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Chet Ross Rare Books

Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a NorthWest Passage and of a Residence in the Arctic Regions During the Years 1829

Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a NorthWest Passage and of a Residence in the Arctic Regions During the Years 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833. By Sir John Ross, C.B., K.S.A, &c. &c, Captain in the Royal Navy. Including the Reports of Commander, Now Captain, James Clark Ross, R. N., and the Discovery of the Northern Magnetic Pole, with Appendix to the Narrative

Ross, Sir John & Captain James Clark Ross New York: Greenwood Press, 1969, 2 volume set. 1st printing of the Greenwood Press Edition. 4to, (12.5" x 9") Vol 1: xxxiii, pp. 740, w/ pp. 18 [Braithwaite's Supplement] & pp. 8 [Answer to Braithwaite]; Vol 2: xii, pp. 120, cxliv [Natural History], LXIV [Appendix-Meteorology] p. Hardbound, brown cloth and gilt spine titles. Facsimile Reprint of the London 1835 original. Numerous black-and-white illustrations throughout, 6 maps Ñ1 fold out. Fine Condition inside and out for both volumes. In 1829, frustrated by the lack of progress in searching for a northwest passage, a philanthropic gin distiller, Felix Booth, sponsored John Ross's second expedition to the Arctic Regions. With his nephew James Clark Ross as second-in-command, Ross sailed down Prince Regent Sound aboard HMS Victory in search of an opening to the west. The two Rosses mapped James Ross Strait and parts of King William Island, and in 1831 James Clark Ross located the Magnetic North Pole. The Ross expedition then disappeared in the ice-bound Gulf of Boothia until 1833. A captivating narrative of human endurance, triumphing over severe peril and suffering of an expedition forced to survive in the harsh Arctic environment for four years. James Clark Ross edited the natural history section of the Appendix and John Ross edited the other sections comprising meteorology, navigation, and ethnology, including vocabularies in English, Danish, and the Esquimaux languages. The Appendix was originally issued separately from John Ross' Narrative, and it covers the Eskimos and the natural history of the areas Ross explored - it also includes biographical sketches of expedition members.
Innocents in the Arctic The 1951 Spitsbergen Expedition

Innocents in the Arctic The 1951 Spitsbergen Expedition

Bull, Colin Fairbanks: University of Alaska Press, Fairbanks, 2005. 1st Edition, 1st Printing, Large 8vo, [xviii]. 254pp. Index. Illustrated with b/w & color, one fold-out diagram. Fine in Fine Dust Jacket - as new. Includes an excellent photographic record in black-and-white prints of the expedition, plus 16 color photos of individuals and scenery of the field areas worked. The intent of the expedition was to explore a remote area of the island of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago. The expedition had several road-blocks including inadequate financial support to procuring a highly unsuitable expedition ship, inappropriate field gear, and miserable weather in the area of their field work. A mix-up here and there resulted in forgetting to take along thermometers, somewhat uncertain assignments of duties of the field team, no means of communication, and shortages of food. On the positive side, there was valuable scientific information resulting from this 10-man expedition in the summer of 1951. An often times humorous narrative by Colin Bull who passed away in 2010. From the dust-jacket: "Colin Bull, cook and glaciologist on the 1951 expedition to Spitsbergen, made more than 25 polar expeditions during his distinguished career as a glaciologist. (His cooking career languished.) He organized the first all-woman scientific expedition to Antarctica and other scientific ventures to Greenland, the Yukon, Alaska, Chile and Peru. He was awarded the Polar Medal by Queen Eli abeth II and the Antarctic Service Medal by the US Government. Two geographical features in Antarctica have been named for him: the stark and dramatic Bull Pass, and Bull Lake, which plunges to a depth of five centimeters."
The Japanese South Polar Expedition 1910-12 Translated by Lara Dagnall & Hilary Shibata.

The Japanese South Polar Expedition 1910-12 Translated by Lara Dagnall & Hilary Shibata.

Shirase Antarctic Expedition Supporters Association (Editors) Norwich: Bluntisham Books / Erskine Press, 2011. (1), 414, (2) pp, 8 full-page colour plates including two full-page maps, numerous black-and-white photographic and drawing illustrations. 10 Scientific Appendices, Postscript, Dramatis personae. Publisher's red cloth-textured boards, bright gilt lettering and decorations on cover and spine. Issued without dust wrapper but this copy with clear 5 mil. acetate protective wrapper. Fine Ñ As New. ISBN 1852971096. Nankyoku-ki (Ross 1.5.1) was first published in Japanese in December 1913. Nankyoku-ki is the account of the Japanese Antarctic Expedition based on official journals and records of the expedition and assembled by the Japanese Antarctic Expedition Supporters Association. This is the first English translation of that account. Many of the black-and-white photos used were not previously published in either Japanese or foreign publications. Tireless effort on the part of the translators has produced the first detailed account in English of the Japanese Antarctic Expedition. The long overlooked (outside of Japan) JAE traveled into Antarctic waters twice and made landfall in 1911. Their original mission was the conquest of the South Pole, and they were on the continent at the same time Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott whose expeditions were seeking the same goal. The JAE mission soon turned into one of scientific investigation and achievement with a farthest south of 80¼5' reached on 28 January 1912.
Rejoice My Heart The Making of H. R. Mill's "The Life of Sir Ernest Shackleton" The Private Correspondence of Emily Shackleton and Hugh Robert Mill

Rejoice My Heart The Making of H. R. Mill’s "The Life of Sir Ernest Shackleton" The Private Correspondence of Emily Shackleton and Hugh Robert Mill, 1922-23.

Rosove, Michael Santa Monica, California: Adelie Books, 2007. First Edition, First Printing. 26.2 cm, deep blue textured papered boards, spine lettered in silver, illustrated dustjacket. [xxi], 142pp.; 4 plate leaves (8 illustrations). Edition limited to 500 unnumbered copies. On 18 April 1922, just over three months following Sir Ernest Shackleton's death, Emily Shackleton, Sir Ernest's widow, invited Hugh Robert Mill, the greatest Antarctic historian of his time, to write Sir Ernest's biography. He wrote back the same day graciously accepting the invitation, and she responded, "Your kind letter rejoiced my heart." These two then embarked on a fast-paced project that would launch the first Shackleton biography a mere twelve months later. Their motivation was a mutual commitment to erecting a monument to the great explorer's memory. They communicated mostly by the post and thus left a trail of their creative process, to the delight of posterity. Their correspondence reveals facts about Sir Ernest, his family, and associates not found in the published works. It also reveals to us the personalities and sensibilities of Dr. Mill and Lady Shackleton. The Honourable Alexandra Shackleton provides some new facts about Lady Shackleton, her grandmother. Dr. T. H. Baughman has written an informative biographical synopsis of Dr. Mill. Dr. Michael Rosove provides background on the correspondence and editions of the biography and has annotated the correspondence. Devotees of Sir Ernest and Dr. Mill will find particular pleasure in this book. Half the proceeds from sales will benefit the William Mills Library Acquisitions Fund of the Scott Polar Research Institute. -- Michael Rosove
Annotated Bibliography of the Polar Regions. Selected List of Bibliographies on the Polar Regions Parts I & II. Sponsored by The Explorers Club Of America.

Annotated Bibliography of the Polar Regions. Selected List of Bibliographies on the Polar Regions Parts I & II. Sponsored by The Explorers Club Of America.

Vilhjalmur Stefansson, et.al. Sponsored by The Explorers Club Of America. Leonard Outhwaite, Director. Vilhjalmur Stefansson, Chairman of the Committee on Polar Exploration. James Ferrell, Technical Supervisor New York: by United States Works in Progress Administration, First Edition, n.d. (c. 1938). 4to - Part 1, (2), [1 – Errata] - 27.9 cm., 41pp.; Part 2, (2), 27pp. - 27.4 cm. Publisher’s original blue mimeographed wrappers with blue linen spine, as issued, and typed mimeographed text, as issued. Wrappers and pages are aged with some light handling and shelf-wear. Bookplates of the Museum of the American Indian inside front wraps with the bookplate in Part 2 being partly peeled off. Some other minor library marks appear on wraps and first pages only, otherwise clean, good to very good, no tears, dog-ears or underlining. Arctic Bibliography 18418 Mimeographed publication intended mainly for the use of libraries, institutions and for research, hence most copies, if not all, have library markings and are somewhat shelf-worn. A bibliography listing over 700 books and publications, Arctic and Antarctic, containing bibliographical lists on the polar regions. The project was executed by the U.S. Works in Progress Administration of the City of New York in conjunction with the Explorers Club. Stefansson was President of the Explorers Club at time of publication. A Scarce but still useful polar reference item.
Sketches in Afghaunistan [Afghanistan]

Sketches in Afghaunistan [Afghanistan]

Atkinson, James London: Henry Graves & Company; J.W. Allen & Co.; and Day & Haghe, 1842, First Edition. Large folio – 55.2 × 38.6 cm. Publisher’s green morocco-backed green moiré boards, gilt title on the front board and morocco spine, blind stamped ruling and double-gilt ruling on covers, cream endpapers, re-backed with strengthened gutters, some foxing as usual, but a very good copy indeed. Spine shows rubbing and wear but complete, original covers worn at extremities. Single-tint lithographic title page and 25 similar highly detailed plates, lithographic dedication leaf, letter press leaf of descriptions printed in blue in double column - all original guard-sheets in place. One of the finest illustrated books on Afghanistan, the plates depicting a selection of superb views on the march - Bolan Pass, Quetta, Khojak Pass, Kandahar, and Kabul. James Atkinson, (1780-1852), a surgeon in the Bengal service, was chosen as Superintending Surgeon to the Army of the Indus during the First Afghan War. He was "relieved in the ordinary course of routine shortly after the surrender of Dost Mohammad" and returned to Bengal in 1841 "and thus escaped the fate which awaited the army of occupation". Atkinson retired in 1847, and died in London in 1852. He is perhaps best remembered for his translations from Persian, of these his selections from the Shâh Nâmeh of Firdausi being the most notable, but he evidently possessed considerable artistic abilities. The renderings are skillfully composed, detailed and sensitively colored. Abbey Travel 508; Colas 173; Lipperheide 1493; Tooley 73.
A Full and Just Account of the Present State of The Ottoman Empire. In all its Branches: With The Government

A Full and Just Account of the Present State of The Ottoman Empire. In all its Branches: With The Government, and Policy, Religion, Customs, and Way of Living of the Turks, in General. Faithfully related From a Serious Observation, Taken in Many Years Travels thro’ those Countries.

Hill, Aaron London: for the author and to be sold by John Mayo , 1709, First Edition. Folio –– 35.5 cm. [xxviii], 339 pp. Period style sprinkled calf with de-bossed stamped panel boards, spine in six gilt decorated compartments with gilt-lettered red-oxide morocco label to second, page-edges wavy and uncut. Engraved portrait frontispiece and 7 plates each with facing explanatory leaf, Errata at contents page, pages clean with no prior ownership markings. An excellent copy of the Very Scarce first edition. Aaron Hill was 15 when he visited his distant relative Lord Paget, English ambassador to Constantinople. From Turkey he travelled to Greece, Egypt, Palestine, Jordan and Arabia before returning to England three years later in April 1703 with Paget. "Hill's Ottoman Empire was a luxury publication designed to establish its author's social and literary credentials at nearly 350 pages it was an impressive achievement for a 24-year-old. Hill's primary model was the diplomat Sir Paul Rycaut's Present State of the Ottoman Empire of 1668. He borrows many of Rycaut's observations on the political, institutional, and religious history of the Turks yet he is undoubtedly more interested in projecting himself into the picture as an adventure hero Hill dramatizes himself struggling with knife-wielding Arabs, finally stabbing one to death, going underwater pearl-diving, braving storms and dangerous tempests on his sea journey to Samon and, finally, enduring 'A Strange Accident which befel the Author in a Vault among the Mummys' --Gerrard. Aaron Hill: The Muses' Projector, 1685-1750, p.22. Atabey 580; not in Burrell.
Travels From St. Petersburg in Russia to Diverse Parts of Asia

Travels From St. Petersburg in Russia to Diverse Parts of Asia

John Bell Glasgow: for the Author by Robert and Andrew Foulis, 1763, First Edition. 2 volumes, octavo – 24.6 cm. Volume I: [xvii] - including list of subscribers, (2), Map, 357 pp. (2 pp. Publisher’s Advertisements); Volume II: (1), 426pp., (1pp.) - Alterations by the Author for Volumes I & II. Period full-calf with more recent full leather spines and gilt titles. Boards with wear on surfaces and extremities, but overall a very good and complete set. Large fold-out map with expert perimeter restoration as frontispiece to Volume I -- map shows the route from Moscow to Peking with inset of the "North Front of Pekin”. Attractive bookplate inside front covers from Royal Society of Literature. Excellent condition internally. Rare and complete. The account of the John Bell's remarkable journey from St. Petersburg through Siberia and into China on behalf of the Russian tsar. Bell's narrative includes detailed descriptions of the manners, customs, geography and scenery in the countries visited. Bell departed St Petersburg on July 15, 1715 and proceeded to Moscow, and from there to Kazan and south along the Volga to Astrakhan. The mission then sailed down the Caspian Sea to Derbent and travelled on to Esfahan in Persia, where they arrived on March 14, 1717. They left Esfahan on September 1 and returned to St Petersburg via Saratov on December 30, 1718. On his return Bell learned of another mission to China. Bell's account of the journey to Kazan and through Siberia to China is possibly the most complete and interesting part of his travels. Of particular note are his descriptions of the Dalai Lama and the Chinese wall, and his residence in Peking" (Howgego). Blackmer 111; Cox I, 256; Howgego, I, B62.
The South Pole: An Account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the Fram 1910 -1912 -- Signed by Amundsen

The South Pole: An Account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the Fram 1910 -1912 — Signed by Amundsen

Amundsen, Roald Signed in the year of publication: Best Wishes, Roald Amundsen, Feb. 1st, 1913, Chicago in Volume I on the front free endleaf. This set was signed in Chicago during Amundsen s first visit to the United States after returning from his conquest of the South Pole in 1912. New York: Lee Keedick, 1913, First Edition, 2 volumes complete in Near Fine Condition and in custom clam shell box. Volume I: [xxxv] 392pp. thick large 8vo with untrimmed pages and gilt tops, original publisher s blue cloth with very bright gilt on spine and cover. Frontis of Amundsen with tissue guard, Introduction by Fridtjof Nansen, 82 photographic images (mostly full page), full page map and color fold out map attached at rear. Complete with the folded plan of the Fram . Volume II: [x] 449pp. thick large 8vo with untrimmed pages and gilt tops, original publisher s blue blind ruled cloth with very bright gilt on spine and cover. Frontis of Amundsen with tissue guard. Appendix I, II, III, IV, & V; Index; 52 photographic illustrations (mostly full page), 20 maps and charts including fold out toward rear. Spence 18, Renard 20, Conrad p. 113, Rosove 9.B2.a The detailed, well-written first person account documenting Roald Amundsen s successful expedition whose primary intention was the conquest of the South Pole begun on February 10, 1911 and achieving the South Pole on December 14, 1911 at 3:00pm with a temperature of -10ºf. Amundsen and his expedition team departed the South Pole on December 17 and arrived at their winter quarters in January 1912, covering a total of approximately 1,750 miles round trip while averaging nearly 15.5 miles per day. Aside from successfully being the first expedition to attain the South Pole, the expedition also achieved significance by determining the extent and character of the Ross Barrier, and by discovering the 530 mile-long mountain range connecting South Victoria Land and King Edward VII Land, This mountain range was named the Queen Maud Mountains by Amundsen.
Sydpolen: Den Norske Sydpolsfaerd med Fram 1910-1912 -- The South Pole: The Norwegian South Pole Expedition with Fram]1910-1912. Complete as published in 40 parts -- with tipped-in signature of Roald Amundsen

Sydpolen: Den Norske Sydpolsfaerd med Fram 1910-1912 — The South Pole: The Norwegian South Pole Expedition with Fram]1910-1912. Complete as published in 40 parts — with tipped-in signature of Roald Amundsen

Amundsen, Roald Kristiania: Jacob Dybwads, [May-September] 1912. 40 parts, First Edition, First Printing. 8vo. Collated Complete with: Sepia photographic frontispiece of Amundsen, 47 plate leaves, 4 maps including 3 coloured two being fold-out, numerous text illustrations, publisher s instructions for private binders at front of Part XXI. Original paper wrappers decorated with circular photograph set within a surround of penguins, the first two parts coloured silver and the remainder light blue-green as called for. All 40 parts complete and in Very Good to Good+ condition; pages untrimmed as issued. RARE original 40 parts First Issue of Amundsen s classic account of his victorious expedition to the South Pole. Rosove 8.A1.1 VERY RARE ORIGINAL PARTS ISSUE of Amundsen's classic account of his victorious expedition to the South Pole. Amundsen disembarked from the Fram at Buenos Aires in May 1912 to meet his sponsor Don Pedro Christophersen. He was invited to stay on one of Christophersen's estancias to write up his account of the expedition. The Fram returned home without him, leaving Buenos Aires on 7 June 1912, the second anniversary of their departure from Christiania. The sudden contrast was not lost on Amundsen: 'Here I am, sitting in the shade of palms, surrounded by the most wonderful vegetation, enjoying the most magnificent fruits, and writing -- the history of the South Pole. What an infinite distance seems to separate that region from these surroundings! And yet it is only four months since my gallant comrades and I reached the coveted spot . On December 14, 1911, five men stood at the southern end of our earth's axis, planted the Norwegian flag there, and named the region after the man for whom they would all gladly have offered their lives -- King Haakon VII. Thus the veil was torn aside for all time, and one of the greatest of our earth's secrets had ceased to exist. Since I was one of the five who, on that December afternoon, took part in this unveiling, it has fallen to my lot to write -- the history of the South Pole'. With: the original publisher s decorative boards issued to bind the 40 parts. With: tipped in signature of Roald Amundsen Noticeably lacking the heroic tone of Scott's accounts, Amundsen's typically modest narrative of the Norwegian endeavor 'speaks of what is achieved, not of their hardships. Every word a manly one. That is the mark of the right man, quiet and strong' (Nansen, Introduction). Written before the outcome of Scott's Terra Nova Expedition was known, the differences between the two expeditions were already being outlined, and the battle-lines in what would become an ongoing debate already being drawn: 'For the victory is not due to the great inventions of the present day and the many new appliances of every kind. The means used are of immense antiquity, the same as were known to the nomad thousands of years ago, when he pushed forward across the snow-covered plains of Siberia and Northern Europe. But everything, great and small, was thoroughly thought out, and the plan was splendidly executed. It is the man that matters, here as everywhere. Let no one come and prate about luck and chance. Amundsen's luck is that of the strong man who looks ahead' (Nansen, ibid). This original parts issue of Sydpolen was followed by Jacob Dybwads' 2-volume edition and translated immediately into English, Danish, French, and German. Rosove lists only 2 copies of the original parts issue (one of which lacks the binding advertisement and instructions) calling it 'VERY SCARCE'. He lists no copies in public institutions. Most part issues were bound together by contemporary binders, the original printed wrappers being 'variably retained', and even these bound sets Rosove considers 'uncommon' (4 listings). No set of the original parts issue is recorded at auction by ABPC since 1975
Outpost of the Lost: An Arctic Adventure -- Signed and inscribed by Brainard on the Half-title page.

Outpost of the Lost: An Arctic Adventure — Signed and inscribed by Brainard on the Half-title page.

By Brainard, David L., Brigadier General Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1929. 1st Edition stated. 8vo — 21.2 cm. 317 pp. Publisher’s dark green cloth with mustard-yellow colored title lettering on cover and spine. Cartographic end leaves front and rear. A Very Good + copy inside and out -- complete. Signed, inscribed and dated in the year of publication by Brainard on he half-title page. Arctic Bibliography 2071 This book consists of the private journals of Sgt. Brainard on polar exploration in 1888, one of the six survivors of the ill-fated Greely expedition. The U.S. International Polar Year Expedition of 1881-4, aka Lady Franklin Bay Expedition, led by Army Lieutenant Adolphus Greely, reached Lady Franklin Bay in August 1881 and established a scientific research station. Although Greely was without previous Arctic experience, he and his party performed notable feats of exploration; many unknown miles along the coast of NW Greenland were added to the map, Ellesmere Island was crossed from east to west, and Second Lieutenant James B. Lockwood achieved a new northern record of 83°24'. The expedition ultimately had tragic results. Their fatal mistake was in plunging into the extremely dangerous ice of Smith Sound, without having established, at the mouth of that sound, a depot of provisions and a house upon which they could fall back in case of disaster. The failure of supply ships to reach the expedition in the next 2 years forced Greely to abandon the station and retreat to Cape Sabine. Relief ships were sent over the next 2 years, but failed to reach Greely's party encamped at Cape Sabine, the 'Proteus' being a store ship bringing much needed supplies who was sunk by ice en route. Finally, the third relief vessel arrived in 1884, all but Greely and six others had perished from starvation, drowning, or exposure. The survivors were near death, and one died on the homeward journey.