F. Benevolent Fund." Although copies are not particularly scarce, this is an unusually clean, bright, and well-preserved example. Condition approaches near fine. The vivid red covers are clean, complete, and unfaded, with an uncreased spine and only light wear to extremities. Prominently featured in a white banner printed blue on the lower front cover are Churchill’s words that encapsulated and immortalized the struggle: "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few." The contents are likewise surprisingly clean, with no spotting and light soiling confined to the endpapers. The sole previous ownership marks are the blue ink stamp of the "Mercantile Library, New York." on a blank lower portion of the title page, at the blank upper portion of p.1, and again at the blank lower margin following the text. "FIRST AMERICAN EDITION" is so stated on the title page. Midsummer of 1940, just months after Winston Churchill became wartime Prime Minister, found Britain fighting for survival, fending off a prolonged onslaught by the German Luftwaffe meant to be the prelude to Nazi invasion. From 10 July to 31 October 1940 RAF pilots fought off the Luftwaffe onslaught, thereby almost single-handedly securing England.
An original press photograph of Winston S. Churchill dressed for a fox hunt with the Old Surrey and Burstow Hunt at Chartwell Farm

An original press photograph of Winston S. Churchill dressed for a fox hunt with the Old Surrey and Burstow Hunt at Chartwell Farm, the home of his daughter and son-in-law, on 27 November 1948

This original press photo captures Winston S. Churchill dressed in his fox hunt kit on 27 November 1948. The image, measuring 10.25 x 8 in (26 x 20.3 cm), is a gelatin silver print on glossy photo paper. Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp and clean with only light edge wear confined to the margins and minor scuffing visible only under raking light. This is a crisp, high contrast image. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "The ‘Topical’ Press Agency" and a typed caption reading "A birthday picture of Mr. Winston Churchill, Britain’s war-time Premier, who is 74 to-morrow. This picture was taken on Saturday, when he rode with the Old Surrey and Burstow Hunt, which met at Chartwell Farm, Sevenoaks, Kent, the home of his son-in-law, Captain Soames." In addition to his numerous accomplishments, interests, and obsessions Churchill maintained a lifelong love of horses. At Sandhurst, training for the cavalry, Churchill graduated second in the arduous riding competition. At Omdurman he participated in "the last significant cavalry charge in British history". He was a talented polo player who did not play his last game until age 52. And as soon as his finances allowed in the last decades of his life, Churchill kept a stable of racehorses and found some success as an owner and breeder. On 27 November 1948, three days before his 74th birthday, Churchill joined the Old Surrey and Burstow Hunt, a foxhunting pack dating back to the 19th century, on their first ever hunt embarking from Chartwell. Though Churchill had given up riding years before, he hired a horse from a nearby stable and joined with enthusiasm. The hunt met in the morning and set off following the hounds until lunchtime. Newspapers reported that "scent was picked up, but was poor owing to the sun, and was lost." Of her septuagenarian father’s feat Mary Soames later wrote, "It really was quite an achievement, but we were all deeply relieved when, having made his point, Winston did not make a habit of riding again." (Soames, Churchill Family Album, p. 370) This experience may have helped rekindle Churchill’s love of horses; in 1949 he purchased the first of an eventual 38 racehorses. His post-war years of relative leisure came to an end with the October 1951 General Election, when Churchill’s Conservatives outpolled Labour, returning Churchill to 10 Downing Street for his second and final premiership. This press photo originated from The ‘Topical’ Press Agency. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives of physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.
The Second World War

The Second World War, Chartwell Edition

Winston S. Churchill This is a superior set of the first illustrated edition of The Second World War, beautifully preserved in the publisher s original glassine dust wrappers. The first illustrated "Chartwell" edition of The Second World War was published soon after the British first edition and is aesthetically superior in every respect. It is also the final text, "in which all those first minor errors are corrected", according to the author. This particular edition is not only collectible, but also stands the test of time as among the most aesthetically pleasing and the most pleasant to actually read, The standard binding for this issue was a bright red embossed calico-grain cloth stamped in gilt with brown leather spine labels and another rectangular brown leather label on the front cover bearing a blind-stamped profile of Churchill. The books have an agreeable weight and size, measuring roughly 9.75 x 6.75 inches. The boards are stout and the spines have extensively gilt and blind ruled panels. The endpapers are dark red and the top edges of the pages are stained red. The text is entirely reset from the first edition and features hundreds of illustrations. Each volume also contains a color frontispiece and three-color maps. The very attractiveness of the sets invited handling, and the course red cloth is often scuffed, faded, and soiled, with the leather labels chipped. This set suffers none of those defects, and is a time capsule, preserved beneath the original glassine dust wrappers. Condition is better than near fine. The original glassine has done its job, suffering in lieu of the books it protected beneath. In brief, the glassine is variously worn and torn with losses, particularly on Volume I, and some staining to the spines. All six bindings beneath the glassine are vividly bright and unusually clean with no appreciable wear. We note only a tiny dark mark to the lower Volume III spine and a touch of mottling to the edges of a few boards. The contents are crisp and bright with perfect, unfaded topstain. We find no previous ownership marks. The only appreciable sign of age is a hint of spotting that appears confined to a few fore and bottom edges. We seldom encounter sets thus. The Second World War is Churchill's history of the epic 20th Century struggle that was so indelibly stamped by his leadership. Seldom, if ever, has history endowed a statesman with both singular ability to make history, and singular ability to write it. As with so much of what Churchill wrote, The Second World War is not "history" in the strictly academic, objectivist sense, but rather Churchill's perspective on history. In his March 1948 introduction to the first volume, Churchill himself made the disclaimer, "I do not describe it as history. it is a contribution to history." Nonetheless the compelling fact remains, as stated by Churchill himself, "I am perhaps the only man who has passed through both the two supreme cataclysms of recorded history in high Cabinet office. I was for more than five years in this second struggle with Germany the Head of His Majesty's government. I write, therefore, from a different standpoint and with more authority than was possible in my earlier books." Certainly The Second World War may be regarded as an intensely personal and inherently biased history. Nonetheless, Churchill's work remains essential, iconic, and a compelling part of the historical record. It has been called "indispensable reading for anyone who seeks a true understanding of the war that made us what we are today." Please anticipate that this large, heavy set may require additional shipping charges. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A240.7.b, Woods/ICS A123(d) Langworth p.269.
The World Crisis (first abridged and revised edition)

The World Crisis (first abridged and revised edition)

Winston S. Churchill This is the first abridged and revised edition of Churchill's monumental and acclaimed history of the First World War. This important edition covering the war years 1911-1918 is not just an abridgement. It incorporates revisions by Churchill with new material, including a whole new chapter on the Battle of the Marne, as well as a new introduction. Moreover, the U.S. edition preceded the British, making it the true first edition. This copy approaches very good minus condition. The blue cloth binding remains square, tight, and clean with bright spine gilt. We note modest wear and bumps to extremities and mild concavity to the upper spine. The contents show mild age-toning. Dust soiling and spotting appear confined to the top edge of the text block. Previous ownership marks include a tiny ink-stamped personal library number, name, and Philadelphia address at the lower front pastedown and same ink-stamp on the lower rear pastedown, as well as a red ink-stamped "D" and "446" on the lower rear pastedown. Churchill's history of the First World War - which he titled The World Crisis - was originally published in six volumes between 1923 and 1931. This first abridged and revised edition was published in the same year as publication of the sixth and final unabridged volume. Churchill was in a special position to write the history of the First World War, which nearly cost him both his political career and his corporeal life. First Lord of the Admiralty from 1911 until 1915, after the Dardanelles disaster, Churchill was scapegoated and forced to resign. He spent political exile as a lieutenant colonel of a battalion in the trenches. Before war's end, Churchill was exonerated and rejoined the Government, foreshadowing the political isolation and restoration he would experience nearly two decades later leading up to the Second World War. Despite Churchill's political recovery, the stigma of the Dardanelles would linger. Hence Churchill had more than just literary and financial compulsion to write his history. This first abridged and revised edition was published at the beginning of the 1930s – the decade called Churchill’s "Wilderness Years", which he spent out of power and out of favor, warning about the dangers of a rising Nazi Germany often at odds with both his party leadership and prevailing public sentiment. By September 1939, at the outbreak of the Second World War, he had rejoined the Cabinet. By May 1940 he was Prime Minister. This first abridged and revised edition of The World Crisis clearly remained current during Churchill’s ascendance – second and third printings (in substantially different bindings) occurred in 1942 and 1949. Please anticipate that this large, heavy book may require additional postage. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A69.5.a, Woods/ICS A31(ba.1), Langworth p.115.
An original press photograph of Winston S. Churchill and his wife

An original press photograph of Winston S. Churchill and his wife, Clementine, arriving at Ascot on 15 June 1950 where Churchill’s horse, Colonist II, was running in the Ascot Gold Cup

This original press photograph captures Winston S. Churchill and his wife, Clementine, arriving at Ascot on 15 June 1950 to watch Churchill’s horse, Colonist II, race in the Ascot Gold Cup. The image, measuring 10 x 8 in (25.4 x 20.3 cm), is a gelatin silver print on matte photo paper. Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scratches, its sole flaw being a .5 in square missing from the photo’s surface at the top edge. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Fox Photos" and a typed caption reading "Mr and Mrs Winston Churchill whose car was involved (though not seriously) in an accident en route to the course, today attended the Ascot race meeting to watch Mr Churchill’s Colonist II run in the Gold Cup. PHOTO SHOWS: - In Ascot topper instead of the proverbial bowler WINSTON CHURCHILL arrives at the course to the cheers of the bystanders. Mrs. Churchill accompanies him." The Fox Photos caption is dated "June 15th 1950". Owning racehorses was a later life manifestation of Churchill’s lifelong love of horses. At Sandhurst, training for the cavalry, Churchill graduated second in the arduous riding competition. At Omdurman he participated in "the last significant cavalry charge in British history". He was a talented polo player who did not play his last game until age 52. And as soon as his finances allowed in the last decades of his life, Churchill kept a stable of racehorses and found some success as an owner and breeder. In 1949 the septuagenarian Churchill purchased Colonist II, a three-year-old French race horse. Colonist became something of a sensation, winning eight of his nine races in 1950, including one in which King George VI’s horse was running. Churchill’s new hobby was not met with approval by all. Clementine wrote to a friend "I do think this is a queer new facet in Winston’s variegated life. Before he bought the horse (I can’t think why) he had hardly been on a racecourse in his life. I must say I don’t find it madly amusing." (letter of 28 May 1951) When Colonist’s trainer suggested that Colonist be put up to stud Churchill allegedly retorted, "To stud? And have it said that the Prime Minister of Great Britain is living on the immoral earnings of a horse?" (quoted in Kay Halle, The Irrepressible Churchill, p. 241) Churchill continued to own horses throughout the remainder of his life, 38 in total, but none quite matched the success of his first. This press photo originated from Fox Photos Ltd. of London. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives of physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.
The Great War

The Great War, a full set of all 26 magazine parts as originally issued, housed in two, purpose-built solander boxes

Winston S. Churchill This is a magnificently well-preserved full set of the first illustrated edition of Winston Churchill's history of the First World War. This first illustrated edition was published under the title "The Great War" and originally issued by the publisher in 26 individual magazine-style parts during 1933 and 1934. "Magazine format" does not do justice to the publication, which is profusely illustrated on very durable, heavy paper. The publisher later offered various binding options. Consequently, it has become challenging to find complete unbound sets of all 26 parts in respectable condition. This is the best set we have offered, each of the original magazines remarkably clean and bright given their age and inherent fragility, with only trivial wear to extremities. The fragile wraps bindings of all 26 issues are sound, complete and firmly attached with no tears or appreciable losses noted. All the printed spine text remains crisp and distinctly legible (The spine of volume 1 was published blank, as per Cohen). Fittingly given the condition, this set is housed in two, purpose-built solander boxes. Then boxes are executed in navy buckram with the Marlborough coat of arms in gilt on the front covers, gilt rules, print, and decoration on the spines, and marbled paper-lined interiors. The shelf presence of this set is impressive, six inches wide and eleven inches tall on the shelf, weighing nearly fifteen pounds. Churchill was in a special position to write the history of the First World War, which nearly cost him both his political career and his corporeal life. First Lord of the Admiralty from 1911 until 1915, after the Dardanelles disaster, Churchill was scapegoated and forced to resign. He spent political exile as a lieutenant colonel of a battalion in the trenches. Before war's end, Churchill was exonerated and rejoined the Government, foreshadowing the political isolation and restoration he would experience nearly two decades later leading up to the Second World War. Despite Churchill's political recovery, the stigma of the Dardanelles would linger. Hence Churchill had more than just literary and financial compulsion to write his history. Churchill titled his history The World Crisis, which was originally published in six volumes between 1923 and 1931. Frederick Woods wrote: "The volumes contain some of Churchill's finest writing, weaving the many threads together with majestic ease, describing the massive battles in terms which fitly combine relish of the literary challenge with an awareness of the sombre tragedy of the events. Churchill signed his contract for the first illustrated edition on 18 April 1933. The original plan was for 24 parts (which evolved to 26), the manuscript to contain about 650,000 words "consisting of such part [of the six volumes] as the Author shall determine". The publishers agree to provide the illustrations, other than the maps and diagrams, their choice being subject to Churchill’s approval. It was the publisher who proposed the title "The Great War". Please note that this large, heavy set may require additional postage. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A69.9.a, Woods/ICS A31(da), Langworth p.118
The Great War

The Great War, a full set of all 26 magazine parts as originally issued, housed in two imposing quarter morocco solander cases made by Asprey

Winston S. Churchill This is a superior, very well-preserved, and handsomely presented full set of the first illustrated edition of Winston Churchill's history of the First World War. This first illustrated edition was published under the title "The Great War" and originally issued by the publisher in 26 individual magazine-style parts during 1933 and 1934. "Magazine format" does not do justice to the publication, which is profusely illustrated on very durable, heavy paper. The publisher later offered various binding options. Consequently, it has become challenging to find complete unbound sets of all 26 parts in respectable condition. This set is unusual thus, very good plus, each of the original magazines notably clean and bright given their age and inherent fragility, with only modest wear to extremities. The fragile wraps bindings of all 26 issues are sound, complete and firmly attached with no tears or appreciable losses noted. All the printed spine text remains crisp and distinctly legible (the spine of volume 1 was published blank, as per Cohen). Each of the 26 magazines is fitted with a clear, removable mylar cover. Additionally, lending both preservation and shelf presence, this set is housed in two, purpose-built solander boxes built by Asprey of London. The boxes feature quarter navy morocco spines over blue cloth. The spines are rounded and feature raised and gilt-decorated spine bands separating gilt-ruled and decorated compartments. Vertical gilt rules mark the transitions between morocco and cloth and the cases are lined in navy felt, each stamped within with the "Asprey" name in gilt. The shelf presence of this set is magnificent, seven and a half inches wide and eleven inches tall on the shelf, weighing nearly seventeen and a half pounds. Churchill was in a special position to write the history of the First World War, which nearly cost him both his political career and his corporeal life. First Lord of the Admiralty from 1911 until 1915, after the Dardanelles disaster, Churchill was scapegoated and forced to resign. He spent political exile as a lieutenant colonel of a battalion in the trenches. Before war's end, Churchill was exonerated and rejoined the Government, foreshadowing the political isolation and restoration he would experience nearly two decades later leading up to the Second World War. Despite Churchill's political recovery, the stigma of the Dardanelles would linger. Hence Churchill had more than just literary and financial compulsion to write his history. Churchill titled his history The World Crisis, which was originally published in six volumes between 1923 and 1931. Frederick Woods wrote: "The volumes contain some of Churchill's finest writing, weaving the many threads together with majestic ease, describing the massive battles in terms which fitly combine relish of the literary challenge with an awareness of the sombre tragedy of the events. Churchill signed his contract for the first illustrated edition on 18 April 1933. The original plan was for 24 parts (which evolved to 26), the manuscript to contain about 650,000 words "consisting of such part [of the six volumes] as the Author shall determine". The publishers agree to provide the illustrations, other than the maps and diagrams, their choice being subject to Churchill’s approval. It was the publisher who proposed the title "The Great War". Please note that this large, heavy set may require additional postage. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A69.9.a, Woods/ICS A31(da), Langworth p.118
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill on 29 September 1960 being helped to disembark from the aircraft in which he arrived in Nice for a holiday

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill on 29 September 1960 being helped to disembark from the aircraft in which he arrived in Nice for a holiday

This original press photo shows Sir Winston S. Churchill arriving in Nice for holiday on 29 September 1960, his frailty evident as he is helped in disembarking from the aircraft. This image measures 10 x 8.125 in (25.4 20.6 cm) on glossy photo paper. Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp and clean with only some minor edge wear, creases to the lower left and upper right corners, and light scuffing visible only under raking light. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Keystone Press Agency Ltd." along with an additional stamp indicating that this is a foreign picture, a received stamp of The Daily Telegraph from September 1960, and a slightly wrinkled typed caption. The original caption is dated "30-9-60", titled "SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL ARRIVES ON FRENCH RIVIERA" and reads "KEYSTONE PHOTO SHOWS: - SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL is helped from the aircraft – on arrival in NICE yesterday on way to his holiday as guest of millionaire Onassis at Monte Carlo." On 28 September 1960 Churchill, along with Clementine and his private secretary, Montague Browne, left for holiday at the Hotel de Paris in Monte Carlo, owned by Churchill’s friend, shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. There his spirits were revived with days spent painting. On 22 October he called on President de Gaulle in Nice where the two spent half an hour discussing world politics. As the image testifies, Churchill was clearly in decline. "Churchill’s family and closest friends watched his decline with infinite sadness. At times it was almost unbearable to see so great a life in such a reduced and ever dwindling span." (Gilbert, VIII, p.1313) This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. This original press photograph was taken in the twilight of Churchill’s remarkable life and career.Winston S. Churchill was 80 years old when he resigned his second and final premiership on 5 April 1955. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served.Just few weeks after returning to England from this holiday, , Churchill would visit his alma mater, Harrow School, giving what would prove to be his last speech in public. (Gilbert, VIII, p.1316) The day after Churchill died, on25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul."Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral.
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill reading a letter on 25 February 1961 as he is driven back to his Hyde Park Gate home from the airport following a holiday on the Riviera

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill reading a letter on 25 February 1961 as he is driven back to his Hyde Park Gate home from the airport following a holiday on the Riviera

This is an original press photograph of Winston S. Churchill reading a letter on 25 February 1961 as he is driven back to his Hyde Park Gate home from the airport following a holiday on the Riviera. This image measures 8x10 in (20.3 x 25.4 cm) on glossy photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scuffing with only some very slight bruising to the corners. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "P.A. Reuter Photos Ltd.", a received stamp of The Daily Telegraph from February 1961, and a typed caption. The original caption is titled "SIR WINSTON’S HOME – AND ‘IN HARNESS’". The caption reads: "The holiday’s over, and 86-year-old SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL gets down to reading letters in the car as he leaves London Airport to-night (Saturday) on the way to his London home at Hyde Park Gate. He had just flown back from the Riviera by BEA liner. He was away for a fortnight. February 25th 1961." Churchill’s official biography records that he left his Hyde Park Gate home in London for Monte Carlo on 11 February. This original press photograph was taken in the twilight of Churchill’s remarkable life. Almost six years earlier, on 5 April 1955, Churchill had resigned his second and final premiership at the age of 80. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. It is interesting to note that on 7 February 1961, just a few weeks before this photograph was taken, "Churchill received an unexpected telegram. It was from the Queen and Prince Philip, then on tour in Pakistan. ‘We both send you our best wishes from Malakand,’ they wrote. It was here, in the remote wild countryside of the former North-West Frontier of India, that Churchill had fought in the army of the Queen’s great-great grandmother." (Gilbert, Vol. VIII, p.1319) The day after Churchill died, on25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message of an entirely different kind - a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul."Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill at Sandown Park

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill at Sandown Park

This is an original press photograph of Sir Winston S. Churchill on 13 July 1957 at Sandown Park where his horse was to run. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. The image measures 10 x 8.125 in (25.4 x 20.6 cm) on glossy photo paper. Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp and clean with some minor edge wear, a small loss to the lower right corner which is confined to the margin, and light overall scuffing visible only under raking light. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Planet News Ltd.", a received stamp of The Daily Telegraph from July 1957, and a typed caption. The original caption is titled "NO WIN FOR WINSTON." And reads: "SANDOWN PARK: Elder Statesman SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL looks thoughtful as he watches his horse "Holiday Time" being saddled for the Star Stakes at Sandown Park today. It was unplaced. 13th July, 1957". Owning racehorses was a later life manifestation of Churchill’s lifelong love of horses. At Sandhurst, training for the cavalry, Churchill graduated second in the arduous riding competition. At Omdurman he participated in "the last significant cavalry charge in British history". He was a talented polo player who did not play his last game until age 52. And as soon as his finances allowed in the last decades of his life, Churchill kept a stable of racehorses and found some success as an owner and breeder. In 1949 the septuagenarian Churchill purchased Colonist II, a three-year-old French race horse. Colonist became something of a sensation, winning eight of his nine races in 1950, including one in which King George VI’s horse was running. Churchill’s new hobby was not met with approval by all. Clementine wrote to a friend "I do think this is a queer new facet in Winston’s variegated life I must say I don’t find it madly amusing." (letter of 28 May 1951) When Colonist’s trainer suggested that Colonist be put up to stud Churchill allegedly retorted, "To stud? And have it said that the Prime Minister of Great Britain is living on the immoral earnings of a horse?" (quoted in Kay Halle, The Irrepressible Churchill, p. 241) Churchill continued to own horses throughout the remainder of his life, 36 in total, but none quite matched the success of his first. This original press photograph was taken in the twilight of Churchill’s remarkable life and career.More than two years earlier, on 5 April 1955, Churchill had resigned his second and final premiership at age 80. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. The day after Churchill died, on25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul."Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral.
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill "smoking the inevitable cigar" on 23 December 1960 as he leaves his Hyde Park Gate home to spend the holidays at Chartwell

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill "smoking the inevitable cigar" on 23 December 1960 as he leaves his Hyde Park Gate home to spend the holidays at Chartwell

This is an original press photo of Winston S. Churchill smoking a cigar outside of his Hyde Park Gate home on 23 December 1960. This image measures 11.25 x 8.5 in (28.6 x 21.6 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is clean and free of scuffing with only minor edge wear, soft corners, and original crop markings. This image features original, hand-applied retouching of Churchill’s face and clothes, and a photographer in the background has been airbrushed out. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Associated Press Ltd.", a published stamp of The Daily Telegraph from 24 December 1960, a clipping of the caption as it was printed in the newspaper, and handwritten printing notations. The published caption for his photograph reads in full "Sir Winston Churchill walking with the aid of a stick, and smoking the inevitable cigar, as he left his home in Hyde Park Gate yesterday to spend Christmas at Chartwell." Now 86, "Churchill spent Christmas 1960 and the New Year of 1961 at Chartwell." (Gilbert, VIII, p.1318). Chartwell had been the Churchills' home since 1922. "Perhaps no physical place - not Blenheim Palace where Churchill was born, the Houses of Parliament where he served for six decades, 10 Downing Street where he twice resided as Prime Minister, or St. Paul's Cathedral where his Queen and leaders from around the world mourned his death - would more deeply affect Churchill's life and legacy." (Gilbert, A Life, p.450) At Chartwell, Churchill was by turns father, husband, painter, landscaper, and bricklayer and work on improving the house and gardens continued for much of Churchill’s life. Chartwell would prove Churchill’s vital sanctuary during the "wilderness years" of the 1930s. And of course Chartwell served Churchill as "my factory" as he turned out an incredible volume of writing. Even during the darkest days of the Second World War, Chartwell was a place of refuge and renewal. After the Second World War, Churchill feared his income was insufficient to maintain Chartwell. Churchill's friend, Lord Camrose, assembled a consortium of 17 benefactors to buy Chartwell for the considerable sum of £50,000 and allowed Churchill to reside there for the rest of his life for a nominal rent of £350 a year, on his death for the property to be given to the National Trust as a permanent memorial. Churchill would not leave Chartwell for the final time until mid-October 1964. True to the intentions of Lord Camrose, Chartwell, with its more than 80 acres of woodland and farmland, remains a National Trust property, full of Churchill’s paintings and belongings, inhabited by his memory and spirit. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. Winston S. Churchill was 80 years old when he resigned his second and final premiership on 5 April 1955. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. Churchill's state funeral little more than four years after this photograph was taken was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral.
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill shaking hands with Prime Minister Anthony Eden outside 10 Downing Street on 15 February 1956

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill shaking hands with Prime Minister Anthony Eden outside 10 Downing Street on 15 February 1956

This original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill shows him smoking a cigar and shaking the hand of his successor, Prime Minister Anthony Eden, as he leaves 10 Downing Street. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. The image measures 10 x 8 in (25.4 x 20.3 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is good plus. there is some loss to the upper left corner, original crop marks, light edge wear, and intermittent bruising. This image features original, hand-applied retouching of the figures’ clothing. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "P.A.-Reuter Photos Ltd.", a published stamp of The Daily Telegraph from 16 February 1956, remnants of a typed caption, handwritten printing notes, and a clipping of the caption as it was printed. The caption, partially lost, reads: "SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL LUNCHES AT No. Anthony Eden shaking hands with Sir Winston Chur side 10, Downing Street yesterday, as Sir Winston lunching with the Prime Minister." In the image Eden is displaying a wide smile of the sort that would prove elusive during his brief and turbulent premiership, which had begun less than a year prior in April 1955. For good or ill, Anthony Eden’s (1897-1977) life became inextricably tied to that of Winston Churchill, arguably defining and empowering Eden but also delaying and diminishing him. As early as age seventeen, Eden had noted admiration for Churchill in his diary. The appreciation proved mutual. In 1938, Eden famously resigned from his Foreign Secretary post over then-Prime Minister Chamberlain’s appeasement policies. Of the man and the moment, Churchill later wrote in The Gathering Storm: "There seemed one strong young figure standing up against long, dismal drawling tides of drift and surrender." During the Second World War, Eden became Churchill’s trusted lieutenant. "Eden was twenty-three years younger than Churchill and in many ways the son he wished he had." (Roberts, Walking with Destiny, p.624) Eden was one of the few regularly willing and able to vigorously – and often effectively - oppose Churchill from a position of unimpeachable trust. It was assumed by many, including Eden, that Eden would succeed Churchill as Conservative Party leader after the Second World War. Churchill encouraged this assumption. Beginning as early as 1941, Historian Andrew Roberts cites "the first of fifteen years of such promises to Eden, of which the kindest thing that can [be] said was that he [Churchill] meant them at the time." (WwD, pp.599-600) "Eden’s tragedy was that, for all Churchill’s faults he was a world-historical figure and a giant on the international stage Eden was none of those things " (WwD, p.897) Whatever Eden’s shortcomings, there is no doubt of his either his sacrifices or service. In the First World War, Eden lost both an older and younger brother and became the youngest brigade major in the British Army. In the Second World War, he lost his eldest son – a loss which, along with politics and the War, also cost him his first marriage. (ODNB) His second marriage (1952) was to Churchill’s niece. Eden would ultimately wait in the wings – both while the Conservatives were in opposition (1945-1951) and during Churchill’s second and final premiership (1951-1955) for nearly a decade after the end of the Second World War. And Eden’s long-awaited premiership (1955-1957) proved fraught and arguably diminished, rather than crowning, his stature and reputation. By January 1957, he had resigned the premiership he had so long sought, undone by both ill health and the Suez crisis. Nonetheless, the passage of time sees Eden "increasingly recognized as a serious and patriotic figure who worked under the most appalling pressure for nearly three decades at the front line of British and world politics." (ODNB)
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill and Lady Clementine Churchill on 10 February 1960

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill and Lady Clementine Churchill on 10 February 1960, just returned from Monte Carlo and being driven from London Airport to their Hyde Park Gate Home

This original press photo shows Sir Winston S. Churchill and Lady Clementine Churchill being driven from London Airport to their Hyde Park Gate home on 10 February 1960 after returning from holiday in Monte Carlo. This image measures 9.5 x 12 in (24.1 x 30.5 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is good. The paper is clean and free of scuffing. There is some chipping, loss, and wear along the edges and some intermittent bruising to the paper. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "The Associated Press Ltd.", a published stamp of The Daily Telegraph from 7 April 1960, handwritten printing notations, and a clipping of the caption as it was printed in the newspaper. The original caption reads: "Sir Winston and Lady Churchill returning from London Airport to their London home at Hyde Park Gate yesterday when they returned form their five-week holiday in Monte Carlo. They were accompanied on their flight in a British European Airways Comet jet airliner by Mr. Aristotle Onassis, the shipowner." On 16 January, Churchill’s private secretary, Montague Browne, wrote that "the Press in London have been very much stirred up by what they believe to be Sir Winston’s imminent death, and in consequence Monte Carlo is full of journalists." (Gilbert, Vol. VIII, p. 1308) Churchill had nearly five years yet to live and returned to London accompanied, as the verso caption notes, by Onassis. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. This original press photograph was taken in the twilight of Churchill’s remarkable life and career.Winston S. Churchill was 80 years old when he resigned his second and final premiership on 5 April 1955. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. The day after Churchill died, on25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul."Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral.
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill, wearing a trademark "siren suit" and waving from a window of his Hyde Park Gate home on his 89th birthday, 30 November 1963

This original press photo of Winston S. Churchill was taken on his 89th birthday. Churchill is standing in a window of his Hyde Park Gate home and wearing a trademark "siren suit". This image measures 10.25 x 9 in (26 x 22.8 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp with only light wear to the edges, a creased lower left corner, a crease extending 1.5 inches from the top edge, original crop markings, and light scuffing visible only under raking light. This image features original, hand-applied retouching of Churchill’s face as well as airbrushing applied to the background to enhance contrast for publication. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Central Press Photos Ltd", a purple publication stamp of the Sunday Telegraph from 1 December 1963, a typed caption, a clipping of the caption as it was printed in the newspaper, and handwritten printing notations. Martin Gilbert notes that two days before this birthday Churchill visited the House of Commons, entering in a wheel-chair. The Yorkshire Post reported that "He was greeted with a warm cheer, and [Prime Minister] Sir Alec Douglas-Home gave up his own Front Bench seat to welcome him, sitting by his side for a brief chat." (Vol. VIII, p. 1350) This press photo once belonged to the Sunday Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. This original press photograph was taken in the twilight of Churchill’s remarkable life and career.Winston S. Churchill was 80 years old when he resigned his second and final premiership on 5 April 1955. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. The day after Churchill died, on25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul."Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral.
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill being lifted out of the ambulance at Middlesex Hospital on 29 June 1962

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill being lifted out of the ambulance at Middlesex Hospital on 29 June 1962, following his fall in Monte Carlo and dramatic return to England via R.A.F. Comet jet on the orders of Prime Minister Harold Macmillan

This is an original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill raising his arm as he is being lifted out of an ambulance on 29 June 1962 outside of Middlesex Hospital, London, after his dramatic return from Monte Carlo via R.A.F. Comet. This image measures 10 x 8 in (25.4 x 20.3 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp with only some light bruising to the corners, original crop marks, and light scuffing visible only under raking light. This image features original, hand-applied retouching of Churchill’s face, hand, and sleeve. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Keystone Press Agency Ltd.", a purple published stamp of The Daily Telegraph from April 1963 hand amended to read 2 April 1963, a clipping of the caption as it was printed in the newspaper, and handwritten printing notations. On the morning of 28 June 1962 while on holiday in Monte Carlo Winston Churchill slipped off the edge of his bed and broke his hip. At Monaco Hospital he was fitted with a plaster cast "enclosing his left leg, his stomach and his lower chest." Churchill’s private secretary Montague Browne later recalled, "he sent everyone out of the room and said to me, ‘I want to die in England.’ I relayed this to No. 10. Harold Macmillan sent an RAF Comet to pick him up in Nice. The Monte Carlo doctors were furious and said that I was killing him." (Gilbert Vol VIII, p. 1335) When he arrived in London Churchill was carried from the plane, giving the V sign while flat on a stretcher. Churchill’s hip was successfully pinned, and he remained in the hospital for his recovery. Each evening his doctor joined him for cigars and brandy, and his visitors included Eisenhower and Macmillan. He left the hospital on 21 August, returning to his house on Hyde Park Gate which had been newly renovated with a lift. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. This original press photograph was taken in the twilight of Churchill’s remarkable life and career.Winston S. Churchill was 80 years old when he resigned his second and final premiership on 5 April 1955. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. The day after Churchill died, on25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul."Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral.
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill and Prime Minister Harold Macmillan at Admiralty House on 8 February 1961

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill and Prime Minister Harold Macmillan at Admiralty House on 8 February 1961

This original press photo shows Sir Winston S. Churchill at the Admiralty House following a lunch with Prime Minister Harold Macmillan. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. The image measures 10 x 8 in (25.4 x 20.3 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scuffing with only some very slight bruising to the corners. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "The Associated Press Ltd.", a received stamp of The Daily Telegraph from February 1961, and a typed caption. The caption is titled: "CHURCHILL JOINS MACMILLAN FOR LUNCH" and reads "PREMIER HAROLD MACMILLAN POSES WITH SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL AT THE FRONT DOOR OF HIS TEMPORARY HEADQUARTERS AT ADMIRALTY HOUSE IN LONDON TODAY, FEBRUARY 8, AS THE ELDER STATESMAN ARRIVED FOR LUNCH. SIR WINSTON, NOW OUT AND ABOUT AGAIN AFTER THE BACK INJURY HE SUFFERED IN NOVEMBER, LEAVES FOR A HOLIDAY IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE THIS SATURDAY." This photograph represents a powerful amalgamation of people and places from Churchill’s remarkable life and career. Admiralty House was for nearly two centuries the official residence of the First Lord of the Admiralty. Churchill had begun both the First and Second World Wars as First Lord of the Admiralty, serving from 1911-1915 and 1939-1940. During the First World War, Churchill served as First Lord until he was scapegoated and forced from the Cabinet over the Dardanelles.He spent his political exile as a lieutenant colonel leading a battalion in the trenches. Before the end of the First World War, Churchill was exonerated and rejoined the Government, foreshadowing the political isolation and restoration he would experience nearly two decades later leading up to the Second World War. Churchill spent his "Wilderness Years" of the 1930s out of power and out of favor, his warning about the dangers of a rising Nazi Germany often at odds with both his party leadership and prevailing public sentiment. But in September 1939, at the outbreak of the Second World War, Churchill was called back to the Admiralty. There – nearly a quarter century after he had been forced to resign - he began work again "in the same room, and at the same desk, where he had worked as first Lord" during the First World War.(Gilbert, Volume VI, p.4) Prime Minister Harold Macmillan (1894-1986) served both in Churchill’s wartime government and the cabinet of Churchill’s second premiership. As it did for Churchill, the outbreak of the Second World War proved his qualities and brought him into thegovernment. In his crucial role as a wartime liaison reporting directly to Churchill, "On several occasions his diplomacy saved the day" (ODNB)– often to both Churchill’s benefit and consternation. Macmillan returned to Britain to join the Cabinet as secretary of state for air just before Labour won the General Election in July 1945.When the Conservatives returned to power in 1951, Macmillan served as minister of housing and then, in quick succession, minister of defence, foreign secretary, and chancellor of the exchequer under the premierships of Churchill and Eden.When the Suez crisis and ill health forced Eden’s resignation, Macmillan became premier, remaining in office until Cabinet scandals and ill health forced his resignation in October 1963. When Churchill broke his hip in Monte Carlo on June 1962, there was concern that the injury might prove fatal and Churchill’s secretary conveyed to 10 Downing Street Churchill’s wish: I want to die in England". It was Prime Minister Macmillan who ordered an RAF Comet to ferry Churchill home. Macmillan’s grandfather had founded Macmillan publishers, who published Churchill’s 1906 biography of his father, Lord Randolph Churchill. During the Second World War Macmillan reprinted several of Churchill’s books and, after his premiership, Harold Macmillan went on to chair his family’s publishing firm.
An original press photograph of Sir Winston S. Churchill flashing his famous V sign while being driven through Istanbul by Aristotle Onassis on 10 August 1959 - a deliciously ironic and improbable convergence of history and symbols

An original press photograph of Sir Winston S. Churchill flashing his famous V sign while being driven through Istanbul by Aristotle Onassis on 10 August 1959 – a deliciously ironic and improbable convergence of history and symbols

There is a deliciously ironic, and even improbable, convergence of history and symbols in this original press photograph of Sir Winston S. Churchill being driven through Istanbul by Aristotle Onassis on 10 August 1959. This image measures 7.25 x 10 in (18.4 x 25.4 cm) on glossy photo paper. Condition is good. There is some wear along the edges, original crop markings, some cockling to the paper, creased corners, some soiling, and light scuffing visible under raking light. This image features original, hand-applied retouching to Churchill’s face and suit, and Churchill has been isolated with airbrushing. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Sport & General Press Agency", a received stamp of The Daily Telegraph from 11 August 1959, a published stamp of the Sunday Telegraph from 21 May 1995, a typed caption, handwritten printing notations, and a clipping of the closely cropped photo and caption as it was printed in the newspaper. The original caption is titled: "SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL ON THE ONASSIS YACHT "CHRISTINA" AS THE GUEST OF MR. ONASSIS, PHOTOGRAPHED DURING HIS VISIT TO ISTANBUL, TURKEY". The caption further reads: "Sir Winston Churchill, wearing a naval cap gives his famous "V" sign to the people of Istanbul as he is driven through the town by Mr. Onassis." Churchill’s official biographer records that "On the evening of August 4, Christina sailed through the Dardanelles, past the Gallipoli peninsula, to the Sea of Marmara and Istanbul after Churchill had gone to bed ‘because’, as Nonie Montague Browne later recalled, ‘they knew it would upset him’. (Gilbert, Vol. VIII, pp.1297-98) Churchill’s demeanor in this image indicates that his notional upset may have been less than anticipated. Arguably few places in the world were less appropriate for Churchill to give his famous victory sign. During the First World War, in 1915, Churchill had been forced from his Cabinet post as First Lord of the Admiralty over Britain’s humiliating failure to force the Dardanelles and the subsequent slaughter at Gallipoli. So great was his fall that Churchill went from the Cabinet to the Front, serving as a lieutenant colonel leading a battalion in the trenches. By the war's end, Churchill was officially exonerated, but the stigma of the Dardanelles lingered for decades. Years later, during the Second World War, Churchill repeatedly presumed that he would bring Turkey into the war on the side of the Allies – and failed to do so. Perhaps one factor among many was the fact that Churchill, as wartime Prime Minister, had aggressively – and ultimately disastrously – advocated British military support for Greece, Turkey’s bitter enemy. Perhaps another was the fact that Churchill would not even linguistically recognize "Istanbul". In April 1945, then-Prime Minister Churchill had told the Foreign Office: "I do not consider that names that have been familiar for generations in England should be altered to study the whims of foreigners living in those parts Constantinople should never be abandoned, though for stupid people Istanbul may be written in brackets after it " (Roberts, Walking with Destiny, p.872) In this image, Churchill seems comfortably oblivious to all of this history. Perhaps not so the archetypally Greek Aristotle Onassis, who wears a serious expression and dark sunglasses, slightly hunched and intent over the steering wheel. Churchill first met Aristotle Onassis (1906-1975), then one of the world’s richest men, at a dinner party at La Pausa in January of 1956. One month later, Churchill would board the Christina for the first time and was met with "a swarm of photographers and newsmen [who] were there to get their pictures and file their stories, touching off the legend of a remarkable friendship". (Ibid., 1180) Churchill would ultimately take eight substantial cruises aboard Christina. Churchill’s regard for Onassis was such that Onassis would become a member of Churchill’s beloved Other Club.
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill arriving on the last of his visits to Washington

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill arriving on the last of his visits to Washington, D.C. for a personal visit with President Eisenhower on 4 May 1959

This original press photo shows Sir Winston S. Churchill arriving at National Airport on 4 May 1959 for the last of his 13 trips to Washington DC. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. The image measures 10 x 8 in (25.4 x 20.3 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is clean, crisp, and free of scuffing. The lower right corner is slightly bumped, and a stain on the verso does not affect the image. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "The Associated Press Ltd.", a received stamp of The Daily Telegraph from May 1959, and a typed caption. For obvious reasons, the original typed caption is titled "HAIR-RAISING" and reads "HIS HAIR FLYING IN THE BREEZE, SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL WALKS ACROSS THE TARMAC AT NATIONAL AIRPORT, WASHINGTON, MAY 4, AFTER ARRIVING FROM NEW YORK ABOARD PRESIDENT EISENHOWER’S PERSONAL PLANE. SIR WINSTON, IN WASHINGTON ON A THREE-DAY PERSONAL AND SOCIAL VISIT, WAS MET BY THE PRESIDENT. HE IS STAYING AS GUEST AT THE WHITE HOUSE." On 4 May 1959 Churchill arrived in Washington DC on what would be the last of his 13 trips to the US Capital taken over his lifetime. Churchill had resigned his second and final premiership more than four years earlier, on 5 April 1955. Eisenhower was approaching the end of his own career; he would end his second presidential term in January 1961, succeeded by Kennedy. Churchill wrote to Clementine on 5 May "Here I am. All goes well & the President is a real friend." (Gilbert, Vol. VIII, p. 1293) On this visit to the President’s farm Churchill gifted Eisenhower with one of his paintings which the President subsequently displayed in the Oval Office. At the height of his own and Eisenhower’s supreme victories, Churchill’s wartime government fell to Labour just a little over two months later in the General Election of late July 1945. More than six years would pass with Churchill as Leader of the Opposition before Churchill’s Conservatives won the General Election of October 1951. Churchill would return to 10 Downing Street to lead a Britain increasingly marginalized and eclipsed by America and Eisenhower would be elected President of the United States just a year later, becoming Churchill’s civilian counterpart. Though their relationship was marked with frequent disagreements about strategic and national priorities, the two men had a deep mutual respect. Of this 1959 visit, Churchill’s private secretary, Montague Browne’ reported "During three days we were in the White House the President showed an affectionate care and consideration for Sir Winston and spent a great deal of time with him." (Gilbert, VIII, p.1295) The two men also visited Eisenhower’s farm at Gettysburg. While the visit was officially social, there were topics of substance - including Eisenhower’s pique with Field Marshal Montgomery, his unfavorable views "of the French in general and General de Gaulle in particular", and the President’s concerns about NATO, his perspective African colonies, and British concerns about American protectionism – and Churchill lunched with Prime Minister Macmillan at 10 Downing Street upon his return to London. When Eisenhower eulogized Churchill on 30 January 1965, he recalled: " I was privileged to meet, to talk, to plan and to work with him for common goals an abiding – and to me precious – friendship was forged; it withstood the trials and friction inescapable among men of strong convictions, living in the atmosphere of war our friendship flowered in the later and more subtle tests imposed by international politics each of us, holding high official post in his own nation, strove together so to concert the strength of our two peoples that liberty might be preserved among men and the security of the free world wholly sustained."
An original 1961 press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill smoking a cigar

An original 1961 press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill smoking a cigar

This is an original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill smoking a cigar in 1961. From the remaining fragment of the original press caption we can assume that Churchill was in a car, arriving at or departing from his Hyde Park Gate home. From the date stamp on the photo, we can assume that it was taken some time in March 1961. This image measures 10 x 8 in (26 x 20.3 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scuffing with only minor edge wear, original crop marks, and finger prints in the right margin original to the photograph’s developing out. This image features original, hand-applied retouching of Churchill’s face and hat as well as crop lines. The verso features the copyright stamp "Central Press Photos Ltd.", a received stamp of The Daily Telegraph from March 1961, remnants of a typed caption, and handwritten printing notations. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. This original press photograph was taken in the twilight of Churchill’s remarkable life and career.Winston S. Churchill was 80 years old when he resigned his second and final premiership on 5 April 1955. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. The day after Churchill died, on25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul."Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral.
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill arriving at Epsom Downs to attend the horse races on 2 June 1960

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill arriving at Epsom Downs to attend the horse races on 2 June 1960

This original press photo captures Sir Winston S. Churchill arriving at Epsom Downs on 2 June 1960. This image measures 10 x 8 in (25.4 x 20.3 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good minus. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scuffing with only some light cockling along the top and bottom edges and original crop markings. This image features original, hand-applied retouching of Churchill’s face and clothes. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "Keystone Press Agency Ltd.", a published stamp of The Daily Telegraph from 2 June 1960, handwritten printing notations, and a clipping of the caption as it was printed in the newspaper. The caption on the verso of this photograph reads: "Winston Churchill, whose horse Vienna was scratched only a few hours before the off, arriving at Epsom." Owning racehorses was a later life manifestation of Churchill’s lifelong love of horses. At Sandhurst, training for the cavalry, Churchill graduated second in the arduous riding competition. At Omdurman he participated in "the last significant cavalry charge in British history". He was a talented polo player who did not play his last game until age 52. And as soon as his finances allowed in the last decades of his life, Churchill kept a stable of racehorses and found some success as an owner and breeder. In 1949 the septuagenarian Churchill purchased Colonist II, a three-year-old French race horse. Colonist became something of a sensation, winning eight of his nine races in 1950, including one in which King George VI’s horse was running. Churchill’s new hobby was not met with approval by all. Clementine wrote to a friend "I do think this is a queer new facet in Winston’s variegated life I must say I don’t find it madly amusing." (letter of 28 May 1951) When Colonist’s trainer suggested that Colonist be put up to stud Churchill allegedly retorted, "To stud? And have it said that the Prime Minister of Great Britain is living on the immoral earnings of a horse?" (quoted in Kay Halle, The Irrepressible Churchill, p. 241) Churchill continued to own horses throughout the remainder of his life, 36 in total, but none quite matched the success of his first. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. This original press photograph was taken in the twilight of Churchill’s remarkable life.Winston S. Churchill was 80 years old when he resigned his second and final premiership on 5 April 1955. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. The day after Churchill died, on25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul."Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral.
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill, iconic with hat and cigar, apparently taken on 29 April 1964, reportedly en route to the House of Commons

This is an original press photo of Winston S. Churchill, waving out of a car window while smoking a cigar, apparently en route to the House of Commons on 29 April 1964 during one of his rare public appearances in the final year of his life. This image measures 8 x 10 in (20.3 x 25.4 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp with only light wear to the edges, a crease in the margin of the lower right corner, original crop markings, and light scuffing visible only under raking light. This image features original, hand-painted retouching of Churchill’s hat, hand, and face as well as airbrushing applied to the background to enhance contrast for publication. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "SPORT & GENERAL PRESS AGENCY", a purple publication stamp of The Daily Telegraph from 30 April 1964, a clipping of the caption as it was printed in the newspaper, remnants of a typed caption, and handwritten printing notations. The original clipping caption affixed to the photograph verso reads: "Sir Winston Churchill leaving his home in Hyde Park Gate for the commons yesterday. Given the published date of the photo – 30 April 1964 – that would imply a visit to the Commons on 29 April. This is an intriguing mystery. Churchill’s official biographer, Martin Gilbert, does not detail any public appearances by Churchill between a play featuring his granddaughter on 15 April and a visit to the House of Commons on 4 June. Nonetheless, the published date and caption on this photograph are unequivocal. Whatever the occasion of Churchill’s outing in this photograph, this is certainly among the last times that the former Prime Minister made a public appearance. He would visit the House of Commons only twice more – on 4 June and 27 July 1964. In this photograph, despite his advanced age and failing health, he looks like his iconic self, engaging the camera and armed with hat and cigar. Winston S. Churchill was 80 years old when he resigned his second and final premiership on 5 April 1955. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. The day after Churchill died, on25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul."Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.
An original press photograph of Sir Winston S Churchill taken on 11 April 1963 capturing him waving while smoking a cigar as he leaves his Hyde Park Gate home for a holiday in Monte Carlo

An original press photograph of Sir Winston S Churchill taken on 11 April 1963 capturing him waving while smoking a cigar as he leaves his Hyde Park Gate home for a holiday in Monte Carlo

This is an original press photograph of Sir Winston S. Churchill taken on 11 April 1963 capturing him waving while smoking a cigar as he leaves his Hyde Park Gate home for a holiday in Monte Carlo. This image measures 10 x 7.625 in (25.4 x 19.4 cm) on glossy photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp with only some light bruising to the corners and light scuffing visible only under raking light. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "P.A. Reuter Photos Ltd.", a purple received stamp of The Daily Telegraph from April 1963, and a typed caption. The quite voluble original caption is titled "SIR WINSTON’S PARTING WAVE: EASTER IN MONTE CARLO" and reads: Wave from 88-year-old SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL as, clenching a cigar, he leaves his London home at 28, Hyde Park Gate, S.W., by car for London Airport to-day (Thursday). He was to fly off for a holiday in Monte Carlo, where he will spend Easter. It is Sir Winston’s first holiday abroad since he fell and fractured his left thigh in his Monte Carlo hotel room last June. As he set off for the airport, people shouted ‘Happy Easter, Sir Winston.’ He will be in Monte Carlo for about a fortnight. April 11 1963" This photograph was taken in the twilight of Churchill’s remarkable life, less than two years before his death. Six years earlier, on 5 April 1955, Churchill had resigned his second and final premiership at the age of 80. "It was during April" of 1963, when this photograph was taken, "that Churchill was pressed, albeit discreetly, both by his wife and by Christopher Soames, to announce that he would not contest the coming General Election." (Gilbert, Vol. VIII, p.1343) By May 1, Churchill had made up his mind and announced his decision not to stand again for Parliament, to which he had first been elected in 1900 while Queen Victoria was still on the throne. During the final years of his life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. The day after Churchill died, on25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul."Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral. This press photo once belonged toThe Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.