Bartleby's Books Archives - inBiblio
last 7 days
last 30 days

Bartleby's Books

placeholder

COMMISSION DES CONFERENCES REGIMENTAIRES. [Title on spine: CONFERENCES MILITAIRES. FIRST SERIES]

Bound volume of various conferences organized by the Commission des Conferences Regimentaires. 14 cm. Bound in 3/4 leather and marbled boards, raised bands and gilt rules on spine, gilt stamped black morocco spine label. Some wear and rubbing to boards but a good, tight copy overall. Bookplate of Russell of Aden on front pastedown, small bookseller’s ticket in upper left corner of pastedown. The conferences, bound out of sequence, and each with a separate title page, include: 1) Conference Sur la Tactique Separee de la Cavalerie. Rapportuer M. Savin-Delarclause. 1869. 4th conf., pp. 5-40 [pp.29-30 bound out of order]; 2) Conference Considerations Generales sur l’Etat Militaire de la France et des Principales Puissances Etrangeres. Rapporteur M. Nugues. 1869. 1st conf., pp. 5-39; 3) Conference sur le role de la Fortification Passagere dans les Combats. Rapporteur M.F. Prevost. 1869. 12th conf., pp. 5-40; 4) Conference Expose Sommaire de la Campagne d’Allemagne en 1866. Rapporteur M. Ch. Fay. 1869. 5th conf., pp. 5-50; 5) Conference sur la Garde Nationale Mobile. Par M. Ch. Corbin. 1869. [?] conf., pp. 5-49; 6) Conference sur le Service de Sante en Campagne. Par M. Legouest. 1868. [?] conf., pp. 5-48; 7) Conference sur l’Emploi des Chemins de Fer a la Guerre et sur la Telegraphie Militaire. Rapporteur M. Prevost. 1869. 3rd conf., pp. 5-39; 8) Conference de l’Organisation Militaire de l’Allemagne. Rapporteur M. Ch. Fay. 1869. 10th conf., pp. 5-43; 9) Conference de la Geographie de l’Allemagne. Rapporteur M. Ch. Fay. 1869. 9th conf., pp. 5-60; 10) [3 folding maps]; "Theatre des Operations en Boheme en 1866" [to accompany Conf. #5; short tear at gutter, extending approx. 3 in. into map]; "Carte d’Allemagne" [to accompany Conf. #9]; "Plan de la Bataille de Sadowa, 3 Juillet 1866;" 11) Conference sur l’Emploi de la Cavalerie en Allemagne Pendant la Campagne de 1866. Rapporteur M. Charreyron. 1869. 7th conf., pp. 5-36; 12) Conference sur l’Artillerie de Campagne son emploi dans la Guerre d’Allemagne de 1866. Rapporteur M. Saunier. 1869. 11th conf., pp. 5-69 (1)pp.; 13) Conference sur la Tactique de l’Infanterie Prussienne Pendant la Campagne de 1866. Rapporteur M. Heintz. 1869. 6th conf., pp. 5-32; 14) Conference, I: Armement Nouveau, II: Considerations Generales sur les Modifications que la Tactique doit subir par suite du novel etat de l’armement europeen. Rapporteur M. Maldan. 1869. 2nd conf., pp. 5-42; 15) Conference de Quelques Recents Travaux sur la Tactique. Par M. Ch. Fay. 1869. [?] conf., pp. 5-36; 16) Conference sur la Tactique des Trois Armes dans la Division. Rapporteur M. Lanty. 1869. 8th conf., pp. 5-70; 17) [publisher catalog (1)p., "en vente a la meme librairie"]. During the Franco-Prussian War, Marshal Niel organized these conferences to introduce military innovations to the French forces, according to Geoffrey Wawro’s book "The Franco-Prussian War," [Cambridge: 2003, p.49], though they failed to find support amongst the French officers. The bookplate of Russell of Aden belongs to the Russell family of Aden, in Scotland. Likely this book belonged to James George Ferguson Russell (1836-1887), fifth Laird of Aden, a diplomat who served in various legations and embassies in Europe, including Berlin and Munich, or his brother Francis Shirley Russell (1840-1912), who inherited the estate at his death, a career soldier. The motto over the crest on the bookplate reads "Courage Promptus." OCLC locates a copy at Univ. of Strasbourg and one at Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin which appear to be collected volumes of conferences, but none in the US.
placeholder

HEADQUARTERS 7847th ORDNANCE SUPPLY GROUP, APO 403-A, U.S. ARMY AND SUBORDINATE DEPOTS. [cover title]

Military History] Oblong 12mo. 64pp. A hand-made brochure containing typed entries, charts, a folding sketch map of the Braconne Ordnance Depot and 15 original photos bound into a black cloth folder, prepared exclusively for Brig. Gen. Earl S. Gruver, Chief, Ordnance Division, Hq USAREUR, for his use during his first tour of the Ordnance Supply Group and its subordinate installations in France and Germany. This copy, created by PFC Raymond E. Rush of the Personnel & Administration Branch, who has penned his name on the first page, contains a typed history of each ordnance, and including an organizational chart, layout area, and statistics for each. The foreword is signed in ink by F.E. Hendler, Lt. Col. Ord. Corps Commanding, and dated January 1953. The photos, varying in size from 3 x 2 1/2 in. to 3 x 4 in., include photos of the various commanding officers of the installations, and gated entrances to the depots at Germersheim, Mannheim, Pirmasens, and Rhine in Germany, and Braconne, Fontenet, and Nancy in France. An illustrated title on the front cover, and an illustration of the 7847th patch and other symbols on the rear cover, printed on stiff card stock, are laid down on the boards. Brig. General Earl S. Gruver (1898-1963), an instructor for ordnance and gunnery at West Point, saw service during World War II as an Ordanance Officer for the U.S. Military Mission in Cairo, Egypt. According to a brief biography in the Ordnance Corps Hall of Fame records, he was transferred to England late in 1944 where he assisted in the preparations for the invasion of Europe as Chief of the Planning Division, Ordnance Section. He was Chief of the Industrial Activities Division in the Office of the Under Secretary of War from 1945-1946. In 1952, he was sent to Heidelberg, as Ordnance Officer of the U.S. Army in Europe. Lt. Col. Frederic E. Hendler was placed in command of the 7847th, which was formed in July 1951, charged with constructing seven depots and supplying thousands of vehicles to member countries of NATO from the Germersheim depot. [see: Stars & Stripes, July 27, 1952].
placeholder

A COLLECTION OF 162 REAL PHOTO POSTCARDS FROM THE U.S.S. PITTSBURGH, IMAGES TAKEN DURING ITS MISSION AS FLEET FLAGSHIP FOR THE U.S. NAVAL FORCES IN EUROPE, 1922-1924, PLUS 4 ORIGINAL PHOTOS OF CREW MEMBERS AND ONE COLORIZED PHOTO OF THE SHIP, AND INCLUDING A HAND-WRITTEN DIARY OF A MEMBER OF THE CREW ON THE VERSOS OF 91 OF THE PHOTO POSTCARDS

Ray, S.V.M. (photographer) Chief Yeoman S.V.M. Ray documented the voyage of the U.S.S. Pittsburgh from its recommissioning in Philadelphia in October 1922 to serve in European and Mediterranean waters for two years, and through some 81 ports of call. Nearly every card, 3 1/2 x 5 1/4 in., has a caption title in white ink, accompanied by Ray’s name or initials, and occasionally a stock number. Images show the ship in dry dock in Philadelphia, destroyers in the Philadelphia Navy Yard, the crew painting or coaling the ship, loading stores, a Captain’s inspection, the ship’s departure for Europe, a whaleboat transfer of a sick man from the USS McFarland to the USS Pittsburgh in mid-ocean, en route to the Canary Islands, Bumboats alongside the ship in the Canaries, native boys diving for coins and native women washing clothes in Las Palmas, the Rock of Gibraltar, Vice Adm. A.T. Long transferring the fleet flag from the USS Utah to the USS Pittsburgh, orphan children on board in Constantinople, the pyramids of Egypt, Haifa, Nazareth, Jerusalem, the Syrian coast, Rhodes, Gallipoli, etc. etc. One of the last photo postcards in this group shows a detachment from the USS Pittsburgh in a Memorial Day parade in Paris, May 30, 1923. The photos are accompanied by a running diary by one of the sailors on board, a seaman second class, who records his duties aboard ship, his homesickness and concerns about the girl he left behind, his adventures in the various ports of call from departure at Philadelphia on September 3, 1922 until his last entry in July 1923. The diary occupies the versos of 91 of the cards, each card with two or three entries over successive days, sometimes continuing on to the next card, a total of approx. 18,000 words. A handful of the early cards start and end in mid-sentence, but thereafter, they are sequential. His handwriting, though small is very legible. The unnamed author, clearly part of a green crew, says his first assignment was lookout duty from the crow’s nest, a job he had never done before, "starting in early for that without any experience." Thereafter he describes painting the ship, coaling, gun drill ("I am an inside shell man"), inspections, and other duties aboard ship. He describes their first port of call at Las Palmas, in the Canary Islands, and his first shore leave where he went to a cathedral and saw artifacts from the Popes, including one Pope’s heart in a bottle. He also says the sailors on board are buying monkeys, dogs, canaries and the like and that if it keeps up they will have a zoo on board. At Gibraltar he sees Shackleton’s yacht, "the one [who] discovered the South Pole," come into the harbor (Shackleton himself had died in Jan. 1922). By November the USS Pittsburgh was in Constantinople, and "all the limey ships are ordered out of the Bosphorus by the turks." [Following World War I, Allied forces occupied Constantinople, sometimes under tense circumstances, until the Treaty of Lausanne in July 1923]. The young sailor diarist visits Ste. Sophia church in Stamboul, sees the Howling Whirling Dervishes in an old Turkish house, and Robert College. He is descriptive and observant, curious about the places he was visiting. He apparently spoke some French, and was often singled out by officers on board for his seriousness and reliability. His ensign complimented him as a natural born helmsman during his time on wheel duty. Two of the four original photos have names on the verso, Vernon Hazelton and George Szabo, but it was not possible to determine if one of these sailors was also the author of the diary. Two of the photographs Chief Yeoman S.V.M. Ray took during the USS Pittsburgh’s mission in Europe appeared in an issue of "The Outlook: an Illustrated Weekly Journal of Current Life," vol. 133, Jan.-May 1923. Under the title "Proof That Recruiting Posters Do Not Lie: Photographs by S.V.M. Ray, Chief Yeoman, U.S.S. Pittsburgh," the photo illustrations, both of the harbor at Rhodes indicate that they were developed and finished by him on board the USS Pittsburgh.
placeholder

Commenting on the war, and expressing concern for her friends in North Carolina, in an autograph letter, signed and dated Pittsylvania C.H. [Virginia], April 13, 1863. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope with two 5 cent Jefferson Davis Confederate stamps, addressed to Miss Ada Currier in Warrenton, NC

Semple, Letitia Christian Tyler (1821-1907; daughter of Pres. John Tyler) A four page letter, in brown ink on thin paper, approx. 460 words. The accompanying envelope is lined in black, as Letitia was evidently still in mourning for her father President John Tyler who had died in 1862. A thoughtful letter, including the effects of the war on her southern compatriots, from one Confederate woman to another. Letitia Tyler Semple writes to her friend Ada Currier, in care of General [Thomas Jefferson] Green, at Esmeralda, in Warrenton, North Carolina. She mentions she has not heard anything from them since she made her trip from Henderson to Richmond the previous October. She asks after the General, and says she thinks of them often "since the tide of war set in towards you and of the suffering and anxiety from the occupation of the Eastern portion of the ‘North State’ by her enemies." She says the papers indicate that the General’s son Col. Green has been wounded very recently and she wishes to ascertain his condition and hopes it is not a dangerous injury. She asks about several other friends in the area, and mentions that her husband "Mr. Semple is still on duty at Drewry’s Bluff and [?] and myself have been, since the 13th of November, at this place twenty miles from a R-Road." She is hopeful that "our cause has now a most encouraging prospect of success," and that if they can hold Vicksburg during these weeks of high water, it will be a "triumph of triumphs." [Vicksburg fell to Gen. Grant and the Union Army less than three months after this letter was written]. Letitia Tyler Semple, daughter of John Tyler (1790-1862), spent part of her early married life acting as hostess in her father’s White House after her mother died. Her husband James Semple, a purser in the U.S. Navy, was often away. A Southerner, James Semple resigned from the U.S. Navy at the commencement of the Civil War and joined the Confederate Navy. Drewry’s Bluff where Letitia mentions he was stationed, was seven miles south of Richmond and a major Confederate fortified position on the James River, a training ground for its naval academy and marines. [see: the National Park Service history of the battlefield]. Letitia directs her letter to the Esmeralda Plantation belonging to Gen. Thomas Jefferson Green (1802-1863). Green moved to Texas in the 1830s. He served in both the Texas Republic’s House of Representatives and in its Senate, and became a Brigadier General in the Texas Army. He returned to North Carolina where he had been born, but was considered too old to join the Confederate Army. His son Col. Wharton J. Green served in the Second North Carolina Battalion. He apparently survived the wound mentioned by Letitia Semple in this letter, only to be wounded and taken prisoner at Gettysburg in July 1863. Col. W.J. Green spent the remainder of the war as a prisoner at Johnson’s Island in Ohio. Letitia Tyler Semple lived most of her married life separately from her husband. Following the war, she moved to Baltimore, Maryland and founded a boarding school for young ladies called the Eclectic Institute, located on Mount Vernon Place in the city. OCLC lists both William & Mary and the Virginia Historical Society as having collections of Tyler family papers, including some personal and family correspondence from Letitia Semple.
placeholder

A TOUR THROUGH THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES, AS DEPICTED IN A GROUP OF 32 PHOTOS DONE FOR THE MEMBERS OF THE CHICAGO ASSOCIATION OF COMMERCE, APRIL 12 – 26, 1914. [title supplied]

A group of 32 individual black & white photos, 3 1/4 x 5 1/2 in., with captions in white ink in the margins and numbered in pen on verso, documenting the group’s travels in Georgia, Alabama, North and South Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky. Accompanied by a 4pp. typed list of the photos, bound with brads along the top edge, with a cover title: "Compliments of Wm. H. Walker. Showing Pictures on Tour of Southeastern States Made by Members of the Chicago Association of Commerce. April 12 to 26, 1914." Only 32 of the 50 photos listed have survived in this collection, including one which, though numbered, does not match the caption listings in Walker’s record. All of the photos are very good, clear. William H. Walker was President of the Woodlawn Business Men’s Association and a member of the Chicago Association of Commerce. The photos show Civil War sites, historical homes, local workers, and various members of the tour group posed in candid snapshots at some of the places they were visiting. Images in this collection include: a moving picture cameraman filming a cotton planter at work; Admiral Farragut’s Civil War flagship; a view of the monument to Gen. McPherson, killed in Atlanta during the Civil War; Confederate trenches on the battlefield of Atlanta; the Old Slave Market in Augusta, Georgia; a group of African Americans outside a railroad station in Macon, Georgia; Pres. Woodrow Wilson’s boyhood home in Columbia, S.C.; a wagon piled high with cotton, with two African Americans and one of the Chicago party posed on it; a group of African American students at Birmingham [AL] High School, posed with their teacher; a group photo of the Chicago delegates at the depot in Macon; an African American convict in striped prison uniform, serving time for forgery, posed with a dog used to track escaped prisoners; Eddy Gore [Edward E. Gore, Vice President, Interstate Division of the Chicago Assoc.] speaking to Visitors and Delegates at Andrew Jackson’s home, the "Hermitage," in Tennessee; two African American boys using a goat-drawn cart to deliver laundry in Augusta, Georgia, etc. According to the Association’s trade publication "Chicago Commerce," [vol. 10, issue of Jan. 8, 1915, p.8], the group’s members made several trade extension trips betwen 1905 and 1914: "an early, a basic activity of the association has been the trade excursion, and the entire vast territory tributary to Chicago, or in which overtures of this kind might incline sentiment toward the Great Central Market, has been visited by picked delegations of from thirty to fifty men, traveling in a special train, entertaining and being entertained and addressing the business and municipal authorities of from twenty to forty cities. A report of this particular trip was published in the June 5, 1914 issue, pp.4- 5. The list of southern cities is given and the purpose of the excursion described as a desire to "strengthen relations with a rapidly developing section of the country," and show the North what the South had to offer in the way of "opportunities for trade extension and commercial development." Apparently the group made films of the trip which they intended to use to better highlight Southern economic possibilites. One of the photos present in this group shows the "moving picture" cameraman at work. We find no record of this item on OCLC.
placeholder

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, CITY OF CHARLESTON. MEMORANDUM OF AN AGREEMENT AND CONTRACT ENTERED INTO THIS __ DAY OF JANUARY 1832 BETWEEN JAMES MARSH & SON SHIPWRIGHTS & COPARTNERS IN TRADE, OF THE ONE PART, AND JAMES WELSMAN MARINER OF THE OTHER PART. TO BUILD FOR THE SAID JAMES WELSMAN A SHIP OR VESSEL OF THE FOLLOWING BURTHEN AND DIMENSIONS VIZ. TO BE 373 TONS GOVERNMENT MEASUREMENT, LENGTH ON THE UPPER DECK FROM STEM TO STERN POST 118 FT. [etc.]

Manuscript contract, 4pp., folio, in a clear, legible hand, with a few ms. corrections. Marsh and his son contract to build a merchant ship for Welsman. With incredible detail, the contract lays out the materials to be used, including the different types of wood, iron and copper fittings, dimensions, etc. This document, likely a working draft of the final contract, is annotated here and there in pencil, a word or two lined through in ink, as the parties come to agreement on aspects of the construction. Pride of workmanship is clear throughout, the contract stating the shipwrights’ intention to build with the best quality materials, including wood "cut in the proper season and.perfectly free from all defects of whatever kind or description." Marsh and his son agree to make the "height between decks, from lower deck to upper deck plank 6 ft. 8 in., depth of Hold from ceiling or limber boards to lower deck plank 13 ft. 4 in.," to use live oak for the upper deck if it could be obtained, and white oak root if not, and to always "work square." The windlass was to be "suitable and complete in every respect, whether as to wood or Iron work for a first rate and fully equipped merchant ship." Welsman, for whom the ship was being constructed, was to be responsible for paying the carvers bill for the decorative work on the trailboard or stern which he might "deem proper," as well as joiners work on the Cabin. Payments for construction were to be made in several installments totaling $10,000, the balance (unspecified) to be paid upon completion, with penalties built in if the ship was not ready to be launched on Jan. 15, 1833. Although there is no mention of who was employed to build this merchant ship for James Welsman, it was likely at least partially built with slave labor. In a May 13, 1833 letter James Marsh and James Poyas wrote in response to a query from Jesse Elliott of the U.S. Navy regarding the construction of a proposed navy yard in Charleston. They state: "There are eight master shipwrights or firms that carry on business in Charleston, owning from seven to nineteen negro ship carpenters, and twenty white apprentices in various progress of their time. These eight master carpenters own, in the aggregate, one hundred slave carpenters, whose usual wages are one dollar and a half per day." [see: American State Papers: Documents, Legislative and Executive. Part 6, Vol. 4, Naval Affairs, (Gales & Seaton: 1861) p.575, for the full text of Marsh’s letter.] Shipbuilders in Charleston often used a combination of hired and owned laborers, according to Michael Thompson in his book "Working on the Dock of the Bay: Labor and Enterprise in an Antebellum Southern Port," [USC Press: 2015]. James Marsh (1772-1852) was a well known shipwright in Charleston, arriving in the city around 1800. When President Jefferson’s administration ordered the construction of 200 shallow draft gunboats in about 1807, Marsh built five of them at his shipyard in Charleston. He also submitted a design for an "unrigged floating battery" on March 14, 1814, and in 1845, offered to sell to the United States "a floating dry dock, adapted to the sloops of war of the United States." [see: Spirek’s "Management Plan for Known and Potential U.S. Navy Shipwrecks in South Carolina," (Wash. Navy Yard: 2004) and Congress’ Series of U.S. Public Documents, vol. 448, Journal of the Senate, Feb. 12, 1845.] According to his will, dated Dec. 1, 1852, Marsh owned several houses on East Bay Street in the city, along with a shipyard, work shop, wharf and docks on Concord Street, one half of the "Charleston Balance Floating Dry Dock," half of Palmetto Wharf, "six negro Carpenters and Caulkers," three superannuated old men, as well as a half share of nine more negro Carpenters and Caulkers already belonging to the business operated by Marsh and his son James, Jr. James Welsman was a prosperous Charleston ship-owner. During the 1840s he was engaged in the slave trade. His name appears as the slave owner/shipper of at least two ships in the Port of Savannah Slave Manifests of 1845. The ship contracted for here was to be used as a merchant ship. Whether it could have also been used in the interstate transport of slaves is not known.
placeholder

CONTACT SHEET IMAGES FROM THE NEGRO ENSEMBLE COMPANY’S SPRING 1972 THEATER SEASON

Harris, George [photographer] Six sheets, including two duplicate sheets, 122 different images showing some of the actors backstage preparing for their performances: one group of 30 shots of a dapper African American man in a bowler hat, with cane and cigar; another series of 36 shots showing an actor’s transformation through the use of make-up into an older woman with a wig and wide-brimmed flowered hat. The Negro Ensemble Company was founded in 1967 by African American producer and actor Robert Hooks and playwright Douglas Turner Ward. Their intent was to showcase African American actors, writers, set designers, etc. and to produce works focusing on the black experience. By the 1972-73 season, however, increased production costs, the need to expand their theater venue, and end of their three year Ford Foundation grant made it difficult to continue. The resident company disbanded and productions were cut back. Only one new show was mounted in that year, Joe Walker’s "The River Niger," but it became the first of the company’s productions to move to Broadway where it won the Tony Award for Best Play. Since then, the Negro Ensemble Company’s reputation has continued to grow and receive wide recognition for its excellence in theater. These sheets are part of a larger group of Harris’ contact sheets, contained in a ring binder. The other images show what appear to be acting or dancing classes of both white and black young adults, as well as a series of photos of science projects and experiments done by children in a classroom.
placeholder

BIBLIOTHECA AMERICANA. A CATALOGUE OF A VALUABLE COLLECTION OF BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, MANUSCRIPTS, MAPS, ENGRAVINGS, AND ENGRAVED PORTRAITS, ILLUSTRATING THE HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA, AND THE WEST INDIES, ALTOGETHER FORMING THE MOST EXTENSIVE COLLECTION EVER OFFERED FOR SALE

22cm. [2], [6pp. index], 308pp., plus [32]pp. list of publications or books for sale by J.R. Smith. Leather backed cloth, head of spine worn down to page edges, gilt stamped title on spine. Foxing to title page, some overall toning to text. This copy bears the ownership signature of W.B. Kelly, a book dealer in Dublin in the 1860s. The subsequent owner, Patrick Traynor was also a Dublin bookseller and affixes this note to the errata page on the verso of the title page: "Bought at the auction of my late friend and employer’s stock, October 1877. Patk. Traynor, late Manager to W.B. Kelly of 8 Grafton St." Traynor had a reputation for "an exceptional knowledge of books," according to his obituary in the "Publishers’ Circular and Booksellers’ Record of British and Foreign Literature," [vol. lxxi, July-Dec. 1899]: "Professors from the different colleges, London booksellers, and book collectors have been know to listen to him for hours at a time and go away delighted with the conversation. He could talk about the insides as well as the outsides of his books, and was always most willing to give any information that he possessed about books." A wonderful association copy.