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WEBSTER'S NEW INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE: SECOND EDITION

WEBSTER’S NEW INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE: SECOND EDITION, UNABRIDGED (LEATHERBOUND INDIA-PAPER EDITION)

Webster, Noah This is the 1948 printing of Webster’s New International Dictionary, Second Edition, First issued in 1934 and last printed in 1960 before giving way (in 1961) to the Third Edition. Just one or two insignificant wear spots at extremities and a tiny nick in the leather to bottom edge of front board. One or two lightly-wrinkled preliminary pages. Indisputably, THE premier and still ultimate researcher’s dictionary in lovely condition — a STUNNINGLY GORGEOUS BEHEMOTH — nicest we’ve seen in a quarter century or more! Wanna be a writer? Put down your Google, and pick up this Baby; it’s the real deal! Size 12" x 9" x 3". Weight 10 lbs. Rich, brown textured leather, with bright gilt lettering to front board and spine. Red and green marbled edges, tab indexed of bright gilt on black. Contains 600,000 Entries; 12,000 Terms Illustrated; 13,000 Geographical Entries. pp. 3210, followed by two pages of advertisements. Its makers write: "Webster’s New International Dictionary, Second Edition is the culmination of a century’s experience in dictionary making. For more than 100 years the work of the editorial staff has been continuous. 207 special editors labored ten years to make this a comprehensive, authoritative and up-to-date reference work to serve today’s needs" In (it) "the consultant will find answers to all questions, not only about meanings, but also about spelling, hyphenation, preferred forms, the part of speech to which a word belongs, pronunciation, etymology, synonyms, and multitudes of other problems." Why this Second Edition is considered preferable to the newer Third Edition The Second, (which is THIS book we’re offering) we’ve been told, is actually preferred by scholars over the Third Edition, due to its strict adherence to correct English, its purportedly greater etymological/philological detail reflecting deeper entry-by-entry scholarship, its superior aesthetic and design sense " Gary Wills in the New Review opined that the new dictionary ‘has all the modern virtues. It is big, expensive, and ugly. It should be a great success’)" Edited by Philip Babcock Gove, the Third encompassed radical changes which some found unacceptable: ".To make room for 100,000 new words, Gove now made sweeping deletions, dropping 250,000 entries. He eliminated the ‘nonlexical matter’ that more properly belongs to an encyclopaedia, including all names of people and places (which had filled two appendices). There were no more mythological, biblical, and fictional names, nor the names of buildings, historical events, or art works. Thirty picture plates were dropped. The rationale was that, while useful, these are not strictly about language. Also removed were words which had been virtually out of use for over two hundred years (except those found in major literature such as Shakespeare), rare variants, reformed spellings, self-explanatory combination words, and other items considered of little value to the general reader. The number of small text illustrations was reduced, page size increased, and print size reduced by one-twelfth, from six point to agate (5.5 point) type. All this was considered necessary because of the large amount of new material." "In the early 1960s, Webster’s Third came under attack for its "permissiveness" and its failure to tell people what proper English was. .as conservatives detected yet another symbol of the permissiveness of society as a whole and the decline of authority, as represented by the Second Edition. As historian Herbert Morton explained, "Webster’s Second was more than respected. It was accepted as the ultimate authority on meaning and usage and its preeminence was virtually unchallenged in the United States. It did not provoke controversies, it settled them." Critics charged that the dictionary was reluctant to defend standard English, for example entirely eliminating the labels "colloquial", "correct", "incorrect", "proper", "improper", "erroneous", "humorous", "jocular", "poetic", and "contemptuous", among others." Further, ".The consensus held that the Third was a "marvelous achievement, a monument of scholarship and accuracy". They did come up with some specific criticisms, including typographic unattractiveness (the type is too small and hard to read); non-use of capital letters (only "God" was capitalized; the goal was to save space); excessive use of citations, giving misspellings as legitimate variants, dropping too many obsolete words, the lack of usage labels, and deliberate omission of biographical and geographical entries.
THE DRYGOODSMAN'S HANDY DICTIONARY; A book of reference containing definitions and explanations of upwards of 2200 words

THE DRYGOODSMAN’S HANDY DICTIONARY; A book of reference containing definitions and explanations of upwards of 2200 words, terms and expressions used in dry goods and general store work and connected industries, to which is appended many useful tables and a defined list of shoe and leather trade terms. Intended for ready reference and . constant use at counter and desk

Adams, Franklin Manning, J.H. Bolton and Carl C. Irwin 8vo. (9.50" x 6.25"). Brick-Red cloth-covered boards with black, embossed border to front board, and black lettering as well. On cover, title reads: "The Drygoodsman’s Handy Dictionary for the Dry Goods and Shoe Trade". Corners bumped. Discolorations/stains to boards and in particular, spine, (which itself shows fraying near top), but otherwise clean and very tight. Complete sections on Carpet Terms, Fur Terms, Glove Sewing and Glove Terms, Knit Goods Terms, Lace Lace Making, and Lace Curtain Terms, Methods of [cloth] Printing. Appendices include sections on: Buttons and BUtton Sizes; Cotton Yarns and Spool Cotton; Gloves and Glove Sizes (including Children’s Glove Sizes);Hosiery; Linen . Yarn and Thread; Ribbons; Silk Yarns and Silk Threads. THEN: Trade Leather Terms (eg. Viscolizing, Tawing, Dongola) Revised Shoe Glossary; (eg. Creedmore, Dom Pedro, Cack; Congress Gaiter); 78 pp. OCLC FirstSearch lists just 5 copies of this first edition (Book was revised in 1924). A rare and comprehensive reference for the textile artist/specialist, the museum curator of a textile collection, "A book of reference containing definitions and explanations of upwards of 2200 words, terms and expressions used in dry goods and general store work and connected industries, to which is appended many useful tables and a defined list of shoe and leather trade terms. Intended for ready reference and . constant use at counter and desk. The authors’ purpose was to create a reference "that may be in the pocket or in the fixtures at a handy place at all times. These business people have no time to ponder over extended articles on preparationand manufacture, anymore than has the man in the office who suddenly comes across a word of a term unfamiliar to him. It . has been the endeavor to give herein the shortest possible definition.The editor remembers his desire, as . a green clerk, to possess a dry good dictionary , but the price of the only one then in existence was h igher than he could afford to pay. That fact has been a large incentive in the preparation of this work — to get it into the hands of every clerk in every store at a time when it is most needed.The cost is not prohibitive to any such who have the desire for information."
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TRILBY (3 VOLUMES, COMPLETE)

Du Maurier, George Octavos. Luxuriously bound in turquoise three-quarter Levant morocco (goat) over Turkish blue boards and signed by Bayntun of Bath, England. Ruled in gilt. Five raised bands to spine (six compartments), with title, author, volume # and date in the 2nd, 3rd, and 6th (bottom) compartments, in gilt.Top edges gilt. Pastel marbled endpapers. Sunning to spines and some rubbing to extremities. NOTE: Volume I states Third Edition; Volume II states Sixth Edition; Volume III states Fifth Edition, but, as was sometimes customary of Victorian publishers, the publisher was known for overprinting first editions with later printing dates as a ploy to convey the impression of multiple printings, and thus falsely creating an impression of high sales volume and popularity. (by way of Sadleir’s XIX Fiction, 1675). Printed on thick, art-grade, high-quality paper. by R. & R. Clark, Edinburgh. Original, cloth covers — beige with turquoise image of Svengali, his arm around Trilby — tipped-in at rear of each volume. Lovely set. "Trilby, novel by George du Maurier, published in 1894. The novel tells the story of Trilby O’Ferrall, an artist’s model in Paris, who falls under the spell of the compelling Svengali, a musician who trains her voice through hypnosis and turns her into a singing star. The pair travel throughout Europe on successful concert tours, Trilby as La Svengali, the famous singer, and Svengali as the accompanying orchestra conductor. When Svengali falls ill and dies, the spell is broken, and Trilby loses her voice. The story of Trilby’s total subjugation to Svengali has passed into the realm of popular mythology."(Britannica).
A COURSE IN JIU JITSU AND PHYSICAL CULTURE

A COURSE IN JIU JITSU AND PHYSICAL CULTURE

O'Brien, John J. (Professor) 8vo. 9.25" x 6.25". Dijon yellow boards with black lettering. Very minor rubbing to extremities, and several small blue spots near top edge. Photo frontis of Professor O’Brien. Large (4" x 5"_ photographic images of an attacker and an attackee illustrates each lesson, plus anatomical diagrams of "Muscles of The Human Body", and one demonstrating how pupils can take their own measurements, as well as "before and after" pictures. Also includes a section at the end with text and drawings illustrating the "ready position" and the "movement" for some of the basic Jiu Jitsu postures. Scarce. Professor John J. O’Brien served for ten years as Inspector of Police at Nagasaki, Japan, and originally introduced Jiu-Jitsu into America. He instructed President Theodore Roosevelt, members of the Cabinet, and various heads of departments in Washington, D.C. "This is the first time that all the secrets of the Japanese national system of physical training and self-defense have been given to Western people. Less than a generation ago you could not have obtained this knowledge at any price. So religiously have the principles of KJiu-Jitsubeen guarded that no foreigner has ever before received official instruction from one who has taken the highest degree in the art. "As a means of self-defense, Jiu-Jitsu is as potent at short range as the most deadly weapon that human ingenuity has devised. A Japanese skilled in this art has no fear of any form of personal attack.The science of Jiu-Jitsu takes into account the vulnerable points in the human body. It comprehends the laws of mechanics, thus enabling the weak to overthrow the strong. ".According to the traditions the science was evolved by a thoughtful samurai having been suggested to him by seeing two kittens at play."
MISPILLION-BUILT SAILING VESSELS 1761 - 1917 (SIGNED)

MISPILLION-BUILT SAILING VESSELS 1761 – 1917 (SIGNED)

Macdonald, Betty Harrington Quarto. Turquoise cloth-covered boards . with bright gilt lettering and design to front. Map endpapers. One tiny stain to front free endpapers. SIGNED by author on title page. A complete history of the famous sailing vessels built in Delaware on the banks of the Mispillion River, the yards and their builders, provenance, crews, etc. " Shipbuilding was an important part of Milford’s growth at the turn of the century. Many ships were built at several different shipyards throughout the town. In the preface to the book "Mispillion Built Sailing Vessels 1761-1917," author Betty Harrington Macdonald wrote that William Penn himself wrote of the Mispillion Creek as a convenient method for transferring goods from one place to another. When ships were completed, their launching was a holiday throughout the town. Schools were closed and the entire town turned out to send the ship off. September 27, 1904 was no exception when the Charles J. Dumas was launched from the Abbott Shipyard. As with all launches at local shipyards, a scaffolding had been built so that those who wished to watch the ship launch could do so above the crowd. In the case of the Charles J. Dumas, school children, who had collected funds for a large bible that was presented to Captain Hutchins after the launch of the ship. Nearly 1,200 people were on hand to see the launch of a ship that had been proclaimed "one of the best productions" of the Abbott shipyard. The ship was to sail to Philadelphia for fitting out before the new owner, A.T. Hudgin, took possession. Just after the launch of the ship, however, tragedy struck as the scaffolding full of school children collapsed. More than 100 people were injured in the collapse, many of them women and children. (Terry Rogers writing on the "Milford Live" Website, on September. Fine in Very Good Minus Dust Jacket
THE DRYGOODSMAN'S HANDY DICTIONARY (Subscription Edition); A book of reference containing definitions and explanations of upwards of 2200 words

THE DRYGOODSMAN’S HANDY DICTIONARY (Subscription Edition); A book of reference containing definitions and explanations of upwards of 2200 words, terms and expressions used in dry goods and general store work and connected industries, to which is appended many useful tables and a defined list of shoe and leather trade terms. Intended for ready reference and . constant use at counter and desk

Adams, Franklin Manning, J.H. Bolton and Carl C. Irwin 8vo. Staplebound pamphlet. (9.00" x 6.0"). Brown, "field" buckram covers with dark brown lettering. Both front and rear covers cracked/creased, and rear hinge in need of a bit of glue repair, but all there, and still solid. On cover, title reads: "The Drygoodsman’s Handy Dictionary. Complete sections on Carpet Terms, Fur Terms, Glove Sewing and Glove Terms, Knit Goods Terms, Lace Lace Making, and Lace Curtain Terms, Methods of [cloth] Printing. Appendices include sections on: Buttons and Button Sizes; Cotton Yarns and Spool Cotton; Gloves and Glove Sizes (including Children’s Glove Sizes);Hosiery; Linen . Yarn and Thread; Ribbons; Silk Yarns and Silk Threads. THEN: Trade Leather Terms (eg. Viscolizing, Tawing, Dongola) Revised Shoe Glossary; (eg. Creedmore, Dom Pedro, Cack; Congress Gaiter); 78 pp. OCLC FirstSearch lists just 5 copies of this first edition (Book was revised in 1924). A rare and comprehensive reference for the textile artist/specialist, the museum curator of a textile collection. "A book of reference containing definitions and explanations of upwards of 2200 words, terms and expressions used in dry goods and general store work and connected industries, to which is appended many useful tables and a defined list of shoe and leather trade terms. Intended for ready reference and . constant use at counter and desk. The authors’ purpose was to create a reference "that may be in the pocket or in the fixtures at a handy place at all times. These business people have no time to ponder over extended articles on preparationand manufacture, anymore than has the man in the office who suddenly comes across a word of a term unfamiliar to him. It . has been the endeavor to give herein the shortest possible definition.The editor remembers his desire, as . a green clerk, to possess a dry good dictionary , but the price of the only one then in existence was h igher than he could afford to pay. That fact has been a large incentive in the preparation of this work — to get it into the hands of every clerk in every store at a time when it is most needed.The cost is not prohibitive to any such who have the desire for information."