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MANUSCRIPT] [CUBA] "Flores Históricas"
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CHILE] [ROMANCE] Boyd, Henry (-1832). The vale of Guasco, or, The maid with seven lovers

Boyd, Henry (-1832) [CHILE] [ROMANCE] Boyd, Henry (-1832). The vale of Guasco, or, The maid with seven lovers : a romance in verse : in seven cantos. Printed for J.J. Stockdale, 1813. 8vo., 21.5 cm.: 320, [2] p. Half-title and errata/publisher ad present. Contemporary calf and marbled boards, lightly worn and scuffed; internally, lightly foxed with heavier foxing to paste-downs and endpapers. Generally, very good. Extremely Rare in commerce and with relatively few institutional copies. The work is attributed to Henry Boyd (d. 1832)), the Irish cleric and translator of Dante, the authorship having been informally suggested (perhaps on stylistic grounds) in Medina’s “Diccionario de anónimos y seudónimos hispanomericanos." Nevertheless, perhaps Medina did not see the verso of the errata present in this copy which makes the attribution more secure with reference to a translation of the Araucana of Don Alonao de Ercilla by the same author. An interesting romance with Chilean connections. The Monthly Review of 1814 reviews the book in delightful fashion: " Though the present age be not so enlightened as some individuals are inclined to suppose, it has less taste for extravagant and improbable fictions than our forefathers manifested: so that romances, properly so called, are rather tolerated than relished. The nursery is not supplied with the trash which formerly found its way into it; and, when we arrive at manhood, we look for something better than fables which outrage common sense and could never have been realized in the history of man. When a tissue of impossibilities is formed into a narrative, the reader, however he may applaud the ingenuity of the poet, cannot be pleased with so gross an attempt to impose on his credulity, and replies in the language of Horace, Quodcunque ostendis mihi sic, incredulus odi. With feelings of this kind, we worked our way through the Vale of Guasco, and experienced little pleasure in the beginning, the middle, or the end of our journey. We followed the hero Courtenay from the banks of the Medway to the provinces of Chili and Peru; we were long kept in suspence respecting the Maid with seven Lovers; and it was not till the sixth canto, (p. 223.) when Courtenay falls in love with Recloma, and thus makes her a maid with eight Lovers, that we understood to what circumstance this part of the title referred. . Like the poem intitled “The Missionary,” (see our Review for April last,) a considerable portion of this Romance is borrowed from the history which constituted the subject of Ercilla’s Spanish poem, the Araucana, and related the defeat of the Spaniards by the Chilians: but it surpasses all belief that an English emigrant (Courtenay), after a series of very improbable adventures, should not only obtain a settlement and family-connections among the Chilians, but be their General, and lead them to take vengeance on the Spaniards for their bloody outrages"
CHILE] [ROMANCE] Boyd

CHILE] [ROMANCE] Boyd, Henry (-1832). The vale of Guasco, or, The maid with seven lovers

Boyd, Henry (-1832) [CHILE] [ROMANCE] Boyd, Henry (-1832). The vale of Guasco, or, The maid with seven lovers : a romance in verse : in seven cantos. Printed for J.J. Stockdale, 1813. 8vo., 21.5 cm.: 320, [2] p. Half-title and errata/publisher ad present. Contemporary calf and marbled boards, lightly worn and scuffed; internally, lightly foxed with heavier foxing to paste-downs and endpapers. Generally, very good. Extremely Rare in commerce and with relatively few institutional copies. The work is attributed to Henry Boyd (d. 1832)), the Irish cleric and translator of Dante, the authorship having been informally suggested (perhaps on stylistic grounds) in Medina’s “Diccionario de anónimos y seudónimos hispanomericanos." Nevertheless, perhaps Medina did not see the verso of the errata present in this copy which makes the attribution more secure with reference to a translation of the Araucana of Don Alonao de Ercilla by the same author. An interesting romance with Chilean connections. The Monthly Review of 1814 reviews the book in delightful fashion: " Though the present age be not so enlightened as some individuals are inclined to suppose, it has less taste for extravagant and improbable fictions than our forefathers manifested: so that romances, properly so called, are rather tolerated than relished. The nursery is not supplied with the trash which formerly found its way into it; and, when we arrive at manhood, we look for something better than fables which outrage common sense and could never have been realized in the history of man. When a tissue of impossibilities is formed into a narrative, the reader, however he may applaud the ingenuity of the poet, cannot be pleased with so gross an attempt to impose on his credulity, and replies in the language of Horace, Quodcunque ostendis mihi sic, incredulus odi. With feelings of this kind, we worked our way through the Vale of Guasco, and experienced little pleasure in the beginning, the middle, or the end of our journey. We followed the hero Courtenay from the banks of the Medway to the provinces of Chili and Peru; we were long kept in suspence respecting the Maid with seven Lovers; and it was not till the sixth canto, (p. 223.) when Courtenay falls in love with Recloma, and thus makes her a maid with eight Lovers, that we understood to what circumstance this part of the title referred. . Like the poem intitled “The Missionary,” (see our Review for April last,) a considerable portion of this Romance is borrowed from the history which constituted the subject of Ercilla’s Spanish poem, the Araucana, and related the defeat of the Spaniards by the Chilians: but it surpasses all belief that an English emigrant (Courtenay), after a series of very improbable adventures, should not only obtain a settlement and family-connections among the Chilians, but be their General, and lead them to take vengeance on the Spaniards for their bloody outrages"
Authentic memoirs of the remarkable life and surprising exploits of Mandrin

Authentic memoirs of the remarkable life and surprising exploits of Mandrin

Louis Mandrin [LAWLESSNESS] Louis Mandrin. Authentic memoirs of the remarkable life and surprising exploits of Mandrin, captain-general of the French smugglers : who for the space of nine months resolutely stood in defiance of the whole army of France : with the copy of an intercepted letter, from one chief to another, relating some curious particulars, concerning the taking of Mandrin : translated from the French : to which is added, a geographical description of those cities, towns and castles on the frontiers of Savoy and Switzerland, and . France, which were the principal scenes of action. London : Printed for M. Cooper . [et al.], 1755. "With a curious print of Mandrin." 8vo., 56 pgs. with folding plate. Later 1/4 calf worn and hinges starting, internally very good. A fascinating example of a new genre of 18th century criminal biography, which grew out of the Renaissance tradition of roguery but was adapted to the political climate of 18th century France. This is a rare and delightful English translation of the Testament politique de Louis Mandrin, 1755. The life of the lawless Louis Mandrin, the most famous bandit of his age who rebelled against the Ferme générale, captured the French imagination. Tales of his celebrated exploits, counterfeiting,s muggling, and murders were a sign of early discontent with the ancient régime.
A dissertation on the construction of locks

A dissertation on the construction of locks

Bramah, Joseph. [TECHNOLOGY] [HI-SECURITY] Bramah, Joseph. A dissertation on the construction of locks : containing, first, reasons and observations, demonstrating all locks, which depend on fixed wards, to be erroneous in principle, and defective in point of security : secondly, a specification of a lock, constructed on a new and infallible principle, which, possessing all the properties essential to security, will prevent the most ruinous consequences of house robberies, and be a certain protection against thieves of all descriptions :London : Printed for the author, sold by R. Baldwin, [1785?] 8vo., 20.5 x 13 cm. [2], 46 pgs., [1] modern 3/4 calf and marbled boards, red morocco spine, peeling to head and foot of spine. Internally, lightly toned but very good with the cooper engraved plates. A Joseph Bramah’s Precision lock was one of the most unbreakable locks of first half of the 19th century and the FIRST KNOWN HI-SECURITY LOCK DESIGN- a true technological marvel. The original Bramah lock had 18 different wafers, which allowed for 470 million possible permutations" [Wikipedia]. The lock was famously picked by Alfred Charles Hobbs at the Great Exhibition of 1851, sending shivers down the backs of wealthy homeowners and forcing lock manufacturers to improve their designs. The work is extremely rare in commerce and really a cornerstone, through modern eyes, of any collection focus on security
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RENAISSANCE BINDING] [GREEK PRINTING] [CLOVIS EVE] HOMER. Homeri Ilias, id est, De rebus ad Troiam gestis.

Homer [RENAISSANCE BINDING] [GREEK PRINTING] HOMER. Homeri Ilias, id est, De rebus ad Troiam gestis. Parisiis : Apud Adr. Turnebum typographum Regiu[m]., M.D. LIIII [1554].:Signatures: [alpha]² A-Z⁸, a-l⁸ m⁶ Printer’s device on title page. Text in Greek; part of title page in Latin. 8vo.,[4], 554, [2] pages, 17.0 x 10.6 cm., A MAGNIFICENT PARIS BINDING, attributed by early cataloger as "A FINE BINDING BY CLOVIS EVE. It is seldom that it is possible to attribute bindings to Clovis Eve, but in this specimen we undoubtedly have one of his fine creations. The original owner, Nicolas de Villars, Bishop of Agen, was a friend of Marguerite de Valois, Queen of Navaare, for whom Clovis Eve executed his finest bindings. The presence in the binding of the marguerite, appears to indicate that the book was bound for the Queen who presented it to de Villars. Guigard states that the marguerite is incontestable proof of the binding having been executed by Eve for Marguerite de Valois" Brown crushed morocco, "covers with three double gilt fillets enclosing an outer border of small gilt foliage tools and an inner border of small gilt flowers, around a large panel with gilt foliage tracery cornerpiece ornaments incorporating a large gilt lozenge of similar tooling with flowers, enclosing the gilt-stamped arms of NICOLAS DE VILLARS, BISHOP OF AGEN (from 1589-1608)." Evidence of ties, expertly re-backed and housed attractive maroon crushed velvet-lined morocco box by Sangorski & Sutcliffe; internally, quite a handsome book, red-ruled, faded but all edges gilt, and printed in a elegant and minuscule Greek letter. Ref: Olivier 1519
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ALDINE SAMMELBAND] [I] AESCHYLUS. Tragoediae sex

[ALDINE SAMMELBAND] [I] AESCHYLUS. Tragoediae sex. Greek text, edited by Francesco Torresani. Venice: House of Aldus and Andrea of Asola, February 1518 113, [1] leaves, including colophon leaf. 8vo, 148 x90 mm. Venice: EDITIO PRINCEPS of the plays of Aeschylus. Renouard, page 85(9); Hoffmann I, 32-34. BOUND WITH. [II] OPPIANUS De piscibus libri V. Eiusdem de venatione libri IIII. Oppiani de piscibus Laurentio Lippio interprete libri V. [colophon:] Venice, Aldus, December 1517. 166, [1] leaves. BOUND WITH [III] [Hero and Leander] [ Orpheus] Mousaiou poiemation ta kath’ Hero kai Leandron., Orpheos Argonautika., Tou autou hymnoi., Orpheus Peri lithon. = Musaei opusculum de Herone & Leandro., Orphei argonautica., Eiusdem hymni., Orpheus de lapidibus. :Venetiis : In aedibvs Aldi et Andreae soceri, mense novembri MDXVII [1517] Second Aldine edition of the Greek text of Hero and Leander accompanied by the Latin translation of Marcus Musurus. The Orphic texts in Greek only. Imprint from colophon. Signatures: b-k⁸; lacking full signature a. Aldine device on t.p. and verso of final leaf; 72 of 80 leaves : woodcut illustrations. ALL THREE WORKS OF CONSIDERABLE RARITY. The whole bound in 18th century Italian vellum, some splitting at hinges and peeling of spine; l.r. old restoration to t.p. of Aeschylus just touching anchor, minor corner dampstain affecting preliminary lvs., some light toning or spotting. Provenance: Ex-Libris of Thomas Day Seymour (1848 – , 1907), the was an American classical scholar and Professor of Greek at Yale University.
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A Perfect narrative of the robbery and murder committed near Dame Annis so Cleer, on Friday night the second of July, 1669, upon the person of Mr. John Talbot : quondam preacher to a regiment of His Majesties forces in Portugal and lately . curate of Laindon in Essex, who . was stripped . stabbed into the throat by six men and a bloody woman . together with their examinations, tryal, and confessions. : London : Printed by William Godbid, Mdclxix [1669].

A Perfect narrative of the robbery and murder committed near Dame Annis so Cleer, on Friday night the second of July, 1669, upon the person of Mr. John Talbot : quondam preacher to a regiment of His Majesties forces in Portugal and lately . curate of Laindon in Essex, who . was stripped . stabbed into the throat by six men and a bloody woman . together with their examinations, tryal, and confessions. : London : Printed by William Godbid, Mdclxix [1669]. 4to., 18.5 x 13.5 cm., 38 pages. marginal darkening to. t.p., inner gutter indicates ones part of a bound volume of tracts, small unobtrusive lower marginal damp-stain to preliminary leaves. Binding: modern red cloth. Wing P1503. Rare with no copies at auction since 1965. OCLC cites 3 copies. Talbot was an Essex minister who fled to London, under the threat of suit, and was attacked and had his throat slit by four to six men and one woman. He was alleged to have engaged in sexual improprieties with one woman Sarah Swift . He was discovered by bricklayers a full two days later but survived long enough to identify his attackers and deny any affair with Swift.
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A Relation of the bloody massacre in Ireland acted by the instigation of the Jesuits, priests, and friars who were promoters of those horrible murders, prodigious cruelties, barbarous villanies, and inhuman practices executed by the Irish papists upon the English Protestants : with an account of the Spanish Inquisition. London :

A Relation of the bloody massacre in Ireland acted by the instigation of the Jesuits, priests, and friars who were promoters of those horrible murders, prodigious cruelties, barbarous villanies, and inhuman practices executed by the Irish papists upon the English Protestants : with an account of the Spanish Inquisition. London : [Printed for Rowland Reynolds, 1689.] 4to., 21 x 16 cm., 7, [1] pgs : 5 woodcut illustrations. Modern red cloth; internally some browning and evidence of removal from bound volume, some light marginal damp staining and thumbing. Wing R.871. This tract represents an interesting example of the recycling of news reportage. The content refers to the Irish Rebellion of 1641 with the Irish Catholics on one side, and English and Scottish Protestant settlers on the other. However, it is re-issued here in 1689 without any clear reference to it being republished. The reader is left to interpret its relevance with respect to current events- i.e. the Irish Night during the Revolution of 1688 and the hysteria of Londoners after James II fled the city during the Glorious Revolution. The naive woodcuts clearly appealed to both the illiterate as well as ‘skimmers’ awash in endless pamphlets of the period.
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IDENTITY THEFT] Settle, Elkanah. The notorious impostor, Or the history of the life of William Morrell, alias Bowyer, sometime of Banbury, Chirurgeon

[IDENTITY THEFT] Settle, Elkanah. The notorious impostor, Or the history of the life of William Morrell, alias Bowyer, sometime of Banbury, Chirurgeon . Together with an authentick copy of his will, taken out of the Prerogative Coure, and the manner of his funeral in St. Clements Church-yard : London, Printed for Abel Roper, 1692. 4to. 36 pgs. First Edition and an UNCUT copy, various sheet sizes but approx. 22 x 16 cm., gracefully bound in modern marbled 1/4 blue morocco; internally some toning and occasional blemishes, but a fine copy and a nice example of an uncut tract. Ref: Wing S2703. Settle, himself a character, and mostly forgotten as a minor poet, still draws bibliographic interest for his famed ‘Settle bindings’- a successful money-making racket and one that bordered on fraud. Howard Nixon in his Five Centuries of English Bookbinding, describes him with some disdain: “Elkanah Settle, who was born in 1640 and had been hailed as a rising playwright in the 1670’s, had dwindled by the end of the century into a hack versifier holding the unremunerative post of ‘City Poet." In the Notorious Imposter, Settle essentially relates the modern issue of identity theft (which must have appealed to a man of questionable business practices himself) with the story of William Morrell, Alias Bowyer, Sometime of Banbury, Chirurgeon. Who Personated Humphrey Wickham of Swackly, in the County of Oxon, Esquire. "A few days before Christmas-day 1691, Morrell went to one Cullen’s, a baker in the Strand, to seek for a lodging. His stock of money was not above two shillings; but he claimed to be a person of worth and honour, the before-mentioned Captain Humphrey Wickham of Swalcliffe, whose name, it seems, was known to Mrs. Cullen. The family supplied his wants, and paid him all the respect due to the character whom he personated. Falling sick at Cullen’s, Morrell, on the 28th December, made a will, in which, in the name of Humphrey Wickham Esq., he bequeathed large property at Swalcliffe, Sulgrave, Apeltree, Cropredy, and other places, together with money in the hands of Ambrose Holbech Esq. (of Mollington and Farnborough), and other sums, to divers persons, some of whom were his pretended relations, friends, and sen-ants; but the family of the Cullens were especially remembered. His design on this occasion was cut short by his death, which occurred on the 3rd January 1691-2, after he had received the Sacrament, and pretended the settlement of his conscience, and his peace with heaven. A coffin of ten-pounds’ value was provided by Cullen, the embalmers were paid, and a sumptuous funeral was prepared. Cullen sent a letter addressed to Mr. William Wickham of Garsiugton in Oxfordshire (who had been named in the will as one of the executors), to whom Captain Wiekham’s mansion at Swalcliffe was bequeathed. In answer to the letter, there came up to London a gentleman from Oxford, to say that the Christian name of Mr. Wickham of Garsington was mistaken, which gave some alarm of an imposture. Cullen also dispatched a messenger to Swalcliffe; for, in the mean time, Major Richardson and Mr. Compton had inspected the corpse, and pronounced that it was not the body of Humphrey Wickham, but that of the man who had been formerly convicted of having six wives, and been more than once a prisoner in Newgate. The messenger returned from Swalcliffe to London on the 12th January, having been received very civilly at Swalcliffe by the real Captain Wickham. Upon this full proof of the imposture, the corpse was taken, with no accompaniment but a watchman and a lantern, and in a coffin of four-shillings’ price, to a nook in St. Clement’s church-yard. The nurse and her assistants afterwards testified, that they once or twice observed Morrell laugh to himself on his deathbed, as if from the pleasure he took in cheating the world he was leaving." [Ref: Beesley, Alfred. The History of Banbury:: Including Copious Historical and Antiquarian .1841]
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BRATHWAITE, Richard (1588?-1673). Ar’t Asleepe Husband: A boulster lecture stored with all variety of witty jeasts, merry tales, and other pleasant passages.

BRATHWAITE, Richard (1588?-1673). Ar’t Asleepe Husband: A boulster lecture stored with all variety of witty jeasts, merry tales, and other pleasant passages. London: by R[ichard] Bishop for R[ichard] B[est], 1640. 8vo., 16 x 10.5 cm. Engraved frontispiece by W. Marshal in facsimile and pp. 317-318 (one leaf) in facsimile for the Huntington Library copy. This is a variant issue of STC (2nd ed.), 3555 and the first issue, "with the text ending with the errata on Y4v, prior to its being reimposed to Z2 to accommodate the later added "Postscript"’. Ref STC 3555 (variant); ESTC S106153; Grolier/Wither to Prior 86. Very attractive 19th century purple straight-grained morocco and gilt, all edges gil,t some rubbing to hinges. Provenance: The Syston Park Copy from the Valuable Library of the Late Sir John Hayford Thorold, Bart. The Binding is by R. Storr, with his ticket, whom Di Ricci charmingly called one of the "worst provincial binders that England has ever known" (albeit this is a handsome specimen). Despite the aforementioned two leaves in facsimile, the books imperfections are greatly outweighed by its superb provenance from one of England’s greatest private collections. Braithwaite, the Westmorland poet, wrote this satirical work love and marriage as a collection of moralizing stories. It described the so-called curtain or boulster lecture when a scolding wife relentlessly lectures her husband in the quiet moments before he falls asleep. The curtains kept away drafts in the bed and reputedly allowed the scolding to have a measure of privacy. As such, the book offers a window in to early English behavioral norms and customs.
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AMERICAN MEDICAL MANUSCRIPT] [HISTORY OF MEDICINE] [ANCIENT WORLD] Lee, Charles Alfred. "Observations on the State of Medicine & Surgery among the Ancients by Charles S. Lee, 1826.

[AMERICAN MEDICAL MANUSCRIPT] [HISTORY OF MEDICINE] [ANCIENT WORLD] Lee, Charles Alfred. "Observations on the State of Medicine & Surgery among the Ancients by Charles S. Lee, 1826. 25 x 20 cm., 32 single sides pages in legible cursive, presumably complete. Integrity of text block is weak with pages separating, loss of spine, some chipping and staining to covers, but generally very good. Apparently unpublished, but by the very few corrections, this was likely a copy intended as a final draft for publication. Almost certainly one of the earliest American works on the history of medicine by a well known physician of the period, which traces the "history of the healing art.and the numerous obstacles it has had to encounter in arriving at its present state of perfection." "Charles Alfred Lee, A. M., M. D., professor emeritus of materia medica and hygiene in thee] University of Buffalo. He was born in Salisbury, Connecticut, March 3, 1801; descended from the Lees and Browns of Massachusetts and Connecticut, who for more than two centuries had occupied distinguished positions; spent much of his youth with an uncle in Shefiicld, Massachusetts, where he fitted for college, at Lenox Academy ; graduated at Williams College, 1822; as M. D. at Berkshire Medical College, 1825; practiced two years in his native town, and moved to New York in 1827, where, by sound principles, close attention to business, and indomitable perseverance, he soon overcame al the difiiculties the; usually lie in the path of young men, and took his place in the front rank of the profession. He was a profound thinker, an enthusiastic, ceaseless worker, and a public-spirited man. Dr. Lee had an extensive private practice—aftcr 1850, chiefly consultation; was one of our best American teachers, but won his highest reputation as an author and editor of medical works. He was one of the founders of t ie Northern Dispensary of New York City, in which he was for four years the attending physician ; of the medical departments of the University of New York, and University of Buffalo, in both of which he was professor, as also in the medical colleges at Geneva, New York; Woodstock, Vermont ; Brunswick, Maine; Pittsfield, Massachusetts; and Columbus, Ohio. His greatest work was the American edition of Dr. James Copeland’s Dictionary of Practical Medicine, the most complete and valuable work on the theory and practice of medicine ever issued from the English or American press. For an account of his other works, labors in hospitals, &c., see Dr. Toncr’s article in the New York Medical Journal, April, 1872." [Ref: Appleton’s Cyclopædia of American Biography, Volume 3. 1888]
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EARLY TENNESSEE IMPRINT] Carter, J. E. The Botanic Physician, or, Family medical adviser : being an improved system, found on correct physiological principles : comprising a brief view of anatomy, physiology, pathology, hygieine [sic], or art of preserving health : a materia medica, exclusively botanical, containing a description of more than two hundred and thirty of the most valuable vegetable remedies : to which is added a dispensatory, embracing more than two hundred recipes for preparing and administering medicine : the diseases of the United States, with their symptoms, causes, cures, and means of prevention : likewise, a treatise on the diseases peculiar to women and children :Madisonville, Ten. : Published by B. Parker & Co., 1837

[EARLY TENNESSEE IMPRINT ] Carter, J. E. The Botanic Physician, or, Family medical adviser : being an improved system, found on correct physiological principles : comprising a brief view of anatomy, physiology, pathology, hygieine [sic], or art of preserving health : a materia medica, exclusively botanical, containing a description of more than two hundred and thirty of the most valuable vegetable remedies : to which is added a dispensatory, embracing more than two hundred recipes for preparing and administering medicine : the diseases of the United States, with their symptoms, causes, cures, and means of prevention : likewise, a treatise on the diseases peculiar to women and children :Madisonville, Ten. : Published by B. Parker & Co., 1837. 8 vo., 20 x 13 cm. 688 pgs. Contemporary calf worn, moderate to considerable browning throughout due to inexpensive paper, dam- stain to lower third of last 100 lvs. but not too obtrusive, some manuscript notations to paste-downs and blanks. Ref: S&S 43581; Tennessee Imprints 629. Noted as an early Madisonville, Tennessee printing. VERY RARE IN COMMERCE; last and only copy in 30 years sold in 1999. NLM copy noted as defective. Provenance: 19th century inscription of James & Julia Hamby. $2750
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Bünting [ Buenting ], Heinrich. Itinerarium totius Sacræ Scripturæ. Or, the trauels of the holy patriarchs, prophets, iudges, kings, our sauiour Christ, and his Apostles, as they are related in the Old and New Testaments. With a description of the townes and places to which they trauelled, and how many English miles they stood from Ierusalem. Also a short treatise of the weights, monies, and measures mentioned in the Scriptures, reduced to our English valuations, quantitie, and weight. Collected out of the workes of Henry Bunting, and done into English by R.B.[raithwaite] London : Printed by Adam Islip, 1636

Buenting, Heinrich. Bünting [ Buenting ], Heinrich. Itinerarium totius Sacræ Scripturæ. Or, the trauels of the holy patriarchs, prophets, iudges, kings, our sauiour Christ, and his Apostles, as they are related in the Old and New Testaments. With a description of the townes and places to which they trauelled, and how many English miles they stood from Ierusalem. Also a short treatise of the weights, monies, and measures mentioned in the Scriptures, reduced to our English valuations, quantitie, and weight. Collected out of the workes of Henry Bunting, and done into English by R.B.[raithwaite] London : Printed by Adam Islip, 1636. 4to., 21.5 x 16cm., ([6], 206, 209-570, [5] pages). Contemporary sprinkled calf, corners worn, backstrip with some loss, some damp-sating and worming through center or letterpress, only lightly affecting letters. Contemporary purchase inscription to recto of first blank of James Parvish with an apparently unpublished 6 line anti-Turkish stanza in manuscript. 1702 STC 4020. Very Rare in Commerce. $1750
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FULL SET IN 7 VOLUMES in 6] OF GELLI’S MASTERPIECE ON DANTE] . Giovanni Battista Gelli Lettvra di Gio. Batista Gelli, sopra lo Inferno di Dante

Giovanni Battista Gelli [FULL SET OF GELLI’S MASTERPIECE ON DANTE] . Giovanni Battista Gelli Lettvra prima di Gio. Batista Gelli, sopra lo Inferno di Dante : letta nella Academia fiorentina nel consolato di M. Guido Guidi et d’Agnolo Borghini. In Fiorenza : Appresso Lorenzo Torrentino, 1562. 8vo., 15.5 x 10 cm., Signatures: A-Q⁸, R² (R2 verso blank): 264 unnumbered page. Modern 3/4 vellum and marbled boards, old repair to t,p. likely to remove early ownership mark. WITH. Lettura seconda sopra lo Inferno di Dante di Giouanbatista Gelli. Letta nella Accademia fiorentina nel consolato d’Agnolo Borghini. : In Fiorenza : [Lorenzo Torrentino], 1555. 8vo., 15.5. x 9.5 Sig.: A12 B-O6 of 8, wanting the last 2 blanks according to OCLC. [8], 218, [1 (errori)] p. Modern full vellum, later blanks and paste-downs; internally some toning and thumbing. WITH. Lettura terza di Gio. Batista Gelli sopra lo Inferno di Dante. Letta nella Accademia Fiorentina nel Consolato d’Antonio Landi. In Fiorenza : [Lorenzo Torrentino], 1556. 8vo., 15.5 x 9.5 cm., Sig: A-N 5of 8; wanting the last 3 blanks according to OCLC :202, [1] p. Modern 3/4 vellum and marbled boards WITH. Lettvra qvarta sopra l’Inferno di Dante n Fiorenza : [Lorenzo Torrentino], 1558. Printer’s device on t.p. Pages 237-238 misnumbered 236-237. 8vo., 15.5 x 9.5 cm. 237 [i.e. 238], [1 of 2; wanting last blank] pages; modern half value and patterned boards. WITH. La qvinta lettvra di Giovan Batista Gelli sopra lo Inferno di Dante : letta nella Academia fiorentina nel consolato del reuerendo M. Francesco Cattani da Diacceto, canonico fiorentino, l’anno M.D. LVIII. r:In Fiorenza : [Lorenzo Torrentino], 1558. 8vo., 15.5 x 9.5 cm. 111 leaves. Contemporary vellum with loss of strings ties and some vellum loss to rear board. This is a particularly uncommon part in commerce with OCLC listing only 6 copies. WITH. La Sesta lettura di Giovanbattista Gelli sopra lo Inferno di Dante. In Fiorenza, 1561. Sig: A-H⁸ I⁴ AND Lettvra settima di Gio. Batista Gelli sopra lo Inferno di Dante : letta nel consolato di Maestro Tommaso Ferrini. :In Fiorenza : Appresso Lorenzo Torrentino, 1561.Sig:: A-I⁸ (I8 blank). Description:144 unnumbered pages 8 vo., 15 x 9.5. 2 vols in 1. Early vellum, light soiling to yapp edges; internally some foxing. Two particularly uncommon parts A RARE FULL SET OF ALL 7 VOLUMES BOUND IN 6 of the comments on the ‘Inferno’ by the great scholar Giovanni Battista Gelli (Firenze 1498-1563), who taught at the Florentine Academy 1541-1551. His studies of Petrarch and Dante are, in addition to those of Vasari, the most important sources of artistic creation in the sixteenth century in Italy.
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Philip Dormer Stanhope Chesterfield, Earl of; Forrester, James . Lord Chesterfield’s advice to his son, on men and manners, or, A new system of education : in which the principles of politeness, and the art of acquiring a knowledge of the world, are laid down in a plain, easy, and familiar manner

Philip Dormer Stanhope Chesterfield, Earl of; Forrester, James . Lord Chesterfield’s advice to his son, on men and manners, or, A new system of education : in which the principles of politeness, and the art of acquiring a knowledge of the world, are laid down in a plain, easy, and familiar manner : to which are annexed, The polite philosopher, or, An essay on the art which makes a man happy in himself, and agreeable to others : also, Lord Burghley’s ten precepts to his second son, Robert Cecil, afterwards the Earl of Salisbury.:Philadelphia : Printed for T. Dobson ., 1789. Note: James Forrester wrote The polite philosopher. Signatures: pi⁴A-S⁶T². Description: 225 fo 227, [1] pages lacking 103/4 in chapter on Lying ; 18mo., 13 cm. FIRST AMERICAN EDITION OF LORD CHESTERFIELD’S MASTERPIECE OF EDUCATION AND CONDUCT Original calf with "GR" [George Richards] incised in leather and signatures on blanks of George and Alexander Richards and New York 1804 to inner front board. Internally with some toning, but generally a pleasing copy and despite the missing page, a VERY RARE book. Despite it being a very successful education manual, Samuel Jonson derided it for teaching the ""the morals of a whore." Ref: AAS. 90236
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REGENCY] [EDUCATION OF PRINCES] [18th CENTURY EDUCATION] George IV, King of Great Britain 1762-1830. Lucubrations of an heir apparent. London : printed for Allen and West; and Owen 1795

[REGENCY] [EDUCATION OF PRINCES] [18th CENTURY EDUCATION] George IV, King of Great Britain 1762-1830. Lucubrations of an heir apparent. London : printed for Allen and West; and Owen 1795. 8vo., [4],104 p. Stitched as issued, internally some soiling to t.p. and light staining to last leaf. Anonymously issued but attributed to George IV. VERY RARE. OCLC cites only the BL copy and no copies appear in the standard auction records. The tract fits into the general category of ‘education of princes" literature that sought to outline virtues of the good prince and the competent counselor. The subjects of these "lucubrations" discuss the importance of a liberal education to a prince; the importance of private virtue in a prince; favouritism; flattery; nationality; the choice of a ministry; the bestowing of honours and rewards; the selection of associates; the patronage of genius and the arts; the encouragement of eloquence: royal gratitude; regard for public opinion. etc. Despite the intentions of this early tract, George IV went on nevertheless to lead an extravagant lifestyle that contributed to the fashions of the Regency era. He was a patron of new forms of leisure, style and taste. He commissioned John Nash to build the Royal Pavilion in Brighton and remodel Buckingham Palace as well Sir Jeffry Wyattvilleto rebuild Windsor Castle. ESTC citation no.: T38775 $750 [SB50]
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EDUCATION] [P.B. SHELLEY] ][P. B. Shelley] Letters from a nobleman to his son, during the period of his education at Eton and Oxford. London: : Printed for Richard Phillips, Bridge-Street, Blackfriars., 1810

[EDUCATION] [P.B. SHELLEY] ][P. B. Shelley] Letters from a nobleman to his son, during the period of his education at Eton and Oxford. London: : Printed for Richard Phillips, Bridge-Street, Blackfriars., 1810. By Gillet and Son, Crown-court, Fleet-street. 2 vols. 12 mo., 17.5 x 10.5 cm., 19th century marbled boards and calf with some wear, front boards detached; internally some toning or spotting, pp. 155-170 slightly crushed and minor loss on inner margin. Generally, despite aforementioned condition flaws, a not unreasonable and an unsophisticated set. Pagination: Volume I: viii, 328 pages. Volume II: vii, [1], 359 [that is, 357], [7] pages. Page iv is incorrectly paginated as vi in volume I. Page 357 incorrectly paginated as 359. A RARE 18th CENTURY ENGLISH EDUCATION MANUAL: OCLC cites 11 copies. No copies in the auction records for over 40 years. This evidently anonymous publication, with echoes of Chesterfield, has particular importance to the educational milieu of Eton and Oxford and particularly of P.B. Shelley. Shelley education’s at Eton is well documented. He fared poorly, and was "subjected to an almost daily mob torment at around noon by older boys, who aptly called these incidents "Shelley-baits". Surrounded, the young Shelley would have his books torn from his hands and his clothes pulled at and torn until he cried out madly in his high-pitched "cracked soprano" of a voice. This daily misery could be attributed to Shelley’s refusal to take part in fagging and his indifference towards games and other youthful activities. Because of these peculiarities he acquired the nickname "Mad Shelley". Harcourt’s An Eton Bibliography (p. 11) notes only two works published regarding Eton or by Eton alumni during 1810; this set and Shelley’s first published anonymous work, the Gothic novella Zastrozzi. It is fascinating how out of the disciplined academic structure at Eton that these "Letters" promote that Shelley could have conceived of Zastrozzi, "one of the most savage and improbable demons that ever issued from a diseased brain."