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Alastair Buchan 1894-1917

Alastair Buchan 1894-1917

Alastair Buchan] Buchan, Anna; Buchan, John Wraps. 51 pages. Frontispiece photograph of Alastair Buchan. Thick drab green paper covers with plain tan paper spine. Hand written "A Buchan" written on the spine. Soft cover is housed inside a gray cardboard custom made slip case. Light edge wear to the wraps. Previous owner name of "J. Anderson" written in the upper left corner of the right front flyleaf (possibly John Anderson, 1st Viscount of Waverly? note: signature not authenticated) . Contents include "A Rhymed Letter" written by Alastair’s father when Alastair was eight years old; a brief biography of Alastair growing up; short narratives of war action; quotes from letters sent to his family; his death at the battle of Arras; a poem written by Alastair in 1912 titled "The Crusaders Prayer"; and a poem by his brother J.B. (John Buchan) which later appeared in the revised edition of "Poems Scots and English" 1936. This memorial includes a few comments by officers, a chaplain, and Mr. Winston Churchhill (spelled with two h’s in this memorial). Churchill wrote, "He was a very charming and gallant young officer, simple, conscientious, and much liked by his comrades. I knew him well enough to understand how great his loss must be to those who knew him better, and to those who knew him best of all." The end of the narrative on page 41 (before the two poems) is initialed "A.B." for Anna Buchan, the sister of Alastair Buchan. Anna Buchan was a Scottish novelist. No printing information associated with this memorial located in the text. Scarce. Three copies of this memorial found in OCLC – Brown University, National Library of Scotland, and Queens University Library. From the University of Glasgow website: Alastair Ebenezer Buchan was born on the 12th June 1894 at Crosshill, Glasgow. He was the son of John Buchan, a Free Church of Scotland Minister, and his wife Helen Jane Buchan (nee Masterton). He attended Hutchesons Grammar School before attending the University of Glasgow as an Arts student from 1911-1914. He studied Latin, Greek, English, Logic and Metaphyics, History and Geography. He was working towards a degree when war broke out and interrupted his studies. He joined the Royal Scots Fusiliers and in February 1915 was sent to France. In March 1916 he was wounded there and did not return to France until October 1916. He was quickly promoted to Lieutenant in January 1917. Lieutenant Alastair Ebenezer Buchan died on the 9th April 1917, aged 22, in Arras, France. He is buried at the Duisans British Cemetery, Etrun. His brother, the well-known author John Buchan is also on the Roll of Honour. The Alastair Buchan Prize was founded in 1919 in his memory, and is awarded annually for the best poem on a prescribed subject. From wikipedia: Anna Masterton Buchan (1877-1948) was a Scottish novelist who wrote under the pen name O. Douglas.[1] Most of her novels were written and set between the wars and portrayed small town or village life in southern Scotland, reflecting her own life. Anna Buchan was born in Pathhead, Scotland, the daughter of the Reverend John Buchan and Helen Masterton. She was the younger sister of John Buchan, the renowned statesman and author. She attended Hutchesons’ Grammar School in Glasgow, but lived most of her later life in Peebles in the Scottish border country, not far from the village of Broughton where her parents first met.[2] Her first novel Olivia in India was published in 1912 by Hodder & Stoughton. Unforgettable, Unforgotten (1945) is a memoir of her brother John and of the Buchan family, while Farewell to Priorsford is her autobiography, published posthumously in 1950. Her work is displayed alongside her brother’s at the John Buchan Museum in Peebles.[3] Also from wikipedia: John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir, GCMG, GCVO, CH, PC (/ b x n/; 26 August 1875 – 11 February 1940) was a Scottish novelist, historian, and Unionist politician who served as Governor General of Canada, the 15th since Canadian Confederation. After a brief legal career, Buchan simultaneously began his writing career and his political and diplomatic careers, serving as a private secretary to the administrator of various colonies in southern Africa. He eventually wrote propaganda for the British war effort during World War I. He was elected Member of Parliament for the Combined Scottish Universities in 1927, but he spent most of his time on his writing career, notably writing The Thirty-Nine Steps and other adventure fiction. In 1935, King George V, on the advice of Prime Minister R. B. Bennett, appointed Buchan to replace the Earl of Bessborough as Governor General of Canada, for which purpose Buchan was raised to the peerage. He occupied the post until his death in 1940. Buchan was enthusiastic about literacy and the development of Canadian culture, and he received a state funeral in Canada before his ashes were returned to the United Kingdom.
History of the Twenty-Fifth Regiment United States Infantry 1869-1926

History of the Twenty-Fifth Regiment United States Infantry 1869-1926

Nankivell, John H. (Captain 25th Infantry) Quarto. xx, 233 pages. Blue cloth hardcover with gilt title and insignia on the front cover. Gilt title on the spine. Color insignia frontispiece. Illustrated with photographs. The blue cloth binding is lightly shelf worn. Cloth lightly edge worn bottom corners and head and base of the spine. Front cover slightly loose. Hinges are intact. This copy includes pencil notes and comments. A pencil inscription written top of the right front flyleaf reads- "Property of Ida Elizabeth Johnson 611 Mason Street-, Springfield, Ohio". Below this inscription, center of the page, is the original owner’s inscription, "Frank Baines Band, 25th Infantry C C (Company C?) Nogales, Az "Honey Boys". Written on the front paste down top of the page is "JHS Band". Written in pencil on the front blank page is the remark, "Liveliest Man in the whole world Frank Baines – "Honey Boy." On page 161 is a photograph of an old African American soldier wearing numerous medals on his uniform with the caption, "An "Old-Timer" Revisits the Regiment (April 20, 1926). Former Private Johnson of Company E, 25th Infantry, 1869-1870." Underneath the photograph written in pencil is this comment, "Gosh Frank-any more medals left out there?" Towards the back of the book are several photographs of units in the 25th regiment. On page 228 written top of the photograph, "Honey boy’s Company". On page 228 is a confusing pencil circle drawn around a soldier of Company C with an erased comment. The soldier’s name, last row from the bottom, (if reading names left to right) appears to be Pvt. 1st cl. Smyly. This name has no apparent relation to the original owner Frank Baines or the Johnson family name. On page 233, under the list of bibliography sources, is a note, "Mothers Grave Lot 7 Row 9 Grave 6 Sec. Z." On the blank verso of page 233 is the comment, "Honey boy gave me this book, and the one that destroys or loans will certainly hear from it’s owner, Betty". The final pencil note written in this book is located on the rear end paper, "Property of Ida E Johnson Given by Frank Baines." From wikipedia: Buffalo Soldiers originally were members of the 10th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army, formed on September 21, 1866, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. This nickname was given to the Black Cavalry by Native American tribes who fought in the Indian Wars. The term eventually became synonymous with all of the African American regiments formed in 1866: 9th Cavalry Regiment 10th Cavalry Regiment 24th Infantry Regiment 25th Infantry Regiment Although several African American regiments were raised during the Civil War as part of the Union Army (including the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry and the many United States Colored Troops Regiments), the "Buffalo Soldiers" were established by Congress as the first peacetime all-black regiments in the regular U.S. Army.[1] On September 6, 2005, Mark Matthews, the oldest surviving Buffalo Soldier, died at the age of 111. He was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.[2] From the website: Southwest Association of Buffalo Soldiers: The 25th Infantry: (Black Bicycle Corps, Lt. Moss, Flag Day Originator) The act of Congress of July 28,1866 that brought about the 25th by the consolidation of the 39th and 40th U.S Colored Troops was spelled out in general order 16 of the War Department on March 11, 1869. This regiment spent ten years in Texas. By May 1888 it was sent to Fort Missoula, Montana. It was there that the Black Bicycle Corps was organized under Lt. Moss, a young white officer. One of their most outstanding events was to make a 1900 bicycle ride from Montana to St Louis, which began on June 14, 1897. Along the way people came out and waved flags at Lt. Moss and his 20 black volunteer bike riders. This young white officer was a west point graduate from Louisiana. By 1922 he retired as Colonel and he is one of the originators of Flag Day, which takes place on June 14th. This group could "Jump Fence" with their bikes. This was a special technique that enabled the Corps to clear a nine foot fence in 20 seconds. In preparation for the long hike this group made other hikes to Yellowstone Park, to Lake Mac Donald and other places around Fort Missoula. While in Arizona, some were located around Nogales, Arizona at Camp Stephen D. Little and lived there. Some were a part of the last Indian War in that area.
Memoirs of Major Joseph McJunkin Revolutionary Patriot

Memoirs of Major Joseph McJunkin Revolutionary Patriot

Saye, Rev. James Hodge Bound wraps. Approx. 9" x 6". 43 pages, [1] page blank, [3] pages index. Tan paper wraps with title printed on the front cover. Light shelf wear to the front cover. Small closed tear upper spine. Staples a bit rusted. This publication first appeared in a series of articles printed in 1847-1848 by the Richmond, Virginia Watchman and Observer. From the publisher, "The second and final publication was in the Piedmont Headlight, a newspaper of Spartanburg, in 1898. It has never appeared in book form." This work was quoted in Lyman Draper’s King’s Mountain and Its Heroes" published in 1881. This scarce 1925 reprint is limited to 100 copies. From wikipedia: In 1776, McJunkin volunteered in Col. John Thompson’s Fair Forest Militia Regiment, where he engaged in the Cherokee campaign. In May, 1777, he was made Captain and commanded at Fort Jamieson.[2] He served a three month guard tour in Charleston, South Carolina, from November 1779 to February 1780.[3] After the fall of Charleston, and the Battle of Camden, the Tory and Whig Militias engaged in guerilla war leading up to Huck’s Defeat, and the Battle of King’s Mountain.[4] He said of Captain Christian Huck: to punish the Presbyterian inhabitants of that place, which he did with a barbarous hand, by killing men, burning churches, & driving off the ministers of the gospel to seek shelter amongst strangers.[5] McJunkin was at the Battle of King’s Mountain, Cedar Springs, Hanging Rock, Musgrove’s Mill,[6] Hammond’s Store, Blackstock’s Ford,[7] and the Battle of Cowpens. He was taken as a captive to Old Ninety-Six, where he was released on parole.[8] He then aided Gen. Nathanael Greene at the Siege of Ninety-Six.
A Philosophical and Political History of the Settlements and Trade of the Europeans in the East and West Indies

A Philosophical and Political History of the Settlements and Trade of the Europeans in the East and West Indies

Raynal, Abbe; Justamond, J. (translated by) Octavos. 4 volumes: [5], 535 pages, [1]; [5], 530 pages, [1]; [6], 557 pages, [1] blank page; [4], 552 pages, [1]. Period polished calf leather bindings. The spine has 5 raised bands (also two other slightly visible bands each volume) with red and black leather title labels. A few scuff, pitted spots to the leather boards. The right front flyleaf of volume 4 removed. Bindings and interiors are in very good condition. All volumes are well preserved and protected by mylar. Note: this particular Dublin edition is not listed in Sabin (the closest Sabin reference is 68088). This set does not have the called for plate and engraved map – possibly not inserted in this set? Also, "Abbe Resnal" is printed on the spine title labels and the title pages as the author. Period previous owner inscription written on the front paste downs of each volume – "Lord Clifden Gowray Castle." Lord Clifden was part of the Agar family in Gowray, Ireland. From wikipedia: The Gowran Castle estate became known as the Annaly estate after the Hon. Liliah Georgiana Augusta Constance Agar-Ellis (1862-1944) married Luke White (Lord Annaly), 3rd Baron Annaly (1862-1922). After her marriage to Lord Annaly, she became known as Lady Annaly. Lilah inherited the Gowran Agar estate. She was a descendant of Charles Agar who came to Gowran c.1650 from Yorkshire in England. Charles Agar and many of his descendants are buried in St. Mary’s Church Gowran (Church open to visitors during the summer months. Grounds open all year round). Later members of the Agar family held the title of Viscount Clifden over several generations. The Agars were often referred to as Lords Clifden or Clifdens of Gowran.
1860-1924 Pensez A Moi Album of Laura L. Earl from Covington

1860-1924 Pensez A Moi Album of Laura L. Earl from Covington, Kentucky to Colorado Springs

Laura L. Earl] Leather hardcover. Approx. 9.75" x 8". [65] leaves. Red leather binding with gilt stamped decorative borders and designs and gilt title on the front cover. Leather is rubbed along the board edges and spine. Album is illustrated with an engraved title page, frontispiece engraving, and three steel engraved illustrations in the album. Most every page has been used for autographs, inscriptions, verse, and well wishes. Several pieces of ephemera laid inside this memory album including name cards, a ribbon, advertisement card, clipped articles, a couple of leaves, slips of paper, etc. Album includes a name card and small photograph for a young Laura Earl. Also found in the album is a 1923 funeral notice for Mrs. D. E. Denman, Normal Illinois, in an envelope, addressed to "Mrs. Laura Nethers 829 S. Sahwatch St. Colorado Springs, Colo." In addition, there are two small obituary clippings dated May 27 and May 28, 1932 for Mrs. Laura Nethers, aged 81. Laura (Earl) Nethers was a resident of Colorado Springs for 56 years. Album entries begin in 1860 with a Christmas inscription by Laura Earl’s father on the right front flyleaf. Few entries from the 1860’s found inside. The majority of inscriptions are from the 1870’s-1880’s. One of the inscriptions inside the album read, "I Ever Remain your true friend James U. Cobb. To Miss Laura Earl Much Respected teacher Ellenboro (Wisc.) Feb the 25th 1872". Another inscription dated Aug 27th/79 reads, "My Dear Daughter Laura, It is now 10 O’Clock & your Sixty-one year old Father expects a long trip to the Injun Reservation two hundred miles north in the morning to make "Sargo lasses" for my Red brothers. So you see I cant write any to night. Please excuse me. Your affectionate Father A. Earl – Cedar Mills, Minn." Laura Earl was married in the 1870s with an 1879 inscription addressed to "Mr. & Mrs Nethers.Litchfield, Minn." Places signed in this album in random order include Covington Kentucky; Colorado Springs; Platterville, Wisc.; Acoma, Minn; Annaton Wisc.; Monument, Colo; Three Oaks, Michigan; Husetedo, Colo; Fennimore, Wisc.; Lima, Wisc.; Ellenboro, Wisc.; Bloomington, Ill.; Oak Grove, Ill.; Valley Falls, Kansas; Cedar Mills, Minn; West Trinity, Ohio; Duluth, Minn; Sumner, Iowa; Williamsville, Ills; Binghampton, N.Y.; Hutchinson, Minn; Montrose, Minn; Laurence, Kansas; Salina, Kansas; Lexington, Ill; Evanston, Wyoming; Lancaster, Wisc.; Lonesome Bluff, Wisc.; Ackley, Iowa; Hudson, Wisc.; Danvers, Ill.; Cincinnati; N. Platte, Neb.; Chicago; Lake City, Minn; Howard Lake, Minn; Litchfield, Minn; Battle Creek, Mich; Yankton, So. Dakota and many other places. There are literally dozens and dozens of named individual, towns, and dates in this album. Many original prose inscriptions from a lady named Emma Eggelson were written in the mid 1910’s. Lots of inscriptions from family inside. It appears Laura was a teacher, traveler and a member of a Colorado woman’s club.
Jim and Mr. Eddy: A Dixie Motorlogue

Jim and Mr. Eddy: A Dixie Motorlogue

Jackson, Algernon Brashear Small octavo. viii, 199 pages. Drab green cloth with title letter in black on the front cover and spine. Ex-library copy from the High Point Public Library, High Point North Carolina. Labels and stamps on the front and rear end sheets. Stamp located bottom of page 198. Label removed from spine. Light browning to the front gutter. Cloth is edge worn head of spine. Previous owner name stamp of "Paul Green Chapel Hill, N.C. on the front paste down. From wikipedia: Algernon Brashear Jackson was a prominent African American physician, surgeon, author, and columnist who contributed profoundly to the National Negro Health Movement, an organization which sought to uplift the race by means of educating the African American community on preventative medicine and public health. The previous owner of the book was Paul Green a writer. From wikipedia: Paul Eliot Green (March 17, 1894 – May 4, 1981) was an American playwright best known for his historical dramas of life in North Carolina during the first decades of the twentieth century. He received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for his 1927 play, In Abraham’s Bosom, which was included in Burns Mantle’s The Best Plays of 1926-1927. His play The Lost Colony has been regularly produced since 1937 near Manteo, North Carolina, and the historic colony of Roanoke. Its success has resulted in numerous other historical outdoor dramas being produced; his work is still the longest-running.