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Polyhistor, rerum toto orbe memorabilium thesaurus locupletissimus – MELA, Pomponius. De situ orbis libros tres.

SOLINUS, Caius Julius (active 3rd century AD). 2 parts in one volume, folio (11 3/4 x 8 in.; 29.9 x 20.3 cm). Printer’s woodcut device to title and verso of final leaf, 2 folding woodcut maps, 18 woodcut maps in the text, text in roman type, commentary in italic. BINDING/CONDITION: Contemporary stiff vellum, manuscript title on spine; remnants of leather ties. (64V1H) Second edition of Sebastian Münster’s annotated commentary of Solinus’s and Mela’s geographical texts with the "Asia Maior" folding map containing "THE EARLIEST REPRESENTATION OF THE NORTH-WEST COAST OF AMERICA ON A PRINTED MAP" (Burden). The cartographer of this map is unknown, but Burden conjectures that it is the work of Münster, who compiled the text. Burden further notes that the "Asia Maior" map shows one of the first delineations of a strait between Asia and America, some two hundred years before Bering’s voyages to the region. At the time, there was still debate about the plausibility of a land mass connection between the Asian and American continents. No other issues of the woodblock for "Asia Maior" are known, and the only way to differentiate between the map in the first edition (1538) and the present, second edition is that the first bears the signature "t 4" in the lower right corner while the second has none. REFERENCES: Adams S-1394; Burden, The Mapping of North America, 11 (1538)
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La Geografia. Commentaries by Sebastian Münster, translated by Pietro Andrea Mattioli.

PTOLEMAEUS, Claudius (after 83-168 AD) 8vo (6 5/8 x 4 1/4 inches, 16.9 x 10.5 cm.) 60 fine double-page copper-engraved maps by Giacomo Gastaldi, including 2 world maps (Shirley 87 and 88), embellished with sea-monsters, mermaids, ships, and wild and unusual animals such as elephants and leopards, each with descriptive letterpress text and map numbers on rectos and versos of the maps, decorative woodcut side-borders to title-page, fine woodcut portrait of Ptolemy observing the heavens, woodcut initials, illustrations and diagrams throughout, publisher’s large woodcut device on colophon leaf 2D7r and on verso of final leaf (cf. Vaccaro Marche, p. 318, fig. 427), blank 2D8 preceding maps. BINDING/CONDITION: Modern brown calf paneled gilt, the spine in 6 compartments richly gilt with raised bands, endpapers and edges plain. A FINE BRIGHT COPY. (64V10C) FIRST COMPLETE EDITION IN ITALIAN, preceded only by Berlinghieri’s verse paraphrase of 1482. "THE VERY FIRST ATLAS OF THE NEW WORLD" (Nordenskiöld). Ptolemy’s Geography, a compilation of what was known about the world’s geography in the Roman Empire during his time (ca. 90-168 AD). The early illustrated incunable editions were all printed as large format atlases. This is the first small format atlas and therefore the first likely to be used by travelers. All maps in the present edition were engraved on copper by Giacomo Gastaldi (ca. 1500-1565), cosmographer to the Venetian Republic and one of the greatest cartographers of the 16th century (Burden). Karrow has argued that Gastaldi’s early contact with the celebrated geographical editor, Giovanni Battista Ramusio, and his involvement with the latter’s work, "Navigationi et Viaggi," prompted him to take up cartography as a full-time occupation. Gastaldi spent two years putting together the maps for Pietro Andrea Mattioli’s new Italian translation of Ptolemy. "[T]HE FIRST TO CONTAIN MAPS OF THE AMERICAN CONTINENT" (Burden). Nordenskiöld states that the 26 Ptolemaic maps are based on the woodcuts by Münster which illustrated the Basel edition of 1540, and that the 34 modern maps are of Gastaldi’s own design. FIVE OF THE SEVEN MAPS RELATING TO THE AMERICAS ARE THE EARLIEST PRINTED AMERICAN REGIONAL MAPS: the modern world map (map 59); "Carta marina" (the first sea chart depicting the modern world, map 60); "Tierra nova" (the first separate map of the South American continent, map 54); "Nueva Hispania" (the earliest separate map of the Gulf Coast, Mexico, and the present southwestern United States, map 55); and "Tierra nueva [del Bacalaos]" (the earliest individual map of the east coast of North America, map 56), showing the discoveries of Verrazzano and Cartier. The work also includes the first separate map devoted to Arabia and the first reference to Singapore on a printed map. The translation by the celebrated botanist Pietro Andrea Mattioli (1501-1577) appears only in this edition; it was superseded by Girolamo Ruscelli’s translation, which was first published in 1561 and frequently reprinted. PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s London, Travel, Atlases and Natural History including the Library of Colin and Joan Deacon, 15 May 2018, lot 231 REFERENCES: Adams P-2234; Burden 16-17; JCB 3:153; Mortimer, Italian 404; Nordenskiöld Collection 2:214; Phillips, Atlases 369; Sabin 66502; Shirley, British Library T.PTOL-9a.
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A New Mapp of New England and Annapolis with the Country[‘s] adjacent.

DANIEL, R[ichard] Engraved map by W. Binneman (19 1/2 x 23 1/4 in.; 49.5 x 59.1 cm), with an inset map of Boston harbor. BINDING/CONDITION: Matted and framed, not examined out of frame. Skillful repairs to centerfold crease, with the "y’s" in "Country’s" altered by hand to read "Country." THIRD AND FINAL STATE OF THE MAP, with the inset of Carolina replaced by a large plan of Boston harbor. The original Daniel map of 1679 was first offered for sale by Robert Morden and William Berry, while the subsequent ca. 1684 edition was published by Morden alone; both are described at length by Burden. Scarce: Only 2 copies of the first state are known to exist. Burden locates 12 copies of the second state in institutions and private collections and of the third 14 copies. Only two copies of the second state have sold at auction in the past 15 years. Christopher Browne (fl. 1648-1712) was known to have purchased plates from other map dealers and alter them. The "Daily Courant" (London, 2 August 1712) contains an advertisement announcing publication of the present map. The major alteration to the map, outside of the imprint, is the inset map of Boston harbor, largely drawn from Thomas Pound’s extremely rare "A New Mapp of New England" (1691). This issue also celebrates the English defeat of the French at Port Royal with a squadron of ships in October 1710. "ARCADIA NOW ANNAPOLIS" is added to the region, and Port Royal was renamed Annapolis in honor of the Queen. "Control was not confirmed until the signing of the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 which ended the war of Spanish Succession" that had raged in Europe since 1701 and, known as Queen Anne’s War in North America, the conflict erupted there in 1702. By the terms of the treaty, the French ceded to the British Acadia, Newfoundland, and the Hudson Bay territory, retaining only Cape Breton Island. However, the French interpreted the terms "all Nova Scotia with its ancient boundaries" to signify only the peninsula of present day Nova Scotia while excluding all of the mainland between New England and the St. Lawrence. This interpretation fueled future conflicts but the treaty marked the beginning of the end of French dominance in North America. PROVENANCE: Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III (sale, Sotheby’s New York, 19 January 2019, lot 1137); Martayan Lan Augustyn, New York, REFERENCES: Burden, The Mapping of North America, 514
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Mr. Greenvil Collins Master of His M:ts Ship the Speedwell, His Journall of the Voyage of the Said Shipp Sent, and Lost, Upon the Discovery of a North-East Passage Anno 1676. Capt. Jno Wood.

COLLINS, Greenville (1643-1694) Manuscript folio (14 x 9 inches; 35.6 X 22.9 cm): 2 full-page maps handcolored in outline, one in-text map of the Shetland Islands, one double-page map in ink and wash of "Mount Missery," 3 ink and wash text illustrations, including one of a walrus and her calf, 18 pages of text within rules. Eighteenth-century marbled wrappers, strips of marbled paper pieced along lower margin and fore-edge of lower wrapper (edges somewhat worn and frayed), in half red morocco case. (65V8D) AN EARLY FIRSTHAND ACCOUNT OF THE QUEST FOR THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE. A manuscript journal of great interest by the renowned hydrographer, Greenville Collins, recording the details of a seventeenth-century expedition from Great Britain along the northern coast of Russia and through Nova Zembla, in search of an eastward passage to Japan and China. In 1493 to defuse trade disputes Pope Alexander VI split the discovered world in two between Spain and Portugal, leaving France, the Netherlands and England without a sea route to the trading nations of Asia. The desire to establish such a route motivated much of the European exploration of both coasts of North America. When it became apparent that there was no route through the heart of the continent, attention turned to the possibility of a passage through northern waters (but it was not until 1906 that passage from Greenland to Alaska was successfully navigated). At the command of King Charles II, the expedition set out from Deptford 6 May 1676. It consisted of two ships, the Speedwell, with John Wood as its captain and Greenville Collins as its master, and the Prosperous, commanded by Captain William Flawes. As shown by Collins’s map, they sailed north toward Greenland, and then east along the ice north of Russia, through the Barents Sea. On 29 June, the Speedwell ran aground and was wrecked during a storm. The crew got safely ashore, but the ship had become separated from the Prosperous in a heavy fog. They were not rescued by the Prosperous until 8 July. Collins’s log records the voyage of the Speedwell in great detail, with daily entries giving the location of the ship, wind, and weather conditions, and observations on their surroundings, including the natives, animals, and topography of the Shetland Islands. He provides a detailed map, complete with depth soundings of the passage, and directions for sailing into Brace Sound. He describes magnificent icebergs and ice formations, noting that some were the color blue, as high as the towers of Westminster Abbey, and others shaped like triumphal arches. He mentions the numerous "sea horses" (i.e., walruses) they saw and attempted to kill, and includes a sketch of a female walrus and her calf. Whales were also sighted. Once the Speedwell had run aground, the crew was able to salvage their provisions and weapons, although Captain Wood had lost his journal and notes in the wreck. The crew set up a camp called "Mount Missery," of which Collins drew a double-page topographical view, until the Prosperous came to their rescue. Greenville Collins is best known as a hydrographer in the Royal Navy and the author of Great Britain’s Coasting Pilot (1693), the first survey of the country’s coast undertaken by a Briton. The three maps that he drew within his journal attest to his talent and ability. The first single-page colored map shows the polar regions on a circular projection stretching from the Button, Hudson, and Baffin Bays in the west around the Arctic Circle to the presumed northern coastline of Russia to 185o east of Greenwich. The other single-page colored map is a detailed chart showing the routes of the Speedwell and Prosperous through the arctic seas north of Lapland to Nova Zembla. The in-text map shows part of the Shetland Islands and Brace Sound, with a cartouche and scale. Manuscript accounts of seventeenth-century voyages of exploration are rare, and the present journal provides a unique opportunity to obtain a firsthand account of a very early attempt at finding a northeast passage in search of the riches of Asia. The present manuscript remains unpublished, although Captain Wood prepared two accounts largely copied from Collins’s journal. One resides in the Rawlinson papers (Rawlinson A.467: "A Relation of a Voyage for the Discovery of a Passage by the North-East to Japan) and the other in Samuel Pepys’s library. As Captain Wood had lost his journal and notes, Samuel Pepys, a secretary of the Commission, ordered him to use the account submitted by Collins. On 4 September 1676, Pepys recorded that "he had this morning received His Majesty’s orders in favour of Mr. Collins.from whom and this journal.his Majesty has received so much satisfaction that.it is his pleasure that he [Collins] be appointed to the Mastership of the Galley frigate [Charles] now going forth from Woolwich." Only two other logs by Collins survive. One, dated ca. 1677, records his service with the galley frigate Charles on an expedition to Tangier. The other records his encounters with Algerine pirates. In addition to his journals, thirty-six manuscript charts by Collins are known to survive, all but ten of them in the Admiralty Hydrographic Department in Taunton. After good service as master on three other ships, Collins was made a captain and appointed to command the 18-gun HMS Larke in 1679. He remained in the Royal Navy until 1693. PROVENANCE: Bookplate of the Duke of Hamilton; Voyages and Travels from the Library of David Parsons (sale, Sotheby’s New York, 11 December 2007, lot 18) REFERENCE: Arader Galleries gratefully acknowledges the research of Captain Paul Hughes, PhD, a marine consultant who has studied Greenville Collins’ work for over ten years.
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La Geografia. Commentaries by Sebastian Münster, translated by Pietro Andrea Mattioli.

PTOLEMAEUS, Claudius (after 83-168 AD) 8vo (6 5/8 x 4 1/4 inches, 16.9 x 10.5 cm.) 60 fine double-page copper-engraved maps by Giacomo Gastaldi, including 2 world maps (Shirley 87 and 88), embellished with sea-monsters, mermaids, ships, and wild and unusual animals such as elephants and leopards, each with descriptive letterpress text and map numbers on rectos and versos of the maps, decorative woodcut side-borders to title-page, fine woodcut portrait of Ptolemy observing the heavens, woodcut initials, illustrations and diagrams throughout, publisher’s large woodcut device on colophon leaf 2D7r and on verso of final leaf (cf. Vaccaro Marche, p. 318, fig. 427), blank 2D8 preceding maps. BINDING/CONDITION: Tiny worm hole on title-page and [cross]1 affecting the word "stato," faint to moderate dampstaining chiefly marginal in text but migrating to maps, worming in lower margins of maps 7-14 and 44-54 affecting a bit of text on map 13. Later limp vellum, front cover with slight rough outer edge. (64V10C) FIRST COMPLETE EDITION IN ITALIAN, preceded only by Berlinghieri’s verse paraphrase of 1482. "THE VERY FIRST ATLAS OF THE NEW WORLD" (Nordenskiöld). Ptolemy’s Geography, a compilation of what was known about the world’s geography in the Roman Empire during his time (ca. 90-168 AD). The early illustrated incunable editions were all printed as large format atlases. This is the first small format atlas and therefore the first likely to be used by travelers. All maps in the present edition were engraved on copper by Giacomo Gastaldi (ca. 1500-1565), cosmographer to the Venetian Republic and one of the greatest cartographers of the 16th century (Burden). Karrow has argued that Gastaldi’s early contact with the celebrated geographical editor, Giovanni Battista Ramusio, and his involvement with the latter’s work, "Navigationi et Viaggi," prompted him to take up cartography as a full-time occupation. Gastaldi spent two years putting together the maps for Pietro Andrea Mattioli’s new Italian translation of Ptolemy. "[T]HE FIRST TO CONTAIN MAPS OF THE AMERICAN CONTINENT" (Burden). Nordenskiöld states that the 26 Ptolemaic maps are based on the woodcuts by Münster which illustrated the Basel edition of 1540, and that the 34 modern maps are of Gastaldi’s own design. FIVE OF THE SEVEN MAPS RELATING TO THE AMERICAS ARE THE EARLIEST PRINTED AMERICAN REGIONAL MAPS: the modern world map (map 59); "Carta marina" (the first sea chart depicting the modern world, map 60); "Tierra nova" (the first separate map of the South American continent, map 54); "Nueva Hispania" (the earliest separate map of the Gulf Coast, Mexico, and the present southwestern United States, map 55); and "Tierra nueva [del Bacalaos]" (the earliest individual map of the east coast of North America, map 56), showing the discoveries of Verrazzano and Cartier. The work also includes the first separate map devoted to Arabia and the first reference to Singapore on a printed map. The translation by the celebrated botanist Pietro Andrea Mattioli (1501-1577) appears only in this edition; it was superseded by Girolamo Ruscelli’s translation, which was first published in 1561 and frequently reprinted. PROVENANCE: Bonham’s London, 27 March 2018, lot 69. REFERENCES: Adams P-2234; Burden 16-17; JCB 3:153; Mortimer, Italian 404; Nordenskiöld Collection 2:214; Phillips, Atlases 369; Sabin 66502; Shirley, British Library T.PTOL-9a.
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Ioannis Camertis.in C. Iulii Solini [Greek: polyhistora] enarationes. Additus eiusdem Camertis Index, tum literarum ordine, tum rerum notabilium copia percommodus studiosis.

SOLINUS, Caius Julius (active 3rd century AD) - CAMERS, Joannes (1468-1546), ed. and comm. Folio (12 x 8 in.; 30.5 x 20.3 cm). Letterpress title within historiated woodcut border, double-page woodcut map "Tipus Orbis Universalis Iuxta Ptolomei Cosmographi Traditionem et Americi Vespucii Aliorunque Lustrationes" by Peter Apian dated 1520 (Shirley 45), bound between the text and the index, text of the Polyhistor surrounded by the Enarrationes, three woodcut initials, woodcut device of Lucas Alantse on colophon leaf F4r, printer’s device on cc3v. Some text browning, occasionally more pronounced, marginal staining in gutters of quires o and p, a bit of finger soiling in lower margins, the map with very slight spotting and right margin shaved, cropping the caption "Oriens"). [Bound with:] MELA, Pomponius (fl. ca. 43 AD) – VADIANUS, Joachim [or Von Watt (1484-1551)], ed. and comm. Libri de situ orbis tres, adiectis Ioachimi Vadiani Helvetii in eosdem Scholiis; addita quoque in Geographia Catechesi: & Epistola Vadiani ad Agricola digna lectu. [Colophon:] Vienna: Johannes Singrenius for Lucasa Alantse, May 1518 Folio (12 x 8 in.; 30.5 x 20.3 cm). Letterpress title within a woodcut border of allegorical figures on the arts, text with commentary surround, woodcut initials, woodcut device of Lucas Alantse on colophon leaf O3v; some marginal dampstaining and text browning, leaves c3 and e3 with lower right corners torn away, tear to inner margin of k1. The two works bound together in contemporary limp vellum, sewn on three pairs of pink tawed deerskin thongs, early ink title and traces of early manuscript paper label on spine, evidence of fore-edge ties, some restoration to covers, the vellum cockled. Cloth folding case. (64V1H) TWO CLOSELY RELATED EDITIONS FROM THE SAME VIENNESE PRESS, BOTH HIGHLY IMPORTANT AMERICANA, PRESERVED IN THEIR ORIGINAL SIXTEENTH-CENTURY BINDING. Solinus’s compilation of the wonders of the natural world was largely borrowed from the geography of Pomponius Mela and from Pliny the elder’s Natural History. Arranged geographically, the work was cited by early medieval authorities such as Isidorus and Bede. Of the numerous editions that followed its first appearance in print (1473), the present edition edited by the Viennese humanist Johannes Camers is prized above all others for the map of the world that illustrates it. The cartographer and cosmographer Peter Apian based his map on the 1507 woodcut wall-map of Waldseemüller, in which the new southern continent was named "America." Apian’s map is modeled after Waldseemüller’s-not only in its cordiform shape but also in geographical detail, including some errors, some of which derived from Ptolemy. It is signed with the publisher’s monogram, as well as with the initials of Camers (or Kamers) and Laurent Fries, the woodcutter. First edition with Vadianus’s commentary and one of the most desirable editions of Pomponius Mela, the first-century Roman geographer to the courts of Caligula and Claudius, whose geographic treatise contains the earliest mentions of the Baltic Sea ("Sinus Codanus") and the Orkney Islands ("Orcades"), Vadianus’s commentary contains several references to Vespucci and the discoveries of the Spanish and Portuguese explorers, and is the first of several editions to append his famous letter to the Swiss humanist Rudolf Agricola. First published as a pamphlet in 1515, the letter elucidates the geographical problems raised by the recent discovery of the continent of America, supporting Waldseemüller’s suggestion to name the new continent "America" after Vespucci (fol. 124v: "ex recentior[um] inquisitione, si Americam a Vesputio repertam.") More widely distributed than the 1515 pamphlet, "this edition.undoubtedly contributed to spread the name ‘America’" (Borba de Moraes). PROVENANCE: Contemporary ownership inscription on front turn-in (partially effaced and illegible) REFERENCES: Solinus: Adams A-1391; Burden, The Mapping of North America, p. xxv, plate xii; Alden/European Americana 520/25; Church 45; JCB 1:77; Sabin 86390; Shirley 45; Wolff, America: Early Maps of the New World, 81. Mela: Alden/European Americana 518/6 Borba de Moraes II:683; JCB I:71; Sabin 63956
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Le Canada, ou Nouvelle France.

SANSON D'ABBEVILLE, Nicolas (1600-1667), Guillaume (d. 1703), and Adrien (d. 1708). Copperplate map (Image: 15 1/2 x 21 1/2 in.; 39.4 x 54.6 cm), engraved by Jean Somer, partially handcolored in outline, decorative cartouche in lower right corner. BINDING/CONDITION: Matted and framed, not examined out of frame. A VERY BRIGHT AND CRISP IMPRESSION OF THE FIRST LARGE-SCALE MAP TO PRESENT ALL FIVE GREAT LAKES IN A COMPARATIVELY ACCURATE CORRELATION. "This delineation would considerably influence the cartography of the region for over 100 years; it was not to be superseded until Guillaume de L’Isle’s Carte du Canada, in 1703" (Burden). Sanson’s transformative map shows the entire Great Lakes region and the St. Lawrence River basin in detail. It names "L. Erie, ou du Chat" as a recognizable and distinct lake for the first time; the name derives from the native name "Derie" which referred to the "panther-like qualities of the feared local native Indians" (Burden). The northern waters remain the same with the exception of Hudson Bay, which is depicted in more detail. Sanson drew on source information from the Jesuit missionaries who ventured westward after Champlain’s death and published annual accounts, or "Relations," of their findings between 1632 and 1673. This included Jean Nicollet’s discovery of Lake Michigan, "Lac des Puans," in 1634 and Father Paul Ragueneau’s "Relation" of 1648 which describes his visit to Niagara Falls, three decades before Father Louis Hennepin’s formal description of the cataracts. Sanson also made several improvements in his east coast delineation: Long Island is introduced with New Amsterdam in its correct position. The Delaware River is more accurately shown, with "N[ouvelle] Suède (the former Swedish colony of Fort Christina) at its mouth, the site of present-day Willmington. The borders of Virginia are defined but none of the English settlements are given. PROVENANCE: Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III (sale, Sotheby’s New York, 19 January 2019, lot 1138); Martayan Lan Augustyn, New York, 2012 REFERENCES: Burden, The Mapping of North America, 318; Karpinski, Great Lakes Region,
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World Map]: Typus cosmographicus universalis.

MÜNSTER, Sebastian ((1488-1552)/?Hans HOLBEIN THE YOUNGER (1497-1543) Large woodcut world map (16 x 22 in.; 36.5 x 65 cm) on an oval projection, printed on two sheets joined, two large panels of inset type, some major place names also inset. BINDING/CONDITION: Loosely laid on sturdy card, enclosed in mylar. (65B1A) Published in "Novus orbis regionum," an important collection of voyages compiled by Johann Huttich and edited by Simon Grynaeus with a geographical preface by Sebastian Münster, this richly decorated map-probably by Münster-is surrounded by masterful vignettes attributed to Hans Holbein the Younger. The map shows a view of the New World, but it was already superannuated at the time of publication. Shirley notes: "Geographically the map.was probably prepared prior to 1532 based partly on the world configuration depicted in the Schöner globes, or on Apian’s map of 1520.The projection follows the oval one of Bordone, with two cherubs energetically turning crank handles at the north and south poles." The map’s elaborate border decorations are attributed to Hans Holbein the Younger, who was in Basel at the time, designing a number of decorations for Münster and others. The borders are enhanced with real and imaginary depictions of hunting scenes and feasting cannibals, winged serpents, elephants, mermaids and sea monsters, chiefly derived from popular, but largely fictitious, travel accounts of the era-notably Amerigo Vespucci’s Mundus Novus (1503). The vignette labeled "Vartomanusi" in the lower right corner, refers to the explorations of Southeast Asia by the Bolognese adventurer Ludovico di Varthema (1470-1517). Varthema was famously the first Christian known to have visited Mecca, and from 1502 to 1507, he extensively explored India, Indochina and the Indonesian archipelago. The account of his travels, "Itinerario de Ludovico de Varthema Bolognese" (Rome, 1510), was one of the most captivating of the early period of global exploration. The vignette in the upper right corner depicts the spices that were the focus of trade to the East Indies. PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s London, 10 May 2011, lot 90 REFERENCES: cf. Shirley, The Mapping of the World, 67
The City of St. Louis

The City of St. Louis

CURRIER AND IVES, publishers (after Charles Parsons and Lyman Atwater) Chromolithograph on wove paper (Image: 20 1/2 x 32 ½ in.; 57.8 x 82.8 cm. Sheet: 28 1/4 x 39 3/4 in.; 72 x 110 cm), being an aerial view of the city with 32 unnumbered references to businesses, schools, houses of worship, railroads, hotels, government offices, and parks and gardens depicted therein. BINDING/CONDITION: Loosely laid down on sturdy card, enclosed in mylar. (65B2B) A STRIKING GRAND FORMAT VIEW OF ST. LOUIS, THE "GATEWAY TO THE WEST." THE RAREST OF THE CURRIER AND IVES PRINTS. With its ideal natural port for overland commerce returning east and the creation of the transcontinental railroad, St. Louis became a fulcrum of economic activity for agriculture and trade, as well as the departure point for those seeking their fortunes in the mines of the west. Parsons and Atwater’s detailed depiction of this sprawling urban center is a testament to its exponential growth in prosperity, particularly along the banks of the Missouri River. "The names of the steamers are as colorful as their appearance, and we can distinguish a good number. Beginning at the left, we see the "Robert E. Lee," the "Natchez," the "Richmond," the "City of Cairo," the "James Howard," the "Memphis," the "De Smet," the "Andy Johnson," the "Great Republic," the "Pike," the "Susie Silver," the "Mississippi," and the "Cahokia" (Deák, p. 566). Some of the landmarks that are pointed out in the 32 captioned references are: Shaw’s Botanical Garden, the Compton Hill Reservoir, the market, the Insane Asylum, three railroad depots-including the Pacific and the Missouri railroads-City Hall, the Laclede Hotel, Missouri Park, St. Louis University, and the Court House with its magnificent neo-classical dome. PROVENANCE: Evelyn and Eric P. Newman (Kennedy Galleries, invoice dated 18 September 1958; their sale, Leslie Hindman, 23 November 2018, lot 8) REFERENCES: Conningham, Currier & Ives Prints (1983), 1117; Deák, Picturing America 835; Reps, Cities of the American West, pl. 1, after p.192; Reps, Cities on Stone, p. 96; Reps, Views and Viewmakers of Urban America, 2051
Novi Belgii novaeque Angliae nec non partis Virginiae Tabula

Novi Belgii novaeque Angliae nec non partis Virginiae Tabula

VISSCHER, Nicolaus (1618-1709) Novi Belgii novaeque Angliae nec non partis Virginiae Tabula [Amsterdam, ca. 1656] Engraved map hand-colored in outline (Image: 18 1/4 x 22 in.; 46.4 x 55.9 cm. Sheet: 21 x 21 1/4 in.; 53.3 x 54 cm), figural cartouche comprising a view of "Nieuw Amsterdam op t Eylant Manhattans," the map embellished with a fortified Native American village, canoes, a galleon, bears, beaver, a turkey, and other wild animals. BINDING/CONDITION: Floated on sturdy card stock and enclosed in mylar. Neat repair to 1 3/4 inch tear at bottom of center fold just touching the cartouche, old repair on verso to 1/2 inch tear in left margin. (65B1B) FIRST EDITION, SECOND STATE, being THE EARLIEST OBTAINABLE STATE (preceded by a proof known in only three copies), with "t’ Fort Kaimier" and without Philadelphia. "Of extreme importance for introducing a view of New Amsterdam. This is probably the second published view of the city, the first being that of Joost Hartgers in 1651. Of interest is that an example of the second state was used in the first boundary dispute between William Penn and Lord Baltimore of Maryland" (Burden). "No general map of the period has great significance in the historical cartography of New England, the Middle States, Maryland, and Virginia (Wroth, 1942-1943, John Carter Brown Annual Report). PROVENANCE: Evelyn and Eric P. Newman (their sale, Leslie Hindman, 12 November 2018, lot 118) REFERENCES: Augustyn & Cohen, Manhattan in Maps, pp. 32-33; Burden, The Mapping of North America, 315 (state 2); Tooley, The Mapping of America, 2:284 (second state)
Totius NeoBelgii Nova et Accuratissima Tabula.

Totius NeoBelgii Nova et Accuratissima Tabula.

ALLARD, Hugo (1625-1691) Totius NeoBelgii Nova et Accuratissima Tabula. Amsterdam: Reinier and Joshua Ottens, ca. 1725 Engraved Map with fine contemporary hand-coloring in outline and wash (Platemark: 18 1/4 x 21 1/4 in.; 46.4 x 54 cm. Sheet: 20 1/2 x 25 1/4 in.; 52.1 x 64.1 cm), the uncolored Restitutio cartouche of New York entitled "Nieuw-Amsterdam onlangs Nieuw Jorck genaemt | en nu hernomen bij Nederlanders op den 24 Aug 1673," surmounted by an elaborate vignette of Native Americans presenting tributes to a magisterial female figure who triumphantly holds a laurel wreath in her hand. Floated on sturdy card stock and enclosed in mylar. A FINE, BRIGHT COPY. (65B1B) FIRST EDITION, SEVENTH STATE, OF THE RENOWNED RESTITUTION MAP, with the Reinier and Joshua Ottens imprint. After Hugo Allard’s death in 1691, the business passed to his son Carolus until 1706 when he in turn transferred operation of the firm to his son Abraham. Burden speculates that Joachim Ottens purchased the plate for the map at auction in 1708. Following his death in 1719, his widow and two sons operated the business, and the imprint in the shield was altered from "Typis IOACHIM OTTENS Amstelodami" to read "Apud REINIER & IOSUA OTTENS Amstelodami." PROVENANCE: Evelyn and Eric P. Newman (sale, Leslie Hindman, 12 November 2018, lot 33) REFERENCES: Burden, The Mapping of North America 373 (state 7); Stokes, The Iconography of Manhattan Island, I:151-154, I:221-222 and pl. 8a-b (comparing the two views); Tooley, The Mapping of America, II: p. 289 (seventh state)
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Carte des Etas-Unis d’Amérique et du Cours du Mississipi; rédigée d’après différentes cartes et relations anglaises et les operations de la derniere guerre avec les Nouvelles Limites générales fixées par les articles préliminaires de paix signés [en] 17

BRION DE LA TOUR, Louis (c. 1743-1803) Engraved map with contemporary hand-coloring in outline and wash, the table and most of the decorative cartouche left uncolored, the cartouche embellished with laurel topped by the Phyrgian cap of Liberty, two flags (the flag of France and part of a striped flag) draped over a cannon and ordnance. Loosely laid on sturdy card stock and enclosed in mylar. Light dampstaining in right margin not affecting map. (65B1D) FIRST EDTION, FIRST STATE. Brion de la Tour compiled his map from various English maps and other sources, but more importantly his base map chiefly derives from Mitchell’s Map of the British and French Dominions in North America-the third edition of which was also used by John Jay to draw boundaries during the negotiations of the Treaty of Paris. The most obvious features deriving from the Mitchell map are the aggressive borders of Pennsylvania (at the expense of New York), with Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia extending west to the Mississippi. De la Tour also copied Mitchell’s locations of forts, Indian peoples, and towns throughout the map. He also duplicates Mitchell’s annotations along the Mississippi, including Ferdinand de Soto’s discovery of the Mississippi in 1541; but far to the north, the source of the river remains yet unknown. Other features of interest on the map include a numeric legend just off the coast of Massachusetts identifying eighteen northeastern forts not named on the map due to space constraints. A table in the lower left lists the population by state, including "subject Indians and Negroes," for a total of nearly 3.1 million people. It also contains a curious note at the end: "It is claimed that the waters of the Mississippi have, like those of the Ganges, such propriety, that one can bathe there all in a sweat, without being inconvenienced." Lastly, Tooley points out that the striped flag in the cartouche was probably meant to represent the American flag, and thus is most likely the first map to represent the colors of the fledgling nation. Phillips, Maps of America, p. 864; Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers, p. 63; Sellers and Van Ee, Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies, 746; Tooley, The Mapping of America, pp. 317-318
Novi Belgii Novaeque Angliae nec non Partis Virginiae Tabula.

Novi Belgii Novaeque Angliae nec non Partis Virginiae Tabula.

DANCKERTS, Justus (1635-1701) Engraved map (Image:18 1/4 x 22 in.; 46.4 x 56 cm. Sheet: 19 x 23 1/4 in.; 48.3 x 59 cm), uncolored, depicting domestic and wild animals, a Native American fort, and canoes, figural cartouche flanked by a female and male Native American incorporating a view of "Nieuw Amsterdam op’t Eylant Manhattans." BINDING/CONDITION: Loosely laid on sturdy card stock, enclosed in mylar. A few short tears, most neatly repaired, just touching image. A FINE IMPRESSION. (65B1B) FIRST EDITION, FIRST STATE, before the names of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania were added, and before the course of the Delaware was updated. According to Stokes, the first state of Danckerts’ map depicts the same period as Visscher’s map of the same title (1651-1655). Stokes describes numerous differences between the Visscher and Danckerts versions, and ultimately concludes that "the N.J. Visscher in its earlier form at least, antedates the earlier Danckers" Burden dates the map later than Stokes or Tooley; he presents three possible periods during which this map could have been produced: the early 1660s, when Danckerts joined the family business and tensions were growing between the English and the Dutch; in 1666, after the death of Danckerts’ brother; or following the recapture of New Netherlands by the Dutch in 1673. Burden postulates that it was most likely produced in 1673, "as the.first state is of some rarity, and the second not being produced until c. 1684." PROVENANCE: Evelyn and Eric P. Newman (sale, Leslie Hindman, 12 November 2018) REFERENCES: Burden, The Mapping of North America 434; Stokes, The Iconography of Manhattan Island, I: pp. 148-151; Tooley, The Mapping America, II: p. 285
Mitchell's Reference & Distance map of the United States.

Mitchell’s Reference & Distance map of the United States.

MITCHELL, Samuel Augustus (1790-1868) and James H. Young (1817-1866) Engraved folding wall map with large inset map of Texas, Oregon and California in lower right, several smaller inset maps of the Falls of Niagara, Northern Maine, Rochester, Albany, Washington, Charleston, and Florida on the perimeter (overall 56 x 71 in.; 142.5 x 179.6 cm), hand-colored in wash and outline, dissected in 36 sections and mounted on linen, engraving of an eagle on a seashell grasping an olive branch in his left talon and arrows in the right, flanked by the capitol at Washington and Philadelphia (attributed to William Mason), wide ornate vine border, green cloth selvage. BINDING/CONDITION: Marbled paper outer panels. Dampstained with traces of mold chiefly on the linen backing but occasionally affecting portions of the map, some sections separating from backing at corners, margins of several sections creased. (65B2C) FIRST PRINTING OF A LANDMARK MAP OF THE WEST AND THE FIRST TO INCLUDE AN INSET MAP OF TEXAS. This monumental wall map was produced by Mitchell the same year as his pocket size map of Texas, Oregon and California "[It is] an important map [depicting] the western political situation on the eve of the Mexican War. A composite map, it judiciously incorporated the recent work of Nicollet, Wilkes, Frémont, and Emory. Both the Oregon Trail and the ‘Caravan route to Santa Fe’ are included" (Schwartz & Ehrenberg). Wheat adds: "This map represents a great step forward [utilizing] the recent explorations that had bounded and determined the nature of the Great Basin. The Texas claim to a western boundary up to the Rio Grande is here shown, with the northern panhandle extending all the way to the 42nd parallel, following Emory’s map of Texas" (Wheat). PROVENANCE: Evelyn and Eric P. Newman (sale, Leslie Hindman, 12 November 2018, Lot 89) REFERENCES: Rumsey 4308.000; Schwartz & Eherenberg, The Mapping of America, p. 276; Wheat, Mapping of the Transmississippi (1959) II:35, no. 520 (referring to the pocket map’s "Accompaniement")
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The Birds of Asia

GOULD, John (1804-1881) and Richard Bowdler SHARPE (1847-1909). Folio (558 x 378mm, 21.9 x 14.8 inches), 7 volumes, 530 hand-coloured lithographic plates by Gould, H.C. Richter, J. Wolf, and W. Hart, list of subscribers. Modern red half morocco, gilt spines and top edges, by Sangorski and Sutcliffe (extremities lightly rubbed). Some scattered spotting and offsetting, but the majority of plates unaffected, one plate towards the end of vol. II, Psaltria erythrocephala, lightly creased, repaired tear in one leaf of text in vol. III. (64F) THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE WORK ON ASIATIC BIRDS OF ITS TIME, CONTAINING ILLUSTRATIONS OF MANY BIRDS NOT PREVIOUSLY DESCRIBED. The intended geographical range of the work was enormous, and very much in keeping with the seemingly limitless self-belief of the 19th-century’s best known ornithologist. As Sharpe writes in his excellent introduction, the work covers ‘Species from Palestine to the westward, and from the Moluccas to the east.’ Unsurprisingly, the subjects of the plates are amongst the most varied of Gould’s folios including trogons, kingfishers, sunbirds, woodpeckers, partridges, parrots, pittas and pheasants. This great undertaking was originally issued in 35 parts to 207 subscribers, and took 34 years to produce, the final three parts only being completed by Sharpe after Gould’s death in 1881. Sharpe’s descriptions are identified by his initials; those without initials were presumably printed from Gould’s notes. William Hart completed the lithographs from Gould’s sketches. Anker 178; Fine Bird Books (1990) p.102; Nissen IVB 368; Sauer 17; Wood p.365; Zimmer pp.258-9.
The American Atlas: Or

The American Atlas: Or, a Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America.

JEFFERYS, Thomas (1719-1771). Folio (22 x 15 3/4 in.; 55.9 x 40 cm). Letterpress title and index leaf, 23 maps on 30 sheets (18 folding, 11 double-page, one single-page) by Emanuel Bowen, Jean-Baptiste Bourgignon D’Anville, Samuel Dunn, Lewis Evans, Joshua Fry and Peter Jefferson, Samuel Holland, Thomas Pownall, William Scull, and others, hand-colored in outline and mounted on guards, sheets stamped 1-30 on verso as issued. BINDING/CONDITION: Half calf over contemporary marbled boards; rebacked and restored to style, endpapers renewed. Right margin of sheet and upper right corner of sheet 23 neatly remargined, right margin of sheet 24 also mended. (65V5F) "ONE OF THE MOST AUTHORITATIVE AND MOST COMPREHENSIVE ATLASES COVERING THE REVOLUTIONARY PERIOD" (Schwartz & Ehrenberg, P. 204). It was the primary cartographic publication most likely consulted by American, English, and French civilian administrators and military officers during the war in planning strategy; and after the war it was valuable in settling boundary disputes. The atlas was assembled from separate maps previously published by various cartographers. "The atlas is representative of British cartographic compilation, engraving, and publishing during the latter half of the eighteenth century, when English maps and charts were the best in the world" (Ristow). There were several editions of the American Atlas dated 1776. The title-page of this copy mentions 49 copperplates and designates Samuel Holland’s rank as a major rather than as a captain. There are various combinations of maps included in the several 1776 editions. For example, the New York and New Jersey map (no. 17), originally issued in 1775, is dated 17 August 1776. The title has been altered, with Jeffery’s name as engraver deleted. Additionally, in the sea off Sandy Hook a four-line note has been engraved reading "For description of this Country. see Govr. Pownall’s topographl. Desn. ." (Stevens & Tree, 44e). The map of Lake Champlain (no. 18) is included for the first time (Stevens & Tree, 25a). Scull’s map of Pennsylvania was previously numbered 17 but here is numbered 20. The present edition includes A New Map of the Province of Quebec (no. 19; Stevens & Tree 73a) dated 16 February 1776, replacing Jefferys’s map of the Middle British Colonies. PROVENANCE: Evelyn and Eric P. Newman (sale, Leslie Hindman, 12 November 2018, lot 69) REFERENCES: Howes J-81; Phillips, cf. 1166 and 1165; Ristow, Bibliographical Note in American Atlas [facsimile edition of 1776 ed.); Sabin 35953; Schwartz & Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, p. 204
Aquatilium animalium historiae

Aquatilium animalium historiae, liber primus.

SALVIANI, Ippolito (1514-1572) Folio (16 1/4 x 11 in.; 41.3 x 27.9 cm). Engraved title with medallion portrait of the author within an elaborate architectural frame flanked by mermaid caryatids and decorated with scrollwork, shells, turtles, and putti astride dolphins, surmounted originally with the arms of Salviani’s patron, Marcello Cervini, but here replaced with the hand-drawn and vividly colored arms of Cardinal Roberto de Nobili, 81 full-page engraved illustrations attributed by Brunet to Antoine Lafréry, containing a total of 98 numbered figures (1-53 and 55-99, omitting 54 as usual) and of which 36 are printed as plates with versos blank, printed cancel slips for names of fish on ff. 112, 130, 137, 149, 194 and 206 (a few others emended in a contemporary hand), large historiated woodcut initials, Salviani’s woodcut "Hercules" device on fol. 256v. CONDITION/BINDING: Title-page cut round and laid down, date on title-page altered by hand from "MDLIIII" to reflect colophon date (i.e., MDLVII"), ownership inscription on top margin of title-page oxidized, some light browning and foxing to leaves and plates, some early ink stains (most prominent on O1 and T1), marginal finger soiling throughout, neat repairs to long tear on P5 just touching illustration but affecting 18 text lines on verso, inside left corner of R7 renewed, early repairs with later mends to long tears on S3 and S6, Y7 neatly remargined, three other tiny tears of which two repaired (R2 and S4), minor loss to lower right corner of Y4. Contemporary full chestnut brown morocco attributed to the papal master binder, Nicolas Fery, double gilt fillets with fleur-de-lys cornerpieces enclosing an elaborate arabesque frame, gilt arms of Cardinal Roberto de Nobili on both covers, edges gilt; rebacked, extremities slightly rubbed, two old knife (?) cuts on lower cover, evident traces of ties. FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE OF A CLASSIC WORK ON ICHTHYOLOGY, AND ONE OF THE EARLIEST EXAMPLES OF THE USE OF ENGRAVINGS FOR SCIENTIFIC ILLUSTRATION. IN A GRAND PRESENTATION BINDING FOR CARDINAL ROBERTO DE NOBILI ATTRIBUTED TO THE PAPAL BINDER NICOLAS FERY. De Nobili (1541-1559) was the grand nephew of Pope Julius III, who made him a cardinal deacon in the consistory of 22 December 1553 at the precocious age of twelve. The privilege leaf in this issue incidentally is headed by Pope Julius III. In addition to being a naturalist, Salviani had been chief physician to three popes-including Julius-which is mentioned in the pope’s privilegio. The death of Salviani’s patron, Marcello Cervini, in 1555, must have added to the delays which meant that printing was not completed until 1557, despite the original 1554 date on the title page, which in this copy has been altered to conform to the colophon date of October, 1557. This-the first issue- is far more scarce than the second issue, which bears a colophon date of January, 1558. Of thirteen copies listed in U.S. institutions by Worldcat/OCLC, only five copies have the 1557 colophon while the remaining eight contain the 1558 one. At auction, only two copies with the 1557 colophon have surfaced: Minerva Auctions, Rome (2014) and Christie’s New York (1999), whereas the 1558 issue has been and is readily available at auction and from dealers alike. Little research on fish species had been conducted since Aristotle. Pierre Belon introduced his Histoire naturelle des estranges poissons marins with woodcut illustrations first in 1551, and an augmented edition in 1553. In 1554 Guillaume Rondelet published his De piscibus marinis-also with woodcut illustrations. With the introduction of copperplate engravings, Salviani was able to depict finer, more realistic physical details of the fish such as the luster in their eyes, the silvery sheen of the scales, and the delicate tracery of the fins. According to Brunet, the plates were engraved by Antoine Lafréry, while Nissen attributes them to Bernard Aretinus. The fish and marine animals are labelled on the copperplates with the names in Greek, Latin, and the common vernacular. In addition to common fish, the plates feature eels, sharks, skates, squids, cuttlefish, and an octopus. The Aquatilium animalium describes only the aquatic vertebrae and cephalopods that Salviani had personally examined. The chapters are devoted to each variety of fish or marine animal, providing detailed notes on their names, physical description, habitat, and even culinary use. There are numerous references to Aristotle, Pliny, and Galen, and with regard to gastronomy, Salviani quotes from Athenaeus, Oppianus, and Giovio. While the title incorporates the phrase "liber primus," Salviani did not print any subsequent volumes,as this was most likely his most costly venture. PROVENANCE: Roberto de Nobili (gilt supralibros and arms on title-page); Christoph Galassi (contemporary ownership inscription on title-page indicating that the book came from Nobili’s library). ACQUISITION: Libreria Antiquaria Borromini (Rome), March, 2019, Item 15. REFERENCES: Brunet: V:101; Mortimer/Harvard Italian 454; Nissen, Schöne Fischbücher; Nissen ZBI 3555. For the attribution of the binding to Nicolas Fery, cf. Piccarda Quilici, Legature antiche e di pregio, 1995; Guido Vianini Tolomei, Legature Romana Barocca 1565-1700 (Rome, 1991); Tammaro Marinis, La Legatura artistica in Italia nei secoli XIV e XV (Florence, 1960)
Chosen hachido no zu (or) Chosen koko zenzu (General Map of Korea)

Chosen hachido no zu (or) Chosen koko zenzu (General Map of Korea), ca. 1786

SHIHEI, Hayashi] (1738-1793 Pen and ink watercolor map on thin tissue and mounted on paper, (28 1/4 x 20 ¼ in.; 71.2 x 51.5 cm), after the 1785 map by Hayashi Shihei, folded to form 8 segments, with holograph annotations in black ink, the names of each of the eight provinces given in small, white rectangles, the city of Seoul distinguished by thick black lines outlining its square walls with its four main gates. BINDING/CONDITION: Accordion folded with light brown tissue affixed to second and eighth segments to form a protective outer covering, vertical cream label on the eighth segment; a little wear to edges all around, some separation from paper mount, scattered worm trails. (65B3A) AN EXTREMELY DESIRABLE MANUSCRIPT MAP OF KOREA AND AN IMPORTANT DOCUMENT FUNDAMENTAL TO THE BEGINNINGS OF A MORE EXPANSIVE JAPAN. Cartographic information on Korea first came to Europe through the Japanese and Chinese, who had some knowledge of the kingdom. "Early Chinese and Japanese maps portrayed the peninsular kingdom more adequately than the often hypothetical accounts in early European maps" (Short). In the 1780s, the Tokugawa regime, the last feudal military government of Japan, began to feel conflicted within its own ideology. Trade monopolies with the outside world generated enormous profits for the shogunate, but authorities wanted to limit the influence of outside traders by restricting free entry of foreigners and denying foreign travel to Japanese people. Although the policy of seclusion was dominant, there were those who endorsed a more activist presence in the region. This map was drawn after that of the military strategist Hayashi Shihei, which accompanied his Sangoku tsuran zusetsu (An Illustrated Description of the Three Countries), published in 1786. His book was one of the first to describe in detail Japan’s geopolitical position in relation to the Joseon Dynasty (Korea), the Kingdom of Ryukyu (Okinawa) and Ezo (Hokkaido). Chief among its purposes was to demonstrate Japan’s proximity to its neighbors. His writings emphasize the very real presence of external threats and the need for Japan to populate and develop its northern frontier in Hokkaido as well as to augment its military and naval powers. In 1792, the Edo government banned his treatise, seized most copies, and destroyed the woodblock printing plates. Consequently, most surviving examples of Shihei’s map had been copied by hand, circulated in learned Japanese circles, and handed down from generation to generation. PROVENANCE: Geographicus Rare Antique Maps, 12 March 2019 REFERENCES: Short, John Rennie. Korea: A Cartographic History (2012), pp. 63-65; cf. Toby, Ronald P., "Mapping the Margins of Japan," passim, in Cartographic Japan (2016).
A General Atlas

A General Atlas, Describing the Whole Universe; Being an Improvement on the Maps of D’Anville and Robert, Containing the Maps of the Whole Continent of America.

KITCHIN, Thomas (1718-1784) A General Atlas, Describing the Whole Universe; Being an Improvement on the Maps of D’Anville and Robert, Containing the Maps of the Whole Continent of America. London: Printer for Robert Sayer, 1773 Folio (22 x 14 in.; 55.9 x 35.6 cm). Letterpress title-page printed in red and black, 23 maps engraved maps on 35 double-page and folding sheets, partially hand-colored in outline and mounted on guards, a folding "New Map of Turkey in Europe" (London: For Robert Sayer, 1789) inserted between maps 3 and 4. BINDING/CONDITION: Contemporary half calf over marbled boards; worn, covers detached. Lacking the lower portion of the map of Europe (map 4), a several margins of maps frayed and browned, some with minor losses, fold separations and marginal tears, some with old repairs, occasional offsetting and light toning. (65V5F) FIRST EDITION of this very popular atlas, with most of the maps dated 1772 or earlier. Among the cartographers who made corrections and additions to the maps were Samuel Dunn, Thomas Jefferys, Emanuel Bowen and John Gibson, Lieutenant J. Ross, and John Roque. Six of the maps relate to the Americas, including the first issue of Ross’s Course of the River Mississipi (no. 33), Scientia terrarum et coelorum. by S. Dunn (nos. 1-2); An Accurate Map of North America. also All the West India Islands.by Eman. Bowen.and John Gibson (nos. 30-32); An Exact Chart of the River St. Lawrence.by Thomas Jefferys (no. 32); and A Map of South America (nos. 34-35). PROVENANCE: Evelyn and Eric P. Newman (sale, Leslie Hindman, 12 November 2018, lot 73) REFERENCES: Phillips 3514; Sabin 38021; Stevens & Tree 31(a), 49(c) and 76(c)
A New and Correct Chart Shewing the Variations of the Compass in the Western & Southern Oceans in the year 1700 by his Ma[jes]ties's Command by Edm[und] Halley Tabula haec hydrographica variationum magneticarum index

A New and Correct Chart Shewing the Variations of the Compass in the Western & Southern Oceans in the year 1700 by his Ma[jes]ties’s Command by Edm[und] Halley Tabula haec hydrographica variationum magneticarum index

HALLEY, Edmund (1656-1742) TOGETHER WITH LETTERPRESS INSTRUCTIONS: HALLEY, Edmund (1656-1742) The Description and Uses of the New and Correct Sea Chart of the Western and Southern Ocean, Shewing the Variations of the Compass. [London]: R. and W. Mount, and T. Page, [1712] Engraved chart by I. Harris flanked by letterpress instructions affixed vertically to left and right sides of chart (Chart: 22 ½ x 19 in.; 57.2 x 48.3 cm. Overall with letterpress: 24 x 27 1/2 in.; 61 x 70 cm)., title cartouche over South America, secondary cartouche over Africa with dedication to William III. BINDING/CONDITION: Hinged to a mat. Creases where previous folding, several small paper repairs where letterpress was affixed to chart, costing one word in paragraph 2; some light browning. (65B1G) APPARENT FIRST EDITION OF HALLEY’S FAMED ISOGONIC CHART, WITH RARE EARLY ISSUE OF INSTRUCTIONAL TEXT. "AMONG THE RAREST OF CARTOGRAPHICAL TREASURES" (Tooley). An instrument of singular importance for navigation in the North and South Atlantic, of which few examples have survived. While Halley is perhaps best known for his computation of the orbit of Halley’s comet, his theory of terrestrial magnetism is one of his most important scientific achievements. Between 1698 and 1700, Halley sailed across the Atlantic in the ship Paramour charting magnetic variation. By postulating the existence of four magnetic poles, Halley hoped to explain the magnetic variations recorded on the Earth’s surface. He published two charts during his voyage on the Paramour, a meteorological chart in 1701, and the present magnetic chart in 1701/1702. The two were the first published charts with lines of equal magnetic variation I the oceans; these were referred to as "Halleyan lines" by his contemporaries, and are now known as Isogonic lines. "Thus the isoline, or line of equal value, was invented. For more than a century Halley’s magnetic lines were a familiar feature of the world chart" (Shirley). Instrument, rather than chart, is the best designation of this early issue, for which the printed text provides instructions on use. Throughout the 18th century, the Mount & Page partnership and imprint went through numerous permutations. Robinson dates that of "R. and W. Mount, and T. Page" to 1712. An inspired work of science by one of the great astronomers of the age, which went on to be reprinted numerous times throughout the 18th century, including numerous editions of The English Pilot. PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s New York, 12 December 2017, lot 37 REFERENCES: Louis A. Bauer, "Some Bibliographical Discoveries in Terrestrial Magnetism," in Nature 52 (1895), pp. 79-80; Edmund Halley and Thematic Geo-Cartography," in The Compleat Plattmaker; Robinson, Marine Cartography in Britain, pp. 117-121; Shirley, The Mapping of the World, p. xiv; Tooley, Maps and Mapmakers, p. 55; The World Encompassed, 199
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Descriptionis Ptolemaicae augmentum sive occidentis notitia. Brevi commentario illustrata, et hac secunda editione magna sui parte aucta.

WYTFLIET, Cornelius (1555-1597). Folio (12 x 7 3/4 in.; 30.5 x 19.7 cm). Engraved architectural title-page surmounted by the Habsburg imperial coat of arms, dedication to Philip III (fol. ***2), notice to the reader (fol. ***3), epigram (fol. ***4r), privileges dated 15 May 1598 and 17 July 1597 (fol. ***4v), table of maps (fol. Aa4v), 19 copper-engraved double page maps interleaved between the preliminaries and the text, woodcut initials and head- and tailpieces, one pagination error (Aa1 reads "158" instead of "185"). BINDING/CONDITION: Contemporary German pigskin over boards roll-tooled in blind stamped with central lozenge on front cover and ecclesiastical arms of a bishop on the lower cover, plain endpapers and edges, traces of two pairs of ties, short crack to joint at foot of spine, extremities rubbed. Ownership inscriptions on title-page partially eradicated, some browning to text, occasional small faint dampstains on lower margins and inside corners of upper margins. (64V1G) AN OUTSTANDING, UNSOPHISTICATED COPY of the second edition, Rivius issue (shared with Johann Bogaerts), of the earliest American atlas, with good, strong impressions of the maps: "Chica sive Patagonica," "Peruani regni descriptio," "Limes Occidentis," "Norumbega et Virginia," and "Nova Francia et Canada" all bear the date of 1597. Wytfliet’s atlas, firsts published in 1597 was an immediate success, and six further editions, including three with French text, were published within the next two decades. In this edition all pagination errors but one have been corrected and the errata eliminated. PROVENANCE: B[ibliotheca] Maria[e] in Salem, Convent of the Cistercians of Salem, north of Lake Constance, Germany (contemporary inscription on top margin of title-page); Bibliotheca Minoraugiensis, Premonstratensian Convent of Weissenau in Swabia, near Ravensburg, viz. north of Lake Constance (inscription on lower margin of title-page); Voyages and Travels from the Library of David Parsons (sale, Sotheby’s New York, 11 December 2007, lot 96) Arader Galleries gratefully acknowledges the assistance of Dr. Paul S. Needham, Scheide Librarian at Princeton, for determining the details of the early ownership inscriptions REFERENCES: Borba de Moraes 2:381; Alden/European Americana 598/122; Gallup, "Wytfliet’s Descriptionis Ptolemaicae Augmentum" in the Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 76:1 (1982), pp. 66-67; Koeman III: Wyt 2; Phillips, Atlases 3645; Sabin 105697; cf. Burden, The Mapping of North America 100-107 and Shirley, World 207
Descriptionis Ptolemaicae augmentum sive occidentis notitia. Brevi commentario illustrata

Descriptionis Ptolemaicae augmentum sive occidentis notitia. Brevi commentario illustrata, et hac secunda editione magna sui parte aucta.

WYTFLIET, Cornelius (1555-1597). Folio (12 x 7 1/2 in.; 30.5 x 19.1 cm). Engraved architectural title-page surmounted by the Habsburg imperial coat of arms, dedication to Philip III (fol. ***2), notice to the reader (fol. ***3), epigram (fol. ***4r), privileges dated 15 May 1598 and 17 July 1597 (fol. ***4v), table of maps (fol. Aa4v), 19 copper-engraved double page maps interleaved in the text, woodcut initials and head- and tailpieces, one pagination error (Aa1 reads "158" instead of "185"). BINDING/CONDITION: Contemporary limp vellum, yapp edges, modern green silk ties, contemporary titling on spine. Linen folding case, black morocco lettering piece on spine. Light to moderate browning throughout, text offsetting to verso of map of Florida. (64V1G) A GOOD, UNSOPHISTICATED COPY of the second edition, Rivius issue (shared with Johann Bogaerts), of the earliest American atlas. "Chica sive Patagonica," "Peruani regni descriptio," "Limes Occidentis," "Norumbega et Virginia," and "Nova Francia et Canada" all bear the date of 1597. Wytfliet’s atlas, firsts published in 1597, was an immediate success, and six further editions, including three with French text, were published within the next two decades. In this edition all pagination errors but one have been corrected and the errata eliminated.PROVENANCE: Antonis Orsetti, Luca (near contemporary inscription on recto of front free endpaper partially obscuring another, together with a manuscript location guide to the maps) REFERENCES: Borba de Moraes 2:381; Alden/European Americana 598/122; Gallup, "Wytfliet’s Descriptionis Ptolemaicae Augmentum" in the Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 76:1 (1982), pp. 66-67; Koeman III, Wyt 2; Phillips, Atlases 3645; Sabin 105697; cf. Burden, The Mapping of North America 100-107 and Shirley, World 207.
DESCRIPTIONIS PTOLEMAICAE AUGMENTUM

DESCRIPTIONIS PTOLEMAICAE AUGMENTUM, SIVE OCCIDENTALIS NOTITIA BREVI COMMENTARIO ILLUSTRATA.

WYTFLIET, Cornelius (1555-1597) Small folio (11 3/4 x 7 1/2 in. 30 x 19.2 cm). Engraved title within an elaborate architectural frame surmounted by the Habsburg imperial coat of arms, privileges dated 15 May 1597 and 17 July 1596, 19 copper-engraved double page maps interleaved in text, text mispaginated as usual but complete with final blank. BINDING/CONDITION: Full brown morocco by Alix, the spine in six compartments with raised bands (the second and last lettered gilt), marbled endpapers, edges gilt. Quarter brown morocco folding case, two green morocco labels on spine, one on front of case; a few nicks. (64V1G) A FINE, BRIGHT COPY. THE RARE FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE. A SUPERB COPY OF THE FIRST ATLAS SPECIFICALLY DEVOTED TO THE AMERICAS. "As the first general geography of America, the text of Wytfliet’s work may, at least in some degree, have contributed to dispel many of the errors regarding the New World In the history of early cartography, the maps in Wytfliet’s Augmentum play the same part for the New World as Ptolemy’s do for the old hemisphere, and they give us.a valuable summary of the early cartography of America" (Nordenskiöld. Facsimile-Atlas to the History of Cartography). CONTAINING SOME OF THE EARLIEST REGIONAL MAPS OF NORTH AMERICA. Intended to supplement Ptolemy’s Geographia, Wytfliet describes those parts of the world revealed by modern discovery that were unknown to the Alexandrian geographer. Wytfliet edited his text using printed editions of primary sources accounts of the early exploration period such as the works of Acosta, Hakluyt, de Bry and Ramusio. He supplements his text with a fine double-hemispherical world map based on Rumold Mercator’s 1587 map (Shirley 207) and eighteen regional representations of the Americas: eight maps of North America (Burden 100-107), ten maps of South America (Chile, Peru, two maps of Brazil, present-day Colombia and Venezuela, the northernmost coast of South America with the neighboring Caribbean islands, Hispaniola, Cuba, and Jamaica, and two maps of Central America). Significant among the North American maps are New England and Virginia, New France and Canada, Florida and Apalche, New Granada and California, and Quivira and Anian. "Norvmbega et Virginia" is the most accurate depiction of the east coast from the Carolinas to Canada until Joannes de Laet’s 1630 "Nova Anglia, Novvm Belgivm, et Virginia" and the second map to use the name Virginia. "Nova Francia et Canada" is the first to use "Canada" in its title and the first to focus on the river and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. It summarizes sixteenth-century knowledge of the region just prior to major French expansion there and the voyages of Samuel de Champlain (Burden 102). "Granata Nova et California" is the first printed map specifically devoted to California and the southwest of the present-day United States. One of its interesting features is its depiction of a number of fabled places, largely derived from Spanish sources. "Limes Occidentis | Quiuira et Anian" encompasses the western coastal portions of the present-day United States and Canada. Based on Gerard Mercator’s world map (1569), its bulging shape is remarkably similar to that of Alaska as it is known today (Burden 107).
The Mapping of North America

The Mapping of North America

BURDEN, Philip D. A list of printed maps 1511-1670. 608 pages, 10.6 x 14.3 inches (270 x 365 mm.), bound in burgundy cloth with color dustjacket. With 410 map entries, 11 color plates and 418 black and white photographs. Mint condition. Never opened. The Mapping of North America documents the printed cartographic record of the discovery of the continent to 1670. The arrival of Christopher Columbus on the American continent in 1492 follows arguably the most influential European invention of the second millennium: printing by the use of movable type. The new technology’s application to printing images soon led to a desire for maps. These began to appear in the 1470s. For students of American history this background means that one of the most important geographical discoveries of man is fully documented in print. Much has been written on the printed word in relation to America, and many works exist on the cartography of it, however, none has attempted to comprehensively detail every known printed map. Maps are one of the most fascinating forms of media. They condense into one document an immense amount of information. Each map is discussed in detail, with a description of both its publication and background history, including those of the cartographers, printers and publishers involved. The complicated network of sources is revealed. Also, if any explorations are recorded, a description of them is incorporated. Lastly, but by no means least, each entry is accompanied by a detailed photograph. The book details all known printed maps, many previously unrecorded, depicting any part of North America (i.e. present day Canada and the United States). Arranged chronologically, the work is complemented by a foreword by Tony Campbell, a full bibliography, and various appendices and charts including a title index and a list of first depictions in maps. Shipping free in USA only.
The Mapping of North America II

The Mapping of North America II

BURDEN, Philip D. A list of printed maps 1671-1700. 612 pages, 10.6 x 14.3 inches (270 x 365 mm.), bound in burgundy cloth with colour dustjacket. With 12 + 364 map entries, 12 color plates and 392 black and white photographs. Mint condition. Never opened. An essential reference work for collectors, dealers, institutions and researchers. The Mapping of North America II continues on from the first volume in documenting the printed cartographic record of the discovery of the continent from 1670 to 1700. Much has been written on the printed word in relation to America, and many works exist on the cartography of it. None however has attempted to comprehensively detail every known printed map. By 1670 European knowledge of the outline of the continent of North America varied considerably. Through the period of this book knowledge of its coastline and interior river system would improve immensely. Maps are one of the most fascinating media. They condense into one document an immense amount of information. Each map in this book is discussed in detail, with a description of both its publication and background history, including those of the cartographers, printers and publishers involved. The complicated network of sources is revealed and, if any explorations are recorded, a description of these is included too. Lastly, but by no means least, each entry is accompanied by a photograph. Shipping free in USA only.
The Mapping of North America & The Mapping of North America II

The Mapping of North America & The Mapping of North America II

BURDEN, Philip D. The Mapping of North America, A list of printed maps 1511-1670. 608 pages, 10.6 x 14.3 inches (270 x 365 mm.), bound in burgundy cloth with color dustjacket. With 410 map entries, 11 color plates and 418 black and white photographs AND The Mapping of North America II, A list of printed maps 1671-1700. 612 pages, 10.6 x 14.3 inches (270 x 365 mm.), bound in burgundy cloth with color dustjacket. With 12 + 364 map entries, 12 color plates and 392 black and white photographs. Mint condition. Never opened. The Mapping of North America documents the printed cartographic record of the discovery of the continent to 1670. The arrival of Christopher Columbus on the American continent in 1492 follows arguably the most influential European invention of the second millennium: printing by the use of movable type. The new technology’s application to printing images soon led to a desire for maps. These began to appear in the 1470s. For students of American history this background means that one of the most important geographical discoveries of man is fully documented in print. Much has been written on the printed word in relation to America, and many works exist on the cartography of it, however, none has attempted to comprehensively detail every known printed map. Maps are one of the most fascinating forms of media. They condense into one document an immense amount of information. Each map is discussed in detail, with a description of both its publication and background history, including those of the cartographers, printers and publishers involved. The complicated network of sources is revealed. Also, if any explorations are recorded, a description of them is incorporated. Lastly, but by no means least, each entry is accompanied by a detailed photograph. The book details all known printed maps, many previously unrecorded, depicting any part of North America (i.e. present day Canada and the United States). Arranged chronologically, the work is complemented by a foreword by Tony Campbell, a full bibliography, and various appendices and charts including a title index and a list of first depictions in maps. An essential reference work for collectors, dealers, institutions and researchers. The Mapping of North America II continues on from the first volume in documenting the printed cartographic record of the discovery of the continent from 1670 to 1700. Much has been written on the printed word in relation to America, and many works exist on the cartography of it. None however has attempted to comprehensively detail every known printed map. By 1670 European knowledge of the outline of the continent of North America varied considerably. Through the period of this book knowledge of its coastline and interior river system would improve immensely. Maps are one of the most fascinating media. They condense into one document an immense amount of information. Each map in this book is discussed in detail, with a description of both its publication and background history, including those of the cartographers, printers and publishers involved. The complicated network of sources is revealed and, if any explorations are recorded, a description of these is included too. Lastly, but by no means least, each entry is accompanied by a photograph. Shipping free in USA only.
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Cosmographiae uniuersalis Lib. VI. In quibus, iuxta certioris fidei scriptorium traditionem describuntur.

MÜNSTER, Sebastian (1488-1552) Folio (12 x 8 in.; 30.5 x 20. 3 cm). Letterpress title within historiated woodcut border, woodcut portrait of author on verso, 14 double-page/folding maps including two world maps mounted on guards, 3 folding panoramas (that of Vienna as two separate folding plates), 38 double-page/folding town views in text, one double-page/folding plate of sea monsters, more than 900 small text illustrations, vignettes and diagrams, printer’s woodcut device at the end. BINDING/CONDITION: Lacking quire H (the double-page/folding map of Bern), quire T misbound after quire V, light marginal dampstaining in preliminaries, small internal tear on atlas map 8, slightly affecting image, some staining from paste on guards, panorama of Heidelberg slightly frayed along bottom margin, occasional spotting or inkstains, corner tear on final leaf repaired. Contemporary blind-paneled calf over wooden boards, edges sprinkled red; rebacked retaining nineteenth-century backstrip, traces of clasps, extremities rubbed. (64V1F) An extremely popular work, at least 27 editions of Münster’s Cosmographia appeared between 1553 (after his death) and 1628 in German, French, Latin, Italian, and Bohemian. There are separate sections on Africa, Asia, and "De novis Insulis, quomodo, quando & per quem" between pages 1099 and 1113. The description of America includes accounts of the voyages and explorations of Columbus, Vespucci, Magellan, etc. The last of the atlas maps, America, is in Burden’s state 10. The book concludes with Latin and Hebrew versions of the so-called Prester John letter, the spurious account of a legendary Christian kingdom in the East. PROVENANCE: ?Thomas Fairfax, first Lord Fairfax of Cameron 1560-1640), with an inscription by "Ryther" in Latin verse on the verso of the map of Europe "Script ex Munst T[homas] F[airfax] de Denton militis; later ownership inscription of ?his son Charles Fairfax (1597-1673), antiquary and genealogist, on the title-page ("Carolus Fairfax") REFERENCES: Adams M-1911; Alden, European Americana 559/30; Burden 12 (state 10), Shirley 77, 22
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Cosmographiae uniuersalis Lib. VI. In quibus, iuxta certioris fidei scriptorium traditionem describuntur.

MÜNSTER, Sebastian (1488-1552) Folio (12 x 7 1/2 in.; 30.5 x 19.1 cm). Letterpress title within historiated woodcut border, woodcut portrait of the author on verso, 14 double-page atlas maps, including 2 world maps, 3 views of Vienna (signed "HRMD"), Worms (signed "ISD") and Heidelberg, each printed on two leaves and intended to be joined, approximately 1,000 woodcut text illustrations including 54 text maps, printer’s woodcut device at the end. BINDING/CONDITION: Title laid down, obscuring portrait of author on verso, moderate browning and marginal foxing, one or two marginal tears occasionally touching the image, closed tears on page 25, the last two leaves with early repairs affecting the text, dampstaining in lower inner margins in the last two quires. Seventeenth-century sheep, the spine in six compartments with raised bands, edges stained red; scuffed and scraped, endpapers renewed in the nineteenth century. (64V1F) ONE OF THE MONUMENTAL ILLUSTRATED BOOKS OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY. First published in 1544, Münster’s Cosmographia became the most popular work of its kind, teaching "nearly three generations of laymen most of what they know about the world beyond their native places" (Strauss). As a description of the whole world, Cosmographia provided an encyclopedia of general knowledge. The author’s preface "promises the prospective reader an exhaustive survey of all that is significant and interesting in his world. ‘The art of cosmography,’ he begins, ‘concerns itself not only with the countries, habitations, and lives of the various peoples of the earth, but also with many other things, such as strange animals, trees, metals, and so on, things both useful and useless, to be found on land and in the sea; [also] the habits, customs, laws, governments of men, the origins of countries, regions, cities, and towns, how nature has endowed them and what human inventiveness has produced in them, [also] what notable things have happened everywhere ‘ " (Strauss). Its success was also due to the fascinating woodcuts (over 1,000) by Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Manuel Deutsch and David Kandel. The present edition published in March of 1552 shortly before Münster’s death on 26 May at Basel, is a reprint of the definitive 1550 edition. It contains the same 14 double-page maps and has the identical text maps (Karrow 58/135-188). The 1550 edition also introduced the town views, which were unusually accurate, as they were "based on first-hand information gathered from local officials of each town or place described, and were some of the earliest large-scale plans of cities to be published" (The World Encompassed, 272). As such, Cosmographia remains a key source of social history for that period. Additionally, the editions of 1550 and thereafter contain Münster’s second world map, an oval projection cut by David Kandel, which replaced the Ptolemaic version that had appeared in earlier editions. There are separate sections on Africa, Asia, and "De novis insulis, quomodo, quando & per quem" between pages 1099 and 1113-a description of America including accounts of the voyages of Columbus, Vespucci, Magellan, etc. Map 14 of America, "Tabula nouarum insularum" is in Burden’s state 5. "He was one of the first to create space in the woodblock for the insertion of place-names in metal type. The map’s inclusion in Münster’s Cosmographia sealed the fate of ‘America’ as the name for the New World North America is not shown as accurately as the southern half of the continent, it had to a large extent been neglected so far by explorers. When Giovanni di Verrazzano passed by the Outer Banks of the Carolinas in 1524, he mistook Pamlico and Albemarle sounds for the ‘Oriental Sea’ that led to Cathay and the rich Spice Islands. Here Münster perpetuates the error and through the success of this book provided the impetus to the exploration of the region" (Burden). PROVENANCE: Nineteenth-century ownership inscription of E. de Freville with Latin motto on front pastedown; nineteenth-century library stamp on front free endpaper. REFERENCES: Adams M-1909; Burden 12; Karrow, Mapmakers of the Sixteenth Century and Their Maps, pp. 431-434; VD 16, MD6715, MD6716; Sabin 51380; Gerard Strauss, "A Sixteenth-Century Encyclopedia: Sebastian Munster’s Cosmography and Its Editions," in From the Renaissance to the Counter-Reformation, Essays in Honour of Garrett Mattingly (London, 1966)
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Cosmographiae uniuersalis Lib. VI. In quibus, iuxta certioris fidei scriptorium traditionem describuntur.

MÜNSTER, Sebastian (1488-1552) Folio (12 1/4 x 8 in.; 31.1 x 20.3 cm). Letterpress title within historiated woodcut border, woodcut portrait of the author on verso, 14 double-page atlas maps, including 2 world maps, 3 folding views of Vienna (signed "HRMD"), Worms (signed "ISD") and Heidelberg, approximately 1,000 woodcut text illustrations including 54 text maps, printer’s woodcut device at the end. BINDING/CONDITION: Title-page slightly cropped at top, a few leaves browned, top margin of pp. 221-222 extended affecting headline and partially obscuring first line of text on p. 222, lower right corner of p. 335 remargined. Seventeenth-century brown morocco with overall diapered pattern of fleurs-de-lys, ecclesiastical arms of a cardinal on both covers, the spine in seven compartments similarly tooled, raised bands, marbled endpapers, edges gilt; some color restoration and repairs to edges of both covers and head of spine, joints at spine ends rubbed, small hole in seventh compartment. (64v1F) A HANDSOME COPY OF ONE OF THE MONUMENTAL ILLUSTRATED BOOKS OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY. First published in 1544, Münster’s Cosmographia became the most popular work of its kind, teaching "nearly three generations of laymen most of what they know about the world beyond their native places" (Strauss). As a description of the whole world, Cosmographia provided an encyclopedia of general knowledge. The author’s preface "promises the prospective reader an exhaustive survey of all that is significant and interesting in his world. ‘The art of cosmography,’ he begins, ‘concerns itself not only with the countries, habitations, and lives of the various peoples of the earth, but also with many other things, such as strange animals, trees, metals, and so on, things both useful and useless, to be found on land and in the sea; [also] the habits, customs, laws, governments of men, .the origins of countries, regions, cities, and towns, how nature has endowed them and what human inventiveness has produced in them, [also] what notable things have happened everywhere.’ " (Strauss). Its success was also due to the fascinating woodcuts (over 1,000) by Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Manuel Deutsch and David Kandel. The present edition published in March of 1552 shortly before Münster’s death in May of that year, is a reprint of the definitive 1550 edition. It contains the same 14 double-page maps and has the identical text maps (Karrow 58/135-188). The 1550 edition also introduced the town views, which were unusually accurate, as they were "based on first-hand information gathered from local officials of each town or place described, and were some of the earliest large-scale plans of cities to be published" (The World Encompassed, 272). As such, Cosmographia remains a key source of social history for that period. Additionally, the editions of 1550 and thereafter contain Münster’s second world map, an oval projection cut by David Kandel, which replaced the Ptolemaic version that had appeared in earlier editions. There are separate sections on Africa, Asia, and "De novis insulis, quomodo, quando & per quem" between pages 1099 and 1113-a description of America including accounts of the voyages of Columbus, Vespucci, Magellan, etc. Map 14 of America, "Tabula nouarum insularum" is in Burden’s state 5. "He was one of the first to create space in the woodblock for the insertion of place-names in metal type. The map’s inclusion in Münster’s Cosmographia.sealed the fate of ‘America’ as the name for the New World.North America is not shown as accurately as the southern half of the continent, it had to a large extent been neglected so far by explorers. When Giovanni di Verrazzano.passed by the Outer Banks of the Carolinas in 1524, he mistook Pamlico and Albemarle sounds for the ‘Oriental Sea’ that led to Cathay and the rich Spice Islands. Here Münster perpetuates the error and through the success of this book provided the impetus to the exploration of the region" (Burden). PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s New York, Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana, 24 January 2019, lot 2036 REFERENCES: Adams M-1909; Burden 12; Karrow, Mapmakers of the Sixteenth Century and Their Maps, pp. 431-434; VD 16, MD6715, MD6716; Sabin 51380; Gerard Strauss, "A Sixteenth-Century Encyclopedia: Sebastian Munster’s Cosmography and Its Editions," in From the Renaissance to the Counter-Reformation, Essays in Honour of Garrett Mattingly (London, 1966)
Geographiae Claudii Ptolemaei Alexandrini

Geographiae Claudii Ptolemaei Alexandrini, Philosophi ac Mathematici praestantissimi, Libri VIII, partim à Bilbaldo Pirckheymero .

MÜNSTER, Sebastian (1488-1552), ed. Folio (12 ¼ x 8 in.; 31.1 x 20.3 cm). 55 woodcut map (54 double-page and one folding being the new map of Pomerania), comprising 2 world maps, 27 maps of the ancient world and 26 of the modern world, ALL WITH CONTEMPORARY HAND COLORING, woodcut portrait of Ptolemy with his sextant on verso of title-page, woodcut text diagrams (of which 2 full-page), brief descriptive text surrounded by woodcut architectural borders (ascribed to Holbein) on the first recto of each map, woodcut initials, colophon with printer’s woodcut device (on second verso of "Nova insulae") BINDING/CONDITION: Inscription at head of title-page erased, conjugate leaves BB 2,5 browned, short marginal tear on Valesia II (Map 35) with old repair, slightly affecting map, tiny worm trail on final leaf Cc8 touching headline and 2 letters. Contemporary paneled calf with triple filleted blind borders and gilt corner fleurons, central gilt strapwork medallions; rebacked to style in 6 compartments with raised bands, corners strengthened, old scratches to covers. (64V1F) A FINE COPY WITH CONTEMPORARY HAND COLORING OF THE MAPS. The fourth edition, and the last to be published in Münster’s lifetime, translated by Willibald Pirckheimer. "This edition, with the colophon-date March 1552, differs from the earlier ones in several respects. It was the first to carry a royal privilege, that of the king of France dated from Paris 20 January 1552. Münster added to the preliminary matter a short treatise ‘De utilitate tabularum geographicarum’ by Conrad Lycosthenes (Pellikan’s nephew) [i.e., Konrad Wolffhart], and a much more elaborate index divided into two parts, referring respectively to the ancient and the modern maps; one map was dropped and one new one added, with a consequent change in numeration; and for the modern map of the world a new block, already used in the ‘Cosmographia’ of 1550, had been engraved.Round the borders of all the modern maps were added woodcut strips with numerical divisions (1-18 vertically, 1-24 horizontally), serving as a grid for references in the index" (Skelton). REFERENCES: Burden 12, state 3 (with new roman numeral "XXVI" in title); Philips, Atlases 370; Shirley 92; R. A. Skelton (intro.), Theatrum orbis terrarum: Geographia (Ser. 3: Vol. 5), pp. XV?-XVI
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KOREA

BEATO, Felice, ca. 1832-1909) A Collection of thirteen photographs from the Battle of Ganghwa, South Korea, 1871 [ca. 1871] 12 albumen prints, one gold-toned albumen print (ranging from 8 3/4 x 11 1/2 in.; 22.2 x 29.2 cm to 9 x 11 1/2 in.; 22.9 x 29.2 cm), one mounted on heavy card. BINDING/CONDITION: All but one loosely laid in mylar sleeves. Slight fading or spotting. (65B3A) A RARE AND FINE collection of photographs by Felice Beato, regarded as the first war photographer. According to Bennett," [a]though there is no shortage of original nineteenth-century photographs of many Far Eastern countries, Korea is a notable exception. The fact that Korea was opened to the West only in 1882, is the most obvious reason for this relative shortage of material when compared with, for example, photographs of India, China and Japan" (p. 18). The Battle of Ganghwa, the first American military action in Korea, was the result of a conflict between isolationist government of the Joseon dynasty and the United States in 1871. American land and naval forces were dispatched to Korea in 1871 to support an American diplomatic delegation that was to establish trade and political relations with the peninsular nation and to ascertain the fate of the merchant ship "General Sherman." Additionally, the Americans indicated their interest in peaceably taking soundings of Korea’s waters and in surveying its shores. While the "Hermit Kingdom" made no initial objections, a gross misunderstanding arose. At the time, Korean policy prohibited foreign ships from sailing on the Han River, as it led directly to the capital city of Hanyang, modern-day Seoul. On 1 June, Korean shore batteries attacked the U.S. fleet as it sailed up the Ganghwa Straits, which leads to the river. When an apology from the Korean government was not forthcoming, Admiral Rodgers, decided on a punitive assault on the forts on Ganghwa Island. Known as the Battle of Gangwha, it was the largest skirmish of the conflict. In the final assault on 10 June, 243 Koreans and three Americans were killed. Korea refused to treat with the United States until 1882. Beato established his reputation as a war photographer by recording the Crimean War in 1855, the Indian Mutiny of 1858 and the 1860 Anglo-French expedition to China. He was, therefore, a strong candidate for the choice of official photographer for the American expedition to Korea in 1871. Images from Beato’s portfolio in this lot include a photograph taken aboard the U.S.S. Colorado of Private Purvis and Corporal Brown posing with their commanding officer, Captain Tilton, in front of the "Sujagi" standard captured at Fort McKee; a portrait of three Korean men aboard the U.S.S. Colorado; the U.S.S. Monocacy and U.S.S. Palos on the Salee River (cf. Marine Amphibious Landing in Korea, 1871, pp. 9, 13, and 15); American marines being towed ashore for action; and the bloody aftermath of fighting inside Fort du Coude (cf. Bennett, pp. 4 and 34); portraits of American naval officers and diplomats; and of Korean officials on board the Colorado. PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s London, Travel, Atlases and Natural History, 13 November 2018, lot 237 REFERENCES: Bennett, Terry. Korea: Caught in Time (1997); Tyson, Carolyn A. (comp.) Marine Amphibious Landing in Korea, 1871 (Naval Historical Foundation Publication, Series 2, no. 5, 1966)
Novus orbis regionum ac insularum veteribus incognitarum una cum tabula cosmographica.

Novus orbis regionum ac insularum veteribus incognitarum una cum tabula cosmographica.

HUTTICH, Johann (?1480-1544) and Simon GRYNAEUS (1493-1541) Folio (12 x 7 1/4 in.; 30.4 x 18.6 cm). Woodcut printer’s device on title-page and last leaf, large woodcut folding map, two small woodcut text illustrations (pp. 21 and 93), woodcut initials. BINDING/CONDITION: Light marginal staining, a trifle more pronounced on leaves X5-6, F6, G1-2, and quire Bb at the end, small internal tear or flaw on gamma2, touching about 2-3 index entries, light discoloration to map along central perpendicular folds. Nineteenth-century diced calf with gilt supralibros of the Society of Writers to the Signet, edges stained red; expertly rebacked with original spine laid down. (64V1H) FOURTH AND MOST COMPLETE EDITION, AUGMENTED WITH MORE ACCOUNTS OF THE NEW WORLD THAN PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED, WITH DISTINGUISHED PROVENANCE. Additions to the present edition include the second and third Cortez letters, the epistle of the Bishop of Temixtitan in "Huketan," and the summary of Herborn’s discourse on the conversion of the Indians. The map is called for in all Basel editions (the Paris edition used a map by Oronce Fine). It is the issue with "Asia" printed at an almost even level with "Mare Caspia," and "Tropicus Capricorni" appears below the tropic line. PROVENANCE: George Lockhart of Carnwath (1673-1731), Scottish writer and politician (armorial bookplate on title-page); Society of Writers to the Signet (gilt supralibros, shelfmark on front pastedown and inscription on front flyleaf: "Ex Lib:|Bibl: Scribar | Sig: Reg:|1812"); Kenneth Nebenzahl (ticket on front pastedown and his sale, Christie’s New York, 10 April 2012, lot 66) REFERENCES: Adams G-1338, Alden-Landis 555/42; Brown, The World Encompassed 65; Brunet IV:132 (".la plus complète [édition]"); JCB 1:202; Sabin 34104; Shirley 67 (world map)
Novus orbis regionum ac insularum veteribus incognitarum una cum tabula cosmographica.

Novus orbis regionum ac insularum veteribus incognitarum una cum tabula cosmographica.

HUTTICH, Johann (?1480-1544) and Simon GRYNAEUS (1493-1541) Folio (11 5/8 x 7 3/4 in.; 29.5 x 19.6 cm). Woodcut printer’s device on title and last leaf, large woodcut map , "Typus cosmographicus universalis," variously attributed to Sebastian Münster or Hans Holbein small woodcut text illustrations on pages 30 and 129, some fine woodcut initials. BINDING/CONDITION: Lacking quire delta, the map in two large folding sheets removed from text and joined, occasional light text browning and spotting, faint marginal dampstain in quires Aa-Bb. Contemporary limp vellum, with yapp edges, text block lightly sprinkled red; remnants of tawed leather ties, a few stains. Tan cloth folding case, morocco spine label; upper joint somewhat frayed, a few chips to label. (64V1H) FIRST EDITION, WITH THE WOODCUT MAP OF THE WORLD IN THE FIRST STATE [Harrisse A] with the "Asia" in 8-millimeter letters. Widely regarded as the first general history of travels, this fine collection of voyages was compiled by Johann Huttich with a preface by Simon Grynaeus. The work contains the first three voyages of Columbus, Vincent Yanes Pinzon’s voyage, the four voyages of Vespucci, and an extract of the Fourth Decade of Peter Martyr, as well as the voyages of Cadamosto, Nino, and Cabral. Other accounts deal with the travels of Marco Polo and voyages to Africa, Russia, Palestine, the Moluccas, and elsewhere. Shirley attributes the cartography to Sebastian Münster and the border decoration to Holbein, who, during his third Basel period designed a number of illustrations for books by that geographer. The "richness of artistic decoration" (Shirley) includes scenes of real and imagined animals, people and customs-as well as a ship, mermaids, and sea monsters plying the oceans. The putti turning the earth on its axis reflect the Copernican theory for the first time, predating the publication of his "De revolutionibus orbium coelestium" by eleven years. Clearly inspired by the Waldseemuller world map of 1507, it is "from the artistic point of view one of the most interesting of the many world maps turned out in the sixteenth century" (Brown). Quire delta provides a preface to the map, but was never included in the present copy. PROVENANCE: Michael Sharpe (morocco ticket in case and sale, Sotheby’s New York, 11 December 2008, lot 178) REFERENCES: Adams G-1334; Alden-Landis 532/17; Brown, The World Encompassed 65; JCB 1:104, Harrisse 171; Sabin 34100; Shirley 67
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Novus orbis regionum ac insularum veteribus incognitarum una cum tabula cosmographica.

HUTTICH, Johann (?1480-1544) and Simon GRYNAEUS (1493-1541) Folio (11 X 7 1/2 in.; 27.9 x 19.1 cm). Woodcut printer’s device on title and last leaf, large folding woodcut map, "Typus cosmographicus universalis," variously attributed to Sebastian Münster or Hans Holbein, small woodcut text illustrations on pages 30 and 129, some fine woodcut initials. BINDING/CONDITION: Map with skilfully closed tear across the image and minor marginal tear, some general browning, occasionally more pronounced, scattered spotting. Eighteenth-century half mottled calf, speckled paper boards, the spine in four compartments with three raised bands, citron and green morocco lettering pieces in two and the others decorated with gilt borders and fine tools, marbled endpapers, edges stained red; extremities rubbed, foot of spine and lower left corner of upper board wormed. (64V1H) FIRST EDITION, WITH THE WOODCUT MAP OF THE WORLD IN THE FIRST STATE [Harrisse A] with the "Asia" in 8-millimeter letters. Widely regarded as the first general history of travels, this fine collection of voyages was compiled by Johann Huttich with a preface by Simon Grynaeus. The work contains the first three voyages of Columbus, Vincent Yanes Pinzon’s voyage, the four voyages of Vespucci, and an extract of the Fourth Decade of Peter Martyr, as well as the voyages of Cadamosto, Nino, and Cabral. Other accounts deal with the travels of Marco Polo and voyages to Africa, Russia, Palestine, the Moluccas, and elsewhere. Shirley attributes the cartography to Sebastian Münster and the border decoration to Holbein, who, during his third Basel period designed a number of illustrations for books by that geographer. The "richness of artistic decoration" (Shirley) includes scenes of real and imagined animals, people and customs-as well as a ship, mermaids, and sea monsters plying the oceans. The putti turning the earth on its axis reflect the Copernican theory for the first time, predating the publication of his "De revolutionibus orbium coelestium" by eleven years. Clearly inspired by the Waldseemuller world map of 1507, it is "from the artistic point of view one of the most interesting of the many world maps turned out in the sixteenth century" (Brown). PROVENANCE: Collegio S. Carlo (purple ink stamp at the foot of the title-page) "A.R.S." (small 20th century embossed library label on front pastedown). REFERENCES: Adams G-1334; Alden-Landis 532/17; Brown, The World Encompassed 65; JCB 1:104, Harrisse 171; Sabin 34100; Shirley 67
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Novus orbis regionum ac insularum veteribus incognitarum una cum tabula cosmographica. Basel: Johannes Hervagius, 1555

HUTTICH, Johann (?1480-1544) and Simon GRYNAEUS (1493-1541) Folio (12 1/2 X 8 in.; 31.8 x 20.3 cm). Woodcut printer’s device on title-page and last leaf, large woodcut folding map, two small woodcut text illustrations (pp. 21 and 93), woodcut initials. BINDING/CONDITION: Contemporary pigskin over wooden boards, each cover decorated in blind with panels of floral and saints roll tools, the spine in five compartments with four raised bands; remains of two pairs of ties, some soiling, rubbed, a few worm trails on front pastedown and free endpaper. Tiny worm holes in margins of title-page and ?2, some browning on perpendicular centerfolds of map, faint marginal dampstaining in quires I-N, ink redactions affecting title-page and a few words on *1v. (64V1H) FOURTH AND MOST COMPLETE EDITION, AUGMENTED WITH MORE ACCOUNTS OF THE NEW WORLD THAN PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED, WITH DISTINGUISHED PROVENANCE. Additions to the present edition include the second and third Cortez letters, the epistle of the Bishop of Temixtitan in "Huketan," and the summary of Herborn’s discourse on the conversion of the Indians. The map is called for in all Basel editions (the Paris edition used a map by Oronce Fine). It is the issue with "Asia" printed at an almost even level with "Mare Caspia," and "Tropicus Capricorni" appears below the tropic line. The redactions, which affect the imprint on the title-page and colophon, as well as the list of contents ("Praefatio Simonis Grynaei ad Collimitium" in line 1 and "per Sebastianum Munsterum" in line 2 of ?1v and "per Sebastianum Munsterum" on Münster’s introduction on *1r) make plain a deep-rooted aversion-most likely by the monks of Baumburg Abbey-for the Protestant Reformation. Grynaeus was a theologian of the Reformation; Münster had joined the Franciscans in 1505 but became an apostate in 1529 in order to assume an appointment at the University of Basel, which was dominated by the Reformed Church. Subsequently Basel had become an important center of the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century, with many of its printers, including Hervagius, producing Protestant works. PROVENANCE: Contemporary ownership inscription with Latin motto; later shelf-mark on the front paste-down; Augustinian Canons Regular, Baumburg Abbey, Bavaria ("Monasterij Baumburg" inscribed at head of title-page); American Antiquarian Society (its gift bookplate inscribed with the donor’s name, Isaac Davis, on the front pastedown, blind-embossed stamp on title-page, deaccession stamp on bookplate and on lower pastedown) REFERENCES: Adams G-1338, Alden-Landis 555/42; Brown, The World Encompassed 65; Brunet IV:132 (".la plus complète [édition]"); JCB 1:202; Sabin 34104; Shirley 67 (world map)
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Ioannis Camertis Minoritani.in C. Ivlii Solini [Greek:Polyhistor] enarrationes. Additus eiusdem Camertis Index, tum literarum ordine, tum rerum notabiliuum copia percommodus studiosis.

SOLINUS, Caius Julius (active 3rd century AD) - CAMERS, Joannes (1447-1546) Folio (12 x 7 in.; 30.5 x 17.8). Letterpress title within historiated woodcut border, folding woodcut map "Tipus Orbis Universalis Iuxta Ptolomei Cosmographi Traditionem et Americi Vespucii Aliorunque Lustrationes" by Peter Apian dated 1520 (Shirley 456), text of the Polyhistor surrounded by the Enarrationes, three woodcut initials, woodcut device of Lucas Alantse on colophon leaf F4r, printer’s device on cc3v. BINDING/CONDITION: Washed and pressed, lacks blank leaf cc4 at the end. Nineteenth-century polished calf by F. Bedford, paneled gilt with triple fillets, gilt dentelles, the spine richly gilt in 7 compartments with 6 raised bands (two reserved for brown morocco lettering pieces), marbled endpapers, edges gilt; upper corners a trifle bumped, extremities lightly rubbed. Brown morocco solander case by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, lettered gilt on spine. (64V1H) THE RENOWNED EDITION OF SOLINUS CONTAINING THE EARLIEST MAP IN A PRINTED BOOK BEARING THE NAME "AMERICA." THE SUPERB HUTH-MENDEL-LILLY LIBRARY COPY. Apian’s map was preceded only by the large Waldseemüller map of 1507, which was separately published and of which only one copy is known to exist (now at the Library of Congress). Drawn on a cordiform projection like Waldseemüller’s, Apian’s map was almost certainly engraved by Laurent Fries, whose initials appear in the lower right corner. The map is rare, as it is often lacking in the text. It features North and South America as two disjunct continents with a sea channel where the Isthmus of Panama should be. South America is designated as "America," and North America as "Vlteri[us] terra incognita." 1497 was the year of Vespucci’s first voyage to America but the cartographer has inadvertently attributed this date to Columbus. On the southern portion the inscription in translation reads: "In the year 1497 this land with its adjacent islands was discovered by Columbus of Genoa by order of the King of Castille. AMERICA provincia." The flag of Spain is planted on Hispaniola, and Cuba is called "Isabella" here. PROVENANCE: ?Padua Library (stamp on title-page "Libreria Pad Pubblica"); Henry Huth (white morocco label and his sale, Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, Part 7, 8 July 1918, lot 6938); sold to Quaritch; Bernardo Mendel; his gift to the Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington (Deaccession stamp dated 2 November 1962 on verso of colophon leaf) REFERENCES: Adams S-1391; Alden/European Americana 520/25; Church 45; JCB 1:77; Sabin 86390; Shirley 45 (world map), cf. Shirley 26 (Waldseemüller, 1507)