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Woodstock; Or

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier. A Tale of the Year Sixteen Hundred and Fifty-one. By the Author of "Waverley, Tales of the Crusaders," &c.

Scott, Sir Walter Three volumes. First edition. Finely bound in contemporary three-quarter brown calf with red and blue marbled paper-covered boards, spines stamped in blind and lettered in gilt, plain white endpapers; complete with half-titles, including first state half-title in Vol. I with "Ballantine" misprint to verso, fly-titles, and first state of cancel leaf in Vol. III with "orders!-I" to p. 168. A very good set, somewhat toned and with rubbing to extremities, backstrips with superficial cracking to the leather, ownership signature to front free endpapers of Vols I-II and to first free leaf in Vol. III, front hinge cracked but holding on Vol. I. Overall, a handsome, sturdy set. Todd & Bowden 190A. Woodstock is a historical novel set in the year 1651 against the backdrop of the waning English Civil War. Over the course of the novel, Scott chronicles Charles II’s escape from England after his defeat by Oliver Cromwell at the Battle of Worcester, his period of exile, and his ultimate reclamation of the English throne. Specifically, Scott tells the story of how Charles evades persecution by disguising himself and residing in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, and where he disrupts the town by breaking up a marriage and enticing Cromwell to lay siege. Woodstock was first published by Scott as a novel "by the author of Waverley" and is therefore known as one of the Waverley novels.
Gone with the Wind

Gone with the Wind

Mitchell, Margaret New edition, printed in facsimile of the first edition. Publisher’s gray cloth, lettered in dark blue to front board and spine, ISBN to rear board, renewed copyright statement below "May, 1936" to copyright page; in a facsimile dust jacket with ISBN to rear panel, else in the same format as the original first issue jacket. A near fine copy with a few bumps to spine ends, front hinge starting at title page, a few spots to top edge; in a near fine dust jacket with a touch of rubbing to extremities and fading to spine, small nick in the edge of the front panel where it meets the spine, parallel with "Wind". Overall, a lovely reprint of this classic title. Gone with the Wind earned Margaret Mitchell both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. Perhaps best described as a work of historical fiction, Gone with the Wind also has many of the trappings of a traditional bildungsroman and romance novel, although critics argue that it does not fully fall under the category of either genre. The novel tells of archetypal Southern belle Scarlett O’Hara as she grows from a young woman into maturity against the backdrop of the American Civil War. Like many of the early 20th century Southern writers, Mitchell portrays an idyllic image of the antebellum South. While it can be legitimately criticized for its insensitivity to the treatment of African Americans who were enslaved, Mitchell’s novel demonstrates how the South was decimated by the Civil War and continued to suffer under the Northern-sanctioned Restoration. It is also the basis of the 1939 Academy Award-winning movie of the same name, the conflicted love story of rebellious Scarlett and Rhett Butler remains an American classic
Women in Love

Women in Love

Lawrence, D. H. (David Herbert) First U.S. trade edition, first printing. Publisher’s blue-gray cloth, ruled in blind to front board, lettered in gilt to front board and spine; in the original first issue dust jacket, printed on cream-colored paper in red and black, front panel with an illustration of a woman’s head with streaming hair. A very good copy with faint soiling to front board and rubbing to extremities, darkening to gilt on the front board, significant darkening of the spine gilt which now appears black, offsetting to endpapers, front pastedown with a note in blue pencil, toning to page edges and foxing to top edge; in a very good or better dust jacket with some foxing to front board, toning to spine, shallow chipping and a few closed tears to extremities, a touch of loss to spine ends, one-inch scratch to bottom edge of front panel, three-inch tear to top edge of rear panel where it meets the rear flap. Overall, a beautiful copy in the extremely rare first issue dust jacket. Roberts A15 Women in Love chronicles the lives of three generations of Brangwens, a farming family from Nottinghamshire, whose livelihoods and relationships are affected by the industrialization of England. Lawrence originally intended the text to be titled "The Sisters," which he eventually divided into Women in Love and its prequel The Rainbow (1915). Because of the controversies surrounding The Rainbow, which was censored for its unapologetic descriptions of the characters’ sexual desires, Women in Love was initially rejected by "almost every publisher in London." It was not until the New York based publisher Thomas Seltzer issued a privately printed edition of 1,250 copies that other publishers took note of the book. Notably, the first issue dust jacket on the U.S. trade edition is extremely rare and is mentioned only briefly in later editions of Robert’s bibliography of D. H. Lawrence: "This is the dust jacket that Lawrence considered ‘terrible’". The boldly illustrated design was unusual for the time, and was part of an effort by Seltzer to capitalize on the controversy that surrounded Lawrence, positioning his books as new and daring material in the New York market. The design stood in stark contrast to the dust jackets issued by Lawrence’s London publisher, Martin Secker, whose simple, text-only jackets attempted to downplay the controversial nature of the text.
Over all the Obscene Boundaries

Over all the Obscene Boundaries, European Poems & Transitions.

Ferlinghetti, Lawrence First edition. Signed and inscribed by Ferlinghetti: "for Marshall! / Ave atque vale – / ciao – / Lawrence Ferlinghetti". Publisher’s blue cloth, lettered in silver to spine; in the original pictorial dust jacket, lettered in black with a photograph of the author to front panel by Wendy Grad; in the original shipping envelope addressed to Marshall Efron. A near fine copy with top edge lightly faded and a small, very faint brown mark to the front board; in an about near fine dust jacket with toning to extremities, a small nick to top edge of front board, and a few black marks to rear panel and spine head. Overall, a lovely copy in the original envelope addressed in Ferlinghetti’s hand. Written following Ferlinghetti’s own travels through Europe, this book of poetry celebrates and reflects on the past and present of cities in France, Italy, Germany, and the Netherlands. The poems flow from one to the next as if the reader is travelling from city to city, and range from a few lines to longer, prose style poetry. Marshall Efron (b. 1938) is an American actor, humorist, and author associated with the art and literary scene in San Francisco and New York, particularly the Beat community. Most famous for his satirical television show on PBS, The Great American Dream Machine (1971-1972), and his radio shows on WBAI and KPFK, Efron also worked as a clerk at City Lights Books in San Francisco, a bookstore and publishing house founded by Lawrence Ferlinghetti in 1953 that served as a creative hub for writers of the Beat generation. Well known among the community, Efron remained friends with Ferlinghetti and other writers like Allen Ginsberg and Dylan Thomas throughout his career.
The Life of Napoleon Buonaparte

The Life of Napoleon Buonaparte

Hazlitt, William Four volumes. Second edition, revised by the author’s son. Finely bound in early 20th century quarter red morocco with five raised bands and dark purple marbled paper-covered boards, lettered in gilt to spine, maroon marbled endpapers. A very good set with some wear and bumps to extremities, front hinges slightly shaken, bookplate to each front pastedown, some scattered spotting to text blocks, Vol. IV with a few scratches to front board. Overall, a handsome set. First published in four volumes from 1828 to 1830, this detailed biography of Napoleon Bonaparte was written by the English essayist and literary critic William Hazlitt (1778-1830), a contemporary of writers like John Keats, Charles and Mary Lamb, and William Wordsworth. A life-long admirer of Napoleon, Hazlitt took on the challenge of writing his biography after learning of fellow author Sir Walter Scott’s own attempt to do the same. Hazlitt deemed Scott’s perspective on the French Emperor too conservative, offering no personal insight either against or in support of Napoleon’s actions. Hazlitt’s own work was informed by his deep-seated respect for the Emperor; he sought to explore Napoleon’s life in as much detail as possible and spent the last several years of his life in Paris conducting research. Despite his fanatical dedication to the task, the book did not reach the success Hazlitt had hoped for upon its publication; the last two volumes were not published until after his death, and were largely a financial failure. This second edition, as his son states in the preface, is an attempt to rekindle interest in the book, and make it more affordable to the general public, allowing it to reach a wider audience of readers.
Memoirs Illustrating the History of Napoleon I

Memoirs Illustrating the History of Napoleon I, From 1802 to 1815, By Baron Claude- François de Méneval, Private Secretary to Napoleon, First Consul and Emperor, Maitre des Requetes at the Council of State Under the Empire, Office of the Legion of Honour

Méneval, Baron Claude-François De Translated from the French by Robert H. Sherard. Three volumes. First American edition. Finely bound in contemporary three-quarter red morocco and red marbled paper-covered boards, five raised bands to spines, decorated and lettered in gilt, top edges gilt, red silk markers. A very good set with toning to spines and some wear to extremities, slight loss to corners from rubbing, bookplates to front pastedowns, Vol. I with front hinge starting and rubbed to exterior, five faint horizontal scratches to rear board, Vol. II with a few tears to spine head where leather is fragile and slightly brittle, Vol. III with wear and a bit of loss to spine head. This account of Napoleon’s time as the Emperor of France was written by his personal secretary, Baron Claude-François de Méneval. Appointed to the Emperor’s cabinet at only 24 years old, Méneval was quickly swept into the world of the French political elite, taking care of Napoleon’s correspondence and often serving as a translator. He was a trusted advisor to the emperor, and worked closely alongside him for many years. In this publication, Méneval details Napoleon’s life from 1802 until his exile to St. Helena in 1815.
Tentative Description of a Dinner Given to Promote the Impeachment of President Eisenhower.

Tentative Description of a Dinner Given to Promote the Impeachment of President Eisenhower.

Ferlinghetti, Lawrence First edition, second state with the publisher’s imprint in black (first state copies bear the publisher’s imprint in gold). Publisher’s white paper wrappers, staple-bound, title and author printed in black to front wrapper from Ferlinghetti’s hand, publisher’s ad to rear wrapper. About very good with some creasing and wear to extremities, yellow-brown stain to front wrapper, through to the first free leaf. A presentable copy with an interesting association, from the library of Marshall Efron. One of Ferlinghetti’s earliest publications, this poem is a political statement against President Dwight Eisenhower. It is written in Ferlinghetti’s long-line prose poetry style, and conveys his strong opposition to Eisenhower’s policies and actions. Like many members of the Beat generation and surrounding social movements, Ferlinghetti supported the idea of an anarchist society, though he recognized that democratic socialism may be a more realistic option for the United States. Notably, this small pamphlet became one of Ferlinghetti’s most popular and widely sold works. Marshall Efron (b. 1938) is an American actor, humorist, and author associated with the art and literary scene in San Francisco and New York, particularly the Beat community. Most famous for his satirical television show on PBS, The Great American Dream Machine (1971-1972), and his radio shows on WBAI and KPFK, Efron also worked as a clerk at City Lights Books in San Francisco, a bookstore and publishing house founded by Lawrence Ferlinghetti in 1953 that served as a creative hub for writers of the Beat generation. Well known among the community, Efron remained friends with Ferlinghetti and other writers like Allen Ginsberg and Dylan Thomas throughout his career.
Napoleon in Exile; Or

Napoleon in Exile; Or, A Voice from St. Helena. The Opinions and Reflections of Napoleon, on the Most Important Events of his Life and Government, In His Own Words. By Barry E. O’Meara, Esq., His Late Surgeon.

O'Meara, Barry E. Two volumes. Fifth edition. Finely bound in contemporary light brown spotted calf with five raised bands to spine with dark red morocco spine labels, bands and compartments decorated in gilt and blind, boards ruled in gilt and decorated in blind, red marbled endpapers and text block edges. A very good set with wear to extremities and hinges, front hinges cracked but holding, two bookplates to each front pastedown with one on top of the other, some foxing to title pages and lightly scattered throughout, offsetting from engravings, Vol. I with a few scratches to front board and rubbing to rear board, spine ends worn and with a faint light-colored stain to first compartment, lacking headband with wear to tailband, Vol. II with a few short tears to the spine ends, wear to headband and lacking tailband. Overall, a handsome set. This in-depth account of Napoleon’s time on the island of St. Helena was written by his physician and confidant, Barry O’Meara, who was assigned the task of accompanying the French statesman during his exile. Following the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, after a failed attempt by Napoleon’s allied opponents to keep him imprisoned on the island of Elba, the British sent him to be held on the remote island St. Helena. There, Napoleon spent the last six years of his life, largely under the control of the island’s governor, Hudson Lowe. O’Meara’s work describes Napoleon’s activities in detail, including his musings and complaints about life in captivity, in chronological order marked by date. Upon its publication, the work caused a stir among the general public, primarily for its assertion that Hudson Lowe mistreated Napoleon.
Memoirs of a Beatnik

Memoirs of a Beatnik

Di Prima, Diane First edition. Publisher’s green paper wrappers, lettered in black and illustrated with a colorful, abstract photo of the author to the front wrapper, lettered in white to rear panel. About near fine with some nicks and bumps to extremities, spine lightly toned, creasing to hinges and some separation to the inside of front hinge, still holding and sturdy, thin red-brown mark to outside edge of front wrapper about four inches from the bottom, light foxing to front endpapers. Overall, a lovely copy, from the library of Marshall Efron. This semi-autobiographical novel tells the story of the Beat movement through the eyes of Diane Di Prima, a woman living and writing among the small group of men whose names are remembered as the central figures of the movement. Though she fictionalizes parts of her story, highlighting and sensationalizing the eroticism that appealed to her readers, Di Prima draws upon her own lived experiences for the bulk of the novel, including anecdotes about her time in New York during the 1950s and ’60s. Like other Beat writers, Di Prima’s work was personal and emotional, and often used obscene language or imagery. She is remembered as an influential member of the Beat generation, and is also closely associated with the hippie movement that followed. Marshall Efron (b. 1938) is an American actor, humorist, and author associated with the art and literary scene in San Francisco and New York, particularly the Beat community. Most famous for his satirical television show on PBS, The Great American Dream Machine (1971-1972), and his radio shows on WBAI and KPFK, Efron also worked as a clerk at City Lights Books in San Francisco, a bookstore and publishing house founded by Lawrence Ferlinghetti in 1953 that served as a creative hub for writers of the Beat generation. Well known among the community, Efron remained friends with Ferlinghetti and other writers like Allen Ginsberg and Dylan Thomas throughout his career.
Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

Barrie, J. M. Illustrated by Arthur Rackham with fifty tipped in color plates, frontispiece dated 1912. New enlarged edition, early issue with illustrated endpapers and title page printed in two colors. Publisher’s green cloth, decorated and lettered in gilt to front board and spine. A very good copy with some toning to extremities, rebacked in bright green cloth with original backstrip laid down, significantly toned and rubbed, gilt to front board still very bright, foxing to text block edges and scattered throughout, else generally clean. Arthur Rackham (1867-1939) was a prolific British artist and illustrator, best known for his deluxe editions of popular children’s books. Artistically inclined since childhood, Rackham started out illustrating for newspapers, but it was not until he began drawing for children’s literature that he received critical acclaim. In response to his burgeoning fame, Rackham’s publisher, William Heinemann, began producing deluxe and trade editions of his illustrated works, the first being Rip Van Winkle in 1905. Deluxe editions were produced in a limited edition of numbered copies (ranging in quantity from 250 – 2,020), bound in vellum bindings, printed on handmade paper, and signed by the illustrator. The trade editions were published concurrently in simple bindings, on thinner paper, and with fewer color plates. This publication strategy benefited both publisher and artist; Rackham produced about one book per year and would have an annual gallery exhibition showing his original artwork for his latest book. The recipient of multiple awards for illustrations, Rackham was a diverse artist with a talent for both the fantastical and the intricacies of human nature, as demonstrated in his famous illustrations for Peter Pan.
For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls

Hemingway, Ernest First edition, first printing, in the first state dust jacket lacking photographer’s credit to rear panel (which was added in later states). Publisher’s beige cloth, stamped to front board in black with author’s facsimile signature, stamped in red and black to spine; in the original black, red, white, and blue dust jacket with a photograph of the author to rear panel. A very good copy with some light rubbing to spine, front hinge tender but generally stable, page edges toned, bookseller’s sticker to bottom of front free endpaper, a few light pencil notes; in an about very good dust jacket with wear to extremities including a chip to top edge of front panel extending about halfway down the "F" in the title, shallow chipping to spine ends and corners, short closed tears to edges, dampstain to rear fold, a few scratches to rear panel. Overall, a sturdy, presentable copy. Hanneman A18a. For Whom the Bell Tolls is Hemingway’s account of the Spanish Civil War, based on his experiences living as a journalist in Spain during the conflict. It tells the story of protagonist Robert Johnson, an American fighting for the republicans during the war. Notably, For Whom the Bell Tolls describes the struggle of the Spanish people without glorifying the war effort. Along with The Sun Also Rises, The Old Man and the Sea, and A Farewell to Arms, this text is considered one of the author’s best novels. Indeed, in his 1940 New York Times review, Ralph Thompson praises it as "the most moving document to date on the Spanish Civil War," "the first major novel of the Second World War," and even Hemingway’s "finest novel." At 211,000 words, For Whom the Bell Tolls is also Hemingway’s longest text.
Treasure Island
A Midsummer Night's Dream

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Shakespeare, William Illustrated by Arthur Rackham with 40 tipped in color plates. First Rackham edition. Publisher’s tan cloth, lettered in gilt to front board and spine, with a detailed gilt illustration of a tree with mountains in the background to the front board, top edge gray, illustrations tipped in to thick stock with tissue guards printed with captions. A very good copy, rebacked with modern gray cloth, large section of original backstrip laid down, significantly toned but with all the gilt lettering present, a few spots and tears to pages, none affecting text, some foxing to text block edges. Overall, a sturdy copy with a clean interior. One of Shakespeare’s most popular and widely performed plays, A Midsummer Night’s Dream tells the story of four young star-crossed lovers and six amateur actors as they attend a wedding between Theseus, the Duke of Athens, and Hippolyta, the former queen of the Amazons. Throughout the night, the characters are manipulated by fairies living in the forest where the wedding takes place, causing everyone some confusion as they attempt to figure out which events were real, and which were merely a dream. Arthur Rackham (1867-1939) was a prolific British artist and illustrator, best known for his deluxe editions of popular children’s books. Artistically inclined since childhood, Rackham started out illustrating for newspapers, but it was not until he began drawing for children’s literature that he received critical acclaim. In response to his burgeoning fame, Rackham’s publisher, William Heinemann, began producing deluxe and trade editions of his illustrated works, the first being Rip Van Winkle in 1905. Deluxe editions were produced in a limited edition of numbered copies (ranging in quantity from 250 – 2,020), bound in vellum bindings, printed on handmade paper, and signed by the illustrator. The trade editions were published concurrently in simple bindings, on thinner paper, and with fewer color plates. This publication strategy benefited both publisher and artist; Rackham produced about one book per year and would have an annual gallery exhibition showing his original artwork for his latest book. The recipient of multiple awards for illustrations, Rackham was a diverse artist with a talent for both the fantastical and the intricacies of human nature, as demonstrated in his famous illustrations for A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
East of Eden

East of Eden

Steinbeck, John First edition, first printing. Publisher’s green cloth, lettered in dark green to front board, stamped in red and black to spine; in the original pictorial dust jacket. Near fine with some toning to top edge and a tiny nick to the spine label, full page ownership inscription to front free endpaper and a few lines on the front pastedown that have been erased; in a near fine dust jacket with a touch of light toning to extremities, a touch of rubbing to the spine ends and corners, very tiny hole to spine panel beside the "S" in "East", a touch of soiling to rear panel. Overall, a beautiful and extremely bright copy. East of Eden features the intertwining stories of the Hamilton and Trask families. The former is based on Steinbeck’s own genealogical lineage, while the latter is a representation of the Biblical Adam and his descendants. Considered by the author to be his masterpiece work, East of Eden is a culmination of the major themes and strengths of Steinbeck’s other novels: an affinity for nature, the pervasive struggle between good and evil, familial relationships, and American history. During the writing process, Steinbeck chronicled the development of this novel with letters to his friend and former publisher Pascal Covici, the contents of which were published a year after Steinbeck’s death as Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters. A lengthy yet popular tale originally intended by the author to teach his sons about the Salinas Valley in California, East of Eden has been adapted into a film, a musical, and a television miniseries.
Green Hills of Africa
The Raymond Chandler Omnibus

The Raymond Chandler Omnibus

Chandler, Raymond First edition, first printing. Publisher’s light blue paper-covered boards, lettered in gilt to spine; in the original pictorial dust jacket printed in black, white, red, and blue. A near fine copy with a touch of light fading to extremities and some offsetting to endpapers, light foxing to text block edges; in a very good dust jacket with some light wear to extremities, four faint white spots to upper part of spine and front panel, rubbing and some light staining to rear panel. Overall, an attractive copy. Bruccoli AA6.1 The Raymond Chandler Omnibus is a collection of Chandler’s first four novels: The Big Sleep (1939), Farewell, My Lovely (1940), The High Window (1942), and The Lady in the Lake (1943). Each of the four novels included in this anthology features Detective Philip Marlowe as the main investigator of each story’s murder mystery. While Dashiell Hammett’s Continental Op and Sam Spade are widely considered the archetypal hard-boiled detective figures, Marlowe possesses a sensitivity underneath his tough exterior that distinguishes him from similar detective characters in the genre. In addition to their mutual protagonist, the four novels collected in this volume are all set in Los Angeles and present a vivid picture of daily life in the city. As Lawrence Clark Powell writes in his foreword, "Chandler brought Los Angeles into focus; he stopped the kaleidoscope, so that we see the brilliant bits and pieces in perfect register; no random movements, no distortion, no blur; all appears the way the city does on a December night after the Santa Ana winds have broomed away the smog and the million lights sparkle like jewels in a queen’s robe." An excellent collection of Chandler’s early detective literature.
Howl

Howl, and Other Poems

Ginsberg, Allen Introduction by William Carlos Williams. First edition, sixth printing. Publisher’s black and white paper wrappers, staple-bound. About very good with rubbing and toning to extremities, front wrapper with a few small stains and a vertical crease down the center, now-flattened. Overall, a nice copy of Ginsberg’s first collection of poetry. From the personal library of Marshall Efron. Published as the fourth installment of City Lights’ Pocket Poets Series, Howl and Other Poems is Allen Ginsberg’s first collection of poetry, which opens with the iconic line "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness." In many ways the mantra of the Beat Movement, "Howl" observes and addresses problems in American society. In addition to "Howl" this volume includes "A Supermarket in California," "Sunflower Sutra," "America," and "In Back of the Real," among others. Marshall Efron (b. 1938) is an American actor, humorist, and author associated with the art and literary scene in San Francisco and New York, particularly the Beat community. Most famous for his satirical television show on PBS, The Great American Dream Machine (1971-1972), and his radio shows on WBAI and KPFK, Efron also worked as a clerk at City Lights Books in San Francisco, a bookstore and publishing house founded by Lawrence Ferlinghetti in 1953 that served as a creative hub for writers of the Beat generation. Well known among the community, Efron remained friends with Ferlinghetti and other writers like Allen Ginsberg and Dylan Thomas throughout his career.
The House At Pooh Corner

The House At Pooh Corner

Milne, A. A. Illustrated by Ernest H. Shepard. First edition, first printing. Publisher’s bright salmon cloth, decorated in gilt with Shepard’s illustration of Christopher Robin, Pooh, and Piglet to front board, lettered in gilt to spine, pale pink illustrated endpapers; in the original pink dust jacket lettered in black with Shepard’s illustrations. About fine with lower front corner bumped and some offsetting to endpapers, early ownership inscription to front free endpaper and first free leaf, tiny ink dot to second free leaf, else exceptionally clean and bright; in a near fine dust jacket, lightly worn to extremities with one two-inch closed tear to top edge of front panel about an inch from the spine panel, two shorter closed tears to top edges of front and rear panels, a few tiny nicks to spine ends. Overall, a beautiful copy. The House at Pooh Corner is a children’s book that comprises the fourth of four volumes in The Pooh Books, Milne’s series of children’s books featuring the adventures of the teddy bear character Winnie the Pooh and his friends of the Hundred Acre Wood. Notably, this text marks the debut of Pooh’s friend Tigger, a tiger who loves to bounce on his tail. The House at Pooh Corner is a collection of short stories written in episodic format, meaning each chapter can be read independently of one another, with the notable exceptions of Chapters 8 & 9. As the last installment of The Pooh Books, The House at Pooh Corner is both Milne’s farewell to his readers and Christopher Robin’s goodbye to Pooh and his other animal friends.
The Big Sleep

The Big Sleep

Chandler, Raymond First edition, first printing. One of 5,000 copies. Publisher’s brownish orange cloth, stamped in dark gray-blue to boards and spine, top edge stained black; in the red and blue dust jacket. A very good or better copy with a touch of fading to the extremities, offsetting and scattered spots to endpapers, small bookseller’s sticker to rear pastedown, very slight lean to spine; in a very good unclipped dust jacket with some wear and shallow chipping to extremities, particularly spine ends, a few small holes to the folds with some paper loss, rear panel with faint dampstaining. Overall, a nice copy of Chandler’s first novel that presents well in the original dust jacket. Bruccoli A1.1.a The Big Sleep marks the debut of Chandler’s hard-boiled detective character Philip Marlowe. Unlike Dashiell Hammett’s Continental Op and Sam Spade, who are widely considered the archetypal hard-boiled detective figures, Marlowe possesses a sensitivity underneath his tough exterior that distinguishes him from similar detective characters in the genre. Indeed, as he investigates a case of blackmail serving as a red herring for a more sinister crime, Marlowe stands out, as Isaac Anderson writes in his 1939 New York Times Review, "as almost the only fundamentally decent person" in the story. Notably, in 1946, The Big Sleep was adapted into a film of the same name starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. A Haycraft Queen Cornerstone.
The Little Sister

The Little Sister

Chandler, Raymond First edition, first printing. Publisher’s red cloth, lettered in gilt to spine; in the original pictorial dust jacket lettered in blue and white. A very good copy with a bit of a lean to spine and front board slightly bowed, light fading to spine and some darkening to gilt, tiny hole in the cloth near the center of the spine; in a very good dust jacket with fading to spine and wear to extremities including some small chips to spine ends and a few short tears to corners. Overall, a lovely copy. Bruccoli A8.1.d The Little Sister is the fifth detective novel in Chandler’s series featuring his protagonist Detective Philip Marlowe, "the most exciting high-velocity private investigator in the business." Unlike Dashiell Hammett’s Continental Op and Sam Spade, who are widely considered the archetypal hard-boiled detective figures, Marlowe possesses a sensitivity underneath his tough exterior that distinguishes him from similar detective characters in the genre. Like many of Chandler’s novels, The Little Sister is set in Los Angeles and the novel illuminates much of the day to day life in that city. Specifically, The Little Sister involves Hollywood and the film industry, focusing on the younger sister of a rising starlet. Despite the slightly more sensitive nature of Chandler’s detective, The Little Sister is classic hard-boiled detective fiction with all of the austerity and ruggedness that hallmarks the genre. As the dust jacket proclaims, "Chandler is the master is of his own brand of vernacular and sets it down as if he were a divinely appointed recording angel to the tough guy."
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream

Thompson, Hunter S. Illustrated by Ralph Steadman. First edition, first printing. Publisher’s quarter black cloth and gray paper-covered boards, lettered in white to spine and stamped in blind to front board with Steadman’s illustration; in the original white pictorial dust jacket designed by Susan Schwaab. A near fine copy with some toning to extremities, slight lean to spine, and touch of soiling to front endpapers; in an about very good dust jacket, variously soiled with wear to extremities and a couple of rough tears to spine ends, tiny holes to spine panel and rear fold. From the personal library of Marshall Efron. Originally published in Rolling Stone, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is the author’s best known "failed but essentially noble experiment in Gonzo journalism," a literary genre that subjectively blends truth and fiction. The novel tells of the protagonist Raoul Duke and his attorney Dr. Gonzo as they travel on a drug-fueled, wild adventure "into the heart of the American Dream." The plot is loosely based on the author’s actual adventures with American attorney and activist Oscar Zeta Acosta and is supplemented with Thompson’s reflections on the 1960’s counterculture movement. Ralph Steadman’s iconic and grotesquely beautiful illustrations animate Thompson’s bizarre journey, assisting the reader in picturing the novel’s absurd events. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas was adapted into a popular film of the same name, starring Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro, in 1998. Marshall Efron (b. 1938) is an American actor, humorist, and author associated with the art and literary scene in San Francisco and New York, particularly the Beat community. Most famous for his satirical television show on PBS, The Great American Dream Machine (1971-1972), and his radio shows on WBAI and KPFK, Efron also worked as a clerk at City Lights Books in San Francisco, a bookstore and publishing house founded by Lawrence Ferlinghetti in 1953 that served as a creative hub for writers of the Beat generation. Well known among the community, Efron remained friends with Ferlinghetti and other writers like Allen Ginsberg and Dylan Thomas throughout his career.
East of Eden

East of Eden

Steinbeck, John First edition, first printing. Signed and inscribed by Steinbeck in blue ink to front free endpaper: "For — / with many thanks / for two fine bits / of thorn / John Steinbeck / New York 1953". Publisher’s green cloth lettered in dark green to front board and stamped in red and black to spine; in the original pictorial dust jacket. About very good, variously soiled and with some wear and toning to extremities, text block edges toned and with faint scattered stains, small dampstain to the gutter at title page, professional repairs to backstrip; dust jacket about very good, price-clipped and with some wear and large chips to extremities, significant paper repairs and reinforcements, most noticeably to the front fold, bottom edge of front panel, and spine ends. Overall, a presentable copy, inscribed by the author in the year following the book’s publication. East of Eden features the intertwining stories of the Hamilton and Trask families. The former is based on Steinbeck’s own genealogical lineage, while the latter is a representation of the Biblical Adam and his descendants. Considered by the author to be his masterpiece work, East of Eden is a culmination of the major themes and strengths of Steinbeck’s other novels: an affinity for nature, the pervasive struggle between good and evil, familial relationships, and American history. During the writing process, Steinbeck chronicled the development of this novel with letters to his friend and former publisher Pascal Covici, the contents of which were published a year after Steinbeck’s death as Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters. A lengthy yet popular tale originally intended by the author to teach his sons about the Salinas Valley in California, East of Eden has been adapted into a film, a musical, and a television miniseries.
Farewell

Farewell, My Lovely

Chandler, Raymond First edition, first printing. One of 7,500 copies. Publisher’s red-orange cloth, stamped in dark blue to boards and spine, top edge stained black; in the original red, blue, and white dust jacket. A very good copy with a touch of wear to the extremities, spine a bit faded, light foxing to prelims and final blanks, rear hinge starting and with some glue residue, p. [277] with a 2" x 4" abrasion near the bottom of the page where it appears a sticker may have once been affixed, not affecting text; in a very good unclipped dust jacket, toned to spine and with a bit of wear and tiny chips to extremities, spine panel with a small circular stain and a one-inch closed tear about three inches up from the bottom edge and a half-inch chip to the bottom, affecting the first three letters of "Knopf", verso of spine panel with a bit of tape residue a couple inches below spine head, faint dampstain to rear panel. Overall, an attractive copy that presents well. Bruccoli A2.1.a Farewell, My Lovely is the second novel to feature Chandler’s hard-boiled detective character Philip Marlowe. Unlike Dashiell Hammett’s Continental Op and Sam Spade, who are widely considered the archetypal hard-boiled detective figures, Marlowe possesses a sensitivity underneath his tough exterior that distinguishes him from similar detective characters in the genre. Regardless, Isaac Anderson declares in his 1940 New York Times review that "the appeal of ‘Farewell, My Lovely’ is in its toughness, which is extremely well done." Notably, Farewell, My Lovely has been adapted into three films: The Falcon Takes Over (1942), Murder, My Sweet (1948), and Farewell, My Lovely (1975). A Haycraft Queen Cornerstone.
Playback

Playback

Chandler, Raymond First American edition, first printing. One of 6,000 copies. Publisher’s orange cloth, stamped in dark brown with concentric circle pattern, lettered in dark brown to spine, top edge stained orange; in the original dust jacket designed by Richard J. L. Tibak. About fine with a touch of wear to spine ends; in a near fine dust jacket with a touch of wear to extremities and a tiny closed tear about an inch up from the spine foot. Bruccoli A11.2.a Playback is the eighth and final complete detective novel in Chandler’s series featuring his protagonist Detective Philip Marlowe, published in the year before the author’s death. Unlike Dashiell Hammett’s Continental Op and Sam Spade, who are widely considered the archetypal hard-boiled detective figures, Marlowe possesses a sensitivity underneath his tough exterior that distinguishes him from similar detective characters in the genre. Unlike many of his other novels, Playback is not set in Los Angeles, but rather in the fictional town of Esmeralda, California – a fictional representation of La Jolla, where Chandler lived towards the end of his life. In this novel, Marlowe is hired to tail a travelling woman, but ultimately must turn on his client, whom he realizes has malicious intent. Although the plot has been critiqued as weaker than the other Marlowe novels, Playback, based on an unused screenplay of the same name, is no less compelling; as the dust jacket states, the plot is not "what matters most, though suspense is there to grip you from the first page," but instead Chandler’s writing makes the novel: "the sour-funny dialogue tickles you to a wry chuckle on almost every subsequently one, those terse casually thrown away pearls of seamy side philosophy in the special Chandler idiom which remains as vividly inventive as ever."
Playback

Playback

Chandler, Raymond Uncorrected Proof copy. Publisher’s light greenish yellow paper wrappers, with the publisher’s printed brown label to the front wrapper, extending over spine onto rear board. About very good with significant foxing to wrappers, text block edges, and publisher’s wraparound band, wear to spine ends with rear hinge slightly starting, interior very clean. Overall, a nice copy of this rare and fragile proof copy. Bruccoli A11.1.a Playback is the eighth and final complete detective novel in Chandler’s series featuring his protagonist Detective Philip Marlowe, published in the year before the author’s death. Unlike Dashiell Hammett’s Continental Op and Sam Spade, who are widely considered the archetypal hard-boiled detective figures, Marlowe possesses a sensitivity underneath his tough exterior that distinguishes him from similar detective characters in the genre. Unlike many of his other novels, Playback is not set in Los Angeles, but rather in the fictional town of Esmeralda, California – a fictional representation of La Jolla, where Chandler lived towards the end of his life. In this novel, Marlowe is hired to tail a travelling woman, but ultimately must turn on his client, whom he realizes has malicious intent. Although the plot has been critiqued as weaker than the other Marlowe novels, Playback, based on an unused screenplay of the same name, is no less compelling; as the dust jacket states, the plot is not "what matters most, though suspense is there to grip you from the first page," but instead Chandler’s writing makes the novel: "the sour-funny dialogue tickles you to a wry chuckle on almost every subsequently one, those terse casually thrown away pearls of seamy side philosophy in the special Chandler idiom which remains as vividly inventive as ever."
For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls

Hemingway, Ernest First edition, first printing, in the first state dust jacket lacking photographer’s credit to rear panel (which was added in later states). Publisher’s beige cloth, stamped to front board in black with author’s facsimile signature, stamped in red and black to spine; in the original black, red, white, and blue dust jacket with a photographic portrait of the author to the rear panel. About fine with a touch of toning to page edges and faint offsetting to endpapers; in a very good or better dust jacket, unclipped, with some wear to extremities, shallow chipping to spine ends, short closed tears to bottom edge of front panel, one-inch closed tear to top edge of front panel near spine head, and to top and bottom edges of rear panel about an inch from the spine. Overall, a bright copy that presents very well in the original first state dust jacket, much nicer than usual. Hanneman A18a. For Whom the Bell Tolls is Hemingway’s account of the Spanish Civil War, based on his experiences living as a journalist in Spain during the conflict. It tells the story of protagonist Robert Johnson, an American fighting for the republicans during the war. Notably, For Whom the Bell Tolls describes the struggle of the Spanish people without glorifying the war effort. Along with The Sun Also Rises, The Old Man and the Sea, and A Farewell to Arms, this text is considered one of the author’s best novels. Indeed, in his 1940 New York Times review, Ralph Thompson praises it as "the most moving document to date on the Spanish Civil War," "the first major novel of the Second World War," and even Hemingway’s "finest novel." At 211,000 words, For Whom the Bell Tolls is also Hemingway’s longest text.
Winnie the Pooh

Winnie the Pooh

Milne, A. A. (Alan Alexander) Illustrated by Ernest H. Shepard. First edition, first printing, first state dust jacket with "117th Thousand" to rear flap. Publisher’s dark green cloth, decorated in gilt to front board with an illustration of Christopher Robin and Pooh, lettered in gilt to spine, top edge gilt, illustrated map endpapers; in the original tan pictorial dust jacket printed with Shepard’s illustrations in black. A near fine copy, front hinge tender but sturdy, tiny nick to the upper corner of pp. 79-121, not affecting text, half-inch closed tear to last free leaf and rear free endpaper, early ownership inscription to first free leaf; in a near fine dust jacket, toned to spine and with a touch of wear to extremities, shallow chipping to spine ends and a half-inch closed tear to top edge of rear panel, else very bright and clean . Overall, a beautiful copy, rare in the original dust jacket. Housed in a custom clamshell box. Winnie-the-Pooh is the second in Milne’s series of children’s books featuring the adventures of the teddy bear character Winnie the Pooh and his friends. Each telling an individual and complete story, the chapters of Winnie-the-Pooh can be read independently of one another. Milne created the story of Winnie the Pooh for his son Christopher Robin, who had a teddy bear named Edward Bear. In his introduction, Milne explains how Edward Bear became Winnie the Pooh, although he notes that "we can’t remember whether Winnie is called after Pooh, or Pooh after Winnie." The name "Winnie" comes from a bear that the Milnes saw at the London Zoo, while the name "Pooh" is from a swan whom the fictional Christopher Robin encountered in When We Were Very Young (1924).
The Galilee Hitch-hikers

The Galilee Hitch-hikers

Brautigan, Richard Limited edition of 700 copies, preceded only by the first edition of 200 copies published six years earlier. Publisher’s red paper wrappers with an illustration by Ken Davis to front board in black, string-bound, printed on laid paper. A fine copy. From the personal library of Marshall Efron. The Galilee Hitch-hikers, Brautigan’s second book of poetry, is a short poem in nine parts, titled "The Galilee Hitch-hiker," "The American Hotel," "1939," "The Flowerburgers," "The Hour of Eternity," "Salvador Dali," "A Baseball Game," "Insane Asylum," and "My Insect Funeral." Connected by their brief descriptions of events involving the character named Baudelaire, the poems are humorous and whimsical, written in Brautigan’s characteristically imaginative style. Marshall Efron (b. 1938) is an American actor, humorist, and author associated with the art and literary scene in San Francisco and New York, particularly the Beat community. Most famous for his satirical television show on PBS, The Great American Dream Machine (1971-1972), and his radio shows on WBAI and KPFK, Efron also worked as a clerk at City Lights Books in San Francisco, a bookstore and publishing house founded by Lawrence Ferlinghetti in 1953 that served as a creative hub for writers of the Beat generation. Well known among the community, Efron remained friends with Ferlinghetti and other writers like Allen Ginsberg and Dylan Thomas throughout his career.
Requiem for a Nun

Requiem for a Nun

Faulkner, William First trade edition, first printing. Publisher’s quarter black cloth spine lettered in gilt and gray-green cloth-covered boards, top edge stained black; in the original pictorial dust jacket designed by M. McKnight Kauffer. A very good copy, front hinge tender after the first signature but still sturdy, light toning to extremities, tape residue extending about 2.5" from the top and bottom edges of each board; dust jacket about very good, toned and with some rubbing to extremities, spine foot with a crude tape repair and a bit of loss. Petersen A32.1b.1. In Requiem for a Nun, Faulkner revisits the story of Temple Drake, a young Mississippi woman who becomes the victim of the criminal assistant of a notorious Tennessee moonshiner. He first introduced these characters in his 1931 novel Sanctuary. Now a grown and married woman, Temple must reconcile with the horrors of her past as she attempts to provide a more normal life for her own child. Interestingly, Requiem for a Nun is presented in the form of a three-part play interwoven with prose sections, and it is divided into three parts: Act One, "The Courthouse (A Name for the City);" Act Two, "The Golden Dome (Beginning Was the Word);" and Act Three, "The Jail (Nor Even Yet Quite Relinquish–)." Notably, this text contains one of Faulkner’s best-known phrases, "The past is never dead. It is not even past," which refers to the understanding that our present identity is inherently linked to our history, an idea that is present in much of Faulkner’s work and throughout the Southern Gothic genre. Marshall Efron (b. 1938) is an American actor, humorist, and author associated with the art and literary scene in San Francisco and New York, particularly the Beat community. Most famous for his satirical television show on PBS, The Great American Dream Machine (1971-1972), and his radio shows on WBAI and KPFK, Efron also worked as a clerk at City Lights Books in San Francisco, a bookstore and publishing house founded by Lawrence Ferlinghetti in 1953 that served as a creative hub for writers of the Beat generation. Well known among the community, Efron remained friends with Ferlinghetti and other writers like Allen Ginsberg and Dylan Thomas throughout his career.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Twain, Mark (Clemens, Samuel) Illustrated by Edward Windsor Kemble. Early edition. Publisher’s decorative green cloth, with an illustration of Huck Finn to the front panel in black and gilt, lettered in black and gilt. A very good or better copy with some light wear to extremities and a bit of rippling to the cloth where it is stamped in black surrounding the illustration of Huck, page edges lightly toned, front hinge a bit tender but without any separation, bookplate to front pastedown, ownership signature to front free endpaper, a few spots to the text block. Overall, a lovely copy of this early edition of Twain’s classic work, in the same format as the first edition. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a pseudo companion novel to Twain’s highly successful The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876); although both are set in the antebellum South, Tom Sawyer is the tale of a young boy’s mischievous adventures, while Huckleberry Finn involves a disenfranchised youth’s moral dilemmas about social conflict. Specifically, Huckleberry Finn runs away from his alcoholic father and befriends Jim, a run-away African-American slave seeking freedom in the North. The dialog of the text features local dialects drawn from Twain’s experiences living in the South. When it was first published in the United States in 1885, Huckleberry Finn was highly scrutinized and was banned by several libraries. Interestingly, the text was banned not for its saturation of racist vocabulary and prejudiced world-views, but for its depiction of criminal, lower class white Americans. Although it continued to be challenged in the 20th century for its depiction and treatment of African-Americans, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn remains one of the Great American Novels. Indeed, Ernest Hemingway proclaimed that it was the beginning of American literature: "There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since."
Moby Dick; Or

Moby Dick; Or, The Whale

Melville, Herman Illustrated by Rockwell Kent. First illustrated edition. Publisher’s black cloth, decorated and lettered in silver with Kent’s Art Nouveau illustration of the whale emerging from the ocean; in the original pictorial dust jacket with Kent’s illustration in blue and black, lettered in black. About fine, a few tiny abrasions to the bottom right corner of the front board and previous owner’s bookplate to front pastedown, else fine; in a near fine dust jacket with some light rubbing to extremities and faint toning to spine, a few chips to spine head. Overall, a gorgeous copy, rare in the dust jacket. One of the great American novels, Moby Dick is narrated by Ishmael, a sailor on the Pequod. The ship is led by the tyrannical Captain Ahab who is consumed by his thirst for revenge on a ferocious sperm whale named Moby Dick. The novel employs a symbolic use of the color white – an expansion upon Melville’s similar symbolism in his 1850 novel White-Jacket. Melville wrote Moby Dick as his friendship with fellow American Renaissance author Nathaniel Hawthorne was developing and dedicated the book to him. In 1926, prolific illustrator and artist Rockwell Kent was commissioned to illustrate Richard Henry Dana, Jr.’s Two Years Before the Mast, but the artist declined, choosing instead to create illustrations for Moby Dick. Kent was given full artistic license, which he used to create a now iconic series of woodcut prints, including the matching covers and dust jacket. After critics rediscovered the text in the 1920s, Rockwell’s illustrated edition helped accelerate the renewed appreciation of Moby Dick that established it as a crowning achievement of American Romantic and Renaissance writing.