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Charles Agvent

PORTER'S SPIRIT OF THE TIMES. A Chronicle of the Turf

PORTER’S SPIRIT OF THE TIMES. A Chronicle of the Turf, Field Sports, Literature and the Stage. Volume I, Nos. 1 – 26

BASEBALL] Folio (10-3/4" x 16") in the original cloth rebacked with a recent brown morocco leather spine, lettered in gilt, and corners; original morocco label with the name "James Burnside" in gilt on the front cover; 416 (of 424) pages. Illustrated with a color frontispiece of a racing horse, "Flora Temple." The debut volume with 26 issues of this important sports newspaper containing accounts of horse races, billiards, cricket matches, chess, and some of the earliest reportage of baseball games including printed box scores (developed by Henry Chadwick in 1856) and rule changes. The National Association of Base Ball Players was the first baseball organization to extend beyond a single club, and its birth coincides neatly with this first volume of PORTER’S. The first hint comes in Volume 1, issue #7, page 93 (11 October 1856): "It is said that a Convention of all the Base Ball Clubs of this city and suburbs will be held this fall, for the purpose of considering whether any and what amendments to the rules and laws governing this game should be made." The 8 November 1856 issue gives an account that reveals the gentlemanly nature of the game at that time describing the toasts offered, lyrics of a song performed solo, and other remarks made to the crowd, though the writer notes that catches were made on the fly, "instead of the child’s play, ‘from the bound.’" The 6 December 1856 issue contains rules for "The American National Game of Base Ball as played by the Putnam Club of New York illustrated with a diagram of the field: "We have been so inundated with communications in reference to the mode of playing the game of Base Ball, that although we gave the directions in our last issue as to where the rules of the game could be purchased, we have concluded to give a diagram and the rules in order that those who desire to form clubs may be prepared for action at the commencement of the next season." This evokes a response in a later issue by New England correspondent "Bob Lively" who describes "how they play the game in New England" with its own and different diagram: "The ball was thrown, not pitched or tossed, as a gentleman who has seen ‘Base’ played in New York tells me it is; it was thrown, and with a vigor, too, that made it whistle through the air, and stop with a solid smack in the catcher’s hands, which he generally held directly in front of his face." The first baseball convention was reported at length on 31 January 1857, with a patriotic flourish: "Base Ball . ought to be looked upon in this country with the same national enthusiasm as Cricket and Foot Ball are regarded in the British Islands. There should be some one game peculiar to the citizens of the United States." The organization formed at that time can be considered the birth of organized league baseball in America. Much more. Very scarce peek into the beginnings of our national pastime. Minor foxing, some pages browned, some unopened, lacking pages 69-72 and 81-84 (there is no baseball information on those pages). Binding quite nice. Overall Near Fine
THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES with THE MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES

THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES with THE MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES

DOYLE, A[rthur] Conan Two large octavo (6-1/4" x 9-1/2") volumes: original light blue beveled cloth, front and spine stamped in black and gold, all edges gilt, floral patterned endpapers, and original dark blue beveled cloth, front and spine stamped in black and gold, all edges gilt, floral patterned endpapers; [1-4,] [1], 2-317, [318: printers imprint], [319-320: blank] pages; and [1-6], [1], 2-279, [280: blank] pages. First Issue of ADVENTURES with "cucaine" on page 133 and "Violent" on page 317. These two volumes collect the first 23 short stories featuring Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, starting with "A Scandal in Bohemia" and ending with "The Final Problem." Green and Gibson, A10 and A14: "Rarely has a character so quickly established itself on the popular imagination as did Sherlock Holmes in the latter half of 1891." Haycraft-Queen Cornerstone. Queen’s Quorum #16 (Adventures). Keating, Crime & Mystery: The Best 100 Books (Adventures). Glover & Greene, Victorian Detective Fiction #128 & #129. Housed in a custom cloth clamshell box with a gilt-lettered morocco spine label. The ADVENTURES has a neat previous owner bookplate to front pastedown, light foxing throughout, some moderate dust soiling overall and some mild edge rubbing; the gilt on the front panel is bright and shows just a bit of rubbing to it on the spine. Very Good. MEMOIRS has a contemporary previous owner dated gift inscription and the same previous owner bookplate as ADVENTURES to front pastedown, light foxing throughout, some mild rubbing and several small stains to the rear cover. Very Good to Near Fine in a handsome box. Overall a very nice set of these books
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THE RUSSIAN IMPOSTOR: OR, THE HISTORY OF MUSKOVIE, Under The Usurpation of Boris and the Imposture of Demetrius, Late Emperors of Muskovy

MANLEY, Sir Roger] Octavo (4-1/4" x 6-3/4") bound in 3/4 brown morocco leather and brown boards with a gilt-stamped spine; [1], 250 pages. Engraving on verso of title page; lacking the 12-page preface. Wing M75. An appendix was included in the Second Edition published in 1677 though retaining the 1674 date on the title page. The online ENCYCLOPÆDIA BRITANNICA gives the background on Manley’s subject matter: "False Dmitry, also called Pseudo-demetrius, Russian Lzhedmitry, or Dmitry Samozvanets, any of three different pretenders to the Muscovite throne who, during the Time of Troubles (1598-1613), claimed to be Dmitry Ivanovich, the son of Tsar Ivan IV the Terrible (reigned 1533-1584) who had died mysteriously in 1591 while still a child." Leo Loewenson in THE SLAVONIC AND EAST EUROPEAN REVIEW states, "THE RUSSIAN IMPOSTOR is of course not a primary historical source in the sense in which such a classification is applicable to reports by foreign travellers. It is obviously a secondary work, i.e. the result of research. Not even the geographical description of Russia, with which the historical narrative is introduced, contains the slightest reason to assume that Manley had ever visited the country. Moreover apart from inconclusive remarks like that about the uncertainty still prevailing in Russia with regard to the identity of the Impostor there is also nothing to suggest that any information was derived from hearsay, But the lack of any value as a primary source does not deprive the work of great historiographical interest The fact that it is wholly based on research gives it a claim to being one of the earliest learned histories of Russia written in this country" (Vol. 31, No. 76 Dec., 1952; page 239). Title page darkened with some wear at the edges, rest of text just a tad darkened; preface lacking. Light rubbing to spine tips but binding Near Fine. Overall Very Good and uncommon
THE ST. LOUIS PRACTICAL PHOTOGRAPHER

THE ST. LOUIS PRACTICAL PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHY] FITZGIBBON, J. H. (editor) The first twelve issues of this scarce western photography monthly edited by J. H. Fitzgibbon, one of America’s finest daguerreotypists and well-known for his portraits of Native Americans. Bound in contemporary half morocco with the original front and rear wrappers for all issues, as well as the ads, bound in. Illustrated with 10 original photographs, mostly mounted albumens including a portrait of Fitzgibbon by Bogardus, an Adirondacks landscape by Stoddard, and various posed studies. One image, the Great Steel Bridge of St. Louis, is printed directly on the paper; another is a chromotype of the Chicago Apollo Musical Club by Gentile. There is no image with the sixth issue, nor is one listed in the contents. The albertype by E. Bierstadt for the eleventh issue is lacking, as is a ferrotype specimen holder in one of the ads. The articles are informative and instructional covering both news and many different technical aspects of photography at the time with much longing for a return to the daguerreotype and a number of articles on new processes such as the Lambertype. This copy is INSCRIBED and SIGNED by the editor to T. S. Lambert in January of 1878 on the inside front cover. Theodore Sarony (T. S.) Lambert was no relation to the creator of the Lambertype, Claude Lambert , but he did team up with Claude to sell exclusive license for the Lambertype process. Front cover now detached and the spine largely lacking, but the text block is tight and the book can be easily rebacked. Despite the defects, Very Good and quite scarce
ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT: AN ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE THE LITERARY SOCIETIES OF AMHERST COLLEGE

ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT: AN ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE THE LITERARY SOCIETIES OF AMHERST COLLEGE, ON THE AFTERNOON PRECEDING COMMENCEMENT, 25TH AUGUST, 1835

EVERETT, Edward Stitched wraps (8" x 9-3/4") consisting of a title and 65 pages bound together with a ribbon, all edges gilt. A lengthy, closely written MANUSCRIPT by Edward Everett, not signed though initialled after his instructions. An early oration from Edward Everett (1794-1865), Whig politician, U.S. Representative and Senator, sometime President of Harvard University, United States Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Britain, and Governor of Massachusetts before being appointed United States Secretary of State. On the back of the title-page, Everett has penciled, "[The compositor will please not to cut nor tear this manuscript, but preserve it as clean as he can conveniently]. E.E." The compositor accomplished the required feat. The oration was published in Boston by Russell, Shattuck, & Williams in 1835. In this commencement address Everett discusses the extension of the means of education and the societal benefits of the general diffusion of knowledge to liberty, science, and virtue. Edward Everett is perhaps best known for his oratory powers. It is he who gave the "other" address at Gettysburg on 19 November 1863. The next day he wrote Lincoln saying, "I should be glad if I could flatter myself that I came as near the central idea of the occasion in two hours as you did in two minutes." Blank wrappers soiled, a few chips; internally Fine
MEIJI PERIOD PHOTO ALBUM with 50 Hand-Colored Albumen Photographs

MEIJI PERIOD PHOTO ALBUM with 50 Hand-Colored Albumen Photographs

JAPAN] Oblong Folio (14" x 10-1/2") with a black morocco leather spine with gilt designs and exquisite black enamel painted and onlaid covers. Containing 50 hand-colored 10-1/4" x 7-3/4" albumen photographs laid down onto heavy cardboard pages titled in the negative in English and with small color drawings of figures in the margins of each page. Images include cityscapes, landmarks, and scenes of daily life and rituals in mid-to-late Meiji period Japan. Places shown include Tokyo, Kyoto, Yokohama, Nagoya, Enoshima, the shrines of Nikko, and two views of Mt. Fuji. Occupational scenes include women spinning cotton, men striking wheat, a rice plantation, men transporting rice bales on horseback, a samurai, a Shinto priest, Shinto pilgrims, a "blind shampooer," a pottery shop, a shoe shop, a grocery, a cloth store, "reading at home," "gathering the cocoons," "playing at ball," and more. Albums such as this were sold to overseas visitors to Japan, ca 1880s- early 1900s, who would choose their favorite scenes from the photography studio’s stock and whether to pay extra for hand-coloring, fine binding, and artistic covers. We have offered a handful of examples over the years, and this is easily the finest in content, with more occupational and daily life scenes as opposed to the standard landmarks, as well as special touches such as the small hand-painted characters in the margins of each page, and also in the finest condition. Housed in a clamshell box with decorative cloth covers and likely the original tin container used for shipment to America. Photographs are Fine and bright with tissue guards. Both boxes in nice shape. The front cover of the album with a horizontal crack about 3 inches from the bottom and extending across most of the cover doing little to detract from the lovely decorative scene. Overall a beautiful example, uncommon in such nice condition
THE WRITINGS OF HENRY DAVID THOREAU [WORKS] with a leaf of manuscript

THE WRITINGS OF HENRY DAVID THOREAU [WORKS] with a leaf of manuscript

THOREAU, Henry David Large octavo (6" x 8-3/4"), 20 volumes bound in original green buckram. Illustrated with a folding map of Concord and 103 plates with lettered tissue guards. Manuscript edition, in original binding. Number 536 of 600 sets SIGNED by the publisher and with an ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT sheet by Thoreau tipped into the first volume. The two page manuscript fragment comprises 55 lines, much of it with a big "X" by Thoreau over the text. What is not crossed out, however, is one of Thoreau’s best-known paragraphs from his important essay, LIFE WITHOUT PRINCIPLE: "Just so hollow and ineffectual, for the most part, is our ordinary conversation. Surface meets surface. When our life ceases to be inward and private, conversation degenerates into mere gossip. We rarely meet a man who can tell us any news which he has not read in a newspaper, or been told by his neighbors, and, for the most part, the only difference between us & our fellow, is that he has seen the newspaper, or been out to tea, & we have not. In proportion as our inward life fails, we go more constantly & desperately to the post office." The rest of the paragraph, not present here: "you may depend on it, that the poor fellow who walks away with the greatest number of letters, proud of his extensive correspondence, has not heard from himself this long while." Most of the manuscript has been "X"ed by Thoreau and may or may not be published, but certainly is interesting. In part: "Mere numbers, noise, & tinsel count as nothing, though many think that they are all. We have just had a state muster — a sort of military picnic — in our usually quiet town of Concord, heralded by many trumpets, as if it were something worth attending to. But the only observation that I made during all those days was, that the town was fuller of dust than it was ever known to be before." LIFE WITHOUT PRINCIPLE originated as a lecture called "What Shall It Profit," first delivered at Railroad Hall in Providence in 1854. It was the 46th of the 75 lectures Thoreau is known to have given and was delivered 5 more times in the next two years. It is considered by many to be preeminent among his essays, his most concentrated statement of his major message, his equivalent of Emerson’s SELF-RELIANCE. Of this essay, Walter Harding in THE DAYS OF THOREAU said: ". in a few pages the very essence of Thoreau’s philosophy. It is pure Transcendentalism, a plea that each follow his own inner light." This edition also marks the first printing of Thoreau’s entire Journal. Light wear. Near Fine with an exceptional manuscript offering